35 Burst results for "Harare"

California wine country faces coronavirus, smoke and fires

Morning Edition

00:56 sec | Last month

California wine country faces coronavirus, smoke and fires

"In Northern California continue to battle new wildfires that erupted this week. Three people have been killed and thousands evacuated workers in the wine industry or facing new problems. From member station KQED, Sam Barnett reports. Sonoma and Napa County is many workers involved in the wine harvest or immigrants and people of color. Guillermo Harare and his wife run the currency, a devil, a wine company. I'm getting calls left. And right today, Dan Day out of folks looking toa. The work. The smoke from the fires contain grapes and her are says insurance company will only pay if grapes are left on the vine, he says. Wineries have to decide whether to pick what could be a ruined crop or gamble on an insurance check. Five or six of my clients are not going to pick any of their fruit this year. Zero Test results for smoke contamination. Khun take 30 days. So for now, it's unclear how many grapes are ruined for NPR news. I'm Sam her net on Wall

Dan Day Guillermo Harare Sam Barnett Kqed Napa County Khun Northern California Sonoma NPR
Kygo Teams Up With One Of His Favorite Artists Ever

Direct from Hollywood

00:47 sec | 3 months ago

Kygo Teams Up With One Of His Favorite Artists Ever

"Kyko help the late Whitney Houston returned to billboard hot, one hundred posthumously something she did dozens of times while alive with his reimagining of Harare, one, thousand, nine hundred ninety cover of Steve, winwood higher love, and with his next project. He's bringing another song from the past back this time from the legendary Tina Turner. Version of Tina's only solo number one, the nineteen, eighty, six classic. What's love got to do with it? Which kyw go names as one of his all time favorite songs writing on social, it feels surreal to get the opportunity to work with such a legendary artists. Now it appears this version will be entirely new with Tina providing vocals, but we'll know for sure when Kyko Tina Turner. What's love got to do with? It arrives on Friday.

Kyko Tina Turner Whitney Houston Steve Winwood
Is Real Reality Hidden

Skeptiko - Science at the Tipping Point

10:08 min | 6 months ago

Is Real Reality Hidden

"I'm your host Alex Karras and today we welcome Anthony Peak back to skeptical to talk about his new and quite amazing book the Hidden Universe in investigation into non human intelligences a book. That is very much about these extended consciousness realms that we talk so much about on this show Anthony as many of you know is not just a very accomplished author and speaker but as someone who truly in every way that I can tell seems to be a researcher. Seeker that is someone who you get the feeling that is really trying to get somewhere with this stuff. And isn't just writing books which are very entertaining and bring us all along on his journey but that this is really a path of discovery for. Anthony and I really appreciate that his latest. The Hidden Universe is no exception. It's packed not just with amazing accounts and stories that you're going to be quite surprised that you've never heard about before but it's also packed with a lot of cutting edge science. That Anthony believes backs up his theories. Now one of the thing I should mention and that is that Tony peak is not someone who's afraid to stick his neck out there regarding his theories and I kinda liked that really because if you really listen to what he's saying I think what he's saying is not that he has all the answers but more that it must somebody sticks a stake into the ground and says hey it's not just about stories. Here's what I think this stuff leads to unless somebody does that. We can't really pull it apart so we all realize that we're probably wrong about all this stuff that the greatest minds of thought about since as long as there's been a human being on this planet but I do appreciate that. He's willing to stick his neck out there and say. Hey here's how I think it all fits together so anthony. It's great to have you back. Thanks so much for joining me. Great to be chatting Te- again Alex. I've been looking forward to this. Pretty good. And thanks for a wonderful introduction. The that's a really hard act to follow. I have to say that. Thank you for it but you totally deserve it. I mean so I tell you what. Let's dive into the book. I love this quote that really Kinda resonates with something. We all know to be true but we can forget until a book like this comes along and reminds us and that is throughout recorded history the belief that humanity shares this planet with a variety of other sentient beings has been persistent. I mean if you want to start from there if you want to start anywhere you like tell us about the book the Hidden Universe. Yeah no that that is. That's quite correct. And that's being my my overall reasons writing this book. Book I think has been inside me since the mid nineteen sixties. It's it's the book I've probably always wanted to write. Because in mid nineteen sixty S I came down with a double pneumonia during that period. I had a series of very profound to loose nations going through the crisis. Pneumonia and at that time even my twelve year old mind. I was fascinated by the nature of the hallucinations received. That were these things. nations internal generated or whether mixture. Both and it's very much as being something. That is intrigued me all through my Brighton career. Because time and time again I come across people who encounter ends in differing circumstances in OB estate in Dreaming States people who encounter entities during closing campuses of the third kind ending. Play developing close encounters of the Moments I the seems to be an awful lot of information out there but what? Nobody's I think is trying to do. Well it's not true. I mean I'm not originally Jackley trying to do it. Many years ago and various other writers over the years tried struggling through history as to what events debate on. This is what I try to do now. I very much. I mean you Coul- my ideas a theory also or high policies. I'd probably sites educated speculation because these things we can never actually know and we can never really asked them working with people trying to test these things but the basic base to the book is just if people have extraordinary experiences encounter entities that seemed to having been existing so then can we build up a neurological model. Can WE BUILD UP A PSYCHOLOGICAL MOBILE? And can we build knowledge comodal to actually explain things all? And that's what I intend to do in the book. Tell us more though. Because that's that's a good starting point but the book really jumps in with both feet about the entirety of this extended realm. That does seem to crop up all over the place. So whether it's magic and spirits and Shamans like you said or whether it's after after life experiences in near death experiences or whether it's the experiences I mean you do kind of take us through this history in order to get us to the point of some of the breakthrough science that you think is influencing you the most right now. So where do you WanNa start with that? I I think the magic and spirits and Shamans thing is something that's really interesting because it grabs a lot of people's attention right now. There's a lot of people really interested in magic right now. A lot of people. Really Interested in the occult right now and I gotta say. I think that we haven't quite thought that through all the way particularly if we mashed into simulation theory and afterlife near death stuff. I mean there's just so many things to pull apart here. Tony hardly know where to begin. So I'm kind of looking. I'm happy to do that. The the first thing I'd like to make a point is the kind of the starting point. The starting price of the book involves inexperienced. Mother had when she was starting to develop out signs and one day. She phones me can. She said she experienced a very strange incident on her way. Onto the local village that we used to live in name livable and she said that she walking with my aunt. My aunt sold tie shoelace. When my aunt Stein tying issue my mother looked up and said what she described to saying a smoke ring. Hong Hovering over local local factory. She then said the smoke ring salty to revolve then shut off towards North Wales unjustly. Won't she scene and I said well you know I don't really know him you know she's not into. Ufo should never have these not the kind of thing she's ever been interested in James Lady and then unless we'll worry about it and she didn't have two or three days in the morning feed as she phones. We opening statements of absolute terror. Now she's woken up in the middle died This you know she. She said she couldn't. She moved properly but she was looking towards the door of bedroom. Now she lives alone. She's away now. What is important here? The important caveat is that she'd lost heroin with malignant melanoma many is before and Harare. She was developing various problems so she was partially science which is important. As as I'm involved with this. She said she looked towards the bedroom. Two bedroom door was an end she. She's fingers around the edge of the veteran Dole and this creature pods head round the door. She described it on. The description is uncanny. She said large black is like insect. She had two holes for nose and a slit from mouth and looked at her and dodge FAC. As if you know seen her she wakes up and she said Tony what did I say and I say well. It's intriguing I. I really don't know them because I didn't want to worry her clearly. In a state of hip Negi ornamental. Punks anesthetic sleep paralysis. Her Dole's perception and broken down to such an extent that she was a seeming. Something that ordinarily alternate Circumstance experienced of it and of course of the book cover of the way straight communion. Because it was it was a classic right it was an all CGI type will gray now. I started to research into this world were when I started to really quite interesting. Facts like for example in twenty seventeen in northern India Louis caved in India Tango. Being ten thousand years they call been dated various things to note. This was the case and the creatures that are depicted in this cave creature my mother. So then he'd go. On Your Graham Hancock congratulating books events natural and then they see describes his own experiences in the shelter in the Here again. We have very similar creatures. That are actually drooled on the cave wall now. What intrigues me? Here is that there's an elderly lady in in the UK. There are people in India under people in Southern Africa. And then again Graham. Hancock says itself. You know you look at a last caves and you look at Pash Mel everywhere else. These these entities seems to be everywhere of the counterargument today sees a well. You know they. They were more expensive than we were these people. They didn't know how to drool pro bowl. They would doing idealization xlt now. The argument doesn't stand up for me because these these ancest- these ancestors of the brain's rejected the same sizes. Clearly that you had to be Faisal and and other animals soclean whatever they were doing. It was not just an abstract. It was something more.

