35 Burst results for "Hanoi"

'A Spirit to Soar' Will Challenge You to Be the Best That You Can Be

The Doug Collins Podcast

01:58 min | 4 months ago

'A Spirit to Soar' Will Challenge You to Be the Best That You Can Be

"I'll leave you with one story they're done. Very sword may talk about it. But I had a friend who had a bad COVID experience. He was going on a cruise, didn't have COVID before he got to Rome, Italy, and they tested him and he had, he had COVID. They went out and go on the cruise, put them in a hotel, not a very nice hotel for ten days. Because that was a quarantine. His wife was in a different room because she didn't have COVID pretty lonely during that time. After the ten days, they tested him again. And he had to understand other ten days. He still had COVID. So three weeks in a hotel. He couldn't wait to get back to the U.S. and he said to me, thanks for the book. I had given him the book because he knew Barry and Kim a copy of the book. And I said, did you have a chance to read it? He said, I did. I read a little bit of it before I got there. I read the rest of it there and he goes, I thought that my life was bad. It was nothing compared to Barry's. And it got me through the 21 days. So I would say that these life lessons that are in there. They're for you. Therefore, your children. They're for your grandchildren. Therefore, your nieces, nephews, whoever you know, because there's something in there that will make an impact on you and the reason for writing the book and getting the story out there very doesn't think there's anything special about him. And it takes people outside of him to see that he meets that outlier definition of Malcolm gladwell talked about. And I think he dug for giving us this time with you.

Barry Rome Italy KIM U.S. Malcolm Gladwell
"hanoi" Discussed on The Doug Collins Podcast

The Doug Collins Podcast

09:41 min | 4 months ago

"hanoi" Discussed on The Doug Collins Podcast

"Exactly. Exactly. As time progressed in the Hanoi Hilton did it, did your time change you were there, of course, over 5. You were there what at 5 months ahead of McCain, right? All right. Yeah. And I was reading my time frame there. You were there before him. After you came through, as you said, the heartbreak hotel, the torture, and initial, you know, initial phase. Describe how it was live because I've heard these stories before, but it'd be interesting to hear from you. Did you came into as best you can describe it a normal battle rhythm. And then it became, you know, they were different parts of the day, but it was a very similar thing as the time increased. Would that be true? Yeah, we developed all kinds of ways to entertain ourselves and plus we spent most of our time helping those in greater need than ourselves that desperately needed us to intervene in whatever way we could. So we were busy as the Dickens taking care of each other. Yeah, even when you didn't have the, you know, they didn't have the resources and they weren't taking care of you. Exactly. And he had all kinds of crazy things. Wow. Now were you a part of any of the, I know that at one point they had the videos, the North Vietnamese tried to do his propaganda kind of stuff. Was that ever a part that you had to go through? Not that I'm aware of, and they never came that I recall it, but I have a story to tell this to you interesting. When I got shot down, Stratton will hit my helmet. And I was bleeding like a stuck pig and all the blood coming out of the head with big gas on top of my head down into my face and down into my flight suit. So I look like I might be dying not pretty soon. I would look pretty bad. And I immediately said, I'm going to play this for everything it's worth to try and convince the North Vietnamese. I can't see. I started that the day I hit the ground. And they took me into this torture chamber program. And I was tortured multiple times, they weren't, they were asking me questions, but they finally got around to deciding that we need to get everybody to write a biography. And so they asked me to write a biography one day, and I said, this was after I'd been through all that torture session. I said, no, I'm not all right about. So they took me to the doors for chamber. That was the way they did everybody. If you didn't do what they said and then you went to the torture team. And so they put me in a room. They put two bricks on the ground. They too only to put my knees on the Brexit. This was difficult for a lot of us. And then hold our arms straight up, and they stood there in this little teeny room with a door in the front of the room, and I forgot that there was a wind in the back of the room, which caused me some grief later. And they said, okay, now you must stay there to your right biography. Well, I was there 5 days and 5 nights, and I said, okay, I'll write your biography. You know, what all of us did when we went to a second line of resistance. We were doing things like one of my buddies. He wrote, when they asked him to write his biography, he says, I have a pet electric duck. I winded up and it flies around my room and goes quack, quite quiet. That was his virus. And they thought that was great. And so what I did instead is I took my left hand, which I'm pretending, I can't see. And I scribble something, you would never be able to figure it out. And I put things like D, E, L, a, a, B, I just put random letters on a page, and they thought that was great. So they took off from left demos. Now, here's an interesting part. One day, the interrogator goes to my room. He opens up to Pete poll that says, you're right, biography. I said, yeah, wrote a good one. He shuts the people and leaves comes back two days later and said, you sure you right, biography? I said, juda lose my biography. Well, he comes back a third time. He says, tonight, we take you to hospital. If you lie, you'll be some barely treated. And they put me in a Jeep. It took me to the Hanoi hospital. Second floor, they've got it's a room with a desk at one end and a chair for me and a for the interrogator. And then at the other end, they have a technician and he opens up a drape and it's the eye chart. The E is about the size of a small car. It's so big. And he takes his Porter, which looks like a pool cue, and he's pointing at the key, and then the interrogator says to me, he says, okay, and now you must tell us what is the letter and I did this. I stood up on my feet and I started turning around on slow circumstance. Where is it? Where is the letter? And he is about to have a fit. And so I played that for all I was worth, and finally they got frustrated, took me and threw me back in my ring. Two years go by. They are now open up a camp, which holds a hunter. Either side by brick wall separated. And we called it the good guy, camp. In other words, we weren't getting tortured every day, but just ever so often. Anyway, one of the things I had learned to do to bide my time, and we were all doing this. I learned a jug. And I made my own little balls out of string and paper and whatever. I had 5 balls that I could throw up and I could juggle and keep them going. Well, one day, in this new camp, I'm in the big room we had, and I'm practicing my juggling and unbeknownst to me, the interrogator that it took me to the hospital is standing in the doorway, watching me juggle. In the first thing I hear is, you lie. You lie. And I looked over us oh my gosh, I said, damn it. And I said, okay, Brad, you got to be real careful what you do at this point. It's got to be convincing, and it's got to be emotional. And I was used to juggle down that element. That much pretty bad. You dropped it off for a minute. That is amazing. That's what we were doing. And again, it goes to this idea of controlling your mind. You were the one controller. Even though you were being hell captive, you were controlling the day. All right, absolutely was. And I think that's such an important lesson for me in such an important lesson and I'm going to make my kids my boys watch this and others. You know, out there, I mean, you see, it's a matter of controlling your day. I can't tell you how many days and I've passed her for a number of years, and I told people I said, how many people have lit? How many times have you let somebody who cut you off maybe in the morning, going to work? You got mad at him, you yelled at him, and you were mad, the whole morning and they didn't even know you existed. You know, it's a matter of your mind being there. Jim, we talk about this and I'm gonna get buried here in just a second. This idea of mind though, I think contributed to what you and I talked about before we started and that's this issue of PTSD. Right. And in the book, you talked about that. Do you think that that had a lot to do with that? I think it did. You know, as I was telling you, I've studied the brain in I too was I couldn't believe that our POWs have such a low rate of PTSD and I think that what happens in life and this is just my theory on it is that it's a surprise thing that we allowed to get to us. You know, like you say, somebody cut you off, you're not expecting it. You get enraged. But I think what happened with the POWs is that they decided that they would take control of their lives because what else did they have? They had a dirt floor and maybe a towel, the lay on or something like that. They had nothing. But if they allowed themselves to accept where they were and that they would never get better, they would have trouble. And so I think that controlling of the mind did contribute to the low rate of PTSD. And they knew they were going to get tortured. At this point, everybody around them was being tortured in fact, they may as barriers talking about it, they may gain some of the things. So that they turn what was terrible in the fund. Well, let me just give this a listener out there, listen to this. The rates and it's so 2009 study that said, almost 31% of Vietnam veterans had PTSD, 10% of Gulf War veterans, 11% of veterans of war in Afghanistan. And in 20% of Iraq and the 5% of POWs from Vietnam. Turning back to you and I think Jim laid that out pretty well. But Barry, when you got, I'm going to take it a step further because we know that what happened there was terrible that the torture, tell me about the last few days and then getting back home. Let me.

Hanoi Hilton Hanoi hospital Stratton Dickens McCain juda PTSD Pete Porter Brad Jim POWs Vietnam Afghanistan Iraq
5 Years in the Hanoi Hilton With Lt. Col. Barry Bridgers

The Doug Collins Podcast

01:25 min | 4 months ago

5 Years in the Hanoi Hilton With Lt. Col. Barry Bridgers

When You Have Control of Your Mind, You'll Never Have a Bad Day

The Doug Collins Podcast

01:51 min | 4 months ago

When You Have Control of Your Mind, You'll Never Have a Bad Day

"Jim, you might have commented that ten changed your life. And for those who don't know, the title of that chapter is make every day a good day by controlling your mind. Jim, why did that change your life? Well, we have all experience or a lot of people have experience in people say, you know, control what goes into your brain, it can have a deep effect of how you approach life. And so we were interviewing Barry regarding his time in the Hanoi and the question post to him was, what was your worst day in the Hanoi? Now, it's very well shared, there was torture. There was loneliness. There was that not knowing if the individual was going to come back. It's anybody even cared home over that many years. And Barry, who's very energetic, very quick to answer, sat back quietly and sat there. And he thought for a while, many said, I don't think I had a bad day. He said, when you have control of your mind, you will never have a bad day. And what that change was, I had heard that time and time again, motivational speakers, individuals saying about your mind, but it finally hit me that if someone like berry could have a good day every day, what could not? And that changed my life. Now, I will tell you, I still have bad days. But they're very minimal. Very minimal because of what he said.

