3 Burst results for "Hannah Lamma"

"hannah lamma" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

04:04 min | 1 year ago

"hannah lamma" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Reporting on the threat of Russian interference to the election, emphasized the threat from China downplay the threat from white supremacists but highlight the threat of Antifa and other leftist groups. That is what a Department of Homeland Security officials says he was told to do in a whistleblower complaint. NPR National security correspondent Hannah Allam is here to talk about the latest claims of political pressure at the D. H s and the implications. Dana. Thanks for being here. Hi there, So I lied. I laid out the the broad strokes of this whistleblower complaint. But can you fill in the details for us? Sure. Until last month, Brian Murphy led the intelligence branch of th S, and he was reassigned after revelations that the office was compiling reports on protesters and journalists. But now, Murphy says the real reason he lost his job is for speaking up about what he portrays is White House attempts to manipulate intelligence to match President Trump's statements. And, as you said he makes claims about Russia an election meddling, but I'm focusing on parts of the complaint, where he describes specific attempts to influence intelligence on domestic terrorism threats. Murphy says his boss is the top th s officials told him in no uncertain terms on several occasions to play down the threat of white supremacists and to play up the thread of Antifa and other militant leftist and he says he was told to do this so that the DEA just intelligence assessments would match what Trump says publicly. And publicly the president frequently and erroneously, we should say it portrays Antifa as an equal or even greater threat than the exponentially deadlier. Extreme, right. This is something I've discussed with Seth Jones at the Center for Strategic and International Studies. He's got a long background in counterterrorism work, and he and other analysts say the White House assertions of widespread violence from the left are baseless. Those comments or general not coming from the experts within the administration, who Are at the National Counterterrorism Center at the FBI Counterterrorism division. They're coming from politicians, so it's not a reflection of the data, The far left simply does not present the same threat. That the far right dozen capabilities in plots and attacks Orin fatalities, none of those Nevertheless, this is what Brian Murphy says he was pressured to do to elevate the threat of the far left. How does he describe this? This pressure campaign. Well in the complaint, he talks about being asked by the top leaders to soften language and report on white supremacy to make it quote less severe, And at the same time, he says, he was being asked to add more information. On the far left. He mentions Antifa anarchists, in particular, the White House's dismissed these allegations are false and defamatory that call Murphy a disgruntled employee. But he's not the first to raise these concerns. We've heard former senior D H s officials saying this that the far right wasn't taken seriously. We've heard it from researchers who work closely with the government on policy making. And I mean we hear it ourselves in the market the different ways. The president speaks about attacks where the perpetrator's a right wing ideologue versus, say, a leftist or a Muslim. What does take this one up A notch in terms of revelations is that this is an insider alleging that political appointees attempted to manipulate actual intelligence and this is not a press release. This was an assessment of domestic threats to the nation. So Murphy is asking the department's inspector general to investigate what he calls abuses of authority. So how how did all of that affect the white supremacist movement? Extremism analyst generally say the far right especially, you know, white nationalist supremacists had been emboldened under Trump. And so this is one more account, saying the administration looked the other way as violent actors got more organized, more violent, better funded. And now we're starting to see some of those groups show up to protest, intimidate and launch attacks that many fear will lead to an escalation before and after the November election. NPR national security correspondent Hannah Lamma. Thank you so much for your reporting. Hannah, we appreciate it.

Beth Fertig Joanna Ka NPR European Union Europe Athens New York
Homeland Security whistleblower: Team Trump distorted intelligence, downplayed Russian threats

Morning Edition

04:04 min | 1 year ago

Homeland Security whistleblower: Team Trump distorted intelligence, downplayed Russian threats