Graham Hancock Anthony Alex Karras India Tony Dole Anthony Peak Tony Peak Researcher Pneumonia UK Pash Mel Dreaming States Brighton Faisal Harare TE Heroin
Royals step up as Charles tests positive for COVID-19

On Heir - Royal News & Interviews

04:56 min | 7 months ago

Royals step up as Charles tests positive for COVID-19

"Of course the big news. This week was Charles tested positive for the corona virus on Tuesday and that was shared with the wealth by Clarence House on the Wednesday. Of course he is in good health. That has been made very clear by the panelists and has continued his work but it was a reassuring glimpse to see him in great spirits to we saw him suited and booted in front of the camera. Copping everyone else in the country and I think you know. We spoke a little bit about this in the past episode. How this country often lanes on the Royal Family Reassurance in times of crisis and I think seeing them regardless of the health status that they may or may not be in still getting on with the work that keep calm. Carry on attitude that we're so used to that we expect from our royals. Of course there has been a lot of concern about the queen. We'll talk about that later in the episode but Yes it's been a time where I think again we're reminded of the relevancy of the royal family. Funny you mention that struck me as well. You had all of the royal palaces saying on twitter throughout the day remember at eight o'clock remember at eight o'clock and I. I laughed a bit when you know one of our mutual friends. Christopher ITV's following the royals he tweeted out. He Re tweeted an account from the Queen. Who was saying. Go out at eight o'clock to clap. And he's like I mean if the Queen tells you to do it you got to do it and there is some truth about all this and more with a crisis like this. It's like you do look to the leadership of the Queen. She is still a leader of this country. And so when you when you look to someone like that during these moments when seems like everything else is falling apart it sort of reinforces that They still have a purpose in their leadership and people really do feel for them and look to them in these times absolutely and of course that leadership the work that she does is continued behind palace walls in social isolation at Windsor Castle. We saw pictures of the Queen working from. I'm from Harare in office. Space or weak. Little look into that but of course he was on the phone to Prime Minister. Boris Johnson she had been Up until that point always meeting a weekly basis like she does with every prime minister for that in-person audience. It's always that confidential off the record meeting that they have really as a chance of the prime minister to almost sort of like let some of the burden office chest and talk to the monarch about some of his or her issues or concerns and although she remains a sort of a political figure I think being able to have that conversation with someone in that position as always being something very much cherished by prime ministers past and present omitted that phone call. We know what happened Wednesday and then Friday that huge announcement would even made me. Do a double take when we saw that. Prime Minister Boris Johnson tested positive for corona virus. One of the biggest world leaders now also falling to this disease this virus but with interesting is that all of a sudden you have the queen who obviously is in her nineties. That is a huge risk group for the virus and she's been meeting with all of these people who have since tested positive. You know. We know that while she was on the phone with Boris this past Wednesday. She did meet with him in person she also met with Charles in person not too long ago. I mean I for one when I heard both about Charles and then today about Boris. One of my first thought was. Oh my gosh the queen like how is she doing right now absolutely and I think that was. Everyone's first thoughts. Obviously we had seen the queen with Boris Johnson. The march eleventh. We saw with Charles much twelve and that was something that I think all of us were very keen to find out from the palace. They do assure us that she remains in good health and they point out that the last time she was with. Boris Johnson was much eleventh. And they just say that she's following the appropriate advice with regards to her welfare then not commenting any further. But I think that we what we can take away from. That is that she is in good health and really. That's what the concern is being and I think that would would have been the same for other family members within the royals to of course it has been a tough week for them. Charles's diagnosis was a bombshell in a way. Because I think we we only took in the last episode how they all sort of removed to isolated locations and they're away from any risks of catching the virus and of course it turns out that Charles had already contracted the virus at that point. It was the Sunday after our last episode that he experienced mild symptoms call in Scotland. Where he was staying Miller had just joined him on that day he'd been there a couple of days earlier and then later that day he was

Prime Minister Boris Johnson Charles Royals Prime Minister Clarence House Christopher Itv Twitter Harare Windsor Castle Social Isolation Scotland Miller
Amazon Opens Cashierless "Go" Supermarket

WSJ Tech News Briefing

07:37 min | 8 months ago

Amazon Opens Cashierless "Go" Supermarket

"You might have heard of Amazon. Goes stores the stores where you walk in. Pick up what you need and just walk right on out. No cashiers necessary on Tuesday. The ECOMMERCE giant is expanding its cash cheerless technology with Amazon go grocery in Seattle and it might even be looking to license. The technology to other retailers here explain is tech reporter Sebastian Herrera Sebastien. Thank you so much for joining us. Okay so this is an Amazon's first. Cashier Lewis Store. What's new about this one? If you've been inside of a regular Amazon go store you know. That's not very big. You can walk pretty quickly. This one felt much bigger in. It is much bigger. It's about five times much bigger than the usual go that they've been rolling out since two thousand eighteen. It's got open produce items. You can go pick up an apple a tomato potato and baggage just like you would add another grocery store and the product variety in general has really been expanded in terms of pet supplies toilet paper other household products meats cheeses and. What's really been updated was new to me was definitely the produce section seeing just open produce. That's not package is definitely new within that store. Yeah let's talk about that. How have they solved that with technology? So it's interesting because if you go inside of an Amazon go store. Mostly items are packaged. You can pick up a can of soda or Sandwich. And they're all in one by one kind of items and basically what they did with produce is their pricing them a per item basis and your regular grocery store. We're all used to like weighing our produce items and cost being determined by that what they did is they price them operating bases so they basically took the same concept of when somebody grabs an item the system the cameras the shove sensors recognizes item by item and counts it in into your basket that way. The challenge there with produce is that unlike a can of soda where Sandwich or whatever it might be. That's package the size varies a lot more. You know between potato two potato tomato tomato. What they were able to accomplish was that their algorithms their machine learning systems got good enough with with the cameras to recognize Those type of items individually Especially if you know a Lotta people pick up you know Tomato or a lettuce whoever might be and we feel those produce products or Avocados Whatever it might be So they were able to. You know account for people you know picking up putting back all that with with those kind of produce items. Gotcha and then. How does that work for customers? They put everything in a basket and then are they. Put everything in a bag. Or how do they just walk out with it? So when when you've if you've ever been to an Amazon go store and most people have him because they're they're only in four major. Us cities but what you do. Is You scan on Amazon? Go APP to enter the store once you scan the APP you pass through the gates to Go inside and at that moment you become recognized by Amazon and it system as a three D object. That's you know basically the whole system's falling you around the store so anytime you pick up an item by the time that you leave all the items that you've picked up where there's produce or household products anything that you that it sees you leaving with inside you know inside of either. You're a bag or if you just carrying your hand the moment that you walk out of the store through the gates again charges you then and you know. It's able to calculate the person that entered the store in that account to what they picked up. They've done this. You know since two thousand eighteen with the smaller stores and they've just been able to figure out enough to the confident that it will work in larger size Store so one of the things that you're reporting on is that Amazon is thinking about licensing. This cashier list technology to other retailers. This feels like a big step away from Amazon kind of used to disrupting retailers. And keeping all of its Info for itself. You're so Amazon. Has BEEN IN TALKS WITH RETAILERS. That include either Sports Arenas or other convenience stores inside of airports Those type of smaller format retailers that could potentially use the technology inside of inside of their spaces and even possible that it could you know extend beyond those kind of smaller stores to you know to bigger retailers and basically what Amazon is doing. Is it building this technology for its own stores but it's looking To how to monetize that because these stores are really expensive to run. You know groceries of low margin industry typically so Amazon's looking to monetize basically their system and it's not very different than what Amazon competitor doing which is the exact same thing Licensing or trying to license their technology with with retailers and. They're looking at Soviet avenues to do that. So you could see and it's likely that you see down the line Those type of partnerships form. It is interesting because you know with Amazon. They've for a long time. Been as you said disrupting the retail business. And so it. It's kind of like a an odd turn for them to be looking to you. Know work with retailers. But at the same time they have been doing that in other ways whether it's punishes with Coles or rite aid in terms of package delivery returns and stuff like that and. This is another way that they're looking to do that. Potentially I mean it's almost like they're testing it out in their own stores to prove that it works right exactly something that struck me when I was talking to the executive who who runs Amazon go was that he said that the what they figured out what this technology can go beyond this ten thousand four. Hundred Square foot store that they're opening. He said it could go five times as big ten times as big. Didn't really put a that much of a limit on it and what they're doing with Amazon go grocery is they're they're basically saying we can now fit a a store. This is with this technology. And it's going to you know work and potentially down the line. We could see bigger stores. I think it's very possible that down the line. You see this kind of technology not only in small footprint stores like seven eleven type of stores More of their convenience stores but in in larger retail spaces and Amazon's not the only one that that's trying to accomplish the other startups trying to do the same thing there's already some partnerships with regional grocery stores and some tech startups that are trying to compete with Amazon. That future is very much kind of happening right now. and it'll be interesting to see. Just yeah five years down. The line is the average grocery store you know. GonNa have this technology. Maybe it's not gonNA completely Become the norm. But but certainly you're expecting to see more and more of it. Excellent Alright Tucker partisan jousting Harare. Thank you so much for joining

Amazon Lewis Store Sebastian Herrera Sebastien Tech Reporter Seattle United States Sandwich Harare Apple Sports Arenas Coles Executive
plant health, herbs and sustainability with Maya Thomas

On The Ledge

02:26 min | 10 months ago

plant health, herbs and sustainability with Maya Thomas

"So before I forget Hoyas Hoyas who is the one I forgot is the lovely Hoya Australis. Lisa how Oh gosh forget this plot while he was sitting on my kitchen window sill where normally don't keep toys so I think it just got a little bit hidden in forgotten when I was pulling those plants together. Four my tour But it's a really nice plant. My one is a fairly spokesman that I picked up. I bought it from North One. God Center Regular Listen. I'm a bit of a fan of that particular shop so this was bought their last year. Some time I can't quite remember when there's a smallish plant I think it's actually to cuttings in apart thought and so far it's going up. The stems haven't got long enough to the point where they start to drop down but the foliage on this plant is he's really lovely. If you can imagine a leaf that starts out its margins in the darkest darkest possible green and then in any regular random patton becomes ever lighter to move towards a Pale Green Line Green Center. It's glossy it's leathery. It's a lovely Hoyer leaf and the nice thing about this plot also is that the new leaves come through this rubble of carmine. Mind pink color and you do get flashes of carmine pink in the League as well and in the stem depending on how much light the plants are in so this is really really nice. Hoyer I can't wait for this to get bigger and start trail. It's an easy one I would say it's as easy as you regular Konno's is and so I think it's also fairly easy to get hold of now so it's one of those kind of entry heuer's that will really get you into this particular genus of plants. So I apologize. Lisa forgetting Getting you or do love you very much and yeah if you've got a lease bigger and more developed with lots of pictures so I can see what my plants GonNa turn into so then we go. That's number thirteen. I don't think it's going to be long. Before my recollection becomes even bigger. I just discovered a website in the Netherlands. Is that sells loads of rooted and unrooted Harare. Cuttings there's also somebody in the UK who sells on Ebay so as soon as the weather warms up. Yup Yup I think I might be getting my collection somewhat. Yeah I'm Gung Ho crazy right now but I just can't get enough these plants

