35 Burst results for "Hannah Jones"

Were All of the Founding Fathers Slave Owners?

The Charlie Kirk Show

02:21 min | Last month

Were All of the Founding Fathers Slave Owners?

"Charlie, my friends all say the founding fathers were slave owners. What do you have to say about that? That is what John says from Pennsylvania. So I've done a, let's say a fair amount of public commentary on this. And I have to thank the great hillsdale college for this, honestly. So look, I went down into the hillsdale online courses, Charlie for hillsdale dot com. You should all check it out. That's Charlie F war hillsdale dot com. And I did the work. A couple years ago, I'd kind of just trip over my words whenever the issue of founding fathers and slavery came up. And I probably had a response that some of you gave like, oh yeah, but we abolished it and that was then and now this was then and this is now. That's not even a proper answer. Because it's not true. The founders all knew what they were doing was wrong. They wrote openly about it. So that doesn't make them hypocrites, it makes them sinners. As the great doctor Larry arn would say. 9 out of 13 a colonies had already abolished slavery by the time the constitution was ratified. The first antislavery convention was hosted in Philadelphia in 1775 by Benjamin Franklin. Thomas Jefferson admonished king George for bringing the Senate slavery into America. In the original draft of the Declaration of Independence. The northwest ordinance, article 6, said that no slaves should be in the new territories. But Nicole Hannah Jones insists that America's true founding was not in 1776 but 1619. Now who is Nicole Hannah Jones? She is the con artist that runs The New York Times 1619 project that your kid is probably learning from right now. Let's play cut one 53. 1619 in August of 1619 is when the first group of 20 to 30 Africans were sold into the Virginia colony. And what the project is basically arguing is that that is actually a foundational to the American story as the year 1776 because nothing would be left untouched by that decision to engage in the institutional slavery. So for those of you listening on podcasts, looks as if she has Elmo on her head. I don't quite understand. That someone went crazy with a dry erase marker. She's this massive orange head of hair. That is very bright. The sunglasses watching that clip.

Charlie Hillsdale Nicole Hannah Jones Hillsdale College Larry Arn Pennsylvania Benjamin Franklin John King George Thomas Jefferson America Philadelphia Senate The New York Times Virginia
Why the Declaration of Independence Is SO Important

The Charlie Kirk Show

02:01 min | Last month

Why the Declaration of Independence Is SO Important

"Emma is from New Mexico Charlie loves seeing that Steve smiled in church. Thank you so much. I'm in high school and my friends think America's racist and awful. They're happy to have the time off for July 4th from their summer jobs and from their sports, but they tell me that America is an awful place and we need to turn it over, have a revolution. Can you please help me explain to my Friends why the Declaration of Independence is so important and what exactly happened that day. It's a great question. Emma from New Mexico. And I love speaking at Steve's mother man's church. So let's read it. July 4th, 1776. Now it took three days to actually finish the document. It's really July 2nd that we should be celebrating Independence Day. But they dated it July 4th for a reason. Now, we must understand the time in the circumstances before. The declaration was signed. That this was a bubbling up of many years of the British Empire that needed to pay off war debt. They need to be able to finance their country to raise taxes. And their colonies in India were totally ravaged by, let's just say imperialistic hubris. Went back to Britain, they need to try to finance to kind of basically bridge the revenue short gap. No one in on the aisle wanted to actually pay taxes. They said, let's go tax those colonists. Now remember, before the 1750s or 1760s came around, the first Europeans to come to America and the first Americans came right near 1620. Now, Nicole Hannah Jones makes a big deal out of this, we'll play some tape from Nicole Hannah Jones, the wannabe historian, who does nothing but basically is a, let's say, historical arsonist. To what is true and what is accurate in American history. Of course, there were the first colonies on the eastern seaboard, Jamestown being one of them, then of course the Mayflower got blown off course. That is the creation of the Mayflower compact, which then of course created the first experiment in self government in the new world. For over a 150 years,

Emma New Mexico America Steve Nicole Hannah Jones Charlie Britain India Jamestown
What Is Charlie's Take on Juneteenth?

The Charlie Kirk Show

02:15 min | Last month

What Is Charlie's Take on Juneteenth?

"I saw that turning point USA is not having off as a federal holiday for Juneteenth. Why is that? What is your perspective on Juneteenth? So last year we came out pretty, let's just say publicly against the idea of making Juneteenth a federal holiday. And it's rather clever by the left, you have to admit, Juneteenth, as it is properly understood, of course, is something worthy of appreciation. It is the day the news of Emancipation reached Texas and that news started to spread. That is not at all what's going on here. Let's stop being naive. Let's stop looking at things as they tell them as they are and really what's going on here. What's really going on here is a BLM holiday to try to focus on alleged systemic racism to resurrect a propaganda campaign to try and focus on racial differences and to try and have a point of reference right before July 4th, by the way, intentionally summertime holiday. To have the worst people you could imagine, ibram X kendi being one of them. And Robin diangelo and Nicole Hannah Jones give them a day where they could become incredibly relevant to talk about, well, yeah, of course, Juneteenth was nice, but really we're more racist than ever. That's the exactly the wording they're going to use. It's like, oh yeah, whatever Juneteenth day that what's really going on is Juneteenth is the show that look at systemic racism and inequality and inequity. And some Republicans will say, oh, no, no, you know, Juneteenth is a conservative day because it's about the freeing of slaves. Of course, if we weren't talking about another political movement that wants us to try to have a federal holiday where they can corrupt the American flag done, Tempe Arizona, they took down all the American flags and put up BLM Juneteenth flags and then have an unnecessary unhelpful entire massive propaganda campaign that will be happening on TikTok on Twitter on Facebook on Instagram. All about how races are country is.

Ibram X Kendi Robin Diangelo Nicole Hannah Jones Emancipation BLM USA Texas Tempe Arizona Instagram Twitter Facebook
Eric Chats With Hegseth and Goodwin About Teaching Love of Country

The Eric Metaxas Show

02:11 min | Last month

Eric Chats With Hegseth and Goodwin About Teaching Love of Country

"One of the things that I think we just have to be clear in American public education before it went wrong in the 19th century, we would teach love of country, love of God, like these basic things, love of freedom. What is freedom? We really understood that there's just no pulling these things apart. And if we don't teach them, they go away in most of the world, they don't have this kind of stuff. So we had this pride in inculcating the generations with these ideas and celebrating them. And as we know, through the decades, this went away so that patriotism, it just kind of went out in elite circles. They were globalists were elitist. We don't believe in that rube stuff, you know, rah rah, America. And they demonize the concept of love of country, which I just find amazing, especially you served in the military. I mean, the idea that we would denigrate a healthy love of country as somehow jingoistic chest thumping, triumphalist. I mean, it's kind of amazing how deep those bad ideas got so that you have a lot of people in the country who they just kind of have gone along with that. Especially in the blue states. Yeah, we're self loathing at this point. America was to quote the disgraced former governor of New York, America was never great. That is the view of the left at this point. Can you imagine? With the history, but before it was Hannah Jones and the 1619 Project, it was Howard zinn, a people's history of the United States, which is the most prolific history textbook of the modern era. And if your high school doesn't have the book in the classroom, then the textbook that was written for your child's classroom was based on Howard zinn and people's history, which is American history written from the Soviet perspective. And then David Coleman and the folks at the college board rewrite the SAT to respond to the common core, which was based on Howard zinn. So now what your kids are learning, what they're tested on and they're entrance exams are based on a Marxist view of American history. No wonder we get kids that are pumped out saying, this America thing is terrible. We're teaching them that.

United States Howard Zinn Hannah Jones New York David Coleman
People Are Defecting From the Left in Record Numbers

The Charlie Kirk Show

02:06 min | 2 months ago

People Are Defecting From the Left in Record Numbers

"Then? The final phase is the desperation of the left realizing that they control, yes, the institutions, but they do not control the people, that the people are defecting from them in record numbers, that their games and their cutting of corners and their cheating will no longer be honored and them realizing that their ability to control us, their magical spell has faded. You see this as grassroots activists in candidates running for office, they just kind of shrug off attacks. This is happening right now in Arizona where Blake masters is being called a racist by the media and he's like, that's not what I said. I'm not a racist, and basically go take a hike. Other Republican candidates are trying to attack Blake masters here in Arizona by calling him a racist. And that is being super rejected by the conservative base. Where the conservative base is seeing other candidates attack Blake masters here in Arizona and they're like, no, actually don't act like a leftist. He's not a racist because he shared some Facebook article 12 years ago that had 25,000 words that you cherry pick one part of it and he didn't necessarily endorse it, like actually that's a scum like tactic. And it is. And so you're seeing this in every corner, you saw it when they tried to attack JD Vance. Like, oh, he's a racist. Nobody cared. Now let me be very clear. Conservatives actually have a radar for a legitimate racism. That's why we know Nicole Hannah Jones and Robin D'angelo and ibram X kendi and taha nishi coach. We know that they are racist. We know that. But we know that people on our side we referee racism and they don't. There's no place for it in the conservative movement. Doesn't exist. And yet on the other side, they're the ones that built entire political movements around it. And this kind of realization of how disingenuous dishonest and power hungry the left is has empowered us, but they are now going to respond with pure force.

