19 Burst results for "Hannah Drake"

"hannah drake" Discussed on Into America

Into America

02:30 min | 2 months ago

"hannah drake" Discussed on Into America

"Are going through elaborate now. So thank you very much for joining us. Thank you very much for having. That was Hannah Drake and activists, writer and Speaker in Louisville Kentucky Hannah was one of the people behind Brianna slow the move to ban.

Breonna Taylor Protests: Two Officers Shot During Kentucky Protest

NPR's Story of the Day

03:15 min | 2 months ago

Breonna Taylor Protests: Two Officers Shot During Kentucky Protest

"To Louisville police officers were shot last night police say they do have a suspect in custody and that the officers injuries are not life-threatening. This happened during protests demanding justice for Briana Taylor yesterday a grand jury declined to charge two officers who shot a Taylor in her home. A third officer was charged with first degree, wanton, wanton endangerment of her neighbors that officer who has been dismissed shot into nearby apartments police broke through Taylor's door, and what they said was a late night drug raid her boyfriend thinking they were intruders shot at them. Police fired at least thirty two shots back hitting Brianna Taylor six times and killing her there have now been months of protests including yesterday's. Definitely. Wolf of W. F., was there yesterday she's with us now good. Morning. Stephanie Good Morning The city set a nine o'clock pm curfew. Not everyone obeyed that curfew. What did you see in the streets yesterday? Yeah. Well, immediately, following the announcement protesters basically marched out of the downtown area and they were met face to face with police and arrests were made much later into the evening. There were small fire set around the hall of Justice and about thirty minutes before curfew is when the two officers were shot downtown police say one had to undergo surgery and there were demonstrations that continued after the curfew. So, as you were out yesterday talking to protesters, what were they telling you? Well, this was not the news protesters were hoping for a few. told me. It was insulting especially that the one officer was indicted for endangering Taylor's neighbors and not for his involvement. In her shooting death I spoke with Louisville based poet and activist. Hannah. Drake she called the results a quote joke. Just another reminder. That the Black Woman that my life is not matters the city. disappointed. This girl was Inter House. Bothering any. We're hearing a lot of heartbreak there from her and from others. I imagine these protests will continue. Yet I mean yesterday marked the hundred and nineteenth consecutive day of protests and lable demanding justice for Taylor since late May and what I repeatedly heard from protesters is that yesterday's Will Not end the demonstrations. Here's Nicole Williams she says, she'll be out today and the next day however many days I will be here no justice no peace and there's still no justice, and until there's justice, there will be no peace period. So. Last week the city settled a wrongful death lawsuit by Taylor family and as part of that settlement, the city committed to implementing a list of law enforcement reforms like using a tracking system to flag officers who who use excessive force or citizen complaints. So protesters and residents are waiting for how much substantive change will be put in place now.

Brianna Taylor Officer Louisville Taylor Family Hall Of Justice Hannah Endangerment Nicole Williams Inter House Stephanie W. F. Drake
"hannah drake" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

07:49 min | 2 months ago

"hannah drake" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Settlement today with Briana Taylor's family six months after she was shot by police and her death became a refrain of national protests is on. The Nevadas tells US policing changes are part of that agreement. The larger question of potential criminal charges against the officers remains front and center to the family into many around the country. In the eyes of her family. One step toward justice for Briana Taylor. It's only the beginning of getting full justice for Briana, her beautiful spirit. And personality is working through all of us on the ground. So Please continue to say her name today. The city of Louisville announced a $12 million settlement with Taylor's mother, Tameka Palmer, after she sued over her daughter's killing by police. Louisville Mayor Greg Fischer. I cannot begin to imagine. Miss Palmer's pain and I am deeply deeply sorry for Brianna's death. It is the largest sum ever paid by the city in a police misconduct case, and the settlement includes a package of police reforms. Settlement comes after months of protests following Briana Taylor's death 26 year old emergency medical technician was shot in her home on March 13th by Louisville police serving a drug warrant. Police say that night, they identified themselves before breaking down Taylor's door. But her boyfriend, Kenneth Walker, says he never heard that thought it was a break in and fired a single shot from his licensed firearm. Police responded, shooting Taylor more than eight times and killing her. No drugs were found in the home of the three officers involved on Ly One was fired in June. A separate criminal investigation is underway by Kentucky Attorney General Daniel Camera. Taylor Story remains at the center of a nationwide movement. Seeking racial justice, police reforms and reminding people to say her name. Now the settlement may have taken six months. But this only relates to the Taylor family civil suit and there is no admission of wrongdoing by the city of Louisville. In today's deal, all eyes are now on the Kentucky attorney general to see if criminal charges against the officers will be filed. Joining me now to discuss this is Hannah Drake. She's an author and an activist in Louisville. She's been leading the calls for Justice and Briana Taylor's name. Welcome Back to the news, Our Hannah Thanks for being with us before we dig into some of these details. I just want to get your reaction to today's news. It's been a long time coming. I just wonder when you heard today's news Very briefly. What did you think? It has been a long time coming. I was certainly very emotional. It's one that has been protesting and demanding justice. It was a very emotional feeling for me to see Brown, a. Taylor's mother get some form of justice for her daughter. We mentioned it's not just the $12 million the single largest city payment in a police misconduct case. There's a whole slate of police reforms. I want to take through a few of them right now. They're now going to require commanders to approve search warrants. Before that goes to a judge. They're going to offer housing credits for officers to actually live within the cities that they police. They want to expand drug and alcohol testing for officers involved in shootings. That's just a few of the highlights there. But Hannah, when you look at those reforms when you look at the disproportionate violence by police against black Americans, what kind of difference do you think those reforms will make? Certainly it's going Tio take manifesting these reforms on the ground. Actually in the community. I will say that I was encouraged that for this to be a civil suit for police reform to be tied to it. I do not know if I've ever seen that that has ever been the case when there have been a pail or police misconduct, police brutality. And the murder of a person at the hands of the police. So I I'm thankful to Briana Taylor's family that they thought to have police reform tied to the civil. Ah, lawsuit, and I know that Lameda Baker said It was non negotiable. There would be no civil lawsuit without some type of police reform. That's right. We did hear from both attorneys for the family, Linda Baker and Ben Crump saying that they knew reforms had to be part of this deal. But I wonder. Are there additional reforms you didn't hear about today that you think are necessary in Louisville? I think there are additional reforms. I think we have a section of our population that is certainly calling on defunding the police. So when you look at defunding the police and you also look at reforming the police. How do we work together As a community For those two things to work hand in hand together. I certainly think it's a great opportunity for police to actually live in the communities that they are policing to actually know the people in the neighborhoods. I loved that. They also mention And that there will be some type of volunteerism for the police so they can actually know the people that they are policing and hopefully that will end some of the police brutality. But I certainly think We stuff such a long way to go when it comes for justice for Briana Taylor and Justice just in our community. And we heard from several people who spoke today at that press conference in her name, saying that they don't believe that there will be full justice until those officers are arrested and charged. Now we mentioned that the attorney general is looking into possible criminal charges that a grand jury is being convened. Can I curious based on your work and your experience in Louisville? How much faith do you have in that process right now? You know to be, to be honest, I do not have faith in that process. I tried to remain hopeful. It's someone that is an activist on someone that speaks out in the community. We have seen how these cases have played out across the United States. So I I'm not that hopeful that we will have complete and full justice for Briana Taylor. Every day. I try to wake up and envision something different. That Attorney General General Cameron will see Briana as a 26 year old black woman that was murdered in her home that she should still be here today that she deserves justice. If any one of us did this wind to our neighbor's home and killed them, we would be charged, and so I do not think anything less should happen Just because someone is a police officer. Legally we've already heard And I should ask you from some experts who say it looks like it's an uphill battle legally to meet that that burden because the officers can claim self defense. They know there was a shot fired toward them in the beginning. I'm curious. If today's restitution is the only justice that ends up coming in the name of Briana Taylor, What do you think the response will be from you and others in the community? I think people in this community will be very upset. I think this is a community that has been forever altered by what had happened in Louisville. There's certainly ah, ton of trauma that has happened in Louisville. And this is a city that needs healing for us not to get justice for the officers not to be charged, will only cause further trauma in this community. And and quite frankly, I don't think it will sit well for the people that have been pro testing for more than 100 days. I think the people that are protesting are demanding full. Austin. We're very happy for Briana Taylor's mother. We certainly expected that there will be some restitution, paid her family but justice it's like an airplane. There are two wings to it. So we have restitution and on the other wing, we need criminal charges pressed against the officers. You mentioned the days and days of protests there have been celebrities magazine covers people making sure that her name continues to be said on that the pressure is kept up..