Lisa Pale Green Line Green Center Hoyer Leaf Hoya Australis Hoyer Harare Gung Ho Konno North One League Ebay Patton UK Netherlands
Keith Kirkland Founded a Wearable Tech Company That Lets People Communicate Through Touch

The Limit Does Not Exist

05:33 min | 10 months ago

Keith Kirkland Founded a Wearable Tech Company That Lets People Communicate Through Touch

"Our guest this week is Keith Kirkland the CO founder and CEO of where works a wearable technology startup based in New York City. Not sure what wearable technology is at one point. Neither was Keith. When he was designing handbags at coach he had no idea that one day he'd start a company that would create a wearable haptic navigation device for the the blind and visually impaired? Don't worry we'll explain what all that means by the way if you listen to last week's episode with Stephanie Harare You'll Remember hearing about new inc an incubator for creators who are working at the intersection of Art Design and technology and fun fact. Keith's company is part of that. Incubator key story is A truly inspiring example of the impact that we human ben diagrams can have when we follow what feels authentic to us even when there's no through line incite and his his work shines and important light on designing for inclusivity. So let's meet Kenya. Let's do it. What is so thick means of or relating to the sense of touch? Basically like optic is for is for the skin and so basically we're working on as we build products and experiences that use your skin as a communications channel right now with the proliferation screen. Based devices everything is using your is MHM Right and we were looking at him. Like how can we get people out of their phones and back into the real world. Oh we can give them some of this information that you don't necessarily need to stare at a screen in order to get and so we started to look at. What types of information can we offload from the visual Channel To kinda give people more like in their world experience but give them the information that they need. So what kind of information can you offload from the visual Shell. So we're starting with a use case of navigation. I have two co founders and we all walked into this door of being interested rested in half digs through different ways. My Personal Dura was. I was spending time. I was at proud at the time doing a Master's program in industrial design and I was trying to find way to teach movement without an instructor being present. I was looking to try to expand movement economy and that kind of boil down to the suit that would eventually allow person to download John. Lewis In the suit with Keith data. Continue that road to build this suit and if so where can I actually. So we're doing right now is actually the foundation for me. What could potentially become with? The suit was envisioned to be. If you look at the suit like the biggest challenges were around it was that lake. All the technology existed to build the suit today. You know you have motion capture data to know where your motion is and you could do motion caption data for an expert to know what your motion should be. You can scale from their body to your body because most of us have the same number of joints in the same places cases being humans. Roughly roughly you know not say that super loosely. Accessibility is ridiculously important. Also you know like generally we can scale but the biggest part that was missing was if I want you to raise raged risk two inches off of the table using vibration. How can I tell you to do that? There was no language to communicate information through touch with. And so I. When I finished my thesis I was like Wow? You can do well this by without this language. This whole thing is kind of useless so let me go and try to work on building a language to communicate information with that could eventually help a person the potentially learn Kung Fu or any form of movement you're co-founders came to this through different channels. How did you all meet each other and realized that you were interested in in this same question of sharing information through touch yes? Oh my co-founder young and we were actually classmates in massive industrial design program at Pratt and so we we came in in the same class. We did three years together. I ended up going away for a year studying in Japan and in London at Yale University in the row. codge Avar Bureau College Young stayed in the program here and I came back and finished my third year out so we did our thesis together. Kevin was a really close friend of Yong's and hemming young had did joint these together but Kevin and I also serendipitous Lee ended up working at the Metropolitan Museum of art together. We were both fellows at at the media lab there and it's a now defunct program but before what it was was they basically invited technologist kind of reimagined. The museum experience the project I worked on was basically. I walked into my thesis with this idea of design slash fashion technology and movement. And in my thesis. It became a downloading suit when I walked onto the same idea because I was like I need all my life to be authentic consistent and at the mat we came out was replicating getting garments from the costume to Putting them on three d models giving them a sense of movement so that people could understand how the dresses and garments moved on people while people were moving because I felt like the the clothing experience was ridiculously divorced because everyone knows not touch mccaw so but you know like the VNA nate dress. You WanNa touch it because we have different experience you know with clothing art hanging on walls. How can we give people that sense of movement and so having having and I both worked on independent projects? There I'm but we worked. You know we run a cohort together and we all ended up at research. Center called the Digital Humanities Research Center it was like a playground for people to come together postgraduate and does work interesting projects. And that's where we decided to join together and and bill ware works and focus on

Keith Kirkland Stephanie Harare Kenya New York City Art Design Kevin Digital Humanities Research Ce Co Founder Mccaw Instructor Metropolitan Museum Of Art CEO Lewis Avar Bureau College Young VNA Co-Founder Pratt Yale University Japan
Iraq And Lebanon Protests Against Iranian Backed Politicians

PRI's The World

04:55 min | 1 year ago

Iraq And Lebanon Protests Against Iranian Backed Politicians

"Iran Lebanon have been rocked by huge protests in recent weeks demonstrators in both countries have a lot in common they're railing against corruption and inequality and many of the politicians they dislike are backed by Iran Tom Hanan Haldar has been connecting the dots in an article in Foreign Policy Harare is a visiting fellow at the Washington Institute for Near East Policy Honey your article is headlined Iran is losing the Middle East what's the essence of your argument Carol what I'm trying to say is that Iran although they are studying control of the political and state institutions Iran have lost everything else that came back its political power and Lebanon Iraq so it and trying to say as that Iran has been very good at winning military battles and to have also been great at winning nations and infiltrating state institutions however they never thought of what's going to happen next they it turned out that Iran is really bad at governing controlling they have been backing corrupt politicians in order to infiltrate state institutions and people in the street have noticed that and today it is not a coincidence that the protests in Lebanon Iraq started as a protest against corruption and eventually turned into protest against Iran proxies in both Lebanon Iraq. This is not a coincidence and I just want to remind our listeners that both Lebanon and Iraq have large populations of Shiite must Salem's and that's where Iran gets influence in these countries Lebanon and Iraq are different Lebanon has thirty percent shop and then the Lebanese population Iraq has majority Shia and what's fascinating about these two protests as the Shia are at the core of these protests Iran is not only losing its corrupt allies in these two countries it's also losing its Shiite support base so I guess a shorthand for your argument is that Iran proxies in places like Lebanon and Iraq know how to win wars and they know how a gain political power but they can't seem to deliver on the economy is it sort of is a kind of you know the old saying it's the economy stupid yes kind of but Hezbollah has done a lot more than just be involved in politics I mean they've had lots of social programs and medical care and all sorts of that would seem to address the concerns of Lebanese and that went back in the one thousand nine hundred and nine hundred ninety s but you're arguing that Iran through its proxies Hezbollah have failed to deliver social economic vision of course of course because two things here one is that this was longtime ago and the only catered for the Shia they did not really cater for the Lebanese people they cater for the shop operation because this is how they wanted to get the Shia political court base the second important thing is that these services are no longer catering for the Shia they do not have the same funds that they used to have twenty or thirty years ago today they are only catering for their members and the families of their members which is not the Shia community so that's why they failed wrote the US has almost strangled Iran's oil exports as a result arounds revenues have fallen catastrophically how has that impacted cash flows to Iran's proxies in Iraq and Syria the very people we've been talking about yes definitely this has definitely contributed to Hezbollah's crisis there the crisis they have stopped serving the majority of the population they couldn't employ people anymore they're started firing employees and they have started to you think reconsider every step they make in terms of a war with Israel or more military adventures region because they cannot afford to have the as wars so this has affected them tied their hands in terms of military adventures and also started to to create this content within the shaft community who are no longer benefiting from Hezbollah services and blow employment so could we be seeing a gradual shift in Iran's influence in places Nick Iraq and Lebanon given these protests given the fact that the traditional ways of propping up proxies isn't working we already seeing this shift Hezbollah today in Lebanon in the very very difficult position the Iranian back militias in Iraq are also very difficult position they have lost their people and this is very important pillar in their political power and public support Anina Dr With The Washington Institute for Near East Policy Okay thanks a lot you're welcome thank

Iran Lebanon Iraq Iran Tom Hanan Haldar Lebanon Iraq Middle East Washington Institute Visiting Fellow Carol Thirty Percent Thirty Years
Zimbabwe Continues Its Economic Downward Spiral