Blake Arizona Jd Vance Nicole Hannah Jones Robin D'angelo Ibram X Kendi Taha Nishi Facebook
Charlie Confronts the Deconstructionist Doctrines Poisoning Politics

The Charlie Kirk Show

01:35 min | 2 months ago

Charlie Confronts the Deconstructionist Doctrines Poisoning Politics

"If you do not teach children that certain things are true, then where does it stop? You have a Supreme Court Justice that can not give you definitive answer of what is a man and a woman and guess what? That is the furthest right now and it will go even crazier. Extrapolation of deconstructionist ideology. At every turn tries to make you doubt question and tear apart things that we know are fundamental to existence that we know are essential to our survival. You see that in the whole transgender movement. You see that where all of a sudden we have the blurring of lines where Pennsylvania's own at University of Pennsylvania, the death of women's sports where you had the man who thinks he's a woman, all of a sudden be the 462nd best swimmer overnight transition to be a woman and win the NCAA championship. Why would that not be wrong? See, we as Christians have an answer. We have two answers. Number one, I want compassion for the person who thinks they're in the wrong body. I want treatment for that person and most importantly, I want their soul that we want for Christ. But secondly, that doesn't mean we have to all of a sudden rearrange the rules of the game to allow cheating. We as Christians believe cheating is wrong. Both things can be simultaneously true because we as Christians and most societies are not able to articulate this, but the Bible tells us when you have strength you are morally called, in fact, you are required to protect the not as strong.

Supreme Court University Of Pennsylvania Pennsylvania Ncaa
Why the Constitution Is the Greatest Political Document Created

The Charlie Kirk Show

01:07 min | 2 months ago

Why the Constitution Is the Greatest Political Document Created

Charlie Speaks at Dayspring Christian's 'Remember America' Series

The Charlie Kirk Show

02:03 min | 2 months ago

Charlie Speaks at Dayspring Christian's 'Remember America' Series

"And last week I was in boulder, Berkeley and Cal state Fullerton. So it's a lot different of a reaction. I know some of you are booing, totally understandable, right? You should boo Berkeley. It's a very dark place to give you an idea how dark Berkeley is. I had to bring a deliver in sky with me. Just in case. Victor marks, if you know who I'm talking about. But here's the amazing thing. And there's something so special happening in our country. When I visited Berkeley in boulder last week, we had a major problem. And it wasn't antifa. It wasn't all that nonsense. We couldn't find rooms big enough to fit all the students that wanted to come to our events. On campus. Very special. So I traveled 330 days last year all across the country. I'm doing three podcasts today, a couple hours of radio. And I'm in the education space, but a little different than day spring. I go to hostile territory and try to spread truth where there is none. And tonight, we get to celebrate and support a place that is full of truth and full of light for liberty. It's a little different, but the same thing, really, because we're trying to raise up a generation to understand what they've been given. We as human beings all have a lot in common. One of the things we all have in common is that we've all been born into a world we did not create. So we're born into a set of circumstances that are not our own. And boy, are we blessed to be born in the set of circumstances in the United States of America? And that statement alone is agreed upon by basically all of you. But it's now wildly controversial to say that in most schools today. In fact, it's four and it's a concept that most young people when I come and I talk about how America is the greatest nation ever to exist in the history of the world, how the constitution is the greatest political document ever written. They want to believe it because in the soul of a person is a yearning to want to actually love the place that you're from. But there's this disconnect between all the propaganda that they've been led to believe and first what they are all of a sudden hearing what they know to be true. And I think one of the reasons for that is actually

Berkeley Cal State Boulder Fullerton Victor United States Of America
"hannah jones" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

77WABC Radio

02:12 min | 3 months ago

"hannah jones" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

"While Hannah Jones did not author the tweet she alerted her follows to a threat in 2020 that alleged fireworks in New York were being used in an effort meant to quote unquote disorient and destabilize Black Lives Matter supporters The media is reporting this as though it's just black and brown kids blowing off steam But I don't believe that's the case The tweet sent by an unverified account identified as author Robert Jones My neighbors and I believe this is part of a coordinated attack on black and brown communities by government forces And attack meant to disorient and destabilize the Black Lives Matter movement Yes government forces using firecrackers She later deleted the tweet and apologized for spreading the unfounded rumor calling her actions and irresponsible use of her platform Europe is not a continent Ukraine alarm is a racist dog whistle Days after Russia invaded Ukraine Hannah Jones wrote a highly controversial statement They claimed Europe is not a continent by definition And concern over Ukraine's invasion is a dog whistle for racial bias What if I told you Europe is not a continent by definition But a geopolitical fiction to separate it from Asia and so the alarm about a European or civilized or first world nation being invaded is a dog whistle to tell us we should care because they're like us While she added that we should care about Ukraine regardless of racial bias several people on both political allows condemn the comments especially as Ukrainians continue to suffer from a Russian onslaught Despite this her tweets remained up with another tweet claiming she was unconcerned And this was fake outrage She's in that isn't she mistreated her She lives in her own perverse reality Well actually she's not the only one who lives there anymore The New York Times helped promote it And even more school districts are promoting this Pretty cool huh I'll be right back.

Hannah Jones Ukraine Robert Jones Europe New York Russia Asia The New York Times
Joe Biden Has a Young Person Problem

The Charlie Kirk Show

02:05 min | 3 months ago

Joe Biden Has a Young Person Problem

"Are repulsed by identity politics. And we should be. The politics of trying to put people in different categories based on their skin color is not something that we appreciate or something that we support. Now identity politics is rooted in the idea of trying to let's just say use a word that came in the 1990s, balkanize the American political, the American political landscape. However, there is one part of kind of segmenting of politics, if you will, or the country that I think is very helpful. And that is to look at things generationally. Instead of looking at things based on skin color, I think looking at political dynamics based on age is far more helpful. While I do believe there are differences between men and women, I do not believe there are differences between white people and black people. I don't. I do not believe in racial differences in people who do. We have words for them, racists like Nicole Hannah Jones, or like Robin D'angelo, or ibram X kendi. But I do believe that there's big differences in experiences and let's say things that people have to live through in generational dynamics. So typically, the younger the voter, the more Democrat and the more liberal they are. They tend to be more idealistic utopian, less rooted to the tragedy of life. And not all life is a tragedy, but life could be tough. The first Buddhist principle is life is suffering. I don't quite believe that to be perfectly honest. Life can be full of suffering, but it also can be beautiful and full of joy and love and prosperity. Generational dynamics for me are the most helpful and interesting to look at. And so when we look at Joe Biden's approval rating and we look at who actually is driving the decline of Joe Biden's approval, it's remarkable when we learn that it's younger voters in particular that disapprove of Joe Biden the most.

Nicole Hannah Jones Robin D'angelo Ibram X Kendi Joe Biden
What on the Left Has Grown Stronger in the Past 4 Months?

The Charlie Kirk Show

02:00 min | 3 months ago

What on the Left Has Grown Stronger in the Past 4 Months?

"I have a legitimate question what on the left has grown stronger in the last four months. Name one thing. The only thing I can name is the amount of illegals that have come into America, the potential population. However, Hispanics are turning conservative and record numbers. So even that it's a little bit blurry. What on the left has grown stronger in the last four months. Since the new year, Pfizer AstraZeneca Johnson & Johnson, they're on the ropes. Disney is down, CNN plus is gone, Twitter is about to be taken over and totally changed, which we know censorship is a fundamental need of this regime. If they're not able to censor they can't exist, they must be able to shut you up, the Democrat party has lower approval ratings than ever before, wire, what, who, what, where is stronger than they were four months ago? I'll tell you who is stronger though. Rogan is more popular than ever before. Tucker Carlson is more popular than ever before. Bill Maher's anti woke, tirades are stronger than ever before. Elon is richer, he might have his net worth as might have gone down by 20 or 30 billion because the stock prices, but Tesla was up 10% since last week, 10%. Our podcast is up amazingly. Our radio program is up. Our social media engagement is up. We can't find spaces big enough at turning point USA to be able to fit all the students that want to come to our events at Berkeley and boulder, meanwhile, I'm not really sure if people are flocking a big numbers, go hear critical race theory, Nicole Hannah Jones, maybe. I don't think so. If you kind of look at these fundamental indicators of where the society is going, Republicans are winning registration wars across the country and desantis wiped out all of the gerrymander gains that California New York tried to do. Desantis basically level the playing field. God bless that man.

