36 Burst results for "Hanna Hanna"

Fresh update on "hanna " discussed on The Bancroft Brothers Animation Podcast

The Bancroft Brothers Animation Podcast

01:20 min | 15 hrs ago

Fresh update on "hanna " discussed on The Bancroft Brothers Animation Podcast

"So basically, I had my very first pitch to Eric Coleman and he gave me some notes on it. At the exact same time, so I knew a Fred cyber who definitely was a key figure in my career as well. I knew of him because one thing about me, I'll say maybe that might be helpful to others as I am extremely observant. And I really watch what's going on. And I just try to think ahead a little bit. And so when I was at Hanna barbera as a PA before my Disney job, there was this guy that became president named Fred cyber, and he was doing this crazy thing where he was reinstating a shorts program based on the style of creating that was done for Looney tune cartoons, which I'm a massive fan on. And I found that very interesting that somebody was coming in and reclaiming this way of creating. So I happen to see was that the what a cartoon of what a program is to kick ass girls, which became girls. Girls. That era. So I was a little intern and then a PA walking around photocopying, pulling drawings out of the trash can, just watching Gandhi and Craig mccracken and these people. And Fred cyber doing this amazing thing..

Eric Coleman Fred Cyber Hanna Barbera Fred Craig Mccracken Gandhi
Manaea 9 KS, Chapman Homers for A’s in 10–4 Win Over Padres

AP News Radio

00:40 sec | 2 months ago

Manaea 9 KS, Chapman Homers for A’s in 10–4 Win Over Padres

"Sharman I it took a perfect game into the sixth inning and Matt Chapman smacked a three run Homer in the athletics ten four blowout over the Padres when I it kept the Padres off the base paths until he issued a one out walk to jurickson Profar and pinch hitter Eric Hosmer followed with a bloop single every time I go out there just you know get a little more confidence in my stuff and you know just going out there and transaction terms so anyway can avoid one Elvis Andrus had three hits and two RBIs for the ace who split the two game series mark Hanna added RBI singles in the second and fourth innings Blake snow had another short outing for San Diego allowing seven runs and seven hits in four innings I'm Dave Ferrie

Matt Chapman Padres Jurickson Profar Eric Hosmer Sharman Homer Athletics Elvis Andrus Mark Hanna Blake Snow San Diego Dave Ferrie
What is Pink-Collar Crime

Business Confidential Now with Hanna Hasl-Kelchner

01:37 min | 4 months ago

What is Pink-Collar Crime

"How common is pink collar fraud. And what exactly is it so pink. Color crime is low to medium level employees comma primarily women comma. Who's feel from the workplace. This turn came out and was popularized in one thousand nine hundred eighty nine by criminal just dr kathleen daily so. I didn't come up with it. But it is the one crime. Women really accelerate and for women in the audience. Don't get upset with me. Because i'm not picking on women. I'm highlighting the fact that they are in the lower to mid level positions. Only yet they know where every dime they come into a business and goes out of business so they are the ones who have access to the money and you know you said a little bit about. My background was a special agent with us customs. My idea of criminals were bad guys and most people think of criminals as bad guys. Well i hate to bring it to you. But it's not the bad guys that you need to be scared of. It's the nice people that you work with that you know ended up crossing the line and they might steal from you so it changed my view of criminals and i say i can't get out of bed in the morning if i think everyone is out to rip me off. We have to trust people. But it's trust but verify. Does that make sense. Well that makes a lot of sense and you know maybe if those lower level positions got paid more they wouldn't feel the need to steal but that's a separate conversation.

Dr Kathleen United States
"hanna " Discussed on The Ordinary, Extraordinary Cemetery

The Ordinary, Extraordinary Cemetery

05:03 min | 4 months ago

"hanna " Discussed on The Ordinary, Extraordinary Cemetery

"Removing debris from the slope each shift contained seventy five to one hundred men mind general manager. Clark ordered arrangements made for receiving bodies. He ordered caskets and suits. The bodies were to be washed and dressed before being placed in the casket. An article that appeared in the laramie boomerang stated disaster at hanna. The worst catastrophe in the whole history of wyoming occurred tuesday morning at ten thirty a..