NPR's Business Story of the Day

04:06 min | 1 year ago

Zimbabwe Continues Its Economic Downward Spiral

"Support for this podcast and the following message come from cohnresnick whose business of baseball and original MLB video series shares key insights on the business side of America's America's pastime for a game changing strategies to help your business visit cohnresnick dot com slash MLB. The family of Zimbabwe's former leader Robert Mugabe burried him this weekend he was in power there for almost forty years and after he died people hoped for a new start but life subway hasn't gotten any better last last week city officials cutoff tap water in the capital city. Harare Andrew Meldrum is Africa editor for the Associated Press Sixteen years ago. He was expelled from Zimbabwe Walkway recently. He went back to look around at the country that he'd covered for decades. Meldrum told me the Water Shutoff in Harari is the result of both drought end economic economic crisis. There's no water going through the pipes. People were lining up to pump water from wells to wash their clothes in brackish streams or ponds so were seeing a city and a country that is really suffering from huge problems from an economic downturn as as I say you know no electricity in the capital for as much as nineteen hours a day no water. This is is something that was just unthinkable people. When I was living there I would imagine having spent so many years in Zimbabwe. You have lots of friends there. What are the differences in their lives since you've been. La well those of my friends who are still in Zimbabwe. They have experienced a roller coaster. Since I was expelled they they have experienced hyperinflation of more than a billion percent inflation Yaha and also they experienced something surprises in political situation they saw Robert Mugabe fall from power and there was a tremendous amount of optimism and excitement to think that that things were going to get better and now two years later at the death of Robert Mugabe. They're saying will actually things aren't better at all and the government under Emerson Mnangagwa's has has not achieved economic growth or an improvement in things so they're they're disappointed so the the question is why not I mean I remember the optimism awesome. People saying the country will be more free. The country will develop economically. It's Mugabe essentially. Many people said that's been holding us back and then you're saying but in two years nothing's happened why not well. Robert Mugabe left but the same party ZANU. PF and the same military military are running the show and they are not making the kind of substantial fundamental changes in the way the country is run that will will improve things for the average. Bob weigh-in one thing that was interesting that I'd like to highlight was a doctor who was calling for a strike to get higher wages. He was abducted he was tortured and he has now been released because there was an outcry amongst the medical community and throughout Zimbabwean of course it's great that he has been released but it it was one of a series of abductions of government critics in in recent months so it shows that there is a level of political repression still in Zimbabwe. What do you think happens next in in symbolic way. Is there some political leader political party waiting in the wings that has the potential to turn things around I don't see that political leader waiting waiting in the wings and it might be further in the wings than I can see at this point you know things are going to come together so that the country returns to the kind of prosperity that I saw it but I think it's going to take quite some time Andrew Meldrum. Thank you so much for being with us. Thank you Noel Andrew Meldrum the A._P.'s Africa editor joined us on Skype from Johannesburg.

Robert Mugabe Andrew Meldrum Zimbabwe Zimbabwe Walkway Editor MLB Baseball Africa Cohnresnick Political Repression Associated Press Zanu America Emerson Mnangagwa BOB Harari Johannesburg Skype
Chilis Are About Flavor, Not Heat

Christopher Kimball's Milk Street Radio

01:50 min | 1 year ago

Chilis Are About Flavor, Not Heat

"I was in Oaxaca a while back. I really started to understand more so than I ever had. The chilis are about flavor and not really heat as much and you make this point a lot. When we're talking about Chile along I twenty five. We're not talking about Jalapenos or Serrano's or all. The multiple types of chilies is that you could grow or chilies from Mexico or anywhere else. We're specifically talking. Abou a chilly that's going to be when it grows with full-size. It's going to be as long as your a hand and pretty thick so the same type of Chili but assumes different flavors depending on where it's grown so people are gonNA swear by their types of chilies and that's where you have big debates especially between New Mexico and Colorado where they fight over each other saying oh archery's better no arch. Elliot's better and the rest of the country doesn't really have a clue about it but New Mexico wins because because they have the bigger budget to promote their chili farmers and their chilies than anyone else thousand outsider you're like wait isn't a chilly chilly chilly. So how do the Harare possible or the flavor possibly change one hundred miles away but it it does it really really does the new Mexican Sunday which actually I have to say sounded appealing as you just described what it is. Oh my Lord Yeah. This is a place down in LAS cruces little chain Khadka Leeches and they sell a new Mexican Sunday so it's it's new Mexican to the court so it's GonNa be Vanilla custard in inside of it. They put Pecans Pecans a huge industry in southern New Mexico but they also have candied Green Chili like little nubs of Candy Green chilly so you're gonNA get a little bit of heat but again. It's all about the flavor. He opens up your pallet. You get a little bit of the spice as a flavor. It is amazing and especially if you're in southern New Mexico is going to be hot so you WANNA to get that Green Chili one

New Mexico Mexico Oaxaca Chile Harare Las Cruces Archery Elliot Colorado
Robert Mugabe will have private burial at national Heroes' Acre

Monocle 24: The Briefing

04:48 min | 1 year ago

Robert Mugabe will have private burial at national Heroes' Acre

"Last week's death of former former Zimbabwean tyrant Robert Mugabe at the age of ninety five presented his country with a problem if from the worst problem with which Mugabe presented Zimbabwe during he's later decades of deranged misrule. How does one commemorate the passing of a figure who was both hero and villain in Mugabe's case indeed both with the founder and destroyer of his nation after an amount of agonizing it has now been decided that Mugabe will be interred in the National Heroes Acre in Harare Laura a public memorial ceremony will be held on Sunday one joined in the studio with more on this bond monocle twenty regular Georgina Godwin Georgina as our listeners are probably aware you are yourself Zimbabwean and I remember we spoke at the time of Mugabe's removal by coup data at how we had that atwells that he was no longer enough and what an I guess a big mental adjustment that was for generations of Zimbabweans. How are we is it adjusting to the fact that he's no longer here at all. You know I think people feel slightly cheated in a way that he went out really with a bit of a whimper not a bang that we and indeed he probably expected and he's no longer there but I gather that in his last few months. He wasn't all there mentally anyway. If you look at the photograph few months well I I mean from when he started wearing you know dribbles and chuck suits but and obviously as you point out his his last years were were he was in the grip of definitely something probably dementia but for him to be dead is something that's quite odd because what you're seeing in Zimbabwe's as you alluded to is people wanting still to hate him but also really wanting to acknowledge the role that he played in in in the formations the country and say so there's quite a lot of them big dichotomy between how people feel because us as I think we discussed at the time if Mugabe is say had sort of cheerfully stepped down from office circa the late eighties and sort of idled into a retirement of giving elections and writing books he would be regarded as one of the twentieth century's heroic figures wouldn't they completely and utterly and he would have got a hero's funeral. Oh hang on the funeral which does prompt the question though that who who turns up for Mugabe's Hero's funeral thousands of people have been attending the lying in state. At referrers stadium in Harari who still is Mugabe's constituency well at the formal proceedings. You'll have a lot of heads of state state. I think Cyril Ramaphosa is coming from South Africa and various other people from from around the continent impacts further afield but in terms of ordinary people what generally happens in in in situations like this is that people have Boston and their promised food and those are the two things that people have that they don't have any fuel in Zimbabwe so they wouldn't be able to get there by themselves. They don't have the money money for bus fare and they're desperate to eat so if you promise people all of that they will turn up much. I mean I'm sympathetic to an extent extent or to this extent with the current Zimbabwean government. You have to acknowledge his passing some how you have to do something if not not what is being done what other suggestions have people made there was an argument of course to whether he should be buried in National Heroes Acre. But where else would you put him well. He is family. It appeared wanted him buried in his home area of Qatar which is where he comes from and I think would have been one way around it but it appears that the government was really pushing to have him in heroes. Acre which apparently he had not wanted himself. There was another really interesting piece of not not legislation but something else he put in his will. I think which was that his wife Grace Mugabe was to stay with the casket at all times until he was buried therefore what he's doing doing that is guaranteeing her starring role in his final Hurrah. Do you get the sense that the current government and we should remind ourselves that the current President Emmerson Mnangagwa was for many years Zimbabwe's Robert Mugabe's kind of conciliatory if you will are they trying to reanimate the myth of Mugabe the liberator to to their own ends. I think that that would certainly serve a purpose that the end but I mean at the same time time. Mugabe's very useful is somebody that you can up lay all the blame on and say look it wasn't us it was the previous guy where clean we're going forward and of course that's what the what Managua A and his cronies would like us to think that this is a completely new dispensation. It really isn't make no mistake.

Robert Mugabe Cyril Ramaphosa Zimbabwe Georgina Godwin Georgina Acre Harare Emmerson Mnangagwa Managua Founder Harari Boston President Trump South Africa Qatar
 It's complicated: Zimbabweans see Mugabe's legacy as mixed

WSJ What's News

02:50 min | 1 year ago

It's complicated: Zimbabweans see Mugabe's legacy as mixed

"Former president of zimbabwe robert mugabe has died at the age of ninety five. He was is a schoolteacher turned guerrilla fighter who helped to topple white rule in zimbabwe. Only to then lead the country to the brink of economic ruin his successor president emerson managua said in a message on twitter quote commander mugabe was an icon of liberation a pan africanist who dedicated his life to the emancipation and empowerment norman of his people his contribution to the history of our nation will never be forgotten our deputy africa bureau chief gabrielle steinhaeuser is in capetown so gabrielle. Tell me a bit more about how mr mugabe ended up in power so mugabe came to power in nineteen eighty initially as prime minister of zimbabwe <hes> having sort of liberated his country from the british and and and also white minority government that followed and in his his first few years he really kept warm relations with his predecessor they would regularly have t- you know and he i think he was was honored by the british and he will succeed as this and of enlightenment need a he was a schoolteacher. You know he was educated. He we build a very strong education system zimbabwe but you right that the way he'll be remembered is a bit more complicated. I think it's a bit of a complicated legacy. I would say for most imbaba winds. They will remember him for the brutality and economic hardship of his final decades in power where the economy really spiraled and off any kind of opposition was brutally repressed but then you know you have other leaders in africa who really especially here in south africa really remember him for the support he gave them in their old liberation struggle so we had a very sort of hard shelled message from the ruling party the african national congress in south africa so the lauding him for his contribution to bringing the an and to apartheid and how is zimbabwe doing now. It's actually a really kind of sad adds to that because after he finally resigned resigned than i was in harare you know tens of thousands of people just storming the streets in celebration and there was so much optimism not only among zimbabweans but also among western governments who were ready and companies who are keen to engage in an invest. I think what we've seen over the last nearly two in years. There's a lot of that optimism plate fade away so it's hard to kind of look at mugabe's staff this this point to to a story of decline because it seems like the decline unfortunately continues

Commander Mugabe Zimbabwe Gabrielle Steinhaeuser President Trump Deputy Africa Bureau South Africa Africa Harare Twitter Emerson Managua Capetown African National Congress Prime Minister Norman
London's National Gallery plans major Artemisia Gentileschi show