Pfizer Astrazeneca Johnson & J America Democrat Party Tucker Carlson CNN Rogan Disney Bill Maher Elon Twitter Tesla Nicole Hannah Jones Berkeley Boulder Desantis California New York
Is Tipping an American Practice Stemming From the Slave Plantation?

The Dinesh D'Souza Podcast

02:40 min | 4 months ago

Is Tipping an American Practice Stemming From the Slave Plantation?

"While the latest kind of idiocy in this kind of, it all goes back to slavery contest is the concept of tipping. So think about your tip on Uber driver or you go to a restaurant and leave a tip. You check into a hotel and you tip the doorman. The argument is that's due to slavery. That's an American practice, by the way. You don't see it in other countries, at least not in the same degree. And moreover, if you go back, you find that that slave masters, it was after slavery, supposedly that this kind of tipping practice became widespread in the United States. At least this is the narrative according to Nicole Hannah Jones, and Nicole Hannah Jones makes outlandish statements that basically look like she's just come out of a vodka spree, but it turns out that no, she's picking it up from she reads the kind of far left rival literature and she picks up these kinds of claims and then gives them a sort of patina of respectability by sort of parading this in The New York Times and on her social media feed. So you as Nicole Hannah Jones tipping is the legacy of slavery and she goes, and if it's not optional, then it shouldn't be a tip, but just to include it in the bill. Have you ever stopped to think why we tip? Like why tipping is a practice in the U.S. and almost nowhere else. Now I've said before in the podcast, this is downright stupid. I've traveled pretty much all over the world tipping as universal and stepping in Africa. It's tipping in India. But the historian, the economic historian Philip Magnus, who's been on this podcast. Well, what Magnus has done is he's written a kind of thorough article on this tipping issue, and this is a guy who really knows how to dig. So he finds he finds out that Nicole Hannah Jones got her ridiculous claim about tipping from a kind of left wing activist named saru jama. This woman sounds suspiciously Indian and anyway, she's apparently some kind of a health activist, not really an academic of any kind. And she wrote an article which had a paragraph on tipping in all the other leftist sources of picking up her nonsense. In any event, what magnets really shows is that all of this nonsense about tipping tracing to the aftermath of slavery isn't really true. Tipping goes way back to the Middle Ages. In fact, it's so common that tipping is referred to more than once in Shakespeare's plays Magnus quotes an example from 12th night. He goes on to point out that you have European travelers who are writing, this is in the early 1700s. So obviously long before the end of slavery, either in England or in the United States, and they're talking about the common practice of tipping in inns and in taverns and in restaurants and

Nicole Hannah Jones Philip Magnus United States Saru Jama Magnus The New York Times Africa India Shakespeare England
Nikole Hannah-Jones Goes Off on Tipping as a 'Legacy of Slavery'

The Dinesh D'Souza Podcast

01:07 min | 4 months ago

Nikole Hannah-Jones Goes Off on Tipping as a 'Legacy of Slavery'

"I just saw something today on social media and I retweeted it. Nicole Hannah Jones and she goes tipping, dipping is a practice that goes back to slavery. And then she goes on to say, you know, have you ever wondered why tipping is only in America and nowhere else around the world that's because it goes back to the slave plantation. This is basically Nicole had a joke so I'm thinking this is one of the stupidest statements I've ever read. First of all, tipping is universal. I grew up in India, people tip in restaurants all the time. I've been all over Europe, tipping is very common in Europe. So first of all, the idea that tipping is only American is nonsense. Number two? What is Nicole Hannah Jones implying that slavery is a form of forced and unpaid labor? Is she saying that on the plantations it was normal practice for masters to tip their slaves? You know, hey Frank, great job. Excellent service in the field today. Here's 50 cents for your efforts. What? I think historians worldwide are waiting with bated breath for Nicola Hannah Jones to explain and she's not going to explain because that these are people who essentially say stupid things and expect never to be called on

Nicole Hannah Jones Europe Nicole America India Nicola Hannah Jones Frank
The US Senate Has Finally Done Something Meaningful!

The Charlie Kirk Show

01:41 min | 5 months ago

The US Senate Has Finally Done Something Meaningful!

"Meaningful. The U.S. Senate has finally done something I approve. This shouldn't have taken so long, but it's finally done. The United States Senate has passed the sunshine protection act by unanimous consent to make daylight savings times permanent. I'm not a fan of daylight savings time. Falling back, springing forward should just remain the same time throughout the entire year. In fact, we should spring forward even more. So that the fall, it's the opposite. I never understood that in the most depressing time of weather, we also made it darker intentionally. Who thought of this thing? Makes zero sense. Now, I know you're gonna say it's Benjamin Franklin. And all this, no way, he was too smart for this. I think it's a Nicole Hannah Jones conspiracy against Benjamin Franklin. There's no way. A 2015 study published in sleep medicine, researchers compared the rate of strokes during the week after daylight saving to the week two weeks after the tweaks before. They found the rate of 8% higher the first two weeks after the shift, and people with cancer were 25% more likely to have a stroke later than the other times of the year. People over 65 were 20% more likely. A 2019 report found a higher risk of heart attack after both time changes, but particularly during daylight savings times. Interruptions to circadian rhythm can also impair focus and judgment. A 2020 study found fatal traffic accidents increased by 6% in the United States during daylight savings time. This shouldn't have been taken so long, but it did, and the U.S. Senate has finally done something useful.

U.S. Senate Benjamin Franklin Nicole Hannah Jones United States Heart Attack Cancer
"hannah jones" Discussed on The Times: Daily news from the L.A. Times

The Times: Daily news from the L.A. Times

05:54 min | 7 months ago

"hannah jones" Discussed on The Times: Daily news from the L.A. Times

"Like several pages long with lots of in notes. And I don't back off of it at all. So if you had questions about it. And what it did was it allowed me to get my vengeance through research..

"hannah jones" Discussed on It's Been a Minute with Sam Sanders

It's Been a Minute with Sam Sanders

06:29 min | 7 months ago

"hannah jones" Discussed on It's Been a Minute with Sam Sanders

"Part three the country we have. History and its accurate telling is that the heart of what Nicole Hannah Jones is aiming for in 1619. It sparked an intense debate about what story we should be telling ourselves about this country. But the debate doesn't end there. Questions are often put to someone like Nicole Hannah Jones, who does the work of storytelling and observation. Questions like, what are we supposed to do with this history? How can pointing out the darkness of the past be productive? How are we supposed to feel about it and what's the point? According to Nicole, these questions miss the point. I don't know why it should matter whether it's pessimistic or optimistic. It is what it is. It's trying to make an argument about our society. And some people have, you know, a criticism of the project is that they do feel it's not hopeful enough. It's too pessimistic. I'm completely unconcerned with that. I don't think it's true. I don't think you can read to the end of my essay where I say black people have made astounding progress despite every obstacle and that we have a right to fly the flag and feel proud of the country that we helped build and think that that is a pessimistic essay. But I don't think that's a relevant question. This is the country that we have. And the last two essays in the project, one is by ibram Kennedy on progress, which gets to this notion that Americans, we need to just believe that we're always moving forward, even if the evidence is to the contrary and that that belief that we are better than we used to be and we're getting better in the future than alleviate us of the need to do something right now about all the inequality that we see. And then the final essays on justice. And it says, okay, we've taken you through this whole history. We've shown you all of the ways that the legacy of slavery has hurt black Americans has corrupted our society. And it says we have a choice. That if you know it's all been created, then you know that it can be undone. And we are not captive to the past. We can't do anything about it, but we don't have to be held captive to it. But we do have a choice to make. And to me, that's tremendously empowering, because we can decide whether we will be that country of our highest ideals. Black people did not until the end of the Civil War with the reconstruction amendments. Believe in the constitution. The constitution laid out no vision for us as citizens or us as free individuals. But they did believe in those opening words of the declaration. And the declaration, which is a Succession document, but the beginning, brass, as we hold these truths to be self evident, that all men are created equal endowed by the creator with an alienable rights of these are life liberty and the pursuit of happiness. Black people took those words and turned the declaration into a freedom document. And I think that is the work that black Americans have been doing since those words were written and what we are calling on is the rest of America to join in the struggle to perfect. Those really majestic words of our founding. You know, I wonder what you think is in the present, what is at stake in revising and reexamining the past and do you think that we as a country can move forward without a shared agreed upon narrative about the past? Why it matters to me. Is we have learned the history of a country that does not exist, and because we've learned a false history of a country that does not exist, we are unable to understand the country in which we live and to create the country of our highest ideals. So I don't know that there can ever be one single uncontested shared narrative. But I do think we are a nation that is exceptional in ways that we should not be proud of. We have an exceptional amount of income inequality. We are the only western industrialized nation that does not guarantee healthcare for its citizens. We are the only western industrialized nation that does not guarantee paid, leave when you have a child. We have the stingiest social safety net of all of the countries that we like to compare ourselves. We incarcerate more people than any country in the world. These are legacies of settler colonialism and these are legacies of African slavery. And until we are honest about that upon which we are built, we will never become the country that we believe ourselves to be. So I don't know if there is one collective unifying narrative about America. I think that the 1619 Project can be a unifying narrative, but only if you believe that black Americans can be heroes of the story and that black Americans are just as American and that a white American can see themselves in the struggle to make this a democracy in a land of equality, just the way we're expected to see ourselves in white founders. So can we get there? I don't know. I don't think that is the concern of a journalist is whether we can have a single unifying narrative. I think the concern of the journalist is to try to help us understand the society we live in and to get as close to the truth as possible. You know, one thing I'm thinking about here is kind of circling back to the beginning of our conversation is and I know this is like asking you to imagine things. How would you know, but what would have meant to you is the 16 year old version of yourself to know that that thing you discovered about 1619 would now be entering classrooms, right? So another 16 year old will.