Clark hanna wyoming
"hanna " Discussed on Business Confidential Now with Hanna Hasl-Kelchner

Business Confidential Now with Hanna Hasl-Kelchner

02:01 min | 4 months ago

"hanna " Discussed on Business Confidential Now with Hanna Hasl-Kelchner

"Us understand what customers do when they get an invoice. And where the these pinch points. Friction can a her so hannah. When i talk about this stuff sometimes it's pretty Pretty easy everybody can do when i'm about what we're going to talk about today and people will say. Oh that's not true. I don't do that. And i don't do this but i'm here to tell you that the information that i'm going to share comes from my readers I have a free easiness. Goes to ten thousand people. And i ask questions in it. And the intimation of put together For this tip sheet that we've been talking about for what we're going to talk about today. And i also give much longer talks on. This comes from things. A told me accounts payable professionals told me This is what happens so anyway. I'm off on a little bit of a tangent. But let's get back to what you wanna talk about. I think it's important that people understand have what happens to their invoices when They send them to be paid. Because if you understand what happens with those invoices Then you'll know how you can address the issue so when an invoice shop and accounts payable to be paid What happens is the invoice process. That takes that invoice and they do what we call the three way match. They match the invoice against the purchase water and against the receiving documents. Assuming that those documents exist and that type of a purchase and then if all three match and it's a big if the invoice is then sent over to whoever initiated the purchase i call the requisition for approval. Now if anything doesn't match if they can't find anything if there's a piece of information missing if they don't know who audited so they don't know who to get the approval from it goes and it gets pushed to the side and it goes on you know What we call the discrepant pile so they have to do some extra

Hannah Mary hannah hassle kelch ner mary schaffer Friction ten thousand people today more than twenty business book hannah first three match three way match fifty influence top
Shrewd Invoicing Tips Every Smart Business Needs to Know About

Business Confidential Now with Hanna Hasl-Kelchner

02:01 min | 4 months ago

Shrewd Invoicing Tips Every Smart Business Needs to Know About

"Us understand what customers do when they get an invoice. And where the these pinch points. Friction can a her so hannah. When i talk about this stuff sometimes it's pretty Pretty easy everybody can do when i'm about what we're going to talk about today and people will say. Oh that's not true. I don't do that. And i don't do this but i'm here to tell you that the information that i'm going to share comes from my readers I have a free easiness. Goes to ten thousand people. And i ask questions in it. And the intimation of put together For this tip sheet that we've been talking about for what we're going to talk about today. And i also give much longer talks on. This comes from things. A told me accounts payable professionals told me This is what happens so anyway. I'm off on a little bit of a tangent. But let's get back to what you wanna talk about. I think it's important that people understand have what happens to their invoices when They send them to be paid. Because if you understand what happens with those invoices Then you'll know how you can address the issue so when an invoice shop and accounts payable to be paid What happens is the invoice process. That takes that invoice and they do what we call the three way match. They match the invoice against the purchase water and against the receiving documents. Assuming that those documents exist and that type of a purchase and then if all three match and it's a big if the invoice is then sent over to whoever initiated the purchase i call the requisition for approval. Now if anything doesn't match if they can't find anything if there's a piece of information missing if they don't know who audited so they don't know who to get the approval from it goes and it gets pushed to the side and it goes on you know What we call the discrepant pile so they have to do some extra

Hannah
How to Successfully Drive the Strategy Execution Process

Business Confidential Now with Hanna Hasl-Kelchner

02:07 min | 5 months ago

How to Successfully Drive the Strategy Execution Process

"Do so many organizations come up short in translating their strategy into real results. Where do they go wrong. Well sometimes it's really just bad strategy They haven't thought carefully through Who their customers are how they distinguish themselves in the marketplace. What makes them unique. What causes customers to choose them versus choosing somebody else and and really an applies whether it's a for profit or not for profit organization but that's really a small percentage of the time most of the time organizations don't execute because a lot of the things that we talk about in the book and in the book we we drive the identify these seven gears that we've experienced over time that keep organizations from really being able to execute well There are We break it up. Into a couple of categories. One is the first category or the foundation or the environment gears. There are three of those. Those are Right right right having the right people in the right roles with the right capabilities. The second of those perform environment. Gears is the organ is aligning the organization architecture. So we talk about the systems and structures the processes and culture and making sure that that's aligned to your strategy and then the third is round creating a culture of communications so being able to communicate up down sideways diagonally. Hold the difficult tough high conflict conversations And and and some of that starts with building that culture and having a culture of trust so that we are tough conversations. We know that it's because we care about each other and we're trying to do the right thing. And then we've also identified these four performance ears which really they're designed to align the performance of every person in the to the strategy of the organization. So they're they're relatively simple concepts but we don't necessarily execute them on all well all the time