The Art Newspaper Weekly

13:01 min | 1 year ago

London's National Gallery plans major Artemisia Gentileschi show

"Returned to Artemis Magenta Leschi in two thousand eighteen the National Gallery in London announced that it had bought Genta Leschi self-portrait to sink Catherine of Alexandria that work has just been on a tour of unusual British venues from Glasgow Women's library to a doctor's surgery in Yorkshire a Catholic High School in Newcastle and a prison in send Surrey Tori is now back at the National Gallery ahead of a survey of gentlest work that opens at the Gallery in twenty twenty in January nineteen. I was joined by not at Travis the National Gallery's curator of later Italian Spanish and French seventeenth century paintings to talk about Artemisia and that remarkable new acquisition the teacher. Can you tell me I more we're about Artemisia. Gentle Leschi the woman and the artist. She's obviously a name now that many people have heard of not just people sort of in the art world or interested in art and I'd I'd say that's quite a recent occurrence <hes>. She was really sort of rediscovered in a way <hes> in the nineteen seventies. She featured an exhibition in L._A.. On women artists artists and a number of her works exhibited then and so she sort of came to the fore then and number of feminist historians focused on her and her work <hes> throughout the latter part of the twentieth century but it's only really since she started being the subject of shows monographic show in two thousand and one in New York and then more recent exhibitions that I think she really came to wider public. I think now she is not necessarily a household name but I think people have heard of her a third of her as an artist but also her life story and I think a lot of the interest around her sort of people's view of her as a kind of empowered women derives from her biography rather like carbohydrate zone biographical stories somewhat somewhat sort of overshadows the art but I think Artemis as an artist now is coming to the fore and I think that's I'm looking forward to working on this show in two hundred twenty because I think it's very much focusing on her. As a painter ops you can't ignore what was happening in her life and the big events that the that obviously influenced that's how life in Harare but it is very much artistic abilities. Can you tell us something of that biography then before we get into into the to the painting the nationals occurred. Uh ultimately has seen very much as a sort of exception. I think it's important say she was quite exceptional that she wasn't the only woman autism the seventeenth century. I mean there had been other successful artists before her. Aha but she was born in Rome to Aratu gentlest who was a well established painter in Rome and a lady prudence and Artemis mother died when she was just twelve so she was actually brought up in a male household so brutal by her father and she had three brothers she was in fact one of five to two died <hes> and the brothers and Artemis rule trained by rats here in his own workshop but it's clear that she was the one that he saw had greater talent than than the brothers <hes> and a and sort of everything changed when she was raped by Agostino. Tassie Passy was <hes> an extremely successful painter of SORTA Trompe l'oeil architecture and who was working at that time without C._E._o.. On a large project the casino limousine he was brought in to teach Artemisia Perspective and he raped her <hes> and they Taylor have sexual relations for some months and then he was brought to trial buyouts and this is very famous as perhaps the most famous episode in Artemis Life because remarkably all the trial documents actually survivor a large portion of survive so you can actually read optimizes own words in the witness box and you read the accusations against us. It's quite extraordinary to have that kind of sort of documentary evidence still survive from the seventeenth century and he's effectively found guilty of de flowering her because what what is bringing against Casey is the fact that not only did he rape his daughter but he didn't do the honorable thing and marry her afterwards and this is sort of idea the lack of honor the the so dishonor on his family. That's very much motivating the trial so he's found guilty although his punishments never enforced and Artemis married off two days as later to the brother of her defense lawyer and with him moves to Florence and obviously this episode was obviously a great tragedy in her life when she describes in in her own words is really violent attack on her. It is quite harrowing but I think if that had never happened. Her life would have been very different. She would have carried John. Working probably in her father's studio in Rome but as a result herbs sort of enforced moved Florence really was the making of her and it's incredible things that how she turned the situation around and really I mean I like to think in Florence. You really became Artemisia. She found her own sort of autistic voice and it's why she really gained independence in Florence and she's there for about seven years and then she comes back to Rome very different sort of person she's very much in demand very successful and we know this from letters says from her husband that survived saying you know they've got cardinals and princes around the house all the time. She after music doesn't even have time to eat. She's so busy and then in sixteen thirty she settles also in Naples where she lives till the end of her life at least sort of twenty five years and runs a very successful workshop. I says you pretty much stays in Italy except for a brief trip to London in the late. Sixteenth extent thirties which in itself is quite unusual for women to be traveling internationally. Elaine indeed just one thing about the biography that makes her have a certain currency. Today is as you say in those documents around the trial. It's clear that she is being put on trial. In the trial and and in fact is is is tortured a- as as part of that process I mean laws be made of that and I think there's been a very much more measured reading of those documents in a wider sort of frame. If you like particularly particularly <hes> one social historian Elizabeth Cohen quite a lot of work on actually the documents relating to the trials of young virgins in Roman that period and it seems as a sort of standard way of leading these trials and actually it falls quite within that I wouldn't call it a pattern but within that but if you really read carefully the words mean she was tortured by using the which were these ropes tightened around her fingers while she was in the box but the judge also beforehand is it will right if we do this and it's clear if if you really read the the original Italian it is clear that it's in a way that they're asking if they can torch her to in a way prove her innocence in a sense sort of <hes> just to make sure that what she's saying is actually true and and it is while she's the torturing her with a C._B._S.. That she says you know it's true. It's true it's true. She repeats the what she says is true and so I think in a way it was sort of in supportive her innocence in this situation. I think you can already read in the language. That's used that. It's in a way away to catch tassie out right now. The the making of her in artistically say was was her moved to Florence say something about her experience there what kind coin of Education for instance did she did. She have there and will she in another painter studio straight away. No I think the really remarkable thing is that she sets up independently. She was trained in her father's studio. You know these sort of kind of family workshop tradition existed since the Renaissance and not just in Italy but it was often a father to Assan workshop so it's quite new female members of the family would be involved but as I say after means is not the first loving Fontana. Her father was very successful. So do you know in a way has sort of training. Rome wasn't unusual as perhaps be unusual because she was a woman but the whole learning from your father your trade from your father wasn't unusual the fact of her moving moving to Florence and having to set up independently is the thing that really made her. I think we have no real indication of having a student with with pupils assault. She worked effectively from her has junior. It wasn't her home. Her husband was apparently a painter but very sort of modest kind of renown. She was the very first female MEL member of the Academy in Florence. She was member from sixteen sixteen so you know she. She arrived in around sixteen thirteen within two three years. She's already really established herself. That's a really shows incredible determination but also kind of recognition of her skill and I think it's partly to do with her resilience. I think it will start to do with who she came into contact with in Florence. Not you say how education but also the circles. She moved in one of her great sort of protect us. There was Michelangelo Buonarroti younger who is the great nephew of Great Michelangelo and Artemis is only documented picture in Florence is in the ceiling of one hundred thirty still today and there she is alongside other Florentine artists of her of her time so she seems to have integrators of quite quickly and Florence <hes> and one of her close friends was Christopher. No Laurie won the greatest painters in the seventeenth century in Florence who is also godfather to her son Christopher so she clearly immediately set us you know sort of entered into autistic circles intellectual circles because she was a friend of Galileo and she worked for the MEDICI and did did she carry her Caravan Jasko style that she would have learned in Rome with her two phones or did she very much incorporate new styles and influences from her surrounding same sex. It's such a hot topic. That's so discussed because she has been called a chameleon and and I think as a result of this now many pictures get attributed to her that aren't necessarily by her because you can still use it as a dolphin well. She's communiqu. She changes all the time I think in the kind of broad sense she is quite community. She can adopt US style but it's part of her sort of business strategy. I think so you know she spent twenty five years. Working in Naples pictures look look really neapolitan but of course they would. She's been living in Naples. She's working for Nipples and patrons and I think when she moved to Florence. I think actually more than Caravaggio it is her father is rats. Here's pictures and rats. Here's handling of paint that's most of present in her mind and in the picture the the National Gary bought <hes> <hes> you know the thing that became very clear as as the pitcher was being cleaned as just that technically the way she paints the flash and so on. It's very ratu still very present in her mind. I think we'll sure influences. She's looking at these Florida artists. She's frequenting. She's using Carter analogy that you see in Florentine painting at that time she's also painting pictures for Medici tastes so that it also makes sense but when she comes back to Rome in sixteen twenty that's when Carava Chisholm off to Caravaggio is death ten years after is when cartridges is really the height of its popularity and I think there is definitely a renewed interest in this heightened naturalism start lighting and you can see that in the pictures of the sixteen twenty s can can you say more about the circumstances in which he would have created the specific work which the national now has well. The conservations been really interesting because you know I think a lot of living has been spilt on Artemis but not a huge amount of being written about her technique and I think this is actually played such an important role in actually understanding after media. It's been a lot written about you know dating's and attributions and also sort of the Mall gender-specific interpretation of her pictures in the iconography but I think had technique is absolutely fundamental understanding astounding to me. It's not Jason. Weeding out the pictures that aren't by her that are currently sort of sitting in this sort of limbo so during the conservation the National Gallery painting. We noticed similarities with obviously rats. Here's painting technique we notice differences. The pictures very closely related to two paintings one. That's in Hartford <hes> Connecticut at the Wadsworth which shows is a self portrait of her playing the lute and the other is a sin Catherine in New Jersey and the the suit of similarity between these pictures is not just sort of superficial fullness similarities but she's taken direct borrowings from one and the other. This is almost kind of amalgamation of these two other pictures which she knows sheds. It's light on her practice. You know how did she did. She transfer these designs to choose tracings. I mean we know how far the rats here uses tracings a lot <hes> did she have these three pictures which is in the studio once <hes> did the pro sort of composition evolve in the national painting. Does she know exactly what she was doing. From the very beginning I mean there are certain technical aspects of the pitcher the suggest it did evolve into Katherine. I'm perhaps didn't start its life as Catherine so I'm very interested also in how she uses her own image so the picture in halt that is clearly a self portrait very characterized face and all is a little bit idealized and I think there's been too much discussion in the post about whether picture easel isn't a self reporter. I think there's a kind of disguise self portraiture in a lot of her works where <hes> she would clear have expected people to kind of vaguely recognize her features a note. It was painting by women of a woman who looked like Artemisia but it doesn't necessarily have to be a self Putin a very literal sense. I think that's that's a really interesting aspect isn't it because how much of it is in that is almost like an advocate for for her capabilities and also for for her personality for her strength or strength of character and it's very easy easy to read biography into it isn't it because it's such a striking image and we know about this history of hers. Yes I mean I've had inquiries from the public. Since we announced the acquisition was saying you know other you know signs of torture on her fingers.