Nicole Hannah Jones ibram Kennedy Nicole America
"hannah jones" Discussed on It's Been a Minute with Sam Sanders

It's Been a Minute with Sam Sanders

07:47 min | 7 months ago

"hannah jones" Discussed on It's Been a Minute with Sam Sanders

"The truth is, if you study history, there is not been. Very successful, long-term class based movements that have not been destroyed by race. And in the end, every example that they can give about class movements, those class movements always end because white people in the movement choose their whiteness over their class solidarity. This is what the slave codes that follow bacon's rebellion are about is saying we have to divide black and white people who are all struggling under a wide elite from each other. And we do that by creating in black people a distinct class that even the poorest white person can never fall below. So if you look at history simply on a class basis, you can give examples, very short lived examples of cross racial solidarity. And then you can show how each and every one of those movements is destroyed by racism. And further, if you remove the class element. So if you look at poor people who are black and white, black people are still worse off in every measure than people who are who are white and poor who have the same income. So how does one describe that? How does one explain the disparity in class within class without looking at race? So I think the project is open to all types of critique, and I would never pretend that the project is perfect in every way. But I don't think the fact that we didn't focus enough on class when classes racialized in this country is the right argument. The one thing I was going to ask about is the one of the central arguments that essay around the American Revolution and being in part, at least in part, or not largely about American college trying to preserve slavery, there came criticisms from a number of historians prominent historians about the veracity of that claim for the most part you've stuck to that argument. My question is, how did you choose to respond to that in the book and why did you choose to kind of stick with that point of view of that argument? So I'm going to push back a little bit on that framing. Sure. I would say fewer than a dozen historians have come out against that argument publicly. And I can't speak to the whole profession and how many people have not said anything. Well, that's fair. But it's a small number of historians and not even all of them are experts in the period of America revolution. We have more historians than that who wrote for the project. We have far more historians than that who agree with our framing of the American Revolution who have also written publicly about that. And yet they never get brought up and no one ever talks about all of the historians who publicly supported the facts that we argued in the framing about the American Revolution. Now, why did I stick with argument? If you've seen the book, then you see the copious amount of end notes from historians of the period of American Revolution that that argument relies upon. We tend to think about history as being settled, right? There's these facts, this happened on this date, and this is who did it. But history is, it is a field of consensus. And consensus does not mean that that's actually what occurred. And for a long time, historians didn't even deal with slavery in a revolution that was largely led by slaveholders. But you have for the last 40 years, have had historians who are really trying to excavate the role of slavery. And they have come up with scholarship that says that slavery played a prominent role, particularly for virginians, south carolinians, in joining the revolution. And is that scholarship that my project or that section on the American Revolution is based on. So why did I leave it in there? Because I think it's right. I think one of the things you just pointed out is the history isn't settled. And there's arguments made about history. People have perspectives. And one of the arguments that I've read you made is that look, for most of American history, it's been one kind of type of person who's been able to make that argument, right? White men, for the most part, historians, and that now, as a black woman living in a 21st century, making this argument, you're making a historical argument, right? Like that, you're making an argument. Like you said this is history is like a collection of historical arguments that finally people settled on and it's never settled. So it sounds to me like that's part of what this is about as well is that there's a historical argument being made. It's just as there has been in the past. Yes. I mean, this is history as toll from the bottom. So do we think that enslaved people were inanimate objects during the period of the American Revolution? That there were no different than the cattle. They were just kind of doing their work and not asserting themselves in the conflict, not understanding that there was the issue of slavery was at play here, right? Not actively engaging in what was happening. This is about focus. It's about if you're not interested in what they are doing, then you don't focus on it. But that's not objective history. In these wars within the profession, have been ongoing. If we think back, if you're a history nerd, to win a net Gordon Reed in her Pulitzer Prize winning book, asserts that Thomas Jefferson had a relationship with Sally hemmings and had children by her. That work was castigated. Scholars of Jefferson said there is no way that's false. Thomas Jefferson absolutely did not have children with Sally hemings and there is no proof that it happened. It is now the historical consensus, including even Monticello, that he did. I'm not arguing as a non professional historian that I could never get anything wrong because of course I could, because historians also get things wrong. What I am saying is I've said many, many times, is I did not sit down at my desk one day and say, let me make up something about slavery and the American Revolution that I wrote that because there was scholarship that backed it up that I thought was compelling and that I believed. You have this book coming out and it's much longer than the original project and I'm assuming that part of the motivation is also that you can fit more of the nuance maybe fit more of the things that ended up not making it into the original project into a longer book and that you can spend more time. I don't want to say responding to because that's assuming that you're responding in parts to some of the things that some of the criticism that came along. But definitely flushing out things that weren't able to be flushed out. In the original project, I mean, is that fair to say do you think that that is partly what the book is able to do that maybe the original project just didn't have the capacity to do as a magazine feature? Yes, absolutely. I mean, let me be clear, there was valid critique to be had on the project and where the critique was valid. We listened to it. And we consulted more experts. And we did more research. And with a book, yes, you can be much more nuanced. You can add much more detail. You can add end notes, so people can actually see the sourcing on the arguments that you're making. And as with anything, which happens with academic publications all the time, you publish something, you get the feedback on it. And then you revise it and you improve it, which is a very normal thing. It's just that 1619 project has become so politicized that people are like, oh, you revise, or you must have got it wrong in the first place. No, we just.

Sally hemings bacon Gordon Reed Thomas Jefferson America Pulitzer Prize Monticello Jefferson
"hannah jones" Discussed on It's Been a Minute with Sam Sanders

It's Been a Minute with Sam Sanders

03:48 min | 7 months ago

"hannah jones" Discussed on It's Been a Minute with Sam Sanders

"Rond Abdel Fattah and rob team are blue host that show. And recently, they talked with Nicole Hannah Jones. She's an investigative reporter at The New York Times and the creator of the 1619 Project. A lot of you may have heard about the 1619 Project by now. It's a collection of essays that reframes the origins of the U.S. by looking at the legacy of slavery and racism in this country. And how that impacted just about every aspect of the America we know now. It is also an award winning podcast and it was just turned into a book. On top of all of that, the 1619 Project has also become a lightning rod for the right. And it's been a big part of the recent debate over critical race theory. In this episode, Rand romp team and Nicole talk about why the 1619 Project became so political. Here's rondin Romney. The past is never passed. This phrase which is a remix of a passage by the famous American writer William Faulkner is basically the tagline for this show. But it isn't just a tagline. It's kind of like a guiding principle. Here on through line, we're constantly trying to understand the mechanics of history. It's limits. The way it oscillates between the light and shadows, darkness and hope. And ultimately, how the past and our interpretation of it has shaped the world we live in today. This task can be especially challenging when it comes to the history of the country we live in. The United States, the complex, murky, painful, and beautiful history of this country has always been ammunition for the political battles of the present. This is because the story we're told about the past shapes the way we view the world and our role in it. So history becomes something we're always updating and fighting over. Whose stories are being told? Whose are being left out? Who gets to decide what stories we teach our children? Who gets the final word on truth? There's a battle waging across this country over these questions. And there's one person who, for the last few years, has been at the center of it. My name is Nicole Hannah Jones. I'm a reporter at The New York Times and the creator of the 1619 Project. In 2019, Nicole Hannah Jones conceived and curated the 1619 Project, a collection of essays by scholars from different disciplines that reframes the origin story of the United States. It contends that the date 1619 should be at the center of our national history. It's the date the first people of African descent were forcibly brought to what would become the United States. And it says that the only way to fully appreciate the vast complexity of American history and identity is to understand the legacy of slavery and racism, experienced by black Americans and the powerful role black Americans have played in our democracy. We have a country that was founded on these ideas of individual liberty of inalienable God given rights, which is unique to the world to have a country actually founded on those ideas. And we were not unique in the world in not giving most people rights. We were unique in the world, though and saying that we were a country based on individual rights while depriving so many people of any rights. That to believe then that founding narrative requires a great deal of historical amnesia, we just can't think about those contradictions. We just can't think about those hypocrisies because if you do, then you have to upend the entire identity of.