"Reporting on the threat of Russian interference to the election, emphasized the threat from China downplay the threat from white supremacists but highlight the threat of Antifa and other leftist groups. That is what a Department of Homeland Security officials says he was told to do in a whistleblower complaint. NPR National security correspondent Hannah Allam is here to talk about the latest claims of political pressure at the D. H s and the implications. Dana. Thanks for being here. Hi there, So I lied. I laid out the the broad strokes of this whistleblower complaint. But can you fill in the details for us? Sure. Until last month, Brian Murphy led the intelligence branch of th S, and he was reassigned after revelations that the office was compiling reports on protesters and journalists. But now, Murphy says the real reason he lost his job is for speaking up about what he portrays is White House attempts to manipulate intelligence to match President Trump's statements. And, as you said he makes claims about Russia an election meddling, but I'm focusing on parts of the complaint, where he describes specific attempts to influence intelligence on domestic terrorism threats. Murphy says his boss is the top th s officials told him in no uncertain terms on several occasions to play down the threat of white supremacists and to play up the thread of Antifa and other militant leftist and he says he was told to do this so that the DEA just intelligence assessments would match what Trump says publicly. And publicly the president frequently and erroneously, we should say it portrays Antifa as an equal or even greater threat than the exponentially deadlier. Extreme, right. This is something I've discussed with Seth Jones at the Center for Strategic and International Studies. He's got a long background in counterterrorism work, and he and other analysts say the White House assertions of widespread violence from the left are baseless. Those comments or general not coming from the experts within the administration, who Are at the National Counterterrorism Center at the FBI Counterterrorism division. They're coming from politicians, so it's not a reflection of the data, The far left simply does not present the same threat. That the far right dozen capabilities in plots and attacks Orin fatalities, none of those Nevertheless, this is what Brian Murphy says he was pressured to do to elevate the threat of the far left. How does he describe this? This pressure campaign. Well in the complaint, he talks about being asked by the top leaders to soften language and report on white supremacy to make it quote less severe, And at the same time, he says, he was being asked to add more information. On the far left. He mentions Antifa anarchists, in particular, the White House's dismissed these allegations are false and defamatory that call Murphy a disgruntled employee. But he's not the first to raise these concerns. We've heard former senior D H s officials saying this that the far right wasn't taken seriously. We've heard it from researchers who work closely with the government on policy making. And I mean we hear it ourselves in the market the different ways. The president speaks about attacks where the perpetrator's a right wing ideologue versus, say, a leftist or a Muslim. What does take this one up A notch in terms of revelations is that this is an insider alleging that political appointees attempted to manipulate actual intelligence and this is not a press release. This was an assessment of domestic threats to the nation. So Murphy is asking the department's inspector general to investigate what he calls abuses of authority. So how how did all of that affect the white supremacist movement? Extremism analyst generally say the far right especially, you know, white nationalist supremacists had been emboldened under Trump. And so this is one more account, saying the administration looked the other way as violent actors got more organized, more violent, better funded. And now we're starting to see some of those groups show up to protest, intimidate and launch attacks that many fear will lead to an escalation before and after the November election. NPR national security correspondent Hannah Lamma. Thank you so much for your reporting. Hannah, we appreciate it.

Brian Murphy Antifa White House President Trump Donald Trump Center For Strategic And Inter Hannah Allam National Counterterrorism Cent Department Of Homeland Securit Seth Jones Dana Hannah NPR China Hannah Lamma D. H DEA
"hannah lamma" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