Briana Taylor Louisville Justice Taylor family Attorney Taylor Story US Hannah Drake Tameka Palmer Lameda Baker Greg Fischer Kentucky Ly One Kenneth Walker celebrities magazine murder Brianna Brown
"hannah drake" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:40 min | 2 months ago

"hannah drake" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Tell me how this will unify the community. The running of course, poet activist Hannah Drake lives near Churchill Downs. She's had a simmering frustration with the Derby for years. Even more. So, she says, as she faces arrest for obstructing highway by protesting in the streets. But I for Darby, too inconvenient me and block off street, not let me pass that fine. Drake, who is black, recently wrote a letter to the CEO asking for some self reflection of the institutions, lack of black representation and a lack of in her opinion, compassion. This is the institution that can redeem itself and they need to start by asking themselves. How can we be better neighbors to this? Adjacent community and to the very one way she thinks they could do better is by dumping a tradition, she says, is rooted in racism. Talking. Since the 19 twenties Derby fans have sung the state song my Old Kentucky home before the big race, sometimes weeping as they do so. It's been called an anti slavery song. But Emily Bingham says that's an accurate she's a local born historian who is working on a book on the History of the Minstrel Song was written by a white man from Pennsylvania about a black person being sold down River from Kentucky to the deep South to being sung by white men pretending to be black men on stages for white oil minces, Bingham adds that the man who wrote it, Stephen Foster was not an abolitionist. Churchill Downs says it will be played this year. But after some discussion, they've decided to have it performed by a solo bugler. Following a moment of silence, Poet Hannah Drake says that makes no difference. It's.

Hannah Drake Churchill Downs Emily Bingham Darby Derby Kentucky CEO Stephen Foster Pennsylvania
"hannah drake" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

06:23 min | 2 months ago

"hannah drake" Discussed on KQED Radio

"About 30,000. Landlords will receive $5000 my tenants only over $12,000 in rent. So if I am able to get into that lottery, that would be incredible. But it unfortunately really only helps a little bit. Is there anyone you can ask for help? I imagine you have surveyed the landscape pretty much already. I think absolute worst case scenario. I could maybe ask my parents, but my parents are older. They want to retire and no, they're not going to retire because I have to support my tenants. That's not right. My dad was furloughed and my mom actually has cancer says she's been on leave. So I have, you know my own personal things going on as well. I hate to ask this but have you thought about evicting your tenants? Yes. So I actually Contact an attorney in March when they were early and not paying. They stopped responding to me completely. I had no idea what to do. And this is the only place I own. I'm not like a professional landlord by any means. And he recommended that I tried affected them. And the purpose of that was actually to just start a conversation. So I figured if they received an eviction notice, maybe we could start a conversation. Work something out s O. My first court date was scheduled for July. 20th. Then I received a notice that it had been moved August 17th and I received another notice that it has been moved to December 23rd. By then my tenants will have been in my unit right free for nine months. And Willow. You almost $20,000 or something about that. On the other hand in this economy, if you evicted them with their be any guarantee anybody else could move in. If I'm able to get them out. I will probably just try to sell this unit. I just Accepted that I probably won't be getting any of that money back. To be honest, The sooner I can get my tenants out. The sooner I can sell my property and stop losing on it every single month in the best of all possible worlds. The people who are in that apartment now Would be able to pay right? Yes, but they can't at the moment they can't or they will not. I'm not sure the unfortunate truth is that we do have tenants are taking advantage of the situation. Right now, the way the victim moratorium is Britain, there is no incentive for tenants to work with landlords. My tenants have been spoken to me in months, and they legally don't have Tio with housing crisis. It's now somehow become my civic duty to provide free housing. It doesn't make any fence. And we're putting this burden solely on landlords. Katrina Balala, who owns a small property in Chicago, Thank you so much for being with us. Thanks for having me. Corona virus has hit some groups in the US harder than others. Tomorrow on weekend edition Sunday, the lead researcher of a new study explains why black and Latino communities have been so badly hurt in the reasons are different and very specific. Tune in for that conversation with Luke tomorrow by telling your smart speaker to play NPR your member station by name. If not the first Saturday in May. But this is Kentucky Derby Day after the postponing of the race is just one reason the 146 Derby is one for the history books As W. F B L Stephanie Wolf explains. Security often referred to as the two most exciting minutes in sports. The Kentucky Derby is also a marquee social event days. A fanfare Parties parade, a massive firework show. Ah, a lot of that is gone this year due to the global pandemic and even more notable None of 155,000 plus fans in the grandstands a revision Churchill Downs, the home of the Derby made recently. That's not all That's different this year. Louisville just marked 100 consecutive days of protest against racism and police violence and demonstrators plan to make Derby 101 days. Several groups held a press conference near Churchill Downs Friday. This's Ehren Jordan of No justice, No peace Louisville. We have several black organisations behind us, and we have full intent to black out their happened demands to cancel dirty something that's never been done before. Haven Harrington is CEO and host of main event sports radio. He's covered the Derby for years. He thinks it should be run. It's the city's signature event. But while the horse racing industry doesn't often weigh in on social justice issues, Harrington says, Now is not the time for silence in this town, you know, which is still waiting on bated breath for what's gonna happen with You know Briana Taylor and the officers involved can't just be big hats in pretty dresses. You have to say and do something to acknowledge the situation. Churchill Downs did issue a statement Thursday afternoon, acknowledging how black jockeys once dominated the race, but were then excluded and acknowledging the pain community members feel right now as they wait for the state attorney general and FBI to conclude their investigation into the police, killing a Briana Taylor. It's important to carry on, says Churchill Down CEO Bill Car Stange in here he is talking on CNBC support for hewing important are our traditions and culture in our community. Tell me how this will unify the community. The running of course, poet activist Hannah Drake lives near Churchill Downs. She's had a simmering frustration with the Derby for years. Even more. So, she says, as she faces arrest for obstructing the highway by protesting in the streets. But I for Darby, too inconvenient me and block off street, not let me pass that fine. Drake, who is black, recently wrote a letter to the CEO asking for some self reflection of the institutions, lack of black representation and a lack of in her opinion, compassion. This is the institution that can redeem itself and they need to start by asking himself. How can we be better neighbors? So this Adjacent community and to the very one way she thinks they could do better is by dumping a tradition, she says, is rooted in racism. Talking. Since the 19.

Churchill Downs CEO Briana Taylor attorney Kentucky Derby Louisville Hannah Drake Haven Harrington US Kentucky cancer Churchill Tio Katrina Balala Darby NPR Ehren Jordan Chicago
Activists demanding justice for Breonna Taylor protested on Kentucky Derby Day

Weekend Edition Saturday

03:01 min | 2 months ago

Activists demanding justice for Breonna Taylor protested on Kentucky Derby Day

"The first Saturday in May. But this is Kentucky Derby Day after the postponing of the race is just one reason the 146 Derby is one for the history books As W. F B L Stephanie Wolf explains. Security often referred to as the two most exciting minutes in sports. The Kentucky Derby is also a marquee social event days. A fanfare Parties parade, a massive firework show. Ah, a lot of that is gone this year due to the global pandemic and even more notable None of 155,000 plus fans in the grandstands a revision Churchill Downs, the home of the Derby made recently. That's not all That's different this year. Louisville just marked 100 consecutive days of protest against racism and police violence and demonstrators plan to make Derby 101 days. Several groups held a press conference near Churchill Downs Friday. This's Ehren Jordan of No justice, No peace Louisville. We have several black organisations behind us, and we have full intent to black out their happened demands to cancel dirty something that's never been done before. Haven Harrington is CEO and host of main event sports radio. He's covered the Derby for years. He thinks it should be run. It's the city's signature event. But while the horse racing industry doesn't often weigh in on social justice issues, Harrington says, Now is not the time for silence in this town, you know, which is still waiting on bated breath for what's gonna happen with You know Briana Taylor and the officers involved can't just be big hats in pretty dresses. You have to say and do something to acknowledge the situation. Churchill Downs did issue a statement Thursday afternoon, acknowledging how black jockeys once dominated the race, but were then excluded and acknowledging the pain community members feel right now as they wait for the state attorney general and FBI to conclude their investigation into the police, killing a Briana Taylor. It's important to carry on, says Churchill Down CEO Bill Car Stange in here he is talking on CNBC support for hewing important are our traditions and culture in our community. Tell me how this will unify the community. The running of course, poet activist Hannah Drake lives near Churchill Downs. She's had a simmering frustration with the Derby for years. Even more. So, she says, as she faces arrest for obstructing the highway by protesting in the streets. But I for Darby, too inconvenient me and block off street, not let me pass that fine. Drake, who is black, recently wrote a letter to the CEO asking for some self reflection of the institutions, lack of black representation and a lack of in her opinion, compassion. This is the institution that can redeem itself and they need to start by asking himself. How can we be better neighbors? So this Adjacent community and to the very one way she thinks they could do better is by dumping a tradition, she says, is rooted in racism.