Soft Skill Secrets That Are Essential to Workplace Trust

Business Confidential Now with Hanna Hasl-Kelchner

02:24 min | 5 months ago

Soft Skill Secrets That Are Essential to Workplace Trust

"Welcome to business confidential. Now i'm your host hannah hassle kelsey and today's special guest an bam. She's the author of small mistakes. Big consequences develop your soft skills to help you succeed. She is the lehigh valley. Executive vice president distribution channels and labor relations for capital blue cross since joining the company in january of twenty ten. Miss bom has been involved in strategic planning and other senior level functions as well as designing and leading leadership development programs through her own company vision accomplished and is a member of numerous boars. An executive committees and her formal education includes a bs in biology from the university of illinois a masters in health systems management from rush university. And the credential. I find most fascinating a certification from the protocol school of washington as a protocol and etiquette consultant. Here small mistakes big consequences author and bam welcome to the show and or you for having me. Hannah are looking forward to talking with you. Yes yes likewise. Because i think that workplace trust is such a fascinating topic I love the the title of your book. Small mistakes big consequences in your experience it. Why is it that small mistakes have such big consequences. I think so much of what people do. In their decision. Making in the workplace is based upon their assumptions or their perception of others. And if we're not careful in how we're presenting ourselves we often find others. Misinterpreting are intense for a reasoned or even impacting trust in a negative manner by paying attention to our behavior and avoiding these small mistakes. It really starts to build this solid trusting relationship between yourself and your team numbers and that's where you really start to roll and get things done more quickly more efficiently and really better.

Capital Blue Cross Miss Bom University Of Illinois Protocol School Of Washington Lehigh Valley Kelsey Hannah Rush University BAM
How to Promote Genuine Diversity and Inclusion in the Workplace

Business Confidential Now with Hanna Hasl-Kelchner

02:18 min | 6 months ago

How to Promote Genuine Diversity and Inclusion in the Workplace

"Guest is michelle silverthorn. Michelle is a recognized organizational diversity expert and the founder and ceo of inclusion nation where she works with fortune five hundred companies tech startups nonprofits and universities to design authentic inclusive spaces designed on equity belonging and authenticity. Michelle is a graduate of princeton university and the university of michigan law school. She's also a ted speaker and author of the book. Authentic diversity how to change the workplace for good welcome to business confidential now. Michelle thank you so much for having me. I'm so happy to be here. One happy to have you because the subject of diversity and inclusion is more important than ever. And i'm so delighted to have you join me today. Because the idea of diversity being a good thing in business has been around for decades but when it comes to making things happen to delivering on the goods on the promises it feels like they're still so much room for considerable improvement. Why do you think organizations keep failing at diversity and that's a really great question. I think the challenge for a lot of organizations. They don't prioritize it. You know they say that ben prioritizing it they say that it's important to them but one of the activities typically have folks do when i'm doing my training with them. Is you know you think of a problem. I whatever your challenges when it comes to diversity in you know i tell. I've talked a lot about black people in the workplace. One is we don't have enough black executive right until you think that's your challenge. The reason is because there's a broken pipeline right. But then what i asked my attendees to do is to ask why five times so there's a broken pipeline wise and then ask why again because we're not recruiting at the rate schools because our executives think that you'll never recruit that these five schools because they are only comfortable hiring people from these schools because they only work with the people who attend these schools and by the time you get to the fifth. Why then you get to the underlying issue. That's really underlying all of that. But for a lot of people are going to get to that six or seven played the because our leaders don't prioritize it. They aren't willing to commit the resources. They aren't willing to commit the people they aren't willing to take the rest and when we aren't willing to do that. We're just gonna keep on falling behind on birthday and inclusion

Michelle Michelle Silverthorn University Of Michigan Law Sch Princeton University BEN
How to Use Peak Performance Psychology for More Competitive Edge