Nicole Hannah Jones Rond Abdel Fattah United States rondin Romney The New York Times William Faulkner rob Nicole amnesia
Nikole Hannah-Jones: Parents Shouldn’t Decide What’s Being Taught in Schools

Mark Levin

01:24 min | 7 months ago

Nikole Hannah-Jones: Parents Shouldn’t Decide What’s Being Taught in Schools

"So Nicole Hannah Jones is on meat that the press on December 26th the day after Christmas On a Sunday What does she have to say To schmuck Todd Cut 17 go hat tip right part I don't really understand this idea that parents should decide what's being taught I'm not a professional educator I don't have a degree in social studies or science We send our children to school because we want them to be taught by people who have expertise and what we're talking about What should be taught The parents aren't saying I should sit there and teach them calculus Or advance physics The parents are saying I expect you to teach them math and have a proficiency in math I expect you to teach them English and have a proficiency in English maybe a second language I expect you to teach them literature and have some proficiency in literature I expect you to teach them real history and have some proficiency in history and so forth So you set a foundation perhaps they want to go to college perhaps they want to get a job out of high school whatever it is Don't fill their minds with crap with your radical Marxist racist segregationist

Nicole Hannah Jones Todd Cut
Nikole Hannah-Jones Says Americans Have 'An Obsession With Guns'

Mark Levin

01:42 min | 9 months ago

Nikole Hannah-Jones Says Americans Have 'An Obsession With Guns'

"The call Hannah Jones included Listen to this cut 11 go We have an article that talks about the Second Amendment That's by doctor Carol Anderson in out of Emory And really argue that our obsession with guns we are What is an obsession with guns me What does that mean These phrases that the marxists use we have an obsession with guns You know as an exception with guns the communist Chinese government The Cuban communist government the communist vet Venezuelan government the police states have obsession with guns They have the obsession with taking them from you So they can overpower you with their own guns Now the call Hannah Jones is a moron The police are systemically racist Because they're there to keep in place this white dominant society which we know is unjust in every respect Meanwhile you are obsessed with guns so you need to be disarmed And it all goes back to slavery You're going to what Oh yes indeed That's how much she knows about the Bill of Rights in the constitution All goes back to slavery Did you read the Second Amendment Nicole Hannah Jones does it say only white people and slave owners have a right to gun Is that what it says Cut 11 go We have more guns than almost any society in the world Who cares What does that have to do with anything What does that have to do with anything Why does it matter Are we supposed to compare ourselves to France

Hannah Jones Carol Anderson Chinese Government The Cuban C Venezuelan Government Emory Nicole Hannah Jones France
Nikole Hannah-Jones Says U.S. Dropped Bombs on Japan for Financial Reasons

Mark Levin

01:37 min | 9 months ago

Nikole Hannah-Jones Says U.S. Dropped Bombs on Japan for Financial Reasons

"Nicole Hannah Jones tweets over at the federalist they picked it up Sean Fleetwood New York magazine writer and founder of the 1619 Project the call Hannah Jones took to Twitter this week to offer historically illiterate take on why the United States bond Hiroshima during World War II In a course she was promoted by The New York Times or 1619 project cronut but a New York Times Historical scholars from every walk of life came out and said she doesn't know what the hell she's talking about but it doesn't matter You see And now deleted November 6th tweet Jones attempted to argue that the only reason the United States dropped an atomic bomb on the Japanese city was due to financial reasons All you World War II vets listen to this She said they dropped the bomb They I guess meaning her country America When they knew surrender was coming because they'd spent all this money developing it and to prove it was worth it She wrote propaganda's not history my friend Now that is unbelievable She is a complete idiot She is a complete idiot Their first bomb was dropped and then the second bomb was dropped because Japan refused to accept unconditional surrender And that's what Harry Truman insisted on She is a historical illiterate but she can push her Pablo her hate for this country and there's not a single corrupt media platform that wouldn't love to

Nicole Hannah Jones Sean Fleetwood Hannah Jones The New York Times New York Magazine America Hiroshima Twitter Jones Harry Truman Japan Pablo
The 1619 Project Lies About the Founding Fathers and Slavery

The Eric Metaxas Show

01:55 min | 11 months ago

The 1619 Project Lies About the Founding Fathers and Slavery

"The book is debunking the sixteen nineteen project and boy does it need debunking. It is preposterous. It's being pushed out there Mary you were You you are a resident fellow at the alexander. Hamilton institute for the study of western civilization. I learned i think only last night watching rick. Burns's nineteen ninety nine nine hundred ninety nine documentary about new york that alexander hamilton one of our founding fathers. He was very active in ending slavery. In his this is over two hundred years ago so again the sixteen nineteen project access though. That never happened exactly and another thing. Is i spend a considerable bowl amount of time on. Thomas jefferson one of the big lies of the sixteen. Nineteen project is that he never intended to abolish slavery. Now thomas jefferson owned hundreds of slaves. He was born into a slave owning family but even for him. That is completely false. He spent his life trying to figure out a way to end slavery peacefully how to how to avoid a civil war he saw that coming and so is completely false to even charge. Thomas jefferson with wanting to continue slavery. That is completely false. It may not be in the way that nicole. Hannah jones in the other riders. What have it which was to start a communist revolution. But he was someone who did want to abolish slavery peacefully.

Hamilton Institute For The Stu Alexander Hamilton Thomas Jefferson Burns Rick Mary New York Hannah Jones Nicole
Author Mary Grabar: Howard Zinn and Nikole Hannah-Jones Hate America

The Eric Metaxas Show

02:57 min | 11 months ago

Author Mary Grabar: Howard Zinn and Nikole Hannah-Jones Hate America

"Heard about the six thousand nineteen project which since we don't have a ton of time i will simply say is evil and full of baloney but when you want some more details i would If you're going to reject something as utterly as i have you wanna be able to back it up with a big book. That has all the facts. Well mary gray bar. Who is my guest. Has written a book called debunking the sixteen nineteen project exposing the plan to divide america. Mary great bar. Welcome thank you. Well listen you. You wrote a book called debunking howard zinn exposing the fake history that turned generation against america. It's devastating stuff. I mean let's start there. Who are these people that obviously you know for lack of a better verb hate america. Why are they putting forward narratives. That are not only pernicious but are actually false. There's no question that howard johnson's version of america and the six thousand nineteen projects version america. This is complete nonsense being pedal as though it were true. Why do these people want to destroy the greatest nation in the history of the world. Well i think they have some personal resentment of howard. Zinn nicole hannah jones. Who is the creator of sixteen. Nineteen project have slightly different. Motivations both are promoting a kind of neo marxist version of history howard zinn of course was a one time member of the communist party and his allegiance was to communism and he hated this country and he hoped to foment a communist revolution. Nicole hannah jones from her interviews. And what. I've read about her and things that she has said has this resentment towards this country She believes perhaps going back to her family. that was mistreated because of their race. The black side of famish used biracial believes that this country has not treated her fairly and she believes in off. The fidel castro's cuba. She praises that regime. She she took a trip there and her politics are aligned with the squad of the democratic party. The far left. She wants to see a redistribution of wealth. She wants socialized healthcare. And so this is a history that kind of fits in. She may not be as aware of the real history is howard zinn but she refuses to take any kind of criticism. How would kind of enlightened her as to what really did

America Mary Gray Mary Great Howard Zinn Zinn Nicole Hannah Jones Howard Johnson Nicole Hannah Jones Famish Communist Party Howard Fidel Castro Cuba Democratic Party
"hannah jones" Discussed on Deep Background with Noah Feldman

Deep Background with Noah Feldman

01:52 min | 1 year ago

"hannah jones" Discussed on Deep Background with Noah Feldman

"Remember that last vacation you took last brench you had with your friends knowing that a once in a century pandemic was about to hit us. Oh oh wait you didn't see it coming. And that's just it. The covert nineteen pandemic showed us. How a microscopic virus could upend our lives and how unprepared our systems. Our leaders in our society were for it. There's so much more out there. We need to understand how new genetic discoveries could change our relationship with their own genes however addiction to social media. changes are brands. Or how right wing. Extremists are conspiring to take away reproductive rights. Every week dr abul el-sayed a physician epidemiologist and the former detroit health commissioner offers perspectives on these issues. And more and talks the leaders who are working out new ways to solve them from crooked media new episodes of america dissect every tuesday. Wherever you listen to podcasts. This episode of deep background is brought to you by see me. Why seamy wine was born from the grit. And perseverance of its tenacious. Founder isabel seamy. Because when life gave grapes she knew exactly what to do. And that's why a glass of seamy wine is a reward worth having because good things come to those who work hard. Even a small goal achieved is a moment worth celebrating. Whether it's a sip of their medium bodied white chardonnay or the full bodied red cabernet-sauvignon raise a glass to the moments that make us seamy wine. Goodness from grit. Enjoy their many varietals. Wherever fine wines are sold or visit online at shop cmih dot com to learn more about their premiums selection of california wines and order yours. Today please enjoy our wines responsibly. Seamy winery geyserville california..