Kentucky Derby Churchill Downs Haven Harrington Hannah Drake CEO Briana Taylor Louisville Kentucky Bill Car Stange Stephanie Wolf Ehren Jordan Darby FBI Cnbc Attorney
"hannah drake" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:56 min | 2 months ago

"hannah drake" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Since the 19 twenties Derby fans have sung the state song my Old Kentucky home before the big race, sometimes weeping as they do so. It's been called an anti slavery song. But Emily Bingham says that's inaccurate. She's a local born historian who is working on a book on the history of the minstrel song. It was written by a white man from Pennsylvania, about a black person being sold down river from Kentucky to the deep South to being sung by white men pretending to be black men on stages for White islands is Bingham adds that the man who wrote it, Stephen Foster was not an abolitionist. Churchill Downs says it will be played this year. But after some discussion, they've decided to have it performed by a solo bugler. Following a moment of silence, Poet Hannah Drake says that makes no difference. It's still doesn't align with their statement about empathy and change for NPR News and Stephanie Wolf in Louisville. You're listening to weekend edition from NPR news. Starting September. 5th Moon has an especially close encounter with the planet Mars tonight. They climb into good view by around 10, 30 or 11. PM Mars looks like a brilliant star at its closest it'll be less than one degree from the moon. About the width of a pencil held at arm's length. For much of South America. The encounter will be even closer. The moon will pass in front of Mars, blocking it from view. Such an event is called Our Quotation. The Moon will occult Mars from a Latin word that means to hide. Aw quotations of Mars or possible because both Mars and the moon stay close to the ecliptic, the sun's path across the sky, But occupations don't occur.

Emily Bingham NPR News Kentucky White islands Churchill Downs Hannah Drake Derby South America Stephen Foster Pennsylvania Stephanie Wolf Louisville
"hannah drake" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:48 min | 2 months ago

"hannah drake" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Radio. He's covered the Derby for years. He thinks it should be run. It's the city's signature event. But while the horse racing industry doesn't often weigh in on social justice issues, Harrington says, Now is not the time for silence in this town, know which is still waiting on bated breath for what's gonna happen with You know Briana Taylor and the officers involved can't just be big hats in pretty dresses. You have to say and do something to acknowledge the situation. Churchill Downs did issue a statement Thursday afternoon, acknowledging how black jockeys once dominated the race, but were then excluded and acknowledging the pain community members feel right now as they wait for the state attorney general and FBI to conclude their investigation into the police killing of Rianna Taylor. But it's important to carry on, says Churchill Down CEO Bill Car Standin here he is talking on CNBC support for this important part of our traditions and culture in our community. Tell me how this will unify the community. The running of course, poet activist Hannah Drake lives near Churchill Downs. She's had a simmering frustration with the Derby for years. Even more. So, she says, as she faces arrest for obstructing highway by protesting in the streets, But by for Darby, too Inconvenient me and block off street, not let me pass that fine Drink who is black, recently wrote a letter to the CEO, asking for some self reflection of the institutions, lack of black representation and a lack of in her opinion, compassion. This is the institution that can redeem itself and they need to start by asking themselves. How can we be better neighbors to this? Jason Community and to the very one way she thinks they could do better is by dumping a tradition, she says, is rooted in racism. Talking..

Churchill Downs Hannah Drake Darby CEO Briana Taylor Rianna Taylor Jason Community FBI CNBC Harrington Bill Car attorney
"hannah drake" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:42 min | 2 months ago

"hannah drake" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"He thinks it should be run. It's the city's signature event. While the horse racing industry doesn't often weigh in on social justice issues, Harrington says, Now is not the time for silence in this town. You know, which is still waiting on bated breath for what's gonna happen with, you know Briana Taylor and the officers involved. Can't just be big hats in pretty dresses. You have to say and do something to acknowledge the situation. Churchill Downs did issue a statement Thursday afternoon, acknowledging how black jockeys once dominated the race, but were then excluded and acknowledging the pain community members feel right now as they wait for the state attorney general and FBI to conclude their investigation into the police, killing a Briana Taylor. But it's important to carry on, says Churchill Down CEO Bill Car Stange in here he is talking on CNBC. This is important part of healing, important part of our traditions and culture in our community. Tell me how this will unify the community. The running of course. Poet activist Hannah Drake lives near Churchill Downs. She's had a simmering frustration with the Derby for years. Even more. So, she says, as she faces arrest for obstructing the highway by protesting in the streets, But by for Darby, too Inconvenient me and block off streets, not let me pass that I find Drake, who is black, recently wrote a letter to the CEO asking for some self reflection of the institutions, lack of black representation and a lack of in her opinion, compassion. This is the institution that can redeem itself and they need to start by asking themselves. How can we be better neighbors? So this Jason Community and to the city. One way she thinks they could do better is by dumping a tradition, she says, is rooted in racism..

Churchill Downs Briana Taylor Hannah Drake Bill Car Stange CEO Jason Community FBI Darby CNBC Harrington attorney
"hannah drake" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:52 min | 4 months ago

"hannah drake" Discussed on KQED Radio

"To all things considered from NPR news. As monuments come down around the country, a group in Louisville, Kentucky, is working on putting one up. It's a memorial dedicated to black people whose names have been lost to history. WFP eels Stephanie Wolf reports. Poet and author Hannah Drake stands near the banks of the Ohio River, looking from Kentucky across the southern Indiana Drake, who is black, thinks about the enslaved people who stood here more than a century ago. You wonder what they do when they weren't Working tobacco fields or him filled when they wanted to escape to Indiana. What were they dreaming about? Kentucky claimed to neutrality during the civil war, but it was a slave state and on the other side of the river was essentially freedom. And it's just right there. You see it, and if you just get across, then hopefully your entire life to be different. Nearby is a stretch of grass shaded by trees, the future site of the public art piece, a monument to black people who were enslaved. It's part of something called the Unknown Project from Louisville Artist Run nonprofit Ideas ex lab where Drake works. The memorial will start as a path of carved our caste footprints that will lead people from nearby history museums to the river, where there will be limestone benches and then more footprints leading to the river's edge. We wanted people to come here and sit And just acknowledge something, and if you sit on the bench for five minutes or you sit on the bench for five hours, I think seeing it will stir up something that's my whole. Drake says The project has many influences, including a visit to the National Lynching Memorial in Alabama. A site includes more than 806 foot tall hanging beans inscribed with names of lynching victims. But on these pillars, they also stamped the word unknown. So there are people that were lynched that they just don't know The names of it just broke my heart. Like, how could someone be here and be on? Somebody knew them? She also visited former plantations in Kentucky and Mississippi family is always the same story. We don't have their names or their names were written down as a name. They were property, so they're written down as a thing. So this is Not Hanna. This is the unknown project is for all of them. This was our way to say. We acknowledged that you were here you existed and we recognize that It's also for enslaved people whose names might be known, but their stories aren't like Lucy and Thornton Blackburn. They escaped from Kentucky by way of the Ohio River and went on to build a successful taxicab business in Canada. Rachel Platt is with Louisville Sprays. You're History Museum, one of several partners on the unknown project. She says she only recently learned about the black burns. How do we not know their story? What other stories are out there? And what are we missing as part of our history that we don't know about? It was Platt, who reached out to Hannah Drake and ideas ex lab about the Black Burns. Drake said she'd never heard about them before and in reading more about them. She came across the following phrase. Anything else about them is virtually unknown. There was that word again unknown, Drake says. Everything kind of clicked together, then. The project has been in the works for more than a year. But there's added residence at this moment because of Briana Taylor's death in Louisville. I feel with Rianna Taylor and the whole say her name campaign is the very same thing. That you have a young woman whose name would have surely been forgotten from history unless people started speaking her name over and over and over again. The plan is to install the benches in the footprints of the unknown project along the Ohio River next year for NPR News.