Business Confidential Now with Hanna Hasl-Kelchner

02:18 min | 6 months ago

How to Use Peak Performance Psychology for More Competitive Edge

"Guest is brian bergeford. He's an entrepreneur who owns multiple businesses including bergeford performance systems. Now brian knows exactly how to create. An unstoppable mindset. You may say come on. But here's the story. He turned a lifelong phobia of being submerged in water on. Its head by learning to swim at thirty years old and then rising to compete at a national level. He's worked with elite athletes. He understands the importance of operating from your strengths. And as an expert in the psychology of winning and creating a winning mindset being a great competitor and the art of effective communication and mastering effective teaching coaching and mentorship. Brian earned his degree in psychology from the university of colorado taking particular interest in neuroscience psychopathology clinical psychology and the principles of peak performance. He's an avid learner to this day. Studying leaders coaches athletes and enterprising high performers to support his continually evolving strategies for human development. I'm a huge fan of continuous learning. It's one of the main reasons i do this. Show so welcome to business confidential now. Brian all right. Well thank you for welcoming and having me on and I'm very excited. The speaking with you today so Let's let's get this party started. Yeah that's what i say. Let's get this party started. Now you've had quite a journey In creating this unstoppable mindset your experience in overcoming the phobia of being submerged in water and then learning to swim at age. Thirty is really pretty amazing. What happened that made you all of a sudden decide you were going to tackle. Swimming was built up over time but at the crux of it was. I just got to a point where i had a belly full of you know allowing something that i was fearful of had the phobic response to and having that dictate some of my life choices and just that really frustrating and i was like this is ridiculous i need to move beyond it. similar thing with Fear of heights. I decided the solution would be to take up rock climbing.

Brian Bergeford Bergeford University Of Colorado Brian Swimming
Jack Hanna, Beloved Animal Expert, Stepping Away Because of Dementia

WISH TV's News 8 Daybreak

00:34 sec | 6 months ago

Jack Hanna, Beloved Animal Expert, Stepping Away Because of Dementia

"Life. Jack Hanna has Alzheimer's disease. In a letter posted by the Columbus Sue, the Hana family says his diagnosis was has progressed quickly over the last few months. His family made the announcement yesterday. Hannah is well known for his live animal demonstrations on late night talk shows. He retired last year. The animal lovers daughters. Say he still has a great sense of humor and still wears his khakis at home. Jack Hanna's into the Wild airs Saturdays at 11 in the morning on Wish TV. It's 5 39 cicadas air set

Alzheimer's Disease Columbus Sue Jack Hanna Hannah
Jack Hanna, beloved animal expert, stepping away because of dementia

WBZ Afternoon News

00:24 sec | 6 months ago

Jack Hanna, beloved animal expert, stepping away because of dementia

"From dementia is now leaving public life. His daughter, Suzanne and Julie, say their father's condition has gone downhill quickly over the past few months. And of the director of the Columbus Zoo from 1978 to 1992. He personally is credited with helping boost attendance by huge numbers over the years and teaching a lot of kids about the joy of animals. All right. 7 26 some growing pressure on the U. S now to boycott

Dementia Suzanne Columbus Zoo Julie U.
How to Optimize Workspace Organization and Gain Productivity with Kathi Burns