dr abul el isabel seamy detroit america california geyserville
"hannah jones" Discussed on Deep Background with Noah Feldman

Deep Background with Noah Feldman

01:56 min | 1 year ago

"hannah jones" Discussed on Deep Background with Noah Feldman

"Pushkin spending more time at home. Maybe it's time to step up your property care now. You can tackle all your landscaping projects with dr power equipment. Go dr power. Dot com is your one-stop shop for brush mowers chipper shredders lifan lawn bax. Wood splitters ro tillers and much much more checkout. Dr powers full line of professional grade gas powered equipment plus the latest and lithium ion battery powered tools clearfield of overgrown brush including four foot high field grass and saplings up to three inches thick or trim mohan edge your suburban lot like a pro. There's a dr for every corner of your property and all our equipment is on sale right now so get over to go d. r. power dot com and stock up for the outdoor season. Dr is professional power done right. This episode of deep background is brought to you by seamy y. Seamy wine was born from the grit. And perseverance of its tenacious. Founder isabel seamy because when life gave her grapes she knew exactly what to do. And that's why a glass of seamy wine is a reward worth having because good things come to those who work hard. Even a small goal achieved is a moment celebrating whether it's a sip of their medium bodied wipe chardonnay or the full-bodied red cabernet-sauvignon raise a glass to the moments that make us me wine. Goodness from grit. Enjoy their many varietals. Wherever fine wines are sold or visit online at shop cmih dot com to learn more about their premiums selection of california wise and order yours. Today please enjoy our wines responsibly..

"hannah jones" Discussed on What Next | Daily News and Analysis

What Next | Daily News and Analysis

05:36 min | 1 year ago

"hannah jones" Discussed on What Next | Daily News and Analysis

"The confederacy and many of the students wanted it taken down for generations. Yeah and and had been working for decades to remove it in a way that was legal and followed all the rules and they went through every process. They could go through the north carolina. General assembly passed a law specifically to protect statues of this type from being removed even by the communities in which they stand and schools where they are in court houses and to make it virtually impossible to remove them and so stymied and unable to do this in a legal way protesters toppled the statue on the campus. And so what happened. After that was members of the board of governors board of trustees in conservatives north carolina said put it back up we would like to redirect confederate statue now in the modern era and this was twenty eighteen and so this was for a lot of reasons. Very bad idea. People who are white supremacists or showing up sometimes armed on campus to quote unquote defend. The statue You know and it's just a terrible terrible idea to deal with any further. So what did the university do about this well in their telling to try to get around this law the state law. That's still in place that protects these statues. They made a secret deal with a neo. Confederate group called the sons of confederate veterans whereby the sense of confederate veterans. Who don't have anything to do with the statue assert that it is their property and they've gotten rights to it from the daughters of the confederacy which did in fact was the group that so many years before had had erected a statue and that they'd be willing to take it off the universities hands in a legal way if they would give them the statue and several million dollars. Technically for upkeep of the statue but still over two million dollars to maintain a confederate statues. That's exactly right and the leader of that group in a celebratory email. Said we're gonna use some of that money to build a headquarters for ourselves. We've won our allies in the unc system in the board of governors Simply helped us do this. It was a huge controversy and and the public only found out about it when it was done deal and it had been announced. So what happened with nicole. Hannah jones when i listened to all of this history is part of a pattern and it becomes clear like in the weeks after the ten year. Back and forth was reported on there was some reporting that for instance i think seventy percent of black faculty had considered leaving the institution. And when you place. What happened with nicole. Hannah jones into the wider context. You can understand why that it's just one more incident that might make that faculty feel unwelcome. Yeah in fact. A prominent tenured professor williams turkey in history. Farmer told me he thinks it's probably closer to ninety percents and their other professors who are leaving their Are publicly saying this is why we've got professors who they were trying to recruit who our top people in their fields. Who've said i'm not coming there and this is why so guy there's there's it's not a theoretical cost so for people who live in. North carolina is the solution to this problem in their educational system. The same solution. We keep hearing about for every other political fight. Were in the middle of vote. Like that's the only way out given the way the boards are appointed as you disagree with what they're doing. Yeah if you agree with what you're what they're doing and this is a. These are the glory days while their husband likes to talk about objectivity and reporting if i totally objective about this and i overlooked any number of things that are ethically objectionable or outright illegal and i just sort of look in it with the totally objective lens than what i see is a political struggle between two sides conservative general assembly in their political appointees and faculty staff alumni and students of the university of chapel hill in many universities in unc system who are are more liberal progressive and they have competing interests and competing philosophies about the university of how should operate what should stand for and one of them is in power and one of them is not a joke kellyanne. Thank you so much for joining me. Glad to help jokey leeann is an investigative reporter at nc policy. Watch and that's the show. What next is produced by lena. Shorts carmelo shod mary. Wilson daniel hewitt and davis land. We are led by alison. benedict unleash. montgomery mary harris. You can go track down on twitter whenever you want. I'm at mary's desk tomorrow. Stay tuned to this feed what next. Tvd is going to be here. Henry gruber is coming in the hosting chair. And he's going to be talking about what happens with remote work once we all go back to the office. okay. I'll get you back here on monday..

Hannah jones board of governors board of tr Confederate group north carolina williams turkey General assembly nicole unc university of chapel hill Farmer North carolina general assembly carmelo shod mary Wilson daniel hewitt davis land montgomery mary harris leeann
"hannah jones" Discussed on What Next | Daily News and Analysis

What Next | Daily News and Analysis

05:40 min | 1 year ago

"hannah jones" Discussed on What Next | Daily News and Analysis

"For tenure.