Hannah Drake Ohio River Kentucky Black Burns Louisville NPR News Rachel Platt WFP National Lynching Memorial Louisville Sprays Rianna Taylor Stephanie Wolf Briana Taylor Indiana History Museum Alabama Canada Thornton Blackburn Mississippi
"hannah drake" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

05:32 min | 4 months ago

"hannah drake" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"The Danish Union of Teachers. Students and kids of all ages might enjoy a story that's coming up tomorrow on weekend edition. Kermit the Frog will be on the program to talk about his new Disney Plus show Muppets now and about how he manages to stay so darn handsome despite the passage of time I soak in pond scum, and so that kind of does that it kind of keeps the frog's skin. Uh oh, nice and young looking. I suppose you could listen tomorrow by asking your smart speaker to play NPR or your member station by name. You're listening to all things considered from NPR news. As monuments come down around the country, a group in Louisville, Kentucky, is working on putting one up. It's a memorial dedicated to black people whose names have been lost to history. WFP yells Stephanie Wolf reports. Poet and author Hannah Drake stands near the banks of the Ohio River, looking from Kentucky across the southern Indiana Drake, who is black, thinks about the enslaved people who stood here more than a century ago. You wonder what they do when they weren't Working tobacco fields or him filled when they wanted to escape to Indiana. What were they dreaming about? Kentucky claimed neutrality during the Civil war, but it was a slave state and on the other side of the river. Was essentially freedom. And it's just right there. You can see it and if you just get across, then hopefully your entire life could be different. Nearby is a stretch of grass shaded by trees, the future site of a public art piece, a monument to black people who were enslaved. It's part of something called the Unknown Project from Louisville Artist Run nonprofit Ideas ex lab where Drake works. The memorial will start as a path of carved our caste footprints that will lead people from nearby history museums to the river, where there will be limestone benches and then more footprints leading to the river's edge. We wanted people to come here and sit And just acknowledge something, and if you sit on the bench for five minutes or you sit on the bench for five hours, I think seeing it will stir up something That's my hope. Drake says the project has many influences, including a visit to the National Lynching Memorial in Alabama. The site includes more than 806 foot tall hanging beans inscribed with names of lynching victims. But on these pillars, they also stamped the word unknown. So there are people that were lynched that they just don't know the names of It just broke my heart. Like, how could someone be here and be on somebody knew them. She also visited former plantations in Kentucky and Mississippi family is always the same story. We don't have their names or their names weren't written down as Name. They were a property, so they're written down as a thing. So this is not Hanna. This is a Negro gave the unknown project is for all of them. This was our way to say we acknowledge. That you were here you existed and we recognize that It's also for enslaved people whose names might be known, but their stories aren't like Lucy and Thornton Blackburn. They escaped from Kentucky by way of the Ohio River and went on to build a successful taxicab business in Canada. Richard Platt is with Louisville's Fraser History Museum, one of several partners on the unknown project. She says she only recently learned about the black burns. How do we not know their story? What other stories are out there? And what are we missing as part of our history that we don't know about? Was Platt, who reached out to Hannah Drake and ideas ex lab about the Black Burns. Drake said she'd never heard about them before and in reading more about them. She came across the following phrase. Anything else about them is virtually unknown. There was that word again unknown, Drake says. Everything kind of clicked together, then. The project has been in the works for more than a year. But there's added resonance at this moment because of Briana Taylor's death in Louisville. I feel with Rianna Taylor and the whole say her name campaign is the very same thing. That you have a young woman whose name would have surely been forgotten from history unless people started speaking her name over and over and over again. The plan is to install the benches and the footprints of the unknown project along the Ohio River next year. For NPR News and Stephanie Wolf and Louisville. This is NPR news. On this week's on the media. The organization pushing for whistleblower protection for cops says Our challenge isn't to identify police brutality. It is to prove it and you just can't always depend on a smart fun. We're going to have to rely on honest who can testify without fear. Don't miss this week's on the media. From W N I. C tomorrow morning.

Hannah Drake Ohio River Louisville Kentucky Black Burns NPR News NPR Richard Platt Stephanie Wolf Danish Union of Teachers Disney National Lynching Memorial Indiana WFP Rianna Taylor Briana Taylor Alabama Lucy Hanna
"hannah drake" Discussed on The Moth

The Moth

06:48 min | 4 months ago

"hannah drake" Discussed on The Moth

"At the moth. We ask that the stories people share our from their own memories, meaning that while it's tempting to tell a story that you heard from your grandmother about when she was a child. We always want our tellers to be firsthand witnesses. In some cases, however, our ancestors stories are very much relevant to our lives today some story start way way earlier like this first one. Hannah. Drake's tail starts before she was born, and even before her mother was born, and even before her grandmother was born. Hannah Drake told this at the Muhammad Ali. Center in Kentucky, where we partner with Louisville public media. The show was especially thrilling for us. Because Lonnie only Muhammad. Ali's widow was in attendance. Here's Hanna Drake. In, Two Thousand Sixteen I had the opportunity to travel to Senegal with the group of performing artists called roots and wings. There were about ten of us, and my daughter had an opportunity to join us on this trip. It was the first time that either of us. We're leaving the United States. The week that we were leaving. I logged onto facebook. And I remember watching philander still. Being murdered by the police in the passenger seat of his girlfriend's car. And his girlfriend was streaming it live on facebook. and. He had on a white t shirt. And I remember watching the blood. Start does pull. Across his shirt. And his girlfriend was screaming. I know you just didn't kill him. And, her daughter was in the back seat and she was saying. Mommy, it's going to be okay. And the day before that Alton sterling was shot in the chest by the police. In someone had recorded it and put the video on facebook so I also watched Alton sterling be murdered. On facebook. And I was so ready to get out of here. And I remember boarding the plane at admittedly I felt a little bit guilty because I was leaving at a time as a writer, and as a blogger where everybody was asking me Hannah. What do you think about this? What is there left to say? and. I didn't have any stories. I didn't have anything to tell them that would make it better. I just knew that I had to get out of here I. Just needed a minute to breathe. And the minute that I step foot into Senegal. I felt like I was home. I felt like finally. There was a place in this world where I belonged. And my friend and I who join me on the trip Cynthia we went to buy earrings. And I remember. We were in the shop, holding the earrings in such a way. That shop owner wouldn't think that we were trying to still them. And when we went to pay for them. We realized that the shop owner was outside of the shop. She wasn't even paying attention to us. And it finally dawned on us here in Senegal. Being black isn't a crime. And just trying to shop while black, we weren't criminals and it was like the world finally opened up to me. and Said Hannah we've been waiting for you. And I was determined to enjoy every minute. Of being in Senegal but I knew there would be one time one visit that would be challenging for me. And it was when we were taking a trip to Goree Island. And Bet Corey island is the door of no return. And it's the last point. Where enslaved black people were brought before they were put on slave ships. And I remember we to take a boat to get to Goree, island and you could see. The door of no return from the boat and it was so quiet, and the mood was so somber on the boat. And we stepped off in went inside. They call it the hell slaves. And it's just a two story stone building. And in this building they have rooms for men, women, Young Girls, infants and a room for those that would resist. And went inside of the room for Young for women, and my daughter went in the room for young women. And I was staring out of the window. Win this room, and when I say window mind, it's just two inches wide. And I heard my daughter start to weep. And she was crying this cry I never heard come out of her. and. It filled up the space of this room with echoes, and I started to walk to the door of no return. And I stood in the door and looked out at the ocean. And I could hear my daughter crying in the background, and I tried to imagine how it would fill in that time to know that I was getting on a ship and coming somewhere that I didn't know what I would have to leave my daughter behind. And I never got that sound out of my mind and I never forgot how to felt to stand in the door of no return, but I also never felt never forgot. How felt to be free for a minute? And when we came back to America I was so incredibly depressed. I knew that I was back to being the other person. Am Back to being racially profiled. And back to be inspected being concerned about driving. In back to my skin filming so heavy. And I remember I called my mom. And I told her we were there for two weeks at twenty, thousand, one hundred and sixty minutes of all my life just to be free. And we started talking about slavery. And the south. In so nonchalantly, my mom says..