Business Confidential Now with Hanna Hasl-Kelchner

07:38 min | 7 months ago

How to Optimize Workspace Organization and Gain Productivity with Kathi Burns

"Don't think anyone would deny that having an organized work space helps their productivity and decrease stress. Especially when you have a lot going on it's nice to be able to just put your finger on it bingo but in your experience why is it so hard to get organized and then stay organized if it's so obvious. Why don't we want more of us do it. Well i think that oftentimes we have too much muck spe- Thank you for the good for my title by the way You know everybody has muck and sometimes when you have too much of it. You can't even see your make clear to knowing where to begin. And that's the main thing that i find with clients says they don't know where to start. They know they need to be productive. They need they know they need to put systems together but they're looking around themselves and they're going. Oh no idea where to even begin knowing where to start. I think is step one. Well that's great. So where is step one. Where do you start. You know. I can just see. There's piles of papers or stuff and if someone likes like you and i'm not necessarily picking on you but if someone comes in with with all good intentions to help get organized says well. What about this. And you're like no. I like that pile just where it is. I mean how you overcome that. Well you know. We i always start with the in goal. You know why. Why does the client want to work with me. Why did they feel the need to call the begin with what is it. That is their biggest pain point and once. I know that i can begin. To kind of edgy. around The service of their desk or the emails in their inbox. I kinda see your up. What's the biggest pain point and we start there so you know a great place to start no matter what is to clear off your desk because a messy desk. You can't tell what's going on and you become overwhelmed just even sitting down at your desk My rule of thumb is that sixty percent of your desk surface open for business. So i always say if you had sixty percent free and clear you'll have the ability to think more clearly about what you need to do for that day so i always start on the surface and some people are very married to their piles you know. I will admit that some people like don't judge that pile cycle. Let's at least move it a little bit away From the surface. Perhaps we you know. Start start slow and do a side table with paper pile in these accurately that they are used to having them but at least having the death. Surface open for businesses is step one always well. That's really interesting because instead of sixty percent clear i have to admit i'm guilty of maybe six percent missing zero there but you. You mentioned something there a second ago. I'd like to follow up on e mail. Inboxes they have a way. Exploding and in a very unstructured way. A what systems can we put in place with respect to electronic documents including our email. What do you. What advice do you have on that. Yeah i'll talk about systems in a minute. But what i wanted to remind me if i forget but sometimes i go up but what you have to realize number one is it your email any email you receive is something that wants you to do something so if you go into your inbox you're going into reaction mode. You are not going into proactive mode. You're going in to see who wants to do. What do they want you to respond to. They want you to quickly. They want you to forward. What are they want. Do you whatever so you have to realize for starters at any time you hit your inbox. There's gonna be a bunch of people screaming at you to do something and take some type of action. So for starters is always good to only check your inbox. A couple of times a day at predetermined times and actually you know. Upn beginnings actually set a timer. And don't stay in any longer than thirty forty five minutes at the most because what happens is if you you will get absorbed. You'll get sucked right into your in box and you'll be out in la la land clicking on links trying to project that wasn't even on your dinner for the day to make someone happy or so on and so forth so the number one system is to figure out when you're going to check your inbox and stick to it. You know. maybe you're gonna check. Your inbox is always say good. Thing is right before lunch. And right before you finish the day right before lunch because you know you wanna eat and you don't wanna eat at your inbox so you'll be a little bit better prompted to get out of there and right before the end of the day because you're over your over work and even though we're all working from home you know setting up specific. Starting in times of your day is really critical and break time. Who's well you know. Eating at your desk is is not necessarily good. And i know that a lot of us set hours and not eating doubts is really super important getting up and moving as well so so have a set time. You're going to check your inbox if you have to have a timer. I always say start with a timer. Start with a thirty minute timer. There's gonna being you in the airball until you to get out of your inbox So those are two really important things to do as far as systems. But i think really the most important thing is realizing that when you get in there it's reacted. You're not doing anything for yourself. Necessarily you're going to be called the do actions for other people that want you to do something for them. Does that make sense. Oh yeah that makes a lotta sense and you know. It's amazing how rude people can be in terms of call to action. I actually got one email yesterday where somebody said. Have you looked at this attachment yet. It's like hello you just sent it to me. Let me just drop everything now. You want me to look at your attachment and it was a pitch so it was It was a bit. Yeah yeah so that that got that got filed but let's talk about filing and organizing our emails because they come in such an unstructured way and like you said it's one thing how much time we devote to them. Which is some great advice you know. Let's limit it and let's not just in terms of the amount of time but when we commit the time so that it doesn't break our workflow as much so that's really good but we don't always just answer an email and then delete it a lotta times. We keep them and that box just kind of blows up after a while even the emails. We've read right so whether it's an email or another type of electronic document which email is what are some good ways to organize well when it comes to email. I recommend that all of my clients read their emails within g mail. On the big genome proponent. There's a bunch of reasons for those. And i have you know you can have all your email. Address is going into your dms account so you can have your web addresses or whatever but what that does is g mail automatically organizes for you and so it puts it into four different buckets. You know whether it could be Can't remember the name was like you know the your inbox. there's updates there's offers so on and so forth so it will automatically do that for you. So that helps. Because actually when i go into my g mail Go right into The number one thing which is my inbox. And see what's going on. And then i will go into Dates and i can literally skin them. Pick them all up ping them all and then Delete 'em

UPN La La
"hanna " Discussed on Business Confidential Now with Hanna Hasl-Kelchner