"hannah jones" Discussed on What Next | Daily News and Analysis

What Next | Daily News and Analysis

07:32 min | 1 year ago

"hannah jones" Discussed on What Next | Daily News and Analysis

"Td ameritrade where smart investors get smarter. Joe killian thinks about nicole. Hannah jones in the university of north carolina. He doesn't think about what happened this year. He thinks about a much younger nicole. Hannah jones before the awards before the sixteen nineteen project became a political lightning rod back when nicole hannah jones. I came to unc as a graduate student nicole. Hannah jones attended the university of north carolina at chapel hill. She she got her masters there. She's a tarheel. Yeah when she was a grad student in journalism school at unc chapel hill. She really thrived and she really started to become a journalist and she credits the university with watt and so she's always as she worked her way slowly up from the chapel hill. News to the durham bureau of the news. Observer to the oregonian propublica new york times along the way winning every major were journalism the peabody the polk award national magazine awards the pulitzer prize. She is maintained that relationship with you. See she's come back and giving commencement speeches to journalism school. She's come back in. Guest taught guest lectured classes. Her either be well. Society is based out of n. Say she cofounded that in its headquartered at safe so the dean of the journalism school susan king who is herself a pioneering woman in journalism began to think you know. Let's bring her back here in a. Let's set up a knight chair for people who don't know the. The knightfoundation endows professorships night chairs. They bring working professionals. In media reporters producers people who work in media to universities to share their professional expertise in the classroom and traditionally they get the protection of tenure which means they have a lifetime appointment right. It's not the case with every night. Sharon it's not the case at every school but at unc since the early eighties when they started this program there every single night. Chair has gotten tenure. And it's been presented to applicants that way and it's never been a problem and all of the applicants have been white. This is the the first black person the first black woman who is up for one of these and it's the only one that has come up against this sort of assistance and it sounds like when the dean offered this potential position to nicole hannah jones. She was initially you know she has a good job in new york and she had to think about it but then decided to really throw herself into the application process teaching classes and going through multiple votes from faculty and other people. What is that process. Typically like this tenure process is incredibly rigorous. Not only do you have to come and do all this things you were talking about where you come to teach you submit things people who you don't even know right things about whether you'd be a good candidate in our people who are faculty members at other universities. The faculty in the department has vote. The tenure committee has vote. she passed unanimously through. All these things so it goes up to the to the chancellor and the provost level of chancellor in the provo recommend her. There's nobody in this process. That has a problem with this so far. So where did the trouble start. Well there was sort of a whisper campaign you know. She's such a prominent persons such a prominent journalist and sixteen nineteen projects in the new york times especially has been the focus of such political ire on the political right. I mean leading political figures. Refer minting as sort of a second satanic panic has to do with critical race theory and the idea that white children are going to be taught to be embarrassed of their history and they wanna make us ashamed of america. Kelo school districts are now using the sixteen nineteen project from the new york times for example a curriculum. That project is the work of an out of the closet. Racial extremists called nicole. Hannah jones the president. Donald trump specifically denounced it teaching this horrible doctrine to our children is a form of child abuse and briefly. I should just say that the sixteen nineteen project. The idea of it is that the country was really founded when slaves were first brought to this country and that that is uniquely american experience that has shaped the country ever since. Yeah that's not a bad way of putting it. I mean not in a literal sense. She sang a better way of thinking about the founding of the country is through looking at its relationship with slavery. And for that you've got to go to sixteen nineteen so that is in this. Racial moment that we're experiencing in this country been very controversial and she's one of a few prominent black journalists and scholars who have taken the brunt of the hit from conservatives on this so because that is the case in because she's such a known quantity it got around that they were pursuing her. Yeah what did this whisper campaign look like i began hearing about it because there were some people in conservative circles. Who were talking about it. They were kind of gearing up to prevent this or make it an issue. One of the things that happened was that there was a conversation between dean. Susan king of the j. school and walter hudson walter. Hudson is an arkansas media. Magnate whose family for a couple of asians has owned and operated a lot of newspapers television stations in arkansas. His name is also on the j. School at unc y- because in two thousand nineteen he donated twenty five million dollars. Pledged twenty five million dollars to the school. They named it after him. It's now the hussmann. Unc husband school of journalism in media and they also agreed to etch what he calls his core values of journalism into a wall at the school. And these are primarily about objectivity and you know restoring faith in journalism things that sound really good sort of on their face if you are abstract ideas once you begin to learn what husband thinks they are and how could be weaponized to attack journalism. He doesn't like Becomes kind of a different story so hussmann calls the dean. And says hey. I've heard that this is where it gets. Super strange husband doesn't call the team. The dean calls husband And says we're thinking about hiring nicole. Hannah jones he says well. I don't much like that idea. Here are my concerns. I'd like to see nineteen project. I'm concerned historians have said that they have some problems whether they think that they're eight historical things in it you know. She says well listen. It's got its critics. They've answered those criticisms. You know we're gonna make the decision here ourselves a good one. He says well. I disagree with you. She says while. I disagree with you. I guess we're gonna have to respectfully disagree. Do they do that not so much. What husband does is contact the chancellor kevin gus quits. He contacts the vice chancellor who's in charge of charitable giving at the university so he goes over her head at yeah and he also sends emails that he sent to them to the board of trustees who will ultimately be responsible.

Hannah jones nicole hannah jones nicole Joe killian unc unc chapel hill durham bureau of the news chapel hill oregonian propublica new york polk award national magazine a susan king ameritrade Kelo school watt new york times dean Sharon provo Susan king
"hannah jones" Discussed on What Next | Daily News and Analysis

What Next | Daily News and Analysis

03:36 min | 1 year ago

"hannah jones" Discussed on What Next | Daily News and Analysis

"Joe's got an answer for that. I primarily think of as a political story.

"hannah jones" Discussed on Here & Now

Here & Now

07:24 min | 1 year ago

"hannah jones" Discussed on Here & Now

"The wall street journal's michael bender wrote his book about trump's twenty twenty defeat one section stuck out as the most difficult telling the story of what bender dubbed hell week and a half those the ten days on twenty twenty that started with the super spreader event in the rose garden included trump's disastrous debate with joe biden in cleveland and then trump himself obviously testing positive for cova a few days later. It's not just that it was a lot to fold together. It's that simply figuring out. What happened was maddening. How early he tested positive. How sticky was during that time. These are serious questions with national security implications that very few people knew or had hand knowledge of and i had competing versions from senior officials. Serious people who all were telling me different versions of that story. That struggle bender explains itself emblematic of the trump administration. That deception wasn't just with the public. It was literally from person to person inside the west wing. And that's the story not necessarily worrying about exactly what happened benders book. Frankly we did win. This election is one of many trying to pull order from trump's chaos. Another nightmare scenario comes from the washington. Post yasmeen abu talib and damian pauleta about trump and cova. Abu talib agreed that it was hard to discern the truth from dozens of conflicting stories which made it all the more striking when they did find consensus on the white house's corona virus response of the more than one hundred eighty people we spoke to you. There wasn't a single one who defended the collective response according to princeton presidential historian. Jillions eleazar telling the story of the trump white house means not just recounting news-making moments the racist statements the allegations of sexual assault the impeachments plural. But making sense of it. Why america's political system have room for so much chaos over a four year period. Which is like this big puzzle. I don't think everyone's totally grappled with and it's not just journalists and historians trump administration insiders will try to explain their place in history. That's according to keep her bond. A co founder of javelin a literary agency that represented bender former un ambassador john bolton and former fbi director. James comey with more to come. I think it does require for people who worked in the trump presidency to wrestle with some of the moral compromises that they had to make by serving in that administration writing. The history of aliki live tweeted. Presidency has been unusual for a variety of additional reasons. There's book industry. Tumult simon and schuster employees protested the publishing giants printing. Mike pence's book. In addition trump could still run for president again which may be why he has given at least twenty. Two book interviews. As axios recently reported there was also a trump era boom in political book sales now however those sales are down sixty percent from the second half of twenty twenty according to market research firm. Npd but that doesn't mean interest will disappear according to javelin co founder matt latimer for example next year or a dozen or more books coming out about president nixon. I mean i think long after we're all on people trying to figure out what the hell this is all about. It's been forty seven years. Since nixon resigned by that same math will be reading new trump books into the late twenty sixty s and probably beyond danielle. Kurt lieven npr news. Pulitzer prize winning journalist. Nicole hannah jones is going to howard university. The new york times reporter and creator of the sixteen nineteen project will be the new knight chair in race and reporting at the revered historically black college. Her decision comes after her alma mater. The university of north carolina at chapel hill denied her. Tenure prompting an outcry that the decision was based on her race and gender nicole. Hannah jones joins us now. Welcome back to here. Now thank you. Thank you for having me. And congratulations on your new position at howard university. What's the message. You're sending with your decision to go to howard after the very public tenure controversy at unc. So i of course. I love the university of north carolina. I was very excited to return back to my alma mater. The place that really launched my journalism career and to teach there. But i was denied initially the vote on tenure by the board of trustees which are politically appointed by the republican legislature and it became a very kind of ugly in public battle where political appointees. We're not voting on my credentials. But because of political reasons they didn't like the nature of my work. And i just decided you know at the age of forty five heavy worked my self through the ranks of my profession having achieved very high level of success in my profession that i was just unwilling to keep fighting that battle that i really wanted to take my talents and the resources i could bring and bring them to an institution that was actually built for black uplifting. Black excellence that wasn't built in opposition to the work that i wanted to do and me as a human being since the nineteen eighties. Nobody had ever been denied. Tenure at unc in the position you were offered you talked about this political process. Did anyone at the university. Tell you why they didn't offer you. Tenure no and this is also part of my decision making you know. I understand that. The political situation around the university of north carolina's not been good for about a decade now. And it's one thing when political appointees interfere in the process but it would have been something else had the leadership of the university namely the chancellor and the provost of spoke out publicly and demanded that i be treated like every other night chair. All of them who are white before me and that didn't happen and not only did they not publicly speak up but privately they were not transparent with me about why i didn't have my ten year. Package voted on in november. When it was supposed to have been voted on the first time orange january and to this day no one in leadership at the university has explained to me what happened and why i was treated differently than everyone else would come before me. You talked about your an alarm of. Unc talked about how how much you love it there. You love the tar heels. This lack of transparency obviously was difficult. How did it feel to go through that process. You know it was. It was humiliating. I didn't speak out about what happened to me. I didn't want everyone to know that. I was the first night chair in the history of that position. To be denied tenure. So it was it was humiliating personally professionally to be treated that way by your alma mater..

trump bender cova michael bender Unc yasmeen abu talib damian pauleta Jillions eleazar James comey aliki axios javelin co matt latimer Abu talib rose garden joe biden howard university Kurt lieven npr news Nicole hannah jones
"hannah jones" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

WCBM 680 AM

02:25 min | 1 year ago

"hannah jones" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

"Hannah Jones time working for, uh, York Times Magazine, pushing the 16 19 project, which has been thoroughly debunked by Through his Starnes. I mean, big time historians. UNC trustees green like tenure for Nicole Hannah Jones, who is known for the 16 19 projects. Just the news, which is an outstanding site. The trustees of the University of North Carolina Chapel Hill have approved tenure for Nicola Hannah Jones. The New York Times Magazine journalist who won the 2020 Pulitzer Prize for commentary for the 16 19 project. See, this is how you get awards. This is how you get tenure. Think at first, they were very queasy about giving her tenure. Then the pressure came and the allegations came, including from her. The AKP legal Defense and Education Fund jumped in as I understand. And she will now have tenure. Shall become the night chair in race and investigative journalism. That is the night chair in race, an investigative journalism. Last week, her attorney said she would not report Yeah. For the role without tenure. So, uh, She gets 10 year. Isn't that great? And we're going to talk about 10 year a lot. We are And the problem with 10 years before we get to our friend Hans and his piece I meant to do this, too. We want to give a hat tip to rumble, which is a fantastic site, by the way. Here We have an Arizona father, who is an African American at a school board meeting. Uh, and he doesn't want to be called by his race. He's an American. And, of course critical race theory, which joy Reid says doesn't exist and isn't being taught in our schools. Is the subject of his father. Attacking critical race theory. Cut 13 go. Not part of any group. I just came here because my tears for 8 10, right, let's start over. Can you? Can you kick it up any louder, Mr Producer? All right, Let's go cut 13, not a parliamentary group. I just came here because my kids are 8, 10 and 12 and, um, we we start to experience things far as Black History month. My kids would come.