Hannah Drake Senegal Bet Corey island Muhammad Ali facebook. Goree Island Alton sterling Kentucky Hanna Drake Louisville America United States Lonnie partner Goree Cynthia writer
"hannah drake" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

08:20 min | 4 months ago

"hannah drake" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Hannah Drake. In 2016 I had the opportunity to travel to finagle with the group of performing artists called Roots and Wings. There were about 10 of us and my daughter had an opportunity to join us on this trip. It was the first time that either of us were leaving the United States. A week that we were leaving. I logged on to Facebook. And I remember watching Philando Castille. Being murdered by the police in the passenger seat of his girlfriend's car. And his girlfriend was streaming it live on Facebook. And he had on a white T shirt. And I remember watching the blood started pool. Across his shirt. And his girlfriend was screaming. I know you just didn't kill him. And her daughter was in the back seat and she was saying, Mommy, it's going to be okay. And the day before that, Alton Sterling was shot in the chest by the police. And someone had recorded it and put the video on Facebook. So I also watched often sterling be murdered. On Facebook. And I was so ready to get out of here. And I remember boarding the plane. And admittedly, I felt a little bit guilty because I was leaving at a time as a writer and as a blogger, where everybody was asking me, Hannah, what do you think about this? What is there left to say? And I didn't have any stories. I didn't have anything to tell them that would make it better. I just knew that I had to get out of here. I just needed a minute to breathe. And the minute that I step foot into Senegal. I felt like I was home. I felt like finally There was a place in this world where I belonged. And my friend and I who joined me on the trip, Cynthia, we went to buy earrings. And I remember we were in the shop holding the earrings in such a way that the shop owner wouldn't think that we were trying to steal them. And when we went to pay for them We realized that the shop owner was outside of the shop. She wasn't even paying attention to us. And it finally dawned on us here in Senegal. Being black isn't a crime. And just trying to shop while black. We weren't criminals and it was like the world finally opened up to me. And said, Hannah, We've been waiting for you. And I was determined to enjoy every minute. Of being in cynical, but I knew there would be one time one visit that would be challenging for me. And it was when we were taking a trip to Goree Island. And at Cory Island is the door of no return. And it's the last point Were enslaved black people were brought before they were put on slave ships. And I remember we had to take a boat to get to Goree Island, and you could see The door of no return from the boat, and it was so quiet and the mood was so somber on the boat. And we stepped off and went inside. They call it the health of flavor. And it's just a two story stone building. And in this building, they have rooms for men, women, young girls, infants and a room for those that would resist. And I went inside of the room for young for women and my daughter were in the room for young women. And I was staring out of the window in this room. And when I say window mind, too, it's just two inches wide. And I heard my daughter start to weep. And she was crying. This cry I never heard come out of her. And it filled up the space of this room with echoes, and I started to walk to the door of no return. And I stood in the door and looked out. At the ocean. And I could hear my daughter crying in the background and I try to imagine Howard would fill in that time to know that I was getting on a ship and coming somewhere that I didn't know when I would have to leave my daughter behind. And I never got that found out of my mind. And I never forgot Howto felt to stand in the door for your return. But I also never felt never forgot have felt just to be free for a minute. And when we came back to America, I was so incredibly depressed. I know that I was back to being the other person. I'm back to being racially profiled and back to B comes back to being concerned about driving. And back to my skin feeling so heavy. And I remember I called my mom. And I told her we were there for two weeks had 20,160 minutes of all my life just to be free. And we started talking about slavery. In the South. And so nonchalantly my mom. Well, Hamma. You know, I used to pick cotton. And I couldn't believe that my mother had said this and I said, What did you say? And she said, when I was a little girl I used to pick cotton. And I said, Well, how long did you do this for? And she said, for three years From the time that I was nine until I was 12. And I still won't tell me about it. And she said my grandmother Would pick me and my brothers and sisters up and bring us to the cotton field. And we would pick cotton for 80 cents a day. And I couldn't imagine that my mother had to do that. And I said, Well, What happened in the fields. Tell me about it, and She said. I wouldn't repeat the names that they called me in those fields and my mother is 70 years old. And I said, Well, can you tell me about your grandmother? What was her name? And she said, I don't remember. We used to just color Mamie. And I said, Can you remember anybody? Beyond her grandmother, and she said no And it was like the history of who I was was lost in that cotton field. And I knew I had to see them. I was calling me And his life would have it. With my job, they said Hannah. You're going to do some work in Natchez, Mississippi. And admittedly as a black woman in America. I didn't want to go to Mississippi, but I knew something inside of me had to go to Mississippi and I was there to do some work. With the young group of girls called Girls and Pearls. Teaching them aren't In history and heritage, and I wanted to take my daughter with me and they connected me with the Tour guide. And I called him and he said Hannah when you fly Into Baton Rouge and drive to Natchez. Do not go through Jackson, Mississippi, because.

Hannah Drake Facebook Mississippi Goree Island America Senegal Philando Castille United States Natchez Alton Sterling Cory Island writer Jackson Cynthia Howto Howard Hamma Baton Rouge
"hannah drake" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

07:09 min | 4 months ago

"hannah drake" Discussed on KCRW

"Moth radio hour. I'm Jennifer Hickson. Memories are vital to storytelling at the mosque. We ask that the stories people share are from their own memories, meaning that while it's tempting to tell a story that you heard from your grandmother about when she was a child We always want our tellers to be firsthand witnesses. In some cases, however, our ancestor stories are very much relevant to our lives today. Some story start way way earlier. Like this 1st 1 Hannah Drakes tale starts before she was born, and even before her mother was born, and even before her grandmother was born. Can a. Drake told this at the Mohammed Ali Center in Kentucky, where we partner with Louisville public media. The show was especially thrilling for us because Lonnie Ali Mohammed Ali's widow was in attendance. Here's Hannah Drake. In 2016. I had the opportunity to travel too thin, A Gaul with the group of performing artists called Roots and wings. There were about 10 of us and my daughter had an opportunity to join us on this trip. It was the first time that either of us were leaving the United States. A week that we were leaving. I logged on to Facebook. And I remember watching Philando Castille. Being murdered by the police in the passenger seat of his girlfriend's car. And his girlfriend was streaming it live on Facebook. And he had on a white T shirt. And I remember watching the blood started pool. Across his shirt. And his girlfriend was screaming. I know you just didn't kill him. And her daughter was in the back seat and she was saying, Mommy, it's going to be okay. And the day before that, Alton Sterling was shot in the chest by the police. And someone had recorded it and put the video on Facebook. So I also watched often sterling be murdered. On Facebook. And I was so ready to get out of here. And I remember boarding the plane. And admittedly, I felt a little bit guilty because I was leaving at a time as a writer and as a blogger, where everybody was asking me, Hannah, what do you think about this? What is there left to say? And I didn't have any stories. I didn't have anything to tell them that would make it better. I just knew that I had to get out of here. I just needed a minute to breathe. And the minute that I step foot in the Senegal I felt like I was home. I felt like finally There was a place in this world where I belonged. And my friend and I who joined me on the trip, Cynthia, we went to buy earrings. And I remember we were in the shop holding the earrings in such a way that the shop owner wouldn't think that we were trying to steal them. And when we went to pay for them We realized that the shop owner was outside of the shop. She wasn't even paying attention to us. And it finally dawned on us here in Senegal. Being black isn't a crime. I'm just trying to shop while black. We weren't criminals and it was like the world finally opened up to me. And said, Hannah, We've been waiting for you. And I was determined to enjoy every minute. Of being in Senegal. But I knew there would be one time one visit that would be challenging for me. And it was when we were taking a trip to Goree Island. And at Cory Island is the door of no return. And if the last point Where enslaved black people were brought before they were put on slave ships. And I remember we had to take a boat to get to Goree Island, and you could see The door of no return from the boat, and it was so quiet and the mood was so somber on the boat. And we stepped off and went inside. They call it the health of slaves. And it's just a two story stone building. And in this building, they have rooms for men, women, young girls infants in a room for those that would resist And I went inside of the room for young for women and my daughter were in the room for young women. And I was staring out of the window in this room. And when I say window mind, too, it's just two inches wide. And I heard my daughter start to weep. And she was crying. This cry I never heard come out of her. And it filled up the space of this room with echoes, and I started to walk to the door of no return. I stood in the door and looked out. At the ocean. And I could hear my daughter crying in the background and I try to imagine Howard was filled in that time to know that I was getting on a ship and coming somewhere that I didn't know what I would have to leave my daughter behind. And I never got that found out of my mind. And I never forgot. Howto felt to stand in the door of no return, but I also never felt never forgot have felt just to be free for a minute. And when we came back to America, I was so incredibly depressed. I knew that I was back to being the other person. I'm back to being racially profiled. And back to beacon back to being concerned about driving. And back to my skin feeling so heavy. And I remember I called my mom. And I told her we were there for two weeks had 20,160 minutes of all my life just to be free. And we started talking about slavery. In the South. And so nonchalantly, my mom says. Well, Hiyama. You know, I used to pick cotton. And I couldn't believe that my mother had said this and I said, What did you say? And she said, when I was a little girl I used to pick cotton..