Business Confidential Now with Hanna Hasl-Kelchner

07:11 min | 7 months ago

"hanna " Discussed on Business Confidential Now with Hanna Hasl-Kelchner

"Startups and small businesses don't have much experience with professionals in the counting field. And that's why. I think it's important for them to understand what a certified public accountant is. What is well. I let me just back up and tell you what a person has to do to become a cpa as you know. There are many people in your community who work on taxes when we think of as the first thing we think of is someone who can prepare our taxes. But i hope. I'll lay out for you so many other ways that a cpa can help your business. There are many other people that can help you if you just need tax preparation but i think all businesses could use the experience. That cpa's had doing their work so the qualifications to become a cpa vary by state. They're generally the same but each state will have the details a little bit differently. I is an educational component their courses that all accountants take in accounting rules and procedures auditing management accounting tax law general business loss finance and very important one in business ethics. And i believe that's a more recent addition to the curriculum because there's been emphasis in the more recent years on having a profession. That's much more honest and open to people looking inside and seeing what they're doing anyway there's an educational component these days in many states. You have to have a master's degree to become a cpa. That was not the case until recently. Now there's also an experience component which varies by state and a national exam and then when a person qualifies by passing all those areas They have to register with their state. Licensing board to keep an active license. You have to renew it annually. And in north i think it's great that Everyone has to do forty hours of continuing education so that it keeps you up on all of the laws and in addition. You have to attest that you've had no convictions. In the court of law and ethical breaches in the past year given that you might wanna hire a cpa. That's what you'll be getting. I'd like to go over the ways of cpa can help you and your business when someone starts business a cpa can be a huge help. If you have an idea for a business or you think of what you wanna create one of your first conversation should be with a certified public accountant as many of you know everyone really needs to keep track of the business finances but there are many other ways that the cpa can help you first of all along with an attorney the cpa can help you. Think about the best structure for your business. That is whether you want to set up a limited liability company or a partnership or a corporation and the cpi should have experience so that he can he or she can say well. If you set up a partnership these might be your problems down the road or if you set up a corporation. Are you sure that this is what you wanna do for the future of your business. So that's a very interesting conversation. And once you decide that the cpa can help you in making a business. Plan particularly the Financial analysis because of that very important to figure out all aspects of the startup of the business and projecting the business into the future. So i would really recommend that. And then the cpa can also provide you with advice on the type of accounting software. You might want to have in your business and when you decide on a cpa. It may be important to have a conversation about whether that your software will interact with the one that the cpa's firm uses so that tax preparation will be quicker and more accurate and much cheaper. That's a very important thing to decide right in the beginning. Of course when you start your business you have to open a business bank account these. Cpa can help you in the business. Make sure that all of your procedures for your money. And for their revenues coming in and the expenses going out are set up so that they'll be easy to track and so that there's set up in a way that minimizes the possibility of fraud because the business owner is usually not the one who has his or her hands on all of the business procedures for example payroll for example paying bills and in the accounting world. The procedures that will help you protect your assets in the business are called internal controls and so if a your procedures is set up in a particular way it makes it much more difficult for anyone handling finances to steal the money of the business. I know that you go into business. You don't think about that. You don't think about an employee or a friend of an employee taking advantage of the good business that you have but this is very very common particularly in small businesses. When you have a one person performing multiple roles. I just think it's extremely important in the beginning to have a cpa. Just look over what you've set up and give you some pointers pudding that extra time and money into setting up business might help you protect thousands of dollars