Nicole Hannah Jones Nicola Hannah Jones Hans 10 year UNC Last week Hannah Jones Arizona 12 University of North Carolina C African American joy Reid AKP 16 19 projects 19 York Times Magazine 10 years 2020 Pulitzer Prize American Fund
"hannah jones" Discussed on WMAL 630AM

WMAL 630AM

03:09 min | 1 year ago

"hannah jones" Discussed on WMAL 630AM

"Gonna marry in the American story and force it into the center Nicole Hannah Jones. They're accepting. Even though people have you know, even like the left is instead of come out and said, Yeah, this should be in the fiction section. Yeah. No. I mean, this was a disgrace. What was done? In this so called 16 19 project. It absolutely was shoddy journalism. There were a number of outright exaggerations and lies that were put into the piece that were quietly changed. After months of concern by actual historians who knew a lot better than Nicole Hannah Jones and the team of journalists who worked on the 16 19 project for The New York Times did. There were all sorts of claims that they've changed in The New York Times. They just did it secretly and they pretended like it was always that way or no, it's no big deal. It's like the things we asserted of that will matter. So like asserting, as you mentioned that the American Revolution Was was fought to preserve slavery. It was not is something that the 16 19 project did. And then under pressure from historians, they finally issued a stealth correction to the piece. An editor's note. A little update they made in order modified just one of the biggest allegations from the entire from the entire piece from the entire work. Also, she sought to enter their team sought to claim that 16 19 was actually the true founding of the United States of America and not 17 76. And that we've all been getting it wrong. They wanted to reframe the American founding around 16 19. And then When they were receiving scrutiny for it like, Hey, wait a second. That doesn't make any sense. The founding of the United States of America was 17 76 the Declaration of Independence. That's crystal clear. The New York Times. Stealth edited The peace stealth edited means they quietly changed it without telling anyone in order to remove those references. And then the call. Hannah Jones had the audacity to tell everyone that that was a lie. That never never happened. They never sought to reframe the founding around 16 19. She herself tweeted. That they sought to reframe the frowning around 16 19. It was life and she deleted those all tweets. This is Orwellian by the way in a week where we're getting all sorts of Orwellian nonsense. May zero, knows writing the dictionary this week. We've reached full blown crazy if you want symbols of the signals of of national decline. We're getting them in rapid succession this week and giving the 16 19 project that journalism award. Nobody cares about journalism in this group. It's not about facts. And the number one work of the decade that that beat out the 16 19 project was the case for reparations by ton, Easy coats in the Atlantic. Is that journalism? According to you, it is. It's an op ed. What? I knew this would get you going. Asshole of the story. Yeah, thanks. 51 on W. Mervis Diamond importers. This is Ronnie Mervis. Love conquers everything. It's the one force that triumphs over the virus..

Nicole Hannah Jones Hannah Jones United States The New York Times W. Mervis Diamond Ronnie Mervis editor Atlantic
"hannah jones" Discussed on Fresh Air

Fresh Air

02:40 min | 2 years ago

"hannah jones" Discussed on Fresh Air

"Worked for generations so that they could become independent so that they could make their own money and be independent of the white people who had ruled over them and there were black men who had served in the Union army. There was a meeting that was held between some of these men, and some generals from the army, and they asked well what? What do you want and what they said is we want land. We want land so that we can be prosperous, and and be our own people so General Sherman takes that to heart, and he issues field order, number, fifteen and field order number fifteen declares that black families will get forty acres of former confederate land, and that they will be able to. To work that land, and actually at the time it was alone. It wasn't even being given to enslave people. It was it was on. They would eventually make enough money and pay for the land, and for a brief period of time. This is what happened. a small number of former slave people in the Georgia. Sea Islands in coastal. South Carolina. Had the land that they had once worked for white people turned over to them, and they began to farm it, but unfortunately That period was very very brief. President Lincoln was assassinated, and he was replaced by his vice president. Andrew Johnson who was a southerner who was a white supremacist, and who believe like many white Americans at the time that black people were deserving of after slavery, that they should be grateful for their freedom, and he skated the land and return the land to the former confederates, and that ended the only real effort in the history of this country to provide reparations for those who have been enslaved and it really left. Formerly enslaved people in absolute devastating poverty, there are stories of math starvations of black people after they had been freed having to leave the plantation and find shelter and burned out buildings of trying to forge for food in burned out field It was a devastating period for black people in this country decided that it was going to do nothing that owed these people nothing. And the black people who had been enslaved had worked their lives for no pay, no property no right to. Keep their family together and slavery ends, and they get nothing. They're left with nothing. Exactly I mean think about this..

Union army President Lincoln Sea Islands General Sherman vice president Andrew Johnson South Carolina Georgia
"hannah jones" Discussed on Fresh Air

Fresh Air

04:11 min | 2 years ago

"hannah jones" Discussed on Fresh Air

"From whyy in Philadelphia I'm Terry Gross with fresh air today we talk with Nicole Hannah Jones. WHO created the new? York Times. Sixteen nineteen project marking the four hundred hundred for Serie of the beginning of American slavery when a ship carrying enslaved Africans landed in the English colony of Virginia. This ongoing project includes essays, videos and PODCASTS, reflecting on the history of slavery and its legacy. Hannah Jones won a Pulitzer Prize last month for the essay. She contributed to the project. Her new article for the new. York Times magazine is headlined. If true justice inequality are achieved in the US it must finally take seriously what it owes black Americans. She'll tell us why she concludes the article by saying. It's time for reparations and we'll talk about her family's story..

Nicole Hannah Jones York Times Terry Gross whyy Pulitzer Prize US Philadelphia Virginia
"hannah jones" Discussed on News-Talk 1400 The Patriot

News-Talk 1400 The Patriot

03:15 min | 2 years ago

"hannah jones" Discussed on News-Talk 1400 The Patriot

"Them when Nicole Hannah Jones and watched the New York times talks about reparations and and all all these what I will I will believe it when I see the holders of the wife of the new York times turned over control of that newspaper to some of these are people like Nicole Hannah Jones is somebody other blacks turned over the control of the newspaper if you really believe in reparations but you start with yourself and be an example of what the rest of the country you should do what you but you don't think New York times has done that I think they have done that and I'll tell you something Bob I never thought I'd do that I cancel my subscription to The New York Times because I said they have finally gone so far that I literally can't read it anymore it's it's activist journalism it's activist media and they they have completely turned themselves over to my mind to folks like Nicole Hannah Jones and her sixteen nineteen project it's it it's an absurd narratives it's an anti American narrative and it does seem to me that they have they have turned themselves over to them to those folks well I'm talking about the capital assets I say I I'm not talking about turning over control of the message now when they take the keys to the new York times and have a public presentation to Nicole Hannah Jones and all the other black from justice to say we we accept our guilt for being white and privileged and accomplished and rich yeah we feel so bad about what we've done to you here are the keys to the new York times you black activist now you only see when I see that we'll begin to take them serious but I really think this is a game that they're playing they still living and of their comfortable lives but they're turning over the organism of the message but they're not turning to the Lucien of the messenger this I mean I would like to see the editorial board of The New York Times with brooms cleaning up the broken glass in people's neighborhoods that is there as a result of what we've seen over the last few days I want to talk to you a little bit Bob about the spiritual aspect of this because to me it's very interesting from a spiritual perspective speaking as a as a Christian right who believes in forgiveness who believes that the lord says vengeance is mine that there's an aspect of this which is profoundly anti Christian and which therefore can never work will never succeed when we come back we'll talk about that folks I'm talking about what's in the woods center Erik and seventeen seventy six unites will be right back that.

Nicole Hannah Jones the new York times editorial board Bob Erik