Facebook Senegal Hannah Drake Hannah Lonnie Ali Mohammed Ali Goree Island Hannah Drakes Mohammed Ali Center Jennifer Hickson Kentucky Philando Castille Louisville Alton Sterling United States Cory Island partner Hiyama Cynthia writer America
"hannah drake" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

06:50 min | 4 months ago

"hannah drake" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"This is the moth radio hour. I'm Jennifer Hickson. Memories are vital to storytelling at them off. We ask that the stories people share are from their own memories, meaning that while it's tempting to tell a story that you heard from your grandmother about when she was a child We always want our tellers to be firsthand witnesses. In some cases, however, our ancestor stories are very much relevant to our lives today. Some story start way way earlier. Like this 1st 1 Hannah Drakes tale starts before she was born, and even before her mother was born, and even before her grandmother was born. Can a. Drake told this at the Mohammed Ali Center in Kentucky, where we partner with Louisville public media. The show was especially thrilling for us because Lonnie Ali Mohammed Ali's widow was in attendance. Here's Hannah Drake. In 2016. I had the opportunity to travel too thin, a Gaul with the group of performing artists called Roots and Wings. There were about 10 of us and my daughter had an opportunity to join us on this trip. It was the first time that either of us were leaving the United States. A week that we were leaving. I loved onto Facebook. And I remember watching Philando Castille. Being murdered by the police in the passenger seat of his girlfriend's car. And his girlfriend was streaming it live on Facebook. And he had on a white T shirt. And I remember watching the blood start of pool. Across his shirt. And his girlfriend was screaming. I know you just didn't kill him. And her daughter was in the back seat and she was saying, Mommy, it's going to be okay. And the day before that, Alton Sterling was shot in the chest by the police. And someone had recorded it and put the video on Facebook. So I also watched Autumn sterling be murdered. On Facebook. And I was so ready to get out of here. And I remember boarding the plane. And admittedly, I felt a little bit guilty because I was leaving at a time as a writer and as a blogger, where everybody was asking me, Hannah, what do you think about this? What is there left to say? And I didn't have any stories. I didn't have anything to tell them that would make it better. I just knew that I had to get out of here. I just needed a minute to breathe. And the minute that I step foot into Senegal. I felt like I was home. I felt like finally There was a place in this world where I belonged. And my friend and I who joined me on the trip, Cynthia, we went to buy earrings. And I remember we were in the shop holding the earrings in such a way that the shop owner wouldn't think that we were trying to steal them. And when we went to pay for them We realized that the shop owner was outside of the shop. She wasn't even paying attention to us. And it finally dawned on us here in Senegal. Being black isn't a crime. I'm just trying to shop while black. We weren't criminals and it was like the world finally opened up to me. And said, Hannah, We've been waiting for you. And I was determined to enjoy every minute. Of being in Senegal. But I knew there would be one time one visit that would be challenging for me. And it was when we were taking a trip to Goree Island. And at Cory Island is the door of no return. And it's the last point Where enslaved black people were brought before they were put on slave ships. And I remember we had to take a boat to get to Goree Island, and you could see The door of no return from the boat, and it was so quiet and the mood was so somber on the boat. And we stepped off and went inside. They call it the health of slaves. And it's just a two story stone building. And in this building, they have rooms for men, women, young girls, infants and a room for those that would resist. And I went inside of the room for young for women and my daughter were in the room for young women. And I was staring out of the window in this room. And when I say window mind, too, it's just two inches wide. And I heard my daughter start to weep. And she was crying. This cry I never heard come out of her. And it filled up the space of this room with echoes, and I started to walk to the door of no return. And I stood in the door and looked out. At the ocean. And I could hear my daughter crying in the background and I try to imagine Howard was filled in that time to know that I was getting on a ship and coming somewhere that I didn't know what I would have to leave my daughter behind. And I never got that found out of my mind. And I never forgot. Howto felt to stand in the door of no return, but I also never felt never forgot have felt just to be free for a minute. What? We came back to America. I was so incredibly depressed. I knew that I was back to being the other person. I'm back to being racially profiled. And back to beacon back to being concerned about driving. And back to my skin feeling so heavy. And I remember I called my mom. And I told her we were there for two weeks had 20,160 minutes of all my life just to be free. And we started talking about slavery. In the South..

Facebook Senegal Hannah Goree Island Hannah Drake Lonnie Ali Mohammed Ali Hannah Drakes Mohammed Ali Center Jennifer Hickson America Louisville Kentucky Philando Castille Alton Sterling United States Cory Island partner Cynthia writer Howard
"hannah drake" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

06:46 min | 4 months ago

"hannah drake" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"I'm Jennifer Hickson. Memories are vital to storytelling at the mosque. We ask that the stories people share are from their own memories, meaning that while it's tempting to tell a story that you heard from your grandmother about when she was a child We always want our tellers to be firsthand witnesses. In some cases, however, our ancestor stories are very much relevant to our lives today. Some story start way way earlier. Like this 1st 1 Hannah Drakes tale starts before she was born, and even before her mother was born, and even before her grandmother was born. Can a. Drake told this at the Mohammed Ali Center in Kentucky, where we partner with Louisville public media. The show was especially thrilling for us because Lonnie Ali Mohammed Ali's widow was in attendance. Here's Hannah Drake. In 2016. I had the opportunity to travel too thin, a Gaul with the group of performing artists called Roots and Wings. There were about 10 of us and my daughter had an opportunity to join us on this trip. It was the first time that either of us were leaving the United States. A week that we were leaving. I logged on to Facebook. And I remember watching Philando Castille. Being murdered by the police in the passenger seat of his girlfriend's car. And his girlfriend was streaming it live on Facebook. And he had on a white T shirt. And I remember watching the blood start of pool. Across his shirt. And his girlfriend was screaming. I know you just didn't kill him. And her daughter was in the back seat and she was saying, Mommy, it's going to be okay. And the day before that, Alton Sterling was shot in the chest by the police. And someone had recorded it and put the video on Facebook. So I also watched often sterling be murdered. On Facebook. And I was so ready to get out of here. And I remember boarding the plane. And admittedly, I felt a little bit guilty because I was leaving at a time as a writer and as a blogger, where everybody was asking me, Hannah, what do you think about this? What is there left to say? And I didn't have any stories. I didn't have anything to tell them that would make it better. I just knew that I had to get out of her. I just needed a minute to breathe. And the minute that I step foot into Senegal. I felt like I was home. I felt like finally There was a place in this world where I belonged. And my friend and I who joined me on the trip, Cynthia, we went to buy earrings. And I remember we were in the shop holding the earrings in such a way that the shop owner wouldn't think that we were trying to steal them. And when we went to pay for them We realized that the shop owner was outside of the shop. She wasn't even paying attention to us. And it finally dawned on us here in Senegal. Being black isn't a crime. And just trying to shop while black. We weren't criminals and it was like the world finally opened up to me. And said, Hannah, We've been waiting for you. And I was determined to enjoy every minute. Of being in Senegal. But I knew there would be one time one visit that would be challenging for me. And it was when we were taking a trip to Goree Island. And at Cory Island is the door of no return. And it's the last point Were enslaved black people were brought before they were put on slave ships. And I remember we had to take a boat to get to Goree Island, and you could see The door of no return from the boat, and it was so quiet and the mood was so somber on the boat. And we stepped off and went inside. They call it the health of flavor. And it's just a two story stone building. And in this building, they have rooms for men, women, young girls, infants and a room for those that would resist. And I went inside of the room for young for women and my daughter were in the room for young women. And I was staring out of the window in this room. And when I say window mind, too, it's just two inches wide. And I heard my daughter start to weep. And she was crying. This cry I never heard come out of her. And it filled up the space of this room with echoes, and I started to walk to the door of no return. I stood in the door and looked out. At the ocean. And I could hear my daughter crying in the background and I try to imagine How would we fill in that time to know that I was getting on a ship and coming somewhere? That I didn't know what I would have to leave my daughter behind? And I never got that found out of my mind. And I never forgot. Howto felt to stand in the door of no return, but I also never felt never forgot have felt just to be free for a minute. And when we came back to America, I was so incredibly depressed. I knew that I was back to being the other person. I'm back to being racially profiled. And back to beacon back to being concerned about driving. And back to my skin feeling so heavy. And I remember I called my mom. And I told her we were there for two weeks had 20,160 minutes of all my life just to be free. And we started talking about slavery. In the.