Florence Artemis Rome National Gallery Naples Artemis Magenta Leschi Tassie Passy Italy London Harare Caravaggio Artemis Life Travis The National Gallery L._A Alexandria Newcastle New York Genta Leschi
Phillies' Herrera arrested for domestic violence

Deminski and Doyle

00:27 sec | 1 year ago

Phillies' Herrera arrested for domestic violence

"Phillies outfielder audible Harare's been placed on administrative leave by major league baseball following his arrest in domestic violence case at an Atlantic City casino. This day after his arrest on an assault charge of the golden nugget police called Monday night on a report of a domestic assault out, the twenty year old Philadelphia woman with arm and neck injuries. Police described Herrera as her boyfriend, he was released on a summons pending future

Assault Phillies Harare Neck Injuries Herrera Philadelphia Twenty Year
Phillies' Herrera arrested for domestic violence

AP 24 Hour News

00:21 sec | 1 year ago

Phillies' Herrera arrested for domestic violence

"Philadelphia Phillies outfielder Oduber, Harare, is on administrative leave by major league baseball. He was arrested in a domestic violence case at an Atlantic City casino. Police say a woman was found with visible signs of injury to her arms and neck. And she said, Herrera was her boyfriend Deuba, Harare, was released on a summons pending future

Harare Phillies Herrera Philadelphia Oduber Baseball Deuba
"harare" Discussed on Pet Life Radio

Pet Life Radio

01:36 min | 1 year ago

"harare" Discussed on Pet Life Radio

"Get another dog thinking that will solve the problem. Get a handle on your pet first and then bring in new pet and you can actually get the assistance of the older pet who uses a litter box properly, or is fully house to help role model and things will go smoothly. But if you get a new naughty, one, you might have to naughty pets. However, in my multi house with all the rescues idea and everything else, there was a couple of I'd say rivalry situations. They're worth you. Those going on in the house, and somehow or other. I guess I just had great luck with picking this kitten, and then putting. Her with the weakest member that was being the most picked on the newest addition to the house for about a month, and then slowly introducing one at a time the males that we're fighting with each other, but always like all the females everybody's neutered, spayed, by the way, so rotating them into the area. Always with extra perks in that area. So new kitten meant wet food, and new kitten met catnip in new kitten meant everything great. I did that for a while. And then last, but at least I brought her in with the kittens that are now grown that I thought would be Harare, because they were bottle fed, and they don't accept new cats and everything worked out. Great. And now I actually have peace the two males of stop fighting the females stop fighting everybody acts like it's a spectator sport to watch this little kitten right around the house. It's just gone so smoothly. So I kind of have to eat my words. Words, but remember have done every, I mean, you went to a great deal of trouble to make sure you did everything..

Harare
U.S. Supreme Court sides with Native American elk hunter

10 10 WINS 24 Hour News

00:30 sec | 1 year ago

U.S. Supreme Court sides with Native American elk hunter

"A ruling from the supreme court sides with native Americans regarding hunting rights of American man, Clave in Harare, was fined eight thousand dollars for hunting elk and Bighorn national forest in Wyoming back in two thousand fourteen but he cited a one hundred fifty year old treaty granting members of the crow tribe, the right to hunt there while you said that treaty was voided when it became a state back in eighteen ninety. But today, the supreme court sided with Harare, saying that eighteen sixty eight treaty still holds up granting tribe members the right to hunt on

Harare Bighorn National Wyoming Eight Thousand Dollars One Hundred Fifty Year
Parra hits grand slam as Nationals rally to beat Dodgers 5-2

FOX Sports Radio Weekends

00:28 sec | 1 year ago

Parra hits grand slam as Nationals rally to beat Dodgers 5-2

"The late ballgame in L A went to Washington. Five to over the dodgers. The win the max Scherzer seven innings seven strikeouts. The young dodger starter for no Walker. Buehler was great seven scoreless with seven strike. And then the dodgers bullpen, of course, came into play five runs in the eighth and the nationals win the game grand slam in the eight from Harare part Harare. Geraldo, par has been a dodger killer before par had just signed with the nationals this week in time to play in LA. And this was his first with his

Dodgers Harare Max Scherzer Geraldo Buehler Walker Washington LA
Constance Wu And Harare discussed on KNX Evening News

KNX Evening News

00:18 sec | 1 year ago

Constance Wu And Harare discussed on KNX Evening News

"Meanwhile, actress Constance Wu sent mixed signals about how she feels about the renewal of Harare BCC come fresh off the boat fan. Call the great news. But we responded in a since deleted tweet quote. No, it's not she said later her earlier comments on the heels of rough day and ill-timed blue last year starting crazy

Constance Wu Harare
"harare" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:44 min | 1 year ago

"harare" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Asked him. Let's go. Let's go. Now. Is this everyone on August? Yes. I'm not going to hang around. If you open told this research emptied. No search, but you know in there. There's rescue does open. Let's go on any other people. If it were the people. Obviously state and then to leave property pita, Harare, escorted the man out of the flat and the other firefighters began to retrace his steps downstairs. So that's the recollection of the firefighters the evidence. Given by residents differs in some key aspects, they remember all eight people being together in one room the door flu. And five by the front door. And I just heard him shouting, the basically stew. Said go minim- take your trans- seem go past. But it was still standing left hollow ashen and Rosemary ran out of the flat. They don't remember any firefighter coming inside feeling the front dole. Oma L jolly followed them into the whole described. Your recollection is all in front of you possibly readies, Mary where was your brother? Muhammad. Time. Not sure I remember that he was behind me by remembered. We're filling all to check what's happening outside. And he was behind me somewhere. Oman denies he told Peter Harare that he was the only person left in the flat. Did you have a conversation like that the firefly's.

Harare Peter Harare Mary Oman firefly Rosemary
"harare" Discussed on Pet Life Radio

Pet Life Radio

01:39 min | 1 year ago

"harare" Discussed on Pet Life Radio

"Don't get another cat. If you already have terrible dog that you can't handle it all don't go. Get another dog thinking that will solve the problem. Get a handle on your pet first. And then bring in a new pet, and you can actually get the assistance of the older pet who uses litterbox properly or is fully house to help role model and things will go smoothly. But if you get a new naughty one, you might have to naughty pets, however in my multi-cap house with all the rescues idea and everything else there was a couple of. I'd say rivalry situations. They're worth you those going on in the house, and somehow or other I guess I just had great luck with picking this kitten. And then putting her with the week. I member that was being the most picked on the newest addition to the house for about a month, and then slowly introducing one at a time the males that were fighting with each other. But always like all the females. Everybody's neutered spayed, by the way. So rotating them into the area. Always with extra perks in that area. So new kitten meant wet, food and new kitten met, catnip and new kitten meant everything great. I did that for a while. And then last, but not least I brought her in with the kittens that are now grown that. I thought would be Harare because they were bottle fed, and they don't accept new cats and everything worked out great. And now I actually have peace the two males of stop fighting the females stop fighting everybody acts like it's a spectator sport to watch this little kitten run around the house. It's just gone so smoothly. So I kind of have to eat my words. Well, you'd have to each words. But remember who have done every? I mean, you went to a great deal of trouble to.

Harare
"harare" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Monocle Arts Review

Monocle 24: The Monocle Arts Review

01:52 min | 2 years ago

"harare" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Monocle Arts Review

"Up oil spills that's right does a project by as caesar harare it's a prototype and it's one of those projects that has the potential or has the potential to revert climate change if you if if we'd like rights and there's a a section of objects in this part of the exhibition where we asked the question should we design the planet so if we think that the the anthropoid in is basically a culmination of many unconscious designs we've designed the earth to certain to such an extent that we now leaving these new geological era now should we design to reverse the situation and so there's a number of projects like caesar harare's the bolt is a wonderful project of a both that can it's an autonomous sailing boats that will clean oil spills but it also we're interested in also raising this question while can we really designed to fix the problem mm and these are questions that as well as the audience being asked of course you'd be asking yourselves and i wonder if you have the answer what is the future and can we fix it or yeah that's a good question i i'm any way h each week i personally sort of foot flip depending on whether i'm optimistic or pessimistic utopian of this type typing but on balance at think i'm i'm i'm positive there's so many brilliant ideas in that room brilliant people that we've met throughout this process that you would be very fortunate to be pessimistic i think with with all this brain power being dedicated to what the future might be how about you marry on well i think that the question is not so much whether we feel hopeful or pessimistic but it's more.

caesar harare
"harare" Discussed on KKOB 770 AM

KKOB 770 AM

03:05 min | 2 years ago

"harare" Discussed on KKOB 770 AM

"About the appointments clause how thoroughly abusive this whole process has been to the president thoroughly abusive harare rosenstein is a constitutional illiterate how robert muller is a constitutional illiterate how james komi is a constitutional illiterate now in my view there's no question they don't care about it they don't care about it these are bureaucrats these are men who spent their entire lifetimes pretty much as federal investigators are bureaucrats their understanding of the constitution relates to a handful of clauses in the bill of rights pretty much and eddie relatively superficial level it's a process they go through you know probable cause due process subpoenas warrants judges fine none of them know a damn thing about the appointments clause none of them none of them know a damn thing about the impeachment clause and they certainly haven't taken the time to educate themselves robert muller does not have the power under the department of justice official opinions to indict a sitting president nor does he have the power to force a sitting president in front of a grand jury as prosecutor is even attempted such a thing with the president of the united states nor does he have the power to use a jury to convict a president of the united states mr muller no prosecutor for that matter as the power to circumvent the constitutional authority granted to congress in determining whether it president remains in office or not specifically the senate mr muller nor any jury they do not have the power do you surf the power of the constitution which grants to the senate and only the senate the power to remove a president and the senate has never removed the president mr mueller has taken us to the brink he's taken us to the brink which is why he needs to be fought he needs to be opposed every step of the way every step of the way so in addition to the impeachment clause of the constitution which the framers actually took a lot of time on and there were focused almost exclusively on the presidency not other principal officers in inferior constitutional positions there were focused on the president and the president they will be shocked at what's taking place here.