The Truth About How to Choose the Ideal Business Accountant with Maxine Stern

Business Confidential Now with Hanna Hasl-Kelchner

07:11 min | 7 months ago

The Truth About How to Choose the Ideal Business Accountant with Maxine Stern

"Startups and small businesses don't have much experience with professionals in the counting field. And that's why. I think it's important for them to understand what a certified public accountant is. What is well. I let me just back up and tell you what a person has to do to become a cpa as you know. There are many people in your community who work on taxes when we think of as the first thing we think of is someone who can prepare our taxes. But i hope. I'll lay out for you so many other ways that a cpa can help your business. There are many other people that can help you if you just need tax preparation but i think all businesses could use the experience. That cpa's had doing their work so the qualifications to become a cpa vary by state. They're generally the same but each state will have the details a little bit differently. I is an educational component their courses that all accountants take in accounting rules and procedures auditing management accounting tax law general business loss finance and very important one in business ethics. And i believe that's a more recent addition to the curriculum because there's been emphasis in the more recent years on having a profession. That's much more honest and open to people looking inside and seeing what they're doing anyway there's an educational component these days in many states. You have to have a master's degree to become a cpa. That was not the case until recently. Now there's also an experience component which varies by state and a national exam and then when a person qualifies by passing all those areas They have to register with their state. Licensing board to keep an active license. You have to renew it annually. And in north i think it's great that Everyone has to do forty hours of continuing education so that it keeps you up on all of the laws and in addition. You have to attest that you've had no convictions. In the court of law and ethical breaches in the past year given that you might wanna hire a cpa. That's what you'll be getting. I'd like to go over the ways of cpa can help you and your business when someone starts business a cpa can be a huge help. If you have an idea for a business or you think of what you wanna create one of your first conversation should be with a certified public accountant as many of you know everyone really needs to keep track of the business finances but there are many other ways that the cpa can help you first of all along with an attorney the cpa can help you. Think about the best structure for your business. That is whether you want to set up a limited liability company or a partnership or a corporation and the cpi should have experience so that he can he or she can say well. If you set up a partnership these might be your problems down the road or if you set up a corporation. Are you sure that this is what you wanna do for the future of your business. So that's a very interesting conversation. And once you decide that the cpa can help you in making a business. Plan particularly the Financial analysis because of that very important to figure out all aspects of the startup of the business and projecting the business into the future. So i would really recommend that. And then the cpa can also provide you with advice on the type of accounting software. You might want to have in your business and when you decide on a cpa. It may be important to have a conversation about whether that your software will interact with the one that the cpa's firm uses so that tax preparation will be quicker and more accurate and much cheaper. That's a very important thing to decide right in the beginning. Of course when you start your business you have to open a business bank account these. Cpa can help you in the business. Make sure that all of your procedures for your money. And for their revenues coming in and the expenses going out are set up so that they'll be easy to track and so that there's set up in a way that minimizes the possibility of fraud because the business owner is usually not the one who has his or her hands on all of the business procedures for example payroll for example paying bills and in the accounting world. The procedures that will help you protect your assets in the business are called internal controls and so if a your procedures is set up in a particular way it makes it much more difficult for anyone handling finances to steal the money of the business. I know that you go into business. You don't think about that. You don't think about an employee or a friend of an employee taking advantage of the good business that you have but this is very very common particularly in small businesses. When you have a one person performing multiple roles. I just think it's extremely important in the beginning to have a cpa. Just look over what you've set up and give you some pointers pudding that extra time and money into setting up business might help you protect thousands of dollars

CPA
How to Reliably Improve Workplace Trust and Collaboration with Jill Ratliff

Business Confidential Now with Hanna Hasl-Kelchner

08:14 min | 8 months ago

How to Reliably Improve Workplace Trust and Collaboration with Jill Ratliff

"One of the things that you write about. Is that the most important skills in leadership are gaining trust and knowing how to collaborate under stress. Absolutely what is it that good leaders do and stressful moments that promote trust in collaboration. We're you know. I think that The place where trust is broken and the place where we stale lead effectively is when the situation or the circumstance that we find ourselves in is greater than our capacity to maintain equity calm clarity focusing kindness right so the the root of trust and collaboration relationships right and then that ability to build them have them maintain them and to lead be able to lead in adversity. Because honestly you know when things are going well. We don't need help when things are going well. Our personalities aren't a problem when things are going well performance. Coaching is easy. So for me. Adversity is the jewel of leadership. And it's the metal that task your own leadership development and your ability to lead in those kinds of environment. I love that lane and it's where a lot of my work said okay. So you're working with a leader. The sauce has hit the fan. There's a mess and so how do you coach them to stay calm. And everything's going to be all right. I mean those are highly stressful times and okay. Sometimes people could react a little better than they do but most people aren't ready to sink combined and like you know let's toast marshmallows stuff that needs to be done. There's clean up that needs to be done and it's not about you know pointing fingers of blame but it's like hey chuck going here. So how do you counsel them when everything inside. Them is screaming white hot. Hey let's get on it and yet that emotional outburst may or may not be the best way to express themselves at that point in time. Yeah what on the the truth of it is. It never is the best way. Because and how. I counsel them as you know i start with helping people understand. It's all about energy where i meaning that at quantum physics right if you have a negative situation negative energies very strong. Right when you walk in a room and someone's upset or something's wrong or dares challenge. What does it feel like when you walk in. You know it immediately right. And even if you're in a group of people where five people are doing fine and one. It's really upset or concerned or or off. It tends to call it the other people in the room to follow that negative energy and then when we get that way literally inside our brains we lose the capacity to think clearly and to problem solve. So what you have to understand as a leader is one and this is sort of one of the