Facebook Hannah Senegal Hannah Drake Lonnie Ali Mohammed Ali Hannah Drakes Goree Island Mohammed Ali Center Jennifer Hickson Louisville Kentucky Philando Castille Alton Sterling United States Cory Island partner America Cynthia writer
"hannah drake" Discussed on News & Talk 1380 WAOK

News & Talk 1380 WAOK

08:54 min | 4 months ago

"hannah drake" Discussed on News & Talk 1380 WAOK

"Okay now backto on point wandering stone. Well, win well on news and talked. 13. 80 W okay? Music live. Well, want to news 13? 80 Okay? Tell me Harry are instant odd sometime on together on the last evening of arise an artist's lounge and we had a great conversation just talked about. Just how he was in the music industry, how he started music industry and how hey had audition and he had this song that he had actually just started singing and the song is with you. And Ah, it's amazing how people can can hear your music and that lady find out that they actually want to invest in your music. So he talked about how Newton Baker and Blair Underwood were very instrumental and making sure that that song came alive and it was just amazing, just awesome. And so there will be another arrives and artists lounge happening on Thursday. And Michelle Rachel will be there with Ethan's David analogy brought, but it's all living here, up to a drive in concert series jokes and jam. That's goingto happen on this. Coming Saturday, the Georgia International Convention Center there in the parking lot, and it's just gonna be an outdoors type of bet and this it's going to be Amazing. So I had a great time. Great died. Let's go now to our own minds. Male of Southwest Atlanta. Hi, How are you? Wonder. Yes. Hello? Hello. This is May Yes, I can hear you. Okay? You could, but, you know We're all stuff that going on. Sort of found backtracking. Talk about the masses. Delays. Me and you go around supposed All. You're just like I told you once. Hirable publican couldn't sleep at night. Hello. Yeah, I hear you. Him. Oh, okay. You know, I mean, I wake up, you know that you are Carlo Macleod. Here, number the clown. And now you talk about the mat? Yeah. Press couple days. Talking about Now we just got out of the way While he and his horrible scumbag out there I have the combat Oh government camp. Not talk about I will great leaders that passed away. He only she know he owned and you're not talking about what brought us scumbag. You know, That was what you always kill you that would basically out of wood so called Republicans. You think he's just being politically correct, Teo talk about CT, Vivian and these civil right I got, you know and are not dark. You know, I love you. I don't know why you public a lot. I hear you are hearing it. Yeah. I think it just got Tio. Um, unfortunately disconnected from male. But thanks so much for calling a healthy they connected and stay on point as I was talking earlier and certainly about degenerate conversation, But I'm talking about just the names. The names of those Young black girls and also women whose lives were taken by police brutality and police violence. And it's just amazing. And so when Attorney Crenshaw Begin to just kind of carved that hashtag say her name. It just began to bring awareness and it was during the Sandra bland Incident that that name was actually forthcoming. And it came forward to begin to amplify the voices of these voiceless women. And so now, even in this day, and even in this time You know we're going to do the same for Briana Taylor, Louisville, Kentucky that empty who worked it to hospitals during the pandemic tale ahead dreams of becoming a nurse, but she was killed Vitaly March their teams and the officers. You know, executed A no knock warrant burst into our apartment at night while she and her boyfriend, Kenneth Walker, we're sleeping and unaware that they were police officers because they did not defend themselves. Walker shot at them in an attempt to protect Taylor and himself. And then, of course, you know how the story when the officers shot back over 20 rounds. Hitting Taylor eight times. And then it turned out that the officers should have never been at Taylor's house to begin with, because the suspect that they were looking for was already in custody. Can you believe this was already in sitting at the time And so Walker was initially charged with the attempted murder of an officer. He shot in the leg, but all the prosecutors eventually dropped the charge. In many of the initial reports about her death, Rianna Taylor was labeled as a suspect rather than a victim. It was a black woman like Louisville based blogger, author and activist Hannah Drake. Who work to expose the real truth. About Phil's death and the days after her murder, because sometimes in cases like this when you have black women in like manner, but I'm focusing on black women whose lives were taken at the hands of police officers. Sometimes their work behind the scenes to really cover the truth or to discard the truth or to get rid of the truth of what actually happened. Or to not even really right down in the police report. What really happened to just leave it blank? And that's part of what happened in this Briana Tail case. But Because people like you and I are continuing to say her name. Briana Taylor. You know, Briana. She had two things really think about it that were working against her. This is why would he talk about reform in our criminal justice system? Talk about just reform and social equality is these things that are happening is because of that brown our tailor. She was a black Individual And a woman. And those are two things that she had working against her. And so as we continue would say her name. You know, this campaign is just drawing attention to Taylor's killings and get national nationwide protest. To actually help to continue to stand up and make a ad for young women and live like Rianna, Taylor and others and so constantly We keep saying her name, but not only the name of Briana Taylor is that next before me, Chef Andr, said Miriam Carey. Dardenne Isha! How is Machel yet And all of the other black women. Sandra Bland and all of the others who have been victims. Let us not forget that being black women their names matter unless continue to stand and support. Adjusted for these blacks were better join the conversation is for for 89 to 27. 03 It is on point will wander. Once we're news.

Briana Taylor Rianna Taylor Sandra Bland Louisville Newton Baker Kenneth Walker Georgia International Conventi Blair Underwood officer Carlo Macleod Michelle Rachel Atlanta Teo Kentucky murder Attorney Vivian Ethan Crenshaw
"hannah drake" Discussed on 2 Bears 1 Cave with Tom Segura & Bert Kreischer