president harare rosenstein robert muller prosecutor united states senate mr mueller james komi eddie department of justice official mr muller congress principal
"harare" Discussed on KNBR The Sports Leader

KNBR The Sports Leader

02:27 min | 2 years ago

"harare" Discussed on KNBR The Sports Leader

"And then after that santana double a wild pitch moved him to third at a ground ball basit to left field score santana pitch was also in the strike zone and pat hobart wasn't gonna call it a strike so i don't know what happened to that big strike zone the stat cast strike zone said allen was right there on the inside he was not calling it a strike only because altair took a swing here's harare with two down he takes a fastball for strike one on the outside corner harare who's batting average for the years up to three forty six he's got a four zero eight on base average he's got power he's got speed pretty remarkable the owen outside for a ball dubreuil harare last year at forty two doubles top five in the national league the native of an israeli he's become a really good player he was an all star two years ago he takes a curve for strike it's one to do he is one of the most successful examples really ever of a rule five draft pick he was left unprotected by the texas rangers and affiliates plucked him from texas for free and he's become an all star player he takes strike three called here stratton has a nice one two three inning in fact he is now retired seven hitters in a row and he's got five strikeouts through the first three innings on we go to the fourth posey belt longoria coming up to nothing vilis gambier northern california honda dealers radio network state farm robert here robert somebody burned down my she shed no one bird done your she shed shero all really victor because my she sheds burning up in the backyard because she shared was struck by lightning cheryl robert the state farm cover my she shed shed she turned are shed mature hideaway robert that's covered here that victor i'm getting a new she she or she shed can we stop she should now go with a win that's here to help life go right state farm talk to an agent today you've reached the high fashion hotline hi my family has three mothers day branches to go to a lot of french toast and a lot of cute outfit to.

santana allen altair harare texas rangers texas stratton longoria pat hobart california honda cheryl robert two years
"harare" Discussed on KNBR The Sports Leader

KNBR The Sports Leader

02:42 min | 2 years ago

"harare" Discussed on KNBR The Sports Leader

"Glad yuko things got bad in a hurry for the giants in philadelphia tonight and then it just went from bad to worse let's review the game now the game summary sponsored by the silicon valley hair institute when you're trying to get back into the game think of the silicon valley hair institute the best in the bay for robotic hair transplants giants had a couple of men on with two down in the first but that's as close as they really came to getting a run in this game gloria hit a little flair brokenbat bloop headed for left field but the young shortstop kingery race dot and timed his leap perfectly and he snared at an outstanding play that kept the giants off the board the phillys though they got right into it with jeff simard you're being wild at the beginning he walked cesar hernandez to start the game then walked hoskins putting two men on and then the first pitch to harare forget about it so now doable harare left handed bat wide open death and he crushes want deep into right center field way back there hits on its way and threerun homer three nothing phillies that was a big fly over the corner of the bleachers in back into the bullpen an extraordinary home run by oduber harare and he was not finished then samardzic had to settle in and he had a man aboard to down to the fourth inning when the law bans cesar hernandez got hold of one pitch is hit deep to right field by hernandez way deep and it is gone into the third level not the upper deck but the middle big jack that is a booming home runs second one of the game for the phillies and our it's five nothing billy in the fifth inning with two men on and nobody out into the game was dj smelter and relief of some odd and do we had an answer to the question when is there a great catch that actually ends up being a home run sounds impossible but that is kind of what happened here is santana i is third nobody out of he hammers one high of deep to centerfield way back hernandez warning track spectacular down on the ground out there not catching against i thought he caught it but it went over the glove and into the botanical gardens out there and it's a three run homer for santana.

philadelphia silicon valley hair institute giants jeff simard cesar hernandez hoskins harare oduber harare phillies santana billy one pitch
"harare" Discussed on KHNR 690AM

KHNR 690AM

03:07 min | 2 years ago

"harare" Discussed on KHNR 690AM

"Breath well i mean there are a lot of liberal catholics today argue with the pope but i think that's in the subconscious of a lot of catholic i think they give the pope known of course in the holy father i think they give the holy father tremendous respect but i think most catholics are aware that it doesn't make it infallible although it is very interesting here's an interesting question and thank you for that either so much to talk about obviously by the way this this i this i do know i'm sure that the vast majority of catholics don't know that a infallibility was invoked only twice in the history of the church in the eighteen fifty s and nineteen fifties and both had to do with the logical beliefs regarding mary and that was it that was it so it's a very very rarely used them only really on feel obstacle matters but here's an interesting question than when you save the church teaches how obligated is a committed catholic to accept that teaching and the answer is they have to give it respect but they're not obligated the best example i can think of is capital punishment the church has been teaching for a number of decades now that unless there's an immediate threat to security there there and there exists other ways of protecting society from the murderer murderous should not be killed i disagree with the position about him that's irrelevant what is relevant is there's an example of a teaching but it doesn't mean that a catholic has to accept that of course the vast majority of catholic history has accepted and even been a proponent of capital punishment for murder okay let's go to nathan in harare zimbabwe which is the capital of zimbabwe i've been his imbaba spent some time there hi how are you doing yeah you say that and you can hear people clear when they're halfway across the way now it really is funny i'm calling because i've been listening to you for a while and i think it's been about two or three years since he had that heart doctor on talking about the cholesterol lipid right right since that since you had him on you know that actually kind of.

mary zimbabwe murder nathan harare three years
"harare" Discussed on The Bone 102.5

The Bone 102.5

01:52 min | 2 years ago

"harare" Discussed on The Bone 102.5

"My experience now i mean you got i didn't i was not predominantly a family law attorney right so back years ago i think that was the fourth prong of what i did auto accidents kremlin fence traffic and then i just throw a little family law in you know on top didn't you i thought we have to talk about this one time we you said you didn't like doing it because it was too personal i mean i have a friend who's a divorce attorney and and it's hard to see all that wreckage and then he was sending go home and look at your wife and i mean it just it it scared him actually the thing that i and i've i've talked about this a lot on the air and i give credit to first of all before jason came on and and filled in for the referrals that i do for family law his wife miriam who's now a judge so harare was my family law referral sources so i i would she would come in and do the shows and i always told her and then i like i tell jason now i give the them all the credit in the world for doing this area of law because not only are the clients a difficult but the attorneys in family law or really really hard i it's it's sometimes nasty i if i might use that term so when judge valkenberg before she was a judge was doing family law but she had an end and jason they have such a unique disposition both of them have a hell of a lot more patients than me i give them credit and and jason is going to be coming on i think later this month to do a family law segment if not the first part of february and i know the phone lines i hate to jabballah advice to get back to the d you is do you think that that's because cops are police are out patrolling more for during the holidays or what is there any can you tributary anything.

attorney jason miriam harare
"harare" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:38 min | 2 years ago

"harare" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Ramos dow fire son of a harare mazda grant vow to me wellbeing immediately sustenance immediately longlife immediately well being in abundance sustenance in abundance long life in abundance greatness wisdom fluent tongue and understanding for my soul and intellect that improved steadily and does not diminish in strength well we looked at ritual and we've looked at the origins but the heyday of zero western ism which was in the persian empire tell me about that we really are looking in a certain sense of three iranian empires we're looking at the candidates the party and and this is and what we can see is that the sonnen period is when zoroastrianism best fits the definition of being something like a state sponsored religion so also the period when disaster in priesthood are in their most muscular moment and one of the things that we can we can see is that in the sonnen period we're living it's a major multicultural empire when we talking about here sonya was basically to twenty four to six fifty one c which is eighty yes yeah of course and in that sense the zoroastrian persians ruled over a variety of different religious communities who lived within the sonnen empire so we have jews christians mannequins mazda kites mandaeans we have various pagan groups and of course not to mention hindu and buddhist groups in the eastern part of the empire but it would also be fair to say that all the ducks zoroastrians occasionally persecuted versions of za restrooms they they considered to be heretical and you mentioned mazda is that was something that was regarded as as a threat yes a mazda is one of the individuals who claims to be a founder of a sort of a new faith or one could say perhaps schismatic group within these hard questions to answer of course but the the persian and arabic sources that do talk about him essentially say that he argued for women in property to be shared in common.

sonya mazda founder Ramos dow harare sonnen
"harare" Discussed on The Andrew Klavan Show

The Andrew Klavan Show

02:02 min | 2 years ago

"harare" Discussed on The Andrew Klavan Show

"Disconnect from his feelings in order to say to himself when the going gets tough the tough get going if i die in the process no problem if i say somebody that's the big issue and so but not connecting with one feelings as part of a series of things that we learned as as boys and men that really worked with that was not healthy for us and therefore is toxic but just calling toxic masculinity is pejorative to understanding the serving that men did and boys did to to protect their country and to be willing to die before women died we often say things like women our civil book men are civilized by women while that's true on one level but the opposite is also true that the result of us going to war and yet working in the coal mines allowed women to be more civilized but being able to stay at home and talk with people and talk with children and so it took both sexes so the entire way we've framed masculinity has led to boys going into college in highschool hearing words like male privilege as opposed to men are fathers grandfathers fulfilling their obligation and responsibilities and that's made boys feel like i can't even say anything as as a boy because i will just be told to shut up you have male privilege that's that's increasing the toxicity toward toward boys today what what's the connection i mean part of this just sounds like a dad crisis which i think is really true in his spreading throughout certainly throughout the the lower classes it's really interesting that the divorce rate among upperclass people is actually quite low in the marriage is quite high but among the lower classes where they need it most the dads are missing what's the connection between that and a loss of harare intelligence which seems more unless i'm misreading this it seems more of a societal problem that that that society itself is rejecting the.