JIM Hanoi Barry Berry
'A Spirit to Soar' Author Jim Petterson on the Power of Communication

The Doug Collins Podcast

01:51 min | 4 months ago

'A Spirit to Soar' Author Jim Petterson on the Power of Communication

"Jim, I want to switch back to you for just saying, and looking at these life lessons, what he just talked about about communication. And I've looked at over some of the ways you've titled these chapters and that is finally what you're thankful for, adopting by, you standing shoulder to throw to those who came before you. You know, hoping for the best preparing for the worst. Patience. Those were all communication skills that when you met Barry, when he came back and you were teaching, his communication actually connects us to each other, isn't it? Yeah, it sure does. The way that we become friends, the way we become lifelong friends is Barry and I have. Become we both were in financial services together, and Barry developed a ways of communicating the clients better ways as to. Better ways to communicate why people need to financial plans. And I was director of training at that time. So we worked together to provide these to the other financial advisers that we work with. Very actually was our top producer for four years. While he was financial adviser, one of the reasons was because of the experiences that he had. Those experiences cost him to think about why financial independence was important and he could communicate it in a way and protection was important. He could communicate in a way that none of the rest of us could communicate it.

Barry JIM
"hanoi" Discussed on The Doug Collins Podcast

The Doug Collins Podcast

04:28 min | 4 months ago

"hanoi" Discussed on The Doug Collins Podcast

"As we go forward. To me, I am married. This is something that really starts off with your story. I do have a question for you for those and it'll come after this, but you, of course, as we've said before, Vietnam, also POW, Hanoi Hilton, I have a question and you mentioned in here by John McCain. I saw later in the book. Did you also know Sam Johnson? I did indeed. Now I didn't climb up there, but I knew him when I came home. I take that 5. I did, I lived with him at the same dang home room. You have to remember, play your chest with it. Yes. I am good man. Hey, Sam, what are you talking about people who make a difference in your life? Sam and Jim, a lot of the way you put that Sam was that for me when I was in Congress. And the one thing I remember and Barry phone I've read in your book, the book so far and what we're gonna get in this is I watched Sam come to the foreign car, especially he got older and you could see the marks of what y'all went through. Okay, you can see it in his hands. You can see the band in his hands. You can see it. But the one thing that he always walked on the floor of that house, no matter where he was no matter how he felt, he always had a pleasant spirit about him. And I see that in this book, I see this in the rotting. Just in general, there's a conception about the POW in the treatments you had. What made it that you could come out of that in a way, besides these life lessons, if you just sort of look at you, Sam Johnson, John McCain. There's many others of you that have survived and thrived. What do you think might be the difference? What we value about living about being. That's what made the difference. I've talked a lot about things. Because in the prison camps of North Vietnam, Sam and I were witnesses to the powerful in the pervasive impact that traditional American values had on my fellow POWs not only to engage, but to survive. The pressure cooker environment of the Hanoi Hilton. I could not leave the quality of individuals that I was bumping into, Tapping on walls, never seeing their face the whole time I was there. And realizing what incredible human beings, I was blessed to go through those night of terror with. It is amazing. Sam actually, I had tonight, I got to spend a night with him and others and him just talking about some of his experiences and he talked about and developing that tap system. And he talked about it in terms of and this is something Barry I want for you to communicate to the maybe to the younger podcast listener who's listening to this and they have only a memory of Vietnam if something way in the past and like for others of us. But Sam made a statement to me one time and he said that the Tapping that he and others came up with was so important because it connected each of you to each other in a way. Explain that for those of us who pick up a phone or make calls, why is it that those Tapping was so important? Tapping in communicating with what's absolutely critical in order for us to survive as a group. You couldn't survive by yourself. You needed help. And we had plenty of it because we had shared values. I was, I was a beneficiary of that communication system, and we worked very hard to amplify, and we did eventually amplify it. A public wish, buddy of mine. In fact, my roommate and Hannah came up with what he called a POW taft code. And assuming hand code POW hand code. And if you took the deaf mute code and tried to figure out to make letters with your hands so that you had a big vague letters, for example, an a, we could hold up one finger. That's an a you can see that with good eyes and we had great eyes up to about a hundred yards away. And so this is a beat. It looks like the letter B so anyway, using his hand code, it revolutionized our communication capabilities and made life not only bearable, but survivable. We had to communicate to survive. Well, and one of the things in looking up.

Sam Sam Johnson John McCain Hanoi Hilton Vietnam Barry POW North Vietnam Jim Congress Hannah
Jim Petterson and Barry Bridger on Their New Book 'A Spirit to Soar'

The Doug Collins Podcast

02:16 min | 4 months ago

Jim Petterson and Barry Bridger on Their New Book 'A Spirit to Soar'

"Going to be a great discussion today. I've met up with these folks at cpac, a book has been written called the spirit to soar. And it's about the true story of former orphan and POW lieutenant colonel Barry bridger, U.S. Air Force retired colonel bridger, I am also a lieutenant colonel in the United States Air Force as well. Finished it got 20 years in, so we'll see if I make it that way. Then you got Jim, Peterson. Jim is with us, and he is on that other blue, a little bit darker blue, the navy side, which I actually started in. But I spent more of my time with the green guys down at camp Pendleton when I was there as a chaplain, but folks, guys, it's good to have you all with us. This has been an exciting, I got to look over the book. And let me just tell you Jim for riding it, but Barry for sir for you and what you've been through. Thank you both for service and I'm looking forward to some discussion here. So am I let it rip? Here we are too. I love it. Well, let's start off jam almost start off with you on the riding of the book. You ride in the book about why you started it, but you chose it to be a biography, but also a lifeless and explain that a little bit. Well, you know, Malcolm gladwell wrote a book called outliers. And he talks about people who do extraordinary things. So started out, I've observed very known very over 30 years now. And I've observed him in the things that he does. I knew a story, but I didn't know it all that well. And once I learned his story, I told him, one day I met a writer biography in that process. I opened up the discussion of this biography saying that bears have been an inspiration in my life. I've learned so much, and so a publicist said, it's a life lesson book. So we put in 17 life lessons that I've learned from Barry's life. And he's had a tremendous impact on my life. So

Colonel Barry Bridger Colonel Bridger JIM Cpac U.S. Air Force United States Air Force POW Camp Pendleton Peterson Navy Barry Malcolm Gladwell Bears
"hanoi" Discussed on The Amateur Traveler Podcast

The Amateur Traveler Podcast

01:51 min | 6 months ago

"hanoi" Discussed on The Amateur Traveler Podcast

"But first there's a change coming for amateur traveler that I want you to be aware of. For most of you, this won't make a difference at all. But we will for some. So I announced almost three years ago that I was changing the show format to be an MP3 enhanced version instead of doing the old AAC version and the reason for that was I wanted to insert ads in older episodes. Most of the downloads in any given month for amateur traveler are for older episodes, for which I make absolutely no money, it doesn't help support my family at all. And so this has been a very slow process, but that is coming. Sometime in June, they'll start to be ads in older episodes of amateur traveler. If you download the show when it comes out and you grab the latest version and you keep it around for whenever you want to go to whatever place we're talking about, this will make no difference to you at all. If you download really old versions of the show, it also won't make any difference at all, but there's that in between when you may get ads inserted on episodes and the problem with that is it will cause the chapters in an episode to go away. Chapters and inserted ads are incompatible. So again, if you download them right away, not a problem, if you're a patron of the show and get the ad free version, not a problem. If you don't care that there are chapters in the show with pictures and links and you never use those, not a problem. But for those of you who do use the chapters and you get them from older episodes, you might want to download a few episodes before you go, or you could always become a patron in the show and get access to those episodes. But I did want to let you know that change is coming in June. And again, if you want to be a patron of this show and get that ad free version and also help support amateur traveler, you can go to Patreon dot com slash.

"hanoi" Discussed on The Amateur Traveler Podcast

The Amateur Traveler Podcast

01:49 min | 6 months ago

"hanoi" Discussed on The Amateur Traveler Podcast

"You are wiping and you do. You wipe your chopsticks before you eat to try to help clean it a little bit more. And you also will pour tea into your glass, like a little if you're getting tea yourself, which is common. For a little bit of tea in there and swirl it around and throw it out. Same thing. You're kind of giving it one last chance of being clean. Interesting. And Paul, if you had to summarize northern Vietnam in just three words with three words we get a pick. Beautiful. Colorful. Excellent. And cultural. Excellent. Our guest again has been pull B Kennedy from Vietnam travel with us dot com. Paul, you say you don't have any posts over there we can go to, but if we're interested in getting some help planning our trip to northern Vietnam, we've got a connection now. So we can find out where the snail soup is. If we contact Paul, so yes, and I do have tidbits on my cookbooks I out, but there are some fun cultural tidbits on my other Paul B Kennedy dot com. Excellent. Well, we didn't actually Kennedy to come, but the reason why we're putting the B in there is so you'll know about polls. Cookbook site. So very good. It's not out. But I'm talking more about culture. I want you to learn about the culture I want to travel, that's it. And Paul, thanks so much for coming on amateur traveler and sharing with us your love for Vietnam. Chris, thank you for having me. Normally I think the listeners of the show who are patrons of the show right now and I'll do that a little bit. But first there's a change coming for amateur traveler that I want you to be aware of. For most of you, this won't make a difference at all. But we will for some. So I announced.