2 Bears 1 Cave with Tom Segura & Bert Kreischer

12:54 min | 8 months ago

"hannah drake" Discussed on 2 Bears 1 Cave with Tom Segura & Bert Kreischer

"Brisket. I made a fifteen pound brisket last night. Trying to figure out who broke. Who Lost. I think I had Broccoli by way I didn't I didn't it would have been you because I didn't have. I had Broccoli in a Egg Patty things and eggs for breakfast and then I didn't eat until nine o'clock at night I had Swordfish brisket okay. So I think you gotta by the Dandy suits guy. Well let's wait until this economic downturn. Let's see cheaper can get Dandy suits before? We could probably get quite a deal on them. Not everyone's going out by dandies middle on essential like business like that. Oh they've got to be like what are we GONNA do? I can't figure this one out. Are you trying to support local businesses? I am worried about my sweatshop not spice. That's why they changed. The name of it is what cycle. Oh Yeah I'm worried about cycle. Actually I'm going to. I should call Hannah Drake right now. I don't have a fucking number number. I was GonNa tell her because all these all these instructors that work there are now kind of out of work. Yes and it's impossible to the job and I was going to try to tell them that what they should do is lean into a podcast or lean in to social media And like I I would definitely listen to Hannah. Drake handled is the first on the very first episode. She's the way the waitress came in with the drinks. She's also my instructor for Spin Site for spin cycles ago sweat cycles cycle but she has great player. Great Tastes in music so she put together a playlist and puts it on her instagram. But what did you do is them on spotify list so that people like me that are getting on a treadmill can fund. Listen to music when you don't know what comes up next. Yeah and put together and deal on Go get doughnuts so bad why I know I'm just thinking of something to do. Yeah about my Liam. It'd be so mad at me if I like. I'm not allowed to leave the house except to see you Yeah she has. Put me on. Strict lockdown strict lockdown. Because she's because we asked you to the girls because the girls WANNA GO PARTY PARTY. No other. The friends are off. They're like dominant. Georgia was like I'm GonNa Apis House for the weekend and Liens like by the way if we were in high school. How great would this have been? If you're like oh school's just over now shit. I would have been and I hate to say this because I know that their kids doing this. Yeah I would have been the kid going but I can't get it fuck. Yeah of course fuck it. I'm partying balls. I'm going out in the boat. I'm going fucking wake boarding. I'm drinking. Who Cares who cares. They had their. I would've been that good. Of course you'd be like I don't care if I get pregnant we're all GonNa die. I mean maybe I take that back because AIDS came out when I was a kid and I was terrified. Fucking tariff getting AIDS. Yeah back when we thought straight white dude get AIDS. Yeah I was terrified. I got drunk with a bunch of people from the CDC in Atlanta Takano. My Shit at laughing skuld is a long time ago And I said something. About what diseases do we need to worry about like salt we just bullshitting and I said like and they said something about aids and they all laughed at me one of the guys at the CDC drunk said do you know what we call a straight guy with AIDS. I said what he goes a liar. I Went Holy Shit. All I heard that was. I've been wearing condoms for nothing. Yeah you don't need to wear them when I was like. I'm not like this is where I spend my conspiracy theory but like it would have decimated our friend population like how many. How many kids did you go to high school that have AIDS? That are straight. How many oh you run through them right now. None Zero like that questions. Ridiculous zero of your friends from high school that are straight have AIDS none and but they told you as a kid. You're going to get AIDS. Yeah and it's not like it's not like wheel an AIDS patient in your school. No way did we had one. Oh I'm GONNA top this but I'm dying to hear the story. Well they were like you need to go to the auditorium and We went to the auditorium. And there's just like a lady sitting on stage Kinda like downtrodden. Where like what is this? Don't even tell us what's happening. And then they're like okay. We got This is a special speaker. And you know Blah Blah Blah. Were still like you know listening kind of zoning out. And they're like and you know she's got something really important to to tell you guys and we're like okay and then she's like my name. I forget her name. She goes about it And I have AIDS and everybody was like what because we'd never heard anything like that and then she went on to tell us that she got it. I think from a blood transfusion and that her T. Cell Count was down to like thirty or something. Oh blood trez use that Shit. Got My die soon and gave us his whole. Of course it was so sambre was so depressing and then not long later. They've made an they announced. They let us know their like she died. When everybody's like okay cool? They're like so. Don't get AIDS. They brought us in tenth grade And they brought in a TV into religion class and we're like sweet and pass when they will in the TV wheel in the TV Mister Dante puts in the tape. Hits play and he's a gentleman this third trimester abortion and walks out of the room. And we're like we say full Third Trimester abortions broke apart. The baby pulled out the body parts. What what's crazy is that you know gallows humor were much boys always high school they show a pussy and we go fucking bananas. Yeah like we see a pussy and we're like Oh shit oh shit and then they go in it when I go God. This is going to get an arm comes out. What the fuck they broke apart. That baby piece by piece showed us that whole fucking thing right God damn in and then they put it back in and put it back together. I had to form my personality somehow. I'm sure that did something they bring up they bring in dudes into our chapel and they'd give a speech My name's Dave. I'm twenty two years old and driving down the causeway drunk going the wrong way and I killed a whole family and I'm here to talk to you about drinking and driving and all this or like. Yeah we're not fucking assholes day yeah we have a couple drinks and drive fucking Jesus. I remember that the They brought in coach a college basketball coach and he gave a speech and it was a good speech. You know I forget like but it was. It was some type of motivation. He was a good speaker and then I found out that they paid him like ten or twenty thousand dollars for that. I was like what were and this was not at the. Here's the thing wasn't a big time like top tier coach. But that is part of your that you know job lane that is. There's the speaking market in the you go and you get hired to do these things and I was like Jesus Christ and then years later when I started doing standup My the school reach out to me and I remembered that I was like. Yeah but you gotta pay up. And they're like well. You're an alum. So can you give us a discount? And I was like no and then they go will then. I guess we won't do speak. I speak to my high school in a second. Oh Yeah I'd go this way. You like them. No no this is what I do. I said to speak their. And then I'd be I'd go faculty priests get outside locked. The doors and I would give the boys a lesson fuck in life. What would you tell them? I tell them number one. Fuck school find out what you. WanNa do and do it and love it. I wish someone had told me about comedy so much more. I like this. What's the hardest part about taking this time off is that I don't feel like I feel put upon because I love what I do I will I would work. You know I worked every single weekend I can. Yeah I love doing comedy. It's the bat. And the fact that it's taken away from me makes me like I was so deflated when we were in New Orleans and they came in the bus and they were like who he pulled the shows. I was so fucking deflated and I felt so depressed for the next three days. I couldn't get out of it. I was like I was like. So what am I do? Yeah that's new reality for us but every kid in that room should find that thing. They love to do video games collecting baseball cards. Whatever it is if you love it you're gonNA fucking succeed at it if you love it you got to pursue it you got to pursue. I talk about it in that new special really. I do yeah. I'm serious really because I talk about it because I talked about the fact that we meet a lot of people and it started to bum me out to meet people that go. Oh yeah man my fucking. This is the highlight of my life. Because my life sucks. I'll be like what the fuck man and then they go like you know. Yeah I hate what I do and you're like well. Why are you doing that so it just became like a theme to build off but yeah I believe in that that that I mean? It's something that everybody kind of knows but for some reason they don't buy into but it is true that if you really pursue Work in a passion space. Something you're passionate about. It becomes the best thing ever. Yeah even if all of us became like the they don't realize that like we were obsessed with doing standup obsessed and broke. Yes we were assessed. Escrowing you stay in it forever because your obsession necessitates that you do it. You know you have to remember choice. I don't have a choice. I don't get to but I don't want to give a discount to my fucking school. Okay that's not a loving or not loving standard performance fuck you. I paid full tuition. Why the hell do I have to give you a discount? We had we had We had our baseball team. We played we used to play alumnis and And they were like just local guys that used to play for the baseball team and then our team at the time would play them so one guy was a baker. I think are like a electrocution. It was like every one of them was like he's a cop. He's a firefighter. Yeah he's a bakeries electrician and is before becoming a baker was an artisanal thing. It was like you just were Baker and I remember being on stealing second base and I was talking to the guy and I want him say use the baker and I said I said so. He was like covering the bag and I guess what do you do for a living and he goes Baker? I said do you like what you do is fuck no and I went. Oh Yeah it's horrible and I was. I remember looking at me as horrible to feel that way. Yeah and I remember looking at all the guys that we're playing against and I was like. Oh they all those guys own hated their jobs. They used to be the mandate. And now you look at it and you're like Oh kids. I tell that everyone find the thing you love to do. I also feel like there's such a great. I mean this is a personality type thing but working for yourself like if I didn't have comedy and you go like what would you be doing? I would go well. I would find some business that it's the business is I can do it. Yeah I mean like that's what I love about. This era is You know talking about sneakers earlier and like you. Can you could buy a bunch of sneakers and do a online thing and and you know have them auctioned and sell them. Direct like that type of thinking and work is what I would pursue. If I wasn't doing comedy I would try to make a living not going to an office I would make. I wouldn't go to office. It's funny I. I met a kid who said he wanted to be a Youtube Star. Youtube a Youtube Star Youtube Stars. And then you and then you see that. And you're like you're like wow that's silly and then you put up youtube videos that I edit and fun and then we'll fucking why wouldn't you just get better at it? Absolutely Logan Paul Krugman. I don't know he's got me dial in. I watched a couple of videos because Joe was talking about him and they've really moved fast and just he knows what the fuck is doing and he's got me like I'm watching. The guy watched him get knocked out and then resolute knows like he's living. His dream is living in his best life. Yeah yeah maybe that'd be a fleet. What was I going to mention to you fucking? Forgot just.

AIDS Hannah Drake Youtube Broccoli instructor spotify Logan Paul Krugman Georgia basketball CDC Liam PARTY Baker New Orleans baseball Spin Site Mister Dante Joe
"hannah drake" Discussed on Gravy

Gravy

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"hannah drake" Discussed on Gravy

"The southern food ways alliance believes that well told stories complement wellmixed drinks if you agree check out our latest book the southern food ways alliance guide to cocktails authors jerry slater and sarah camp my lem gathered classic and contemporary recipes for more than twenty bartenders working all across the american south the 88 cocktail recipes are accompanied by stories of spiritus lore think of them as conversation starters for your next gathering pick up a copy of the sfa guide to cocktails wherever you buy books cheers and happy reading artist in poet hannah drake of louisville kentucky host occasional allfemale dinners she asked beach guess each woman to bring two things a dish in their mother air just reminded me how we are here in america and we wonder why we do these things and we don't know why we do them you're listening to greg gravy gravy grain proved stories of the changing americansouth toll through the production of the southern food ways once i'm john to yet your hoechst dinners with a purpose or having a moment suppers with a conscience are on the rise from suppers at celebrate refugees influx forced to negotiate new identities to dinners focused on conversations about uneasy subjects like racism over accra soup anjola thrice and evening feast is where we connect through discussions of politics in dinner parties in history space come to think of it dinners of always afforded opportune moments to think through what vexes us and what delights us and what nourishes us today reporter rocks and scott takes us to a kitchen in louisville kentucky where one woman encourages african americans to connect to africa over food.

hannah drake scott kentucky african americans jerry slater sarah sfa louisville america greg gravy reporter africa