harare
"harare" Discussed on Talk Radio WPHT 1210

Talk Radio WPHT 1210

01:40 min | 3 years ago

"harare" Discussed on Talk Radio WPHT 1210

"That point let's hope not let's hope not but but point while turkish harare that's what i was kind of thinking um well the last thing i can think of is we are addressing the advantages and disadvantages of this one specific item that impacting you cindy but i don't want to lose sight of other things matter so it'd be really nice to make the decision in the context of let's say what your future retirement looks like when you plan to retire do you have enough income from the other sources how's that other money invested i mean here we are talking about a decision on of pension a lump sum offer and i get it you have an offer you need to make a decision but we haven't even addressed a million dollars you have accumulated is it invested the right way or you saving in the right places so i do kind of encourage you to look at it holistic lee to and that's the benefit of doing it in the context of a overall financial plan with and adviser i half with an omen okay i mean i i do go over this year annually with with my financial advisor um and i did poses questions to him the only thing that was holding me up on it was more of a psychological thing that darn i'm not going to be able to get these guaranteed money every single months but that's really a ridiculous thought because i am still going to get x amount of money per month it'll just come from a different source you're exactly right so um and let's face it were emotional sometimes we get hung up on something that uh is emotional so but it's it's nice that you've noticed that and so i it makes me feel better that you're making this decision with a financial plan behind it so we thank you for calling and wish you the best thank you so much i appreciate the input cindy thanks so much.

harare cindy advisor million dollars
"harare" Discussed on Sports Talk 1050 WTKA

Sports Talk 1050 WTKA

01:52 min | 3 years ago

"harare" Discussed on Sports Talk 1050 WTKA

"Food you know so i mean is kind of just came hand in hand with that one but with that pyros agai loko for a long time so i'm i'm sure model be glad you enjoyed big time that was an even enjoyed it now that thing go for gin what do you have to work it you're getting too good weather is growls in harare donor be led of jewish i was thinking about the twobats coming in today but hey he's gonna miss out on not not not day family can eat some good student night of a man so when you walk outside them doors you doing were on the oca yeah you're gonna jamie get up to leave stop whining about the weather you you're from michigan only now years it happens man how skinny with all great food around you here that i can't wait till you you hit like fifty years old and you're just turned into kartman not i am now go away at some point i just you know i eat so much still to my wife look at me she said sean you eat today right on my three cheeseburgers like i don't know what it is the man's eaten cheese burger still if he burgers drop largely due to care for the man know i love my birth but not all the time it's funny 'cause i just mentioned my brothers and you'll see my younger brother big boy mother brother he's big and talk so i try to keep up with him but for some reason i got greatest syndrome i mean xu he skinny israel so i i mad at it but no more swedes for me in number protein and starches will be going in my body 'cause you know when man xu blow brand new coat uk i know my wife is beautiful unearned hundred dollar coat and he's one hundred one where the pattern i got the pick out of that's why i love picking that.

israel harare jamie michigan sean hundred dollar fifty years
"harare" Discussed on SuperTalk WTN 99.7

SuperTalk WTN 99.7

01:59 min | 3 years ago

"harare" Discussed on SuperTalk WTN 99.7

"No idea like when he was not in harare when in one away was when these thank you still got it all we still got we save that where they went nuts on this because this was supposed to show that he was a senile is something i don't know what's the nablus sanal of these senility has to do with with are being a pronounce worth no one has to do with the being it would be slurring your speech but the less united church anchor her for land less united church thank you very much paler who drunk we we wear jackie giver share a vigorous accuweather big way triggered we wear a president out of river low arrived spinner rigors israel radio i have no idea whether the i think he pro i suspected that it was a loose cap on his teeth tooth or something i have no idea with the icrc less united shij nebot now he's the bush a dog whistle do you hang and then like a like a loose to rats right hang in there like a loose still with us must be when it's what the bear lethal the euro and up and so now but sippy cup thing drinking water lackey's drinking i was sippy cup and the purple tie you're supposed to be some kind of signal to the new world order or in maybe it's all the prince fans i have no idea if thinking of prince yeah what i mean was so what's he's supposed to be seen to the new world order women saying you know now that we've now that we pag tax tax reform as party like it's 1990 now that must be what it is yeah that's laying out is new young um so we got that on the tax front end there you all sorts of side stories that come with them we got a listed companies giving bonuses because the tax bill if you want to see that we talked about off and on uh we also got the strife are found this interesting these are the highest and lowest paying jobs of 2017 now this has nothing to do with the tax thing is just you know economics i found it interesting one of the interesting does is.

harare president icrc accuweather israel
"harare" Discussed on Global News Podcast

Global News Podcast

02:42 min | 3 years ago

"harare" Discussed on Global News Podcast

"A coup the aim of the military and their political allies is to persuade the international community and regional powers that what began as a coup is now a legal constitutional process what today's demonstrations have done is to widen the base of the movement against robert mugabe the people on the streets have shown that the revolution does not belong to the army or to the ruling party philippine president mugabe's nephew patrick shuaihao a minister of labour in this imbaba in government who's now in south africa spoke to the bbc's julian marshall he was asked if he'd been in contact with president mugabe i did night access to speak with him and he has been denied access to speak with ease muniz that's because the military has staged it but i understand you have information as to his current health sandon deed intentions in my capacity as a simple effectively yes i have communicated with other members of the ability that just under what is the information about your uncle president mugabe's state of health and indeed his intentions at saw you saw that whitney appreciate it if the graduation ceremony it was only bet that you was allow officiate at by the mid that us clutter but beyond that term how is he responding to what must be repealed two requests citing the issue of substance relate to creating fundamental chips three fundamental questions are what is happening in zimbabwe and the answer to that is it is a military something that should not be happening in this day and so a sense of enormous change in harare a but what about elsewhere to get a sense of the news outside the capitol the bbc's julian keane has travelled into the quiet rural heart of zimbabwe to find out what people there make of the week's extraordinary events grousing about beyond the capital and it's hard to imagine the country's going from one of the most mementos times of its recent history need life here is going on as normal except for one thing people field changes in the air at where people talking unprompted the room wondering what will happen next it also take need is given that robert mugabe will go now for them it's a question of how and when everybody i've spoken to support the military intervention.

bbc julian marshall president muniz president mugabe whitney zimbabwe julian keane patrick shuaihao south africa harare
"harare" Discussed on Rebuild

Rebuild

01:31 min | 3 years ago

"harare" Discussed on Rebuild

"Are not on the imola can irish to watch on thought jay beat the accommodate snow nyarko dork at the harare yield uh higher loss i buchwa associate mussina human health animal does what the what they give someone like it or an upgrade on otherwise so sites addition again mendel that out about this whole issue of the muscat law more those snow more and more the snow dimitar quotas sent need him a shattuck on sundarban disconnect solely one annika liberal nor gum and garlic him us own doganov stalled sky moscow mcdonough coming on normal tell us when he hits what ldl dan i got home lindsay mckee must meet in a corner shocking the nominees his critic koetthallen us what i want to win a dose gillan zimba keita did not you my mother cut the yet oba titled alah quote a out the door komando jb narcan to go moscow was a walkout had got are you want me to any coma garage ap no whollyowned that east icu what they can agree musyoka tickled by eating at them on the zoo mm begging baggio mr jacques at gorda sonar since hasn't quite the next day honda marshalls aggressive a ducks as they get it will you must be checked newer healthier considered chocolate let me ask my two though mazu gorsuch than old while kale did not get cool with the sooner yeah muslim accomplishes stella artois gillan next year when i made all the research up oswaldo organisers of fossil log onto him tuition what's going on and all linxia.

jay mussina muscat law lindsay mckee zimba keita kale stella artois harare mendel moscow alah honda
"harare" Discussed on This Week in Tech

This Week in Tech

01:57 min | 3 years ago

"harare" Discussed on This Week in Tech

"Uh we're induce streaming he saw that happening and then he saw the movie companies squeezing among they were getting first run movies they were only getting kinda crappy stuff and he said we got to solve his we're going to do a there were one of the first to do original programmeiom hbo suit a content coming but this was a digital did they they rented dvds and they turn into a content creation company i i think they'll give releasing a lot of harare he to help started i mean i think hulu had a path paved for it not sends you down he was way ahead at a game with it but you have to really be really fearless in a way to start a dvd business try to get rid of it halfway through in a still your cash flow driver and then stress many billions of dollars a year on regional content i mean that's amazing he did that one blockbuster was like getting we the writing was on the law but bataille also was it's ever been a and also binds as 2020 i think you're right i think the the his crew courage it but that's what makes it breaks and entrepreneur right is the ability to step up and they said i'm going to do the very very risky thing it's the innovators dilemma it's very it's very tempting just say hey we got an iphone we got some great success let's just keep doing that let's not take a chance or iron the content business to be fair to amazon amazon is in really in one business they're in the delivery business delivery goods and they deliver you bits and they want to be in the middle of every single transaction on earth for those two things that's why said in when we talked about it a few months ago i think they eventually by ups or make their own death delivery company book is a delivery service because they are a delivered they all about delivering eu stuff and they can be in the middle and make a penny off at every single transaction and the original content ashley isn't there businesses it is just an israeli really just a benefit for prime members it actually to live to be fair i want to go into the accounting of prime figure highly figure out cost per user and how that makes money or doesn't because i would love to see the math there the.

harare hulu bataille iphone amazon ashley cash flow