"hanoi" Discussed on The Amateur Traveler Podcast

The Amateur Traveler Podcast

05:35 min | 6 months ago

"hanoi" Discussed on The Amateur Traveler Podcast

"I would never be able to even describe in a million years how you would find me. Because the mail system can't even find me. It's not like I'm in some obscure part of Hanoi. One advantage of the food tour is follow the person who knows how to get to the place. Yeah, if you see what you want, but yeah, if you come here, I'll happily pin where I am. And you can come find, you can try this snail restaurant. It's by far my favorite. Obviously, because I go before every trip I have a bowl of that. That's my favorite meal in annoying. It's just now superior. Excellent. Well, let's do some of our app up questions and you were standing in the prettiest spot in northern Vietnam. Where is it? And what are you looking at? It doesn't sound like it's the hand bridge. It's not the hand bridge. It's not the Hamburg. Obviously, I like how long bay. Yeah. I go back to the peace and tranquility a lot. Because annoy is allowed city. I moved here from New York. So nothing should be loud to me. But I do it more chickens where you are now than in your chickens. There are a lot of chickens. I think the red bridge too. In one cam Lake in the old quarter. It's nothing that unique, but I think it has a pretty backdrop with the Lake and the temple. And that's the one you were saying. You don't usually include on a tour, but you recommend that people get there in the off hours. Yes, yes, yes. Yeah, there's a lot. Everything in central is man-made. But the red bridge, there's a dragon bridge and central Vietnam too. But the red brick is simple red bridge. So I wouldn't go there expecting to see a lot, but it means a lot to me because it really is a center of Hanoi..

Hanoi cam Lake Vietnam Hamburg red bridge New York
"hanoi" Discussed on The Amateur Traveler Podcast

The Amateur Traveler Podcast

05:36 min | 6 months ago

"hanoi" Discussed on The Amateur Traveler Podcast

"So you know a little bit about the hospitality industry here in Hanoi. We should say. Yeah. Well, and that's why I wanted to ask you the question, because yes. So yes, with the boats, that's why with the service, I think it's good service on the 5 star. It would be the same service as going to a 5 star restaurant or a Michelin star restaurant in the states, probably not. Okay. Do they serve from the correct side? No. And I left. But I'm sure that there are people that that is important to I don't happen to be in that crowd. Having a door rather than a curtain at all in my room, that I care about. Am I on the smelly train versus the non smelly train that I care about? And people don't know about it. And I've been on the spelling train so I can picture what you were saying when you were saying that. And some of these things I'm taking it back by when my Vietnamese friends tell me they're like, yeah, it's either going to be a smelly train or not smelly train. This is where the questions and even the students can help me with because they know how to figure things out. They're Vietnamese. We don't. And when you said smelly train, for instance, I pictured a train I did a night train in China where the toilet facilities was a hole in the floor, literally. Oh yeah, yeah. And you could see the tracks. And it was smelly, you know? Because you're on a moving train and aim is what it is. Let's stop there. So yeah, it's a big risk. If you don't have someone looking after your interest because again, if there's 200 boats and just say 40 of them are lying, well obviously the travel agents are booking up the ones that are reliable. That they know that they work. So the ones that are lowering the prices at the end of the day, the ones that still have room are the ones that are most likely not good or just change hands changing names is very common here. Hotels, boats, cabs, changer name when they mess up. It's very easy to do. I'm up in that area. Is there other things that I want to do on the way to or while I'm up there besides the crews? Not really. That's about it. How long city is also pretty westernized? Okay. And there's not a lot to offer. Not a downtown area to walk around. So you couldn't even really do a half day or part of a day in how long. How long really is strictly how long bay it's the cruise, it's the sights. It's really just about taking in mother nature, which is why I really encourage a nice boat with a balcony. So that you can just relax. And you haven't had a really chance to decompress. Right. If you're on a 7 day itinerary and.

Hanoi China
"hanoi" Discussed on The Amateur Traveler Podcast

The Amateur Traveler Podcast

04:12 min | 6 months ago

"hanoi" Discussed on The Amateur Traveler Podcast

"Are there any tricks to how long bay to get that experience of, is there a season you can go to get fewer boats or is there both that goes to different places or COVID? Cured of pandemic is there a trick that we can? Another pandemic. Let's try to avoid that one. I've had some great cruises on that water during the pandemic. Is one of them. It has less than how long bay. But honestly, they're all pretty similar. And there are different paths you can take, but the reality is you're going to be out there. There may be a hundred boats on your tour. No matter which one you're on, the slow one or the busy one, you're still going to have probably at least 12 around you, if not 20 round you at any given point. So I think they're all similar. I try to steer people more towards again. A little money goes a long way. So I put more money into having a nicer boat. Okay. And now this isn't like the train where there's the smelly boat and the non smelly boat is there. Oh, the bad boats are bad, Chris, back. Now, when you hear a complaint about a bad boat, it's usually a really bad complaint like the staff, oh. We could do a whole episode of just things not to do. There's the bad boats, your vegetarian meal might be and has been a piece of bread and a cucumber. Or you hear people complaining about how they had no curtain or anything to block anything, no privacy in their room. So people walking by, I could see them at all. And we're talking about a cruise overnight. Overnight. Overnight. The day cruises are more party cruises, a lot of typically people that stay in hostels or locals who are just out there drinking all day. I would definitely do at least today for this situation for this itinerary. I would do it two day one night. On how long bay and I would do a 5 star cruise with a terrorist because you can just sit on your terrace, you can leave your room just for the meal which is going to be spectacular..

Chris
"hanoi" Discussed on The Amateur Traveler Podcast

The Amateur Traveler Podcast

05:14 min | 6 months ago

"hanoi" Discussed on The Amateur Traveler Podcast

"Those months, you're pretty safe to get some color. The problem is, if you start pushing your luck where you want to see the yellow, which is the consider the creme de la creme for people visiting. All the ethnic villages harvest differently. One could harvest first week in October, the other one could do it in the middle of September. It's up to them it's up to their crops. So you may not see what you thought you would see. Or you may get there when they are burning. And that is a nightmare. It's like you're in a giant fireplace, it is smoky, it's really and I would never think of that. I would never. For me, it's easier. I can go whenever I want. To stop. But if someone has 7 days, they're not wandering around the country. And I'd play it safe and stick to a window way before that yellow harvest for the yellow time. And you mentioned the different ethnic villages. So we're up here with the Hmong people and with, I don't know who else. Yeah, yes. I am not as versed with the different ethnicities here. Again, as part of that history, there's so much different information out there. I read something online, but then when I actually experience it, it seems a little off. So I'm more into the culture aspect of it than I am. The history of it only because I find myself not confused, but I feel like if I get this information that I'm passing on this information and I'm not completely convinced that it's accurate. And I experience this firsthand in, I think it was my show, which is also outside of Hanoi. Where I had read something about the ethnic tribes there, and when I got there, I was taught something completely different by the people that lived there..

Hanoi
"hanoi" Discussed on The Amateur Traveler Podcast

The Amateur Traveler Podcast

05:29 min | 6 months ago

"hanoi" Discussed on The Amateur Traveler Podcast

"Carefully away from with my cookbook was using making a historical book because there's a lot of misinformation out there and a lot of truths that are no longer truths. So there's a lot of debate, but yes, they all take independence days from the U.S.. Every generation. That's what they celebrate. If you ask them to Google it, it doesn't matter. That's their belief and their sticking with it regardless of if they find out it's otherwise. The date we're talking about is the date they were independent from France. Yeah. Okay. Interesting. The only person, not people. The only person who did not believe this was a Vietnamese friend who was schooled in France. And he understands what's happened, and he gets it. But that's not how the country works. The country is taught to believe it's in the schools. And it's independence from the U.S.. I, when lockdowns started, Chris, when lockdown started, I could not leave the country. And no one could come in. So I paused the business. But I started teaching. And unbeknownst to myself, I ended up with this platform to obtain information. I couldn't have been luckier. You would think I would be able to describe things better like the prison. Obviously information. But I get to ask questions. I have at least 50 students at a time. So in a week, I'll have a ver a thousand students. I have a question. I have this platform of thousands of students in front of me. They're my sounding board for any discrepancies about why or when or where anything happened. But they really helped me understand better. About the country versus things that I understood through reading or hearing. But Independence Day is one of them. Independence is one of them. But yes, back to the prison, the prison, again, there are certain sites that people want to see and spend time in that kind of changes their schedule. But the prison is one of them. I typically don't include in the tour. You want can Lake, which is a Lake in the old quarter. But I think that is something that during free time. It's a place that should be explored, and that has the red bridge and another pagoda. I think those are just great places to go, and they're not tourists heavy. They are crowded, but they're crowded with locals. So you get to see what locals do for fun. Where they go. And I get the impression you're kind of wrapping a pan away and you're ready to take us out on some of those side trips, you are mentioning. Side trips, you said using Hanoi as a base, and we were gonna go into other places. That was your take away from me to keep talking. Yes, yes. So after the respiratory the next day is up to sapa for sapa the only way to get there is to drive..

France U.S. Google Chris Hanoi
"hanoi" Discussed on The Amateur Traveler Podcast

The Amateur Traveler Podcast

05:32 min | 6 months ago

"hanoi" Discussed on The Amateur Traveler Podcast

"We can do breakfast lunch or dinner with that. The next day, we go into the half day tour Vespa tour familiar. Okay. Sometimes their motorbikes. Okay. Sometimes they're best buds. Now, I laugh because I've seen Vietnamese traffic. Oh, yeah, bro especially. I heard she men's horrible. I sound like anti Ho Chi Minh. I loved man, I really did. The traffic there is even worse. I leave my neighborhood and it is 8 lanes each way. It's all motorbikes has three motorbikes per lane. So do the math. Some of them are 12 lanes. So I go from 8 lanes each direction to 12 lanes each direction and that's just not a highway. It's just so just regular road. Near me. Yes, the traffic is crazy. The alternative is the Jeep tour. Which is also a lot of fun. But it's just sad. It's a tour of Hanoi and seeing the different sites where they are. And a tour while you're driving around. And what are the most sea sites that we're going to see in our tour? Definitely the Ho Chi Minh mausoleum. If things are open, if the sites are open, whether it's a temple of literature or mausoleum, if people want to see it, then we again focus on that and spend more time on less places and going into these places. But most of the tour allows for night to be open and or to shift things around. So we start with the food tour and the sites of Hanoi so that you can start thinking if there's something that you would want to see more of. And that's why I'm trying to see if I can get you to name the site so I'll know more of what to choose when I get there. So you mentioned the most Liam. I mentioned them as Liam, definitely pagodas and temples. I mentioned the temple of literature. Any, we also go into tejo. Which is we have all day can take you around everywhere in Hanoi in a half day. Tejo is where the expats live, but it's also one of the nicer areas on the water. I'm not sure if you're trying to remember if you've been there. No, no, I'm sorry. I was trying to figure out temple of literature. I was still couldn't get past what a temple of literature might be. It's not what I thought it was. I can tell you that. It is just that. It's a temple and it's a base around the old literature literally in Hanoi. It's like an old school almost. And where they house some of the old literature and they did do and I think they still do some education there..

Hanoi Ho Chi Minh Ho Chi Minh mausoleum Liam
"hanoi" Discussed on The Amateur Traveler Podcast

The Amateur Traveler Podcast

05:21 min | 6 months ago

"hanoi" Discussed on The Amateur Traveler Podcast

"Now I have a business here, but I had left New York one day on a birthday trip. And eventually, I just never went back. It was really the long, long story, as I kept traveling. And with no plans and when I got to Vietnam, I decided to stay here. And since then, like I said, I opened up a business. I live here. It's my home now. Excellent. Moving from New York to New Jersey. Yeah, I moved from New York City now. That's New York from New Jersey is so done. It's been there. Excellent. Why should someone come to Vietnam? It is so amazing. It's gorgeous. I knew within 15 minutes of being in Hanoi. That this was a place I wanted to be. So if I can tell within 15 minutes what this place has to offer, I can tell you right now that this definitely has a place for you to visit. It's one of the few places that is so culturally rich and beautiful at the same time. The takeaway, the culture and the things you can learn from it, I think, are beyond words. Which is going to be a problem with a podcast, but it is. It is because I was going to draw a picture for you, but I'll scrap that plan. It really is. I still have a tough time after almost four years of putting into words how great it is here. It's one of those experiences. But you can tell when you get here. It's just culturally rich, but I think in color and the food. And the natural landscapes are amazing. Excellent. Well, what kind of itinerary are you going to recommend for us? I recommend if you are starting with the lowest number of days that you could possibly spend would be 7 days in Vietnam. Okay. I'd encourage more. But not everyone has the same opportunity..

New York Vietnam New Jersey Hanoi New York City
"hanoi" Discussed on The Doug Collins Podcast

The Doug Collins Podcast

03:56 min | 8 months ago

"hanoi" Discussed on The Doug Collins Podcast

"All kinds of crazy things. Wow. Now were you a part of any of the, I know that at one point they had the videos that the North Vietnamese tried to do is propaganda kind of stuff. Was that ever a part that you had to go through? Not that I'm aware of, and they never came that I recall it, but I have a story to tell this to you interesting. When I got shut down, shrapnel hit my helmet. And I was bleeding like a stuck pig and all the blood coming out of the head with Vic gas on top of my head down into my face and down into my flight suit. So I look like I might be a dome that's pretty soon. I would look pretty bad. And I immediately said, I'm going to play this for everything it's worth to try and convince the North Vietnamese. I can't see. I started that the day I hit the ground. And they took me in to this torture chamber program. And I was tortured multiple times, they weren't, they were asking me questions, but they finally got around to deciding that we need to get everybody to write a biography. And so they asked me to write a biography one day, and I said, this was after I'd been through all that torture session. I said, no, I'm not all right about. So they took me to the doors for chamber. That was the way they did everybody. If you didn't do what they said, and then you went to the torture team. And so they put me in a room, they put two bricks on the ground. They told me to put my knees on the Brexit. This was difficult for a lot of us. And then hold our arms straight up. And they stood there in this little teeny room with a door in the front of the room, and I forgot that there was a wind in the back of the room, which caused me some grief later. And they said, okay, now you must stay there to your right biography. Well, I was there 5 days and 5 nights. And I said, okay, I'll write your biography. You know what all of us did when we went to a second line of resistance. We were doing things like one of my buddies. He wrote, when they asked him to write his biography, he says, I have a pet electric duck. I winded up and it flies around my room and goes quack, quite quiet. That was his virus. And they thought that was great. And so what I did instead is I took my left hand, which I'm pretending I can't see. And I scribble something you would never be able to figure it out. And I put things like D, E, L, a, a, B, I just put random letters on a page, and they thought that was great. So they took off from that demo. Now, here's an interesting part. One day, the interrogator goes to my room. He opens up to Pete polls and says, you're right, biography. I said, yeah, wrote a good one. He shuts the people and leaves comes back two days later and said, you sure you right biography? I said, you can lose my biography. Well, he comes back a third time. He says, tonight, we take you to hospital. If you lie, you'll be some barely treated. And they put me in a Jeep, it took me to the Hanoi hospital. Second floor, they've got a room with a desk at one end and a chair for me and a for the interrogator. And then at the other end, they have a technician and he opens up a drape and there's the eye chart. The E is about the size of a small car. It's so big. And he takes his Porter, which looks like a pool cue. He's pointing at the key, and then the interrogator says to me, he says, okay, and now you must tell us what is the letter and I did this. I stood up on my feet and I started turning it around on a slow circle scene. Where is it? Where is the letter? And he is about to have a pet. And so I played that for all I was worth, and finally they got frustrated, took me and threw me back in my ring. Two years go by..

Vic Hanoi hospital Pete Porter
How You Can 'Make Every Day a Good Day by Controlling Your Mind'

The Doug Collins Podcast

01:48 min | 8 months ago

How You Can 'Make Every Day a Good Day by Controlling Your Mind'

Dr. Jim Petersen on the Importance of Communication

The Doug Collins Podcast

01:51 min | 8 months ago

Dr. Jim Petersen on the Importance of Communication

"Gym. I want to switch back to you for just saying, and looking at these life lessons, what he just talked about about communication. And I've looked at over some of the ways you've titled these chapters. And that is finally what you're thankful for, adopting by, you standing shoulder to throw to those who came before you. You know, hoping for the best preparing for the worst. Patience. Those were all communication skills that when you met Barry, when he came back and you were teaching. His communication actually connects us to each other, isn't it? Yeah, sure, it does. The way that we become friends, the way we become lifelong friends is Barry and I have. Become we both were in financial services together, and Barry developed a way of communicating the clients better ways as to. Better ways to communicate why people needed financial plans. And I was director of training at that time. So we worked together to provide these to the other financial advisers that we work with. Very actually was our top producer for four years. While he was financial adviser, one of the reasons was because of the experiences that he had. Those experiences cost him to think about why financial independence was important and he could communicate it in a way and protection what's important. He could communicate in a way that none of the rest of us could communicate

Barry
"hanoi" Discussed on The Doug Collins Podcast

The Doug Collins Podcast

05:59 min | 8 months ago

"hanoi" Discussed on The Doug Collins Podcast

"Well, let's start off jam almost start off with you on the riding of the book. You ride in the book about why you started it, but you chose it to be a biography, but also a lifeless and explain that a little bit. Well, you know, Malcolm gladwell wrote a book called outliers. And he talks about people who do extraordinary things. So started out, I've observed very known very over 30 years now. And I've observed him in the things that he does, I knew a story, but I didn't know it all that well. And once I learned his story, I told him, one day I met a writer biography in that process. I opened up the discussion of this biography saying that berry's been an inspiration in my life. I've learned so much and so a publicist said, it's a life lesson book. So we put out 17 life lessons that I've learned from Barry's life. And he's had a tremendous impact on my life. So I thought, and as we're finding, as people read the book, that's really what is been very beneficial to them to sort of reflect on their lives. As we go forward, spin issue to me, I am married, this is something that really starts off with your story. I do have a question for you for those and it'll come after this, but of course, as we've said before, Vietnam also POW Hanoi Hilton, I have a question and you mentioned in here by John McCain. I saw later in the book. Did you also know Sam Johnson? I did indeed. Now I didn't claim up there, but I knew him when I came home. I take that 5. I did, I lived with him at the same dang home room. You have to remember, play your chest with it. Yes. Sam, good man. Hey, Sam, what are you talking about people who make a difference in your life? Sam and Jim, a lot of the way you put that Sam was that for me when I was in Congress. And the one thing I remember and Barry phone I've read in your book, the book so far and what we're gonna get in this is I watched Sam come to the foreign car, especially they got older and you could see the marks of what y'all went through. Okay, you can see it in his hands. You can see the band in his hands. You can see it. But the one thing that he always walked on the floor of that house, no matter where he was no matter how he felt, he always had a pleasant spirit about him. And I see that in this book, I say this in the writing. Just in general, there's a conception about the POW in the treatments you had. What made it that you could come out of that in a way, besides these life lessons, if you just sort of look at you, Sam Johnson, John McCain. There's many others of you that have survived and thrived. What do you think might be the difference? What we value about living about being. That's what made the difference. I've talked a lot about things. Because in the prison camps of North Vietnam, Sam and I were witnesses to the powerful and the pervasive impact that traditional American values had on my fellow POWs not only to engage, but to survive. The pressure cooker environment of the Hanoi Hilton. I could not believe the quality of individuals that I was bumping into, Tapping on walls, never seeing their face the whole time I was there. And realizing what incredible human beings, I was blessed to go through those night of terror with. It is amazing. Sam actually, I had tonight, I got to spend a night with him and others and him just talking about some of his experiences and he talked about and developing that tap system. And he talked about it in terms of and this is something Barry I want for you to communicate to the maybe to the younger podcast listener who's listening to this and they have only a memory of Vietnam if something way in the past and like for others of us. But Sam made a statement to me one time and he said that the Tapping that he and others came up with was so important because it connected each of you to each other in a way. Explain that for those of us who pick up a phone or make calls, why is it that those Tapping was so important? Tapping in communicating with what's absolutely critical in order for us to survive as a group. Couldn't survive by yourself. You needed help. And we had plenty of it because we had shared values. I was, I was a beneficiary of that communication system, and we worked very hard to amplify, and we did eventually amplify what a public wish buddy of mine. In fact, my roommate came up with what he called the POW taft code. And POW hand code. And if you took the deaf mute code and tried to figure out to make letters with your hands so that you had big letters. For example, an a, we could hold up one finger. That's an a you can see that with good eyes and we had great eyes up to about a hundred yards away. And so this is a beat. It looks like the letter B so anyway, using his hand code, it revolutionized our communication capabilities and made life not only bearable, but survivable. We had to communicate.

Sam Sam Johnson Barry John McCain Malcolm gladwell Hanoi Hilton Vietnam berry POW North Vietnam Jim Congress
"hanoi" Discussed on The Doug Collins Podcast

The Doug Collins Podcast

02:11 min | 8 months ago

"hanoi" Discussed on The Doug Collins Podcast

"A book's been written called the spirit to soar. And it's about the true story of former orphan and POW lieutenant colonel Barry bridger, U.S. Air Force, retired, colonel brazier, I am also a lieutenant colonel in the United States Air Force as well. Finished it got 20 years and so we'll see if I make it that way. Then you got Jim, Peterson. Jim is with us, and he is on that other blue, a little bit darker below the navy side, which I actually started in. But I spent more of my time with the green guys down at camp Pendleton when I was there as a chaplain, but folks, guys, it's good to have you all with us. This has been an exciting I got to look over the book. And let me just tell you, Jim for riding it, but Barry for sir for you and what you've been through. Thank you both for service and I'm looking forward to some discussion here. So am I let it rip? Here we are too. I love it. Well, let's start off jam almost start off with you on the riding of the book. You ride in the book about why you started it, but you chose it to be a biography, but also a lifeless and explain that a little bit. Well, you know, Malcolm gladwell wrote a book called outliers. And he talks about people who do extraordinary things. So started out, I've observed very known very over 30 years now. And I've observed him in the things that he does, I knew a story, but I didn't know it all that well. And once I learned his story, I told him, one day I met a writer biography in that process. I opened up the discussion of this biography saying that berry's been an inspiration in my life. I've learned so much and so a publicist said, it's a life lesson book. So we put out 17 life lessons that I've learned from Barry's life. And he's had a tremendous impact on my life.

Sam Sam Johnson Barry John McCain Malcolm gladwell Hanoi Hilton Vietnam berry POW North Vietnam Jim Congress
The Spirit to Soar: Lt Col Barry Bridger's Story of Hope

The Doug Collins Podcast

02:11 min | 8 months ago

The Spirit to Soar: Lt Col Barry Bridger's Story of Hope

"A book's been written called the spirit to soar. And it's about the true story of former orphan and POW lieutenant colonel Barry bridger, U.S. Air Force, retired, colonel brazier, I am also a lieutenant colonel in the United States Air Force as well. Finished it got 20 years and so we'll see if I make it that way. Then you got Jim, Peterson. Jim is with us, and he is on that other blue, a little bit darker below the navy side, which I actually started in. But I spent more of my time with the green guys down at camp Pendleton when I was there as a chaplain, but folks, guys, it's good to have you all with us. This has been an exciting I got to look over the book. And let me just tell you, Jim for riding it, but Barry for sir for you and what you've been through. Thank you both for service and I'm looking forward to some discussion here. So am I let it rip? Here we are too. I love it. Well, let's start off jam almost start off with you on the riding of the book. You ride in the book about why you started it, but you chose it to be a biography, but also a lifeless and explain that a little bit. Well, you know, Malcolm gladwell wrote a book called outliers. And he talks about people who do extraordinary things. So started out, I've observed very known very over 30 years now. And I've observed him in the things that he does, I knew a story, but I didn't know it all that well. And once I learned his story, I told him, one day I met a writer biography in that process. I opened up the discussion of this biography saying that berry's been an inspiration in my life. I've learned so much and so a publicist said, it's a life lesson book. So we put out 17 life lessons that I've learned from Barry's life. And he's had a tremendous impact on my life.

Colonel Barry Bridger Colonel Brazier JIM U.S. Air Force United States Air Force POW Camp Pendleton Peterson Navy Barry Malcolm Gladwell Berry
"hanoi" Discussed on Everything Everywhere Daily

Everything Everywhere Daily

02:15 min | 1 year ago

"hanoi" Discussed on Everything Everywhere Daily

"An estimated twenty thousand children were falsely diagnosed as mentally ill in the province of quebec so they could claim more money when the transcontinental railroad is built congress paid the railroad companies per mile of track laid the union pacific railroad would then put in unnecessary benzion curves on the track just so it would be longer so they would make more money in two thousand and two in afghanistan. The british military offered afghan farmers. Seven hundred dollars per acre. Poppy which they destroyed. This resulted in an explosion of planting poppies so farmers could claim their award. Ibm used to have a program in place where they paid programmers for each line of code that they wrote the end result was bloated software. That had far more lines of code than was ever necessary. A paleontologist working in indonesia put out a bounty on every of hominids skull that someone brought in what people did was take fully intact skulls and break them so they had more fragments to turn in farm. Subsidies are often given only for certain commodities. And they're given without limit this results in massive overproduction of particular crops which are then used inefficiently. Because there's such a large surplus several years ago the. Us meant a lot of people to buy one dollar coins online with a credit card because they were a government agency. they didn't have to pay for postage. So if you purchased one hundred dollars for the coins it only cost you one hundred dollars. People would buy tens of thousands of dollars of one dollar coins with credit cards bank. The frequent flyer miles or cashback rewards and then immediately deposit the coins in a bank to pay off their credit cards. Perhaps one of the best reason examples was in the uk where they wanted more people to take cova tests so they offered five hundred pounds to anyone who tested positive for cova people on twitter immediately pointed out that this was an incentive for people to get covert so they could spend the money they got a playstation and then spend the next two weeks playing it because they were in quarantine and this is just scratching the surface of the number of cases of perverse incentives. As for paul. Dome air the governor of indochina give actually returned home to france and became the president of france in nineteen thirty-one hanoi actually did suffer an outbreak of bubonic plague in one thousand nine hundred six which most probably was.

benzion quebec afghanistan congress Ibm indonesia cova Us uk twitter indochina france paul hanoi bubonic plague
"hanoi" Discussed on Everything Everywhere Daily

Everything Everywhere Daily

04:57 min | 1 year ago

"hanoi" Discussed on Everything Everywhere Daily

"The stage for what happened in hanoi in one. Thousand nine hundred to you. I need to know that at the time vietnam along with what is modern day. Laos and cambodia were all part of the french colony of indochina. A failed former. Finance minister of france called paul. Do mayor was assigned to be the governor of indochina in one thousand nine hundred ninety seven. His goal has governor was to bring french civilization and infrastructure to the region in particular he wanted to bring this infrastructure to the parts of the colony where french people lived in one thousand nine hundred. The capital of french indochina was moved from saigon to hanoi the area where the french colonial administrators lived in. Hanoi looked like it could have been in minus the climate. The french neighborhoods had european houses. Wide tree-lined european boulevards and other european amenities. The one thing they lacked was flush toilets flush toilets would help improve sanitation and bring modern luxury to the french people of hanoi to this effort. They installed fourteen kilometers or nine miles of modern sewer pipes in the french section of the city. These pipes hooked up all the french homes and allow them to have modern flush toilets running water polo mayor and other french administrators. Were pretty proud of themselves and consider the creation of the sewer system a great accomplishment and it was for a while as it turned out. The sewer pipes that were installed. Where a perfect breeding ground for rats. The pipes are cool dark and provided protection from any potential predators it also served as a superhighway to all the french homes which were hooked up to the new sewer system just as an aside. Rats breed extremely rapidly a single breeding pair of rats. If left unchecked and given sufficient food can produce half a billion rats in just three years. The french population in hanoi freaked out with all the rats coming out of the sewers rats were known to transmit disease so the french in hanoi demanded that something be done about the problem. The french solution to the problem was simple. They would hire rat hunters that would go into the sewers and start killing rats..

indochina hanoi Laos cambodia vietnam saigon Hanoi france paul
"hanoi" Discussed on AP News

AP News

02:29 min | 1 year ago

"hanoi" Discussed on AP News

"Of Hanoi's 5.7 million adults who received least one shot with authorities aiming for 100%. By the end of this week. However, the country's overall vaccination rate still remains low at about 28% and only 4% have been fully vaccinated with both jobs hence the major drive on now, With more than a million vaccine shots given over the weekend, more than half of the country's 98 million population remain under lock. Down. I'm Charles de la Decima. Geico presents motorcycle word of the day. Today's word is tank slapper is a tank slapper used to describe a handlebar wobble. Or is it a motorcycle joke? That is so funny? You just have to slap the gas tank with your hand as you laugh as it Oh, man. Darryl told me a great joke last night. It was hilarious. It was something about a dog wearing sunglasses. I wish I could remember it was a real tank slapper. Geico Motorcycle 15 minutes could save you 15%, or more leader convicted in 2000 and 17 bombing at a mosque in Minnesota. Faces sentencing today, the leader of an Illinois anti government militia group who authorities say was the mastermind behind the 2017 bombing of a mosque in Bloomington, Minnesota, Emily Claire Harry. He was previously known as Michael Harry, and recently said she is transgender faces a mandatory minimum of 30 years in prison for the attack on the Dar El Farouk Islamic Center. Several worshippers were gathered at the center to pray when a pipe bomb was thrown through the window of an imam's office. Co defendants said that Harry led the group and came up with the plan to attack the mosque motivated by Hatred for Muslims cited in a manifesto known as the White Rabbit Handbook. Harry's attorney Shannon Elkins, is asking U. S District Judge Donovan Frank for no more than the minimum 30 year sentence and says the gender dysphoria and misinformation fueled hearings inner conflict that led to the bombing. Prosecutors are seeking a life sentence well, no one was physically hurt in the attack. Prosecutors say the bomb was an act of terror. I'm Jennifer King. Pope Francis has opened his first full day in Slovakia by meeting with the country's president ahead of an encounter with the Jewish community to honor its Holocaust dead and atone for Catholic complicity in World War two era racial laws and crimes. That's where Francis arrives at the Cathedral of Saint Martin, looking well and rested on the second day of his four day pilgrimage to Hungary and Slovakia.

Jennifer King Hungary 15% Francis 100% Michael Harry Shannon Elkins Geico Slovakia Harry Minnesota 15 minutes Darryl Emily Claire Harry Cathedral of Saint Martin Hanoi Pope Francis White Rabbit Handbook Bloomington, Minnesota Charles de la Decima
Vietnam Speeds up Hanoi Vaccine Drive; 1M Jabs Over Weekend

AP News Radio

00:42 sec | 1 year ago

Vietnam Speeds up Hanoi Vaccine Drive; 1M Jabs Over Weekend

"Vietnams is speeding up its vaccination program in an effort to loosen coronavirus looked down restrictions in major cities by the end of the month about eighty percent of handle is five point seven million adults who received at least one shot with authorities aiming for one hundred percent by the end of this week however the country's overrule vaccination rate still remains low that's about twenty eight percent a ninety four percent the mean fully vaccinated with both jobs hence the major drive all now with more than a million vaccine shots given over the weekend more than half of the country's ninety eight million population remain on the lockdown I'm Charles the last month

Charles
‘Cussing Cheerleader’ Wins in Supreme Court Free-Speech Case

Bloomberg Law

00:26 sec | 1 year ago

‘Cussing Cheerleader’ Wins in Supreme Court Free-Speech Case

"For a former cheerleader in a closely watched free speech case. Michael Kastner reports high school student was suspended by her school over foul mouth Social Media Post. It was made off campus during the weekend. The court ruled The Post did not warrant a suspension. 81 ruling appears to be a narrow decision and not a broader statement about free speech. The case came from a Hanoi city, Pennsylvania, about 100 miles outside of Philadelphia. I'm Michael

Michael Kastner Social Media Post The Post Hanoi City Pennsylvania Philadelphia Michael
Party down: Vietnams Communist leaders meet

The Economist: The Intelligence

06:25 min | 1 year ago

Party down: Vietnams Communist leaders meet

"Once every five years with much pomp and pageantry the bombs communist leadership convenes in a national party congress thirteenth. One again in the capital hanoi. This week the expectation is that there will be a raft of stamp policies and new party leaders john despite the country's relatively low kobe numbers and positive economic performance. The party's position outside. The national conference center is weaker than it seems at the national party congress. They discuss issues confronting vietnam. They set policy and they elect the central committee. Politburo and the four top jobs. Charlie mccann is our southeast asia correspondent among them the most powerful job in the country. That is the party. Secretary-general and what's the overall tone at the congress. This time around pretty self. Congratulatory parties had a good year. They've handled the pandemic pretty well. Had just over fifteen hundred cases and fewer than fifty deaths and the economy actually grew by three percent but there's still a lot of disquiet and the party and indeed in the public disquiet in the party in the form of some kind of opposition. There's no organized opposition. Nobody's going to supplant the communist party anytime soon and ever since the nineteen eighties. When the country embarked on the transition from a century planned economy to market one the party has state its legitimacy on rising incomes on his ability to increase prosperity. And it's done that over. Four decades vietnam has transformed from one of the poorest countries in the world to middle income manufacturing powerhouse. But if you look beyond. Those headline figures are causes for concern. The economy has been growing at about seven percent. The last several years and the economy needs to reach that level of growth to keep the labor market. It's not clear that it can do so however at the same time as you have this depressed. Economic growth inequality is rising and social mobility is declining. okay that's about formal opposition parties but you mentioned disquiet among the public as well. What's happening. They're vietnamese can't express their discontent through politics. Because opposition parties are banned but informal criticism is growing. There are a lot of vietnamese. Social media users about sixty five million out of a total population of one hundred million according to our social british firm as level of education has improved in the country and more and more people have access to the internet. they've been exposed to values that are antithetical to the communist paradise that the regime is trying to build these values like democracy and human rights and they can express views on social media and so it's that disquiet than in the public that's causing the disquiet in the party. I mean how is the house. The party dealt with that space for criticism harshly. They have cracked down over the past five years. They've arrested two hundred eighty people for quote anti-state activities up from sixty eight in the previous five year period instructed the serum press to scrub phrases like civil society and human rights from their pages and in the months leading up to the national congress. This crackdown has intensified earlier. This month day sentenced three freelance journalists famous for criticizing the government to between eleven and fifteen years in prison. It's a lot easier to shoot off an angry tweet or facebook post than it is to organize in vietnam where protest is technically illegal but actually there have been a lot of protests in real life over the last several years so in two thousand eighteen for instance tens of thousands of vietnamese took to the streets. Because they're angry about a proposed law that they were worried would allow chinese companies to lease special economic zones for a ninety nine years as a lot of anti chinese sentiment in vietnam. Because there's a lot of concern that chinese infringing on their offering sovereignty and the protests so violent angry there were clashes between the police and protesters. The government eventually abandoned this law so a good pandemic response and the economic growth. That comes with that somewhat offset by this discontent. What else is on party leaders minds. Ironically trade is going to be a worry as well and i say -ironically because trade is a is a massive driver of economic growth. It is through trade. That vietnam has been able to transform itself into manufacturing powerhouse and yet at the same time it gives its export markets leverage over the government. So for instance in order to get the eu to agree to free trade deal last year. Vietnam had to agree to abolish forced labor and allow the creation of independent labor unions which was a massive concession but surely concerns such as that aren't limited to the you know means the party officials have to think very carefully about their relations with both china its biggest trade partner and the us biggest export market. The trump administration came down really hard on vietnam labeled it. A currency manipulator late last year and trump has described vietnam quote. Almost a single worst abuser of everybody for that reason. So the party will be very keen to rebuild the relationship with the biden administration. But at the same time i can't be seen to cozy up too closely to the us for fear of offending china. With whom it has an incredibly important relationship you know. Shares ideology shares along land border and they have an important trade relationship you know. China is largest source of materials and equipment for vietnam manufacturing industry so that it's a tricky balancing act required of party officials to get that relationship right so whoever emerges from the congress secretary general. There won't be much time for celebrating. He's gonna have a lengthy to do list.

Vietnam National Conference Center Congress Charlie Mccann Politburo National Party Central Committee Hanoi Asia John National Congress Facebook Biden Administration China EU Donald Trump United States
Is Optimism a Luxury Good?

No Stupid Questions

06:08 min | 2 years ago

Is Optimism a Luxury Good?

"Angela. I'd like to ask you a question today. Sent in by listener named ben all right and this is about something that i feel. We've discussed on the show at least once or twice which is the power of optimism. I think it's safe to say that. You and i are both all things considered optimistic people. Yes so in a way benz question is a challenge to that which i like he writes. How do you square the benefits of with the harsh realities. That might make any reasonable person. A pessimist so look. I think this is a great question. A couple of levels. I think we should appeal it by first asking about the supposed benefits of optimism as ben puts it. Wasn't you first house. What litter tries to say about that. So optimism can be defined in different ways but the way that is often defined is the tendency to look for in a way biased by information. That things are going to get better and that you can make them better and the benefits are enormous. And i wanna say ubiquitous just in the sense that when you think about all the possible life outcomes like doing well at work making more money living longer having more friends being happier. These are all koretz of optimism. So first of all. I have to say your claim about. The benefits of optimism sounds really enthusiastic. Like optimistically enthusiastic. Tuesday sounds like you say. They are enormous and ubiquitous. But when i look into the literature which you know much better than i. Here's one paper. I see optimism is associated with exceptional longevity in two epidemiologic cohorts of men and women. So that sounds good. But then i read a little bit of it. It makes the claim that optimistic people have reduced risk for cardiovascular disease mortality compared with their less optimistic peers but to me this sounds like potentially classic example of correlation without causality. It could be that the same behaviors that result in or drive optimism. Also result in dr healthy behaviors. It could be that healthier. People have more reason to be optimistic. Because they're healthy. Yeah the causal arrow could go the other way like. Wow your life is great. No wonder you're an optimist so persuade me some of those correlates for some of the outcomes of optimism. Get into the causal. Okay and let me also say even that when i say enormous i mean you can't take back enormous. You said it. I might need to take back. Are you gonna take back ubiquitous to now. I'm going to go with ubiquitous. Let's leave that one but you know. Listeners should know that nothing predicts anything with truly norm or enormous food. Life is complicated right so relatively speaking these effects are really impressive. But i don't want to exaggerate too much there. Okay so first. Let me just say you're right. Correlation is not causation. Can you say that again. Look you have a point. I'm going to back down from that too. It's quite obvious that the causal aero could go the opposite way. You're having a great life therefore you're optimistic. It's also possible that some third variable like being rich or something drives it. But here's some evidence to suggest that the causal arrow is also from optimism to outcomes one example. Is that when you look at the relationship to an optimism and health outcomes one reason that we think that this is really optimists doing something differently. Is that when you actually measure. How physically active. They use to be what they eat whether they smoke. It turns out that optimist tend to engage in healthy behaviors. So optimism can drive behaviors that have better health outcomes. That's still correlation evidence by the way it's just that it's a little more of a satisfying story. It is satisfying and one can imagine the mechanism by which that's true. One can say. If i feel like the activity that i do is going to have a real result like feel optimistic about my leverage their then i'm probably more likely to do as opposed to. I can do this all day long. It's not gonna help. Yeah like my life is terrible and it's not gonna change. I'll stay in bed and smoke the cigarette. Let's flip it for a second and talk about what the listener ben wrote in about the harsh realities of life. That would make any reasonable person a pessimist. This calls to mind a famous. Ish story called the stockdale paradox. You familiar with this. Just vaguely admiral. James stockdale when he was in captivity in vietnam. I think in the famous hanoi hilton which was not a hotel by the way it was prison. That the american prisoners called the hanoi hilton. He was years later. Asked what he had learned from that experience about dealing with helplessness and torture and imprisonment. He said i can tell you who didn't survive. It was the optimists and his argument. Was that the optimist. Felt like oh. We're going to be out by christmas. And then chris would come and go and you were now and as he put it they died of a broken heart which i think is probably not exactly what happened. False hope right. And that's where. i think. This question is really interesting for all of us. Because i think these are natural tendency to reach for optimism but there should be a natural cautionary vibe against letting your optimism become delusion. I don't know the story very well. And certainly never interviewed stockdale. But i don't know that optimism. Like i know by christmas. Everyone's going to be vaccinated kind of optimism. I don't know that that's truly at the core of these findings. I think the best kind of optimism. Is you know what. There's gotta be something that i can do here. It's just that of all the things you could pay attention to. Should you pay attention to the things you can't control or should he try to pay attention to things that you can. So couple your optimism with agency. You're saying yeah in fact if you want to say that. Optimism of the a gigantic flavor is the optimism that angela duckworth really likes. That's the phrase was reaching for optimism of the genetic flavor. Yes i thought so.

BEN Cardiovascular Disease Mortali Benz Angela James Stockdale Hanoi Hilton Vietnam Stockdale Chris Angela Duckworth
The Power of Goodness |

Buddhist Society of Western Australia

06:52 min | 2 years ago

The Power of Goodness |

"Lost friday when i gave a talk here to the talk was finished. People left tie went to the airports. Go to thailand and just came back this afternoon. I sound which my trips between these friday night talks but the trip over to thailand was as part of the waste sack sermonise ways is one day of the year in my the full moon nights of my which happens to be tonight in the sky. You see the full moon and his mocks birth enlightenment. Final passing away voters a huge so many throughout the world and being popular mankind. Get invited and have to go to many places to celebrate many ways. Sex and part of the seventies was a huge seventy in bangkok. Every last year was in a hanoi. This year in bangkok united nations-sponsored way sack ceremony. An one so. I was over there representing australia. And it was very inspiring to not just have ceremonies with many of the most senior and powerful monks and scholars announce but also to have the opportunity to use his great buddhist teaching to solve some of the bigger problems of the world. So we talked about how we can use what is not just to help a human being achieved more peace in their life no interest in the individual and avoid sometimes saying the put us image just about the individual how you can really happier more peaceful more free but also to make use of these put his teachings in the international arena so we did talk about things like the global economic crisis. And those of you who think that these conferences now have no effect her soon as we finished our three day conference the share market rose throughout the world love. The evidence is out there. We're told about the political crisis in the world and look the last few days. Thailand has been peaceful again so maybe we should take responsibility for these things but one thing which we did discuss which is going to be. The topic of this talk tonight is not only in the individual theater. What also in the national theaters of our world. How much we underestimate the power of goodness. It's not hard power. It's not soft power. It's how of ethics and virtue and goodness which has a huge effect on this planet. Everybody keeps on say the reason for the current economic crisis which is about to hear is because of our conference. Of course. The reason why is about to heal. Africa is because the problem was because of access greed. Not looking at the proper things in life. I mean how much money to people need to be happy and well you want to know how much money a person needs to be really happy. Go look at me or the monk sitting next to me. We've got absolutely nothing and we're very happy. It's a great symbol like among all none of what is what is non one of the most important parts of them one. We've few possessions. We rely that competence. People have all sorts of stuff. You know all sorts of gifts prime minister of thailand. Deputy prime minister this great person network. They've they've only source of gifts. But what you do some mark when you receive all these things you say thank you very much and give it to somebody else so i never any of that stuff home with me because my home in my heart is peaceful and free. I don't want clot it up and say way that when you get a gift what a wonderful thing it is somebody gives you a gift very kind of you. Love happiness when they give you something. So what do you do next. You give it to someone else and they get a lot of happiness and they give it to someone else. Please don't store possessions this. Pass it around like passing the paso and eventually working to somebody who really needs an appreciate it. Then they can keep here. What a wonderful thing. It is not to keep things but to be part of a static but it's this process is dynamic active giving and receiving enjoying the gifts and enjoy the process of giving an a passing it to someone else impossible to someone else in passing it to someone else so one gift keeps going round and round and round making many many people happy and eventually and it's happened to me and the gift i gave someone they say we've got a president for you are temper this a gift like if someone else about three weeks ago this happened see as the law of power walk out cubs literally but we all know that that sort of agreed thing is this you get a gift you wanna keep it you have money you think it's yours you have a house you don't share it what things for any way they are for sharing for enjoying not just by yourself. It's not very nice enjoying things by yourself. in fact it's almost impossible to enjoy it by yourself for sharing it. It's a wonderful thing to you. Get much more happiness that way as they say in business you get far more bang for your bucks when you share your box. So you'll know that greed is a why are people so just greedy and why are people just like in politics. We also talked about the political problems in the world. Why people angry. What was the point of getting anxious. Somebody does that help at all

Thailand Bangkok Hanoi United Nations Australia Africa United States
John Bolton's Damning Indictment of Trump

Viewpoints

05:43 min | 2 years ago

John Bolton's Damning Indictment of Trump

"Police reform two Supreme Court rulings to Juneteenth many of the week's biggest stories involved the president of the United States we're starting off with a new book by his former national security adviser John Bolton who did not testify in the impeachment proceedings but who broke his silence this week with his new book coming out next week the room where it happened is his account of working under president Donald Trump in it Bolton warns of the president being taken advantage of by foreign adversaries I think Putin thinks he can plan like a fiddle I think Putin is smart tough I think he sees that he's not faced with a serious adversary here I don't think he's worried about Donald Trump he claims the president's only focus was winning again in twenty twenty I think he was so focused on the reelection that longer term considerations fell by the wayside describing his presidency in terms of obstruction of justice as a way of life John Bolton said Donald Trump simply isn't up to the job the president may well be a superb deal maker when it comes to Manhattan real estate dealing with arms limitation treaties on strategic weapons dealing in many many other international security issues are things far removed from his life experience Fulton disputes the book contains classified information but top Intel officials warn it could cause grave damage to national security both gave his first interview to ABC chief foreign correspondent Martha Raddatz it's airing at nine o'clock Sunday night this week I talked to Martha about her interview the significance of Bolton's accounts and what it all might mean for the country this book there is so much in it for everything from president trump is a radical irrational foolish stunningly uninformed was there any one thing that stood out in this beside some of those comments the book is just briefly job drop paying page after page and the interview is as well John Bolton says this is just a book of facts what happened during his seventeen months in the White House I think it's so important to remember he is the highest ranking official who's written such a comprehensive book like this while a president is still in office he told us he concluded from all that he saw that the president isn't fit for the office of president I don't think he has the confidence to carry out the job there really isn't any guiding principle that I was able to discern other than what's good for Donald trump's re election was very firm about that and that is an extraordinary statement for someone to make about a sitting president yeah I'm structure of justice as a way of life expelled on them he talks a lot about what happened during the Ukraine back and forth John Bolton of course as you remember did not testify during the impeachment hearings and he's been heavily criticized for that but he says he thinks that the hearing should have been expanded they should have looked at other things that the president has done with foreign leaders if he does not say that they are are impeachable but he says it's possible their peach bowl and he's talking about relationships with with China with other foreign leaders with Turkey and he says some of these foreign leaders cannot wait to get in a room alone with president trump without aids without Bolton so they could make a better deal for themselves what does that mean as somebody who has covered global affairs for such a long time as you have looking forward for even just the next few months of this presidency or possibly the next four years if the president is reelected all when it comes to foreign policy in American security one of the things the president said is that parts of this book are classified and that they could harm national security and when you ask John Bolton about that I mean he clearly says a lot about what was said inside the rooms with these foreign leaders because John Bolton was there trump says he's a liar but whatever those stories are out there and I said look doesn't that harm national security that John Bolton is writing about foreign leaders and he said look it's not anything those foreign leaders don't know I think what John Bolton says about the president not being prepared for these meetings those are alarming statements I am I'm sick of my own preparation for that was that for the Singapore summit in the Hanoi summit and and you really want to read up on those things and you know John Bolton saying the president did not and wasn't prepared for them but foreign policy in the country Bolton will say it's been harmed if there is another four years it could be harmed further according to Bolton what's the overall reason for this book do you think I can only tell you what John Bolton says and he said he wanted to get just the facts out of what he saw that he thought they were important to get out that he thought it was important for people to hear what the president said and John Bolton clearly is concerned about the presidency and about the future I think that is why he wrote this book it is almost six hundred pages all I can say is that John Bolton insists he did not write this to settle scores he says he wrote it to let the American people know what goes on in the White House with president trump

President Trump United States Supreme Court
North Korea says it sees little reason to maintain ties to Trump

Hugh Hewitt

00:53 sec | 2 years ago

North Korea says it sees little reason to maintain ties to Trump

"North Korea says there is nothing to gain from pursuing closer ties with the US and north Korean foreign minister saying American policies proved the US remains a long term threat the BBC's Laura bicker isn't sold the first summit between a sitting U. S. president and the north Korean leader was supposed to be a turning point but very little was agreed a second summit in Hanoi eight months later field after Washington asked Pyongyang to give up a large proportion of its weapons program before receiving sanctions relief the statement by the song one accused the trump administration of using these summits to score political points he claimed the White House made empty promises and said that North Korea would never again for Washington to deal with that it's getting anything in return Mr ri also said that Pyongyang would continue to build weapons to combat the threat from the US and that is the BBC's Laura

North Korea United States BBC Laura Bicker President Trump Hanoi Washington Pyongyang White House Mr Ri
Samsung starts building $220 million R&D center in Vietnam

Murph and Mac

00:28 sec | 2 years ago

Samsung starts building $220 million R&D center in Vietnam

"South Korea's Samsung started building a two hundred twenty million dollar research development center in Vietnam the Vietnamese government said Monday that business insider dot com reports a ground breaking ceremony was canceled Saturday due to travel restrictions on south Koreans construction of the centre in Hanoi will be completed the end of twenty twenty two and the central point twenty two hundred to three thousand people Samsung is the single largest foreign investor in Vietnam with investments totaling seventeen

South Korea Samsung Vietnam Vietnamese Government Hanoi Koreans
German state minister: Shooter had xenophobic motive, his mother is dead

Morning Drive with Casey and Elliot

00:29 sec | 3 years ago

German state minister: Shooter had xenophobic motive, his mother is dead

"The date at least nine people killed in a shooting rampage targeting to who caught by us in the city of Hanoi named Frank said the state interior minister souls visit given so they're saying authorities suspect as xenophobic motive German media reports the suspects left a confession letter featuring extreme right wing views the forty three year old German man believed to be the attack it was later found dead at his home along with the body of his mother Turkey says at least some of those killed were

Frank Turkey
US declares Coronavirus a public health emergency

RMWorld Travel Connection with Robert & Mary Carey and Rudy Maxa

06:30 min | 3 years ago

US declares Coronavirus a public health emergency

"But so far two hundred and fifty nine people are have died from this virus there's nearly twelve thousand cases worldwide seven confirmed here in the USA late yesterday president trump declared a public health emergency foreign nationals from China or those who have visited China within the past two weeks will now be banned from entering the US and U. S. citizens who've been there during that time will not be quarantined for up to fourteen days upon their return so like to know what are you seeing out there regarding the corona virus that it maybe has you most concerned and our listeners around the country should be aware of well concern is just fifty increasing numbers the latest ones for this hour twelve thousand and twenty four the vast majority literally ninety nine percent are in mainland China so the things that the Chinese government is doing to quarantine people and keep it in in that country seem to be fairly successful this time some courage about that however the numbers go up every single day okay so doctor Spengler as you know every virus has its own unique characteristics and and certain precautions that come with that what do you recommend for those who are listening whether they're traveling abroad meeting obviously to China but just in general are kind of precautions and scenarios the things we should be doing all along because there's viruses that this hi but other types throughout the world all over the place so we should be washing our hands we should be carrying a small bottle of the alcohol based hand sanitizer we should be waiting offer tray tables on the plane we should be wiping the phone we get into our hotel room so things like that just routine think that we should be doing every single day to prevent the flu will also work against the coronavirus we believe that being said remember we've known about this virus for about a month now and you had a great deal of research on it and we know what it is there's a test for it but still no vaccine end up here doctor I ready back so here I am in actually in Hanoi in north we have northern part of Vietnam today and that's about seventy percent of the people walking around town have face masks on Morse and I wonder I understand that that one of the dangers of this particular strain of the supply of viruses that you don't know you have it for four or five days yet you can pass it on what her symptoms are travelers like I am should be looking for sure that's the the newest thing I suggest this week that there are people who have been exposed to people who are a symptomatic later they become in a sense because maybe come symptomatic and then what it turns out the the work contagious we got our first really contagious when you had a fever when your coffee what have you but now it turns out probably earlier than that again it's kind of like the regular old clue so what we want for would be fever cough congestion it's basically flu symptoms if the first cousin of gold who ate beef which we see every year worldwide which killed literally hundreds of thousands of people every year and should be taking the exact same precautions insane watch full yeah that person over here so the room is coughing let's be careful okay so we see airlines canceling flights tour operators making changes cruise ships refocusing some trips and as you said ninety nine percent of the corona virus outbreaks are in China so besides the new rules that the president instituted this week is there anything else that you'd like to see being done to limit the spread or do you think there you know we're doing a good job globally overall so I think globally to CDC and the who World Health Organization are doing a very good job and they did very complimentary of the Chinese government what they've been doing it can literally impossible to quarantine sixty million people we all know that but they put the education out there to their public and they allow the world to know the sequence of the virus has the world for their help it's back to be very present another who's been very very complimentary do has it in you made a public health emergency of international concern declaration again this is more of a political and money type thing that medical in that it says yes this is something that could become a pandemic throughout the world and could be very devastating we need to all work together not to say which China's problem don't worry about it we all need to work together the richer countries the poor countries to assist each other well that's a good point that you make you know and certainly there is a balance between public safety and the economics out there because travel is such an important part of the world economies and we all understand I think at this point that China is the epicenter for the coronavirus outbreak but are there other areas of the world but you're also watching maybe with some concern for greater outbreak well we now know that the Chinese love to travel I need a huge portion of the economic does come to China has been focused on travel people leading China with that coming out and disappearing that's me very problematic certainly the local areas the the Hong Kong the the Taipei's what have you are certainly worrisome but again very few cases there so where I would be concerned would be if this comes to a country that does not have the infrastructure and the medical where with all to combat it into isolated so not necessarily United States or Canada let's talk about Africa South America someplace like that aren't really last question first and again we appreciate you joining us today we are talking to doctor William Spangler he is the global medical he leads to global medical team for a I G. travel if someone feel they've contracted the corona virus in or perhaps maybe they have been exposed to someone who has her there are only as I just said seven confirmed cases here in the United States at this point so it really is something that we want to just be clear about but what do you suggest would be the next step of the fall sure remember only one of those was person to person so if you haven't been to China or being around someone who's been to China in the past two weeks not to worry and certainly season I working her to form to see the day in Salt multiple cases of flu so you need to make sure that when you go to the position that you plan to see that you tell them back from her third call before and say Hey I have been to China I've not been to China and that would make a difference there is a test it takes a few days as you go to the C. seeing that Lana so it does take awhile but we also know the a plain old clue are playing all cold and that certainly has to be done first okay wearing a facemask fast no there should be people that are symptomatic or sick there we go okay okay well

USA