06:06 min | 1 year ago

"hannah lamma" Discussed on KQED Radio

"He's got a long background in counterterrorism work, and he and other analysts say the White House assertions of widespread violence from the left are baseless. Those comments or general not coming from the experts within the administration, who Are at the National Counterterrorism Center at the FBI Counterterrorism division. They're coming from politicians, so it's not a reflection of the data, The far left simply does not present the same threat. That the far right dozen capabilities in plots and attacks Orin fatalities, none of those Nevertheless, this is what Brian Murphy says he was pressured to do to elevate the threat of the far left. How does he describe this? This pressure campaign. Well in the complaint, he talks about being asked by the top leaders to soften language and report on white supremacy to make it quote less severe, And at the same time, he says, he was being asked to add more information. On the far left. He mentions Antifa anarchists, in particular, the White House's dismissed these allegations are false and defamatory that call Murphy a disgruntled employee. But he's not the first to raise these concerns. We've heard former senior D H s officials saying this that the far right wasn't taken seriously. We've heard it from researchers who work closely with the government on policy making. And I mean we hear it ourselves in the market the different ways. The president speaks about attacks where the perpetrator's a right wing ideologue versus, say, a leftist or a Muslim. What does take this one up A notch in terms of revelations is that this is an insider alleging that political appointees attempted to manipulate actual intelligence and this is not a press release. This was an assessment of domestic threats to the nation. So Murphy is asking the department's inspector general to investigate what he calls abuses of authority. So how how did all of that affect the white supremacist movement? Extremism analyst generally say the far right especially, you know, white nationalist supremacists had been emboldened under Trump. And so this is one more account, saying the administration looked the other way as violent actors got more organized, more violent, better funded. And now we're starting to see some of those groups show up to protest, intimidate and launch attacks that many fear will lead to an escalation before and after the November election. NPR national security correspondent Hannah Lamma. Thank you so much for your reporting. Hannah, we appreciate it. Thank you. Along with so much of American life. The pandemic stopped ordinary court proceedings. Now states and cities have resumed operations hearing new cases, plus the backlog of old ones. Beth Fertig of our member station W. N. Y. C watched a New York City court trying to safely do business. Brooklyn's busy housing court had just started here in cases again when the federal government announced a moratorium on evictions. Judges were back in courtrooms. This is the quietest try alive ever had. Judge Sheila Capell took a break from her first trial since March because Brooklyn's notoriously cramped housing court wasn't fit to reopen in a pandemic trials were moved to the criminal court building a few blocks away with much bigger courtrooms. And safety features. Desks were being wiped. While we talked, the bench witnessed and on the court attorney area and other desks in the courtroom. All have fucks to glass around them. And are more than 6 ft. Apart from each other, like everyone else here, Capell was wearing a mask. There was just one trial that day. One sister wanted to evict the other from a building they used to own together. Attorney Dominick Napolitano raised concerns with compel that his client couldn't sit next to him. But she can't be sitting here with the people. From what I understand The judge had suggestions, right Exchange them another they will do it for the trial proceeded with lots of know taking. Despite safety precautions in the housing and criminal courts. There isn't a lot of business being conducted in person each day. Grand Juries, air hearing evidence and making indictments and some felony cases are being called in for procedural hearings, but there are still no jury trials. Arraignments are still virtual and so are most other cases, but that requires having the right technology access to a computer access to a smartphone. Many of my clients don't have regular access to the Internet. Brooklyn Legal Services lawyer Alex Dremel says That's an obstacle to virtual trials in a lot of courts, even though she says her clients need this option. They're mostly people of color who were disproportionately affected by the Corona virus and afraid to take mass transit attorneys also worry about the potential for witness coaching an online trials when you can't see if anyone else may be present. Housing court trials are expected to slow down now that the CDC has made it much harder to evict tenants affected by the Corona virus, but with other cases ramping up Paula Hannaford, a goer of the National Center for State Courts, says virtual hearings are the on ly way for courts to move forward in a pandemic. She says. Some courts are letting those without the right technology use computers at libraries and community centers to bridge the digital divide. In New York City, public defenders and court officers have complained about poor ventilation in the courts and insufficient protections. But the sisters who sat on opposing sides for their trial in Brooklyn Lucy weighed, and Evelyn Collier agreed. They felt safe. I thought when I walked in, and it was gonna be a room full of people, then I would have been concerned you don't have to worry about 25 of the people standing by to do our waiting to get in the New York court system knows thes in person proceedings can on ly.

Brian Murphy Brooklyn Sheila Capell New York City National Counterterrorism Cent attorney National Center for State Cour Hannah Lamma White House FBI NPR Dominick Napolitano CDC federal government Brooklyn Legal Services Beth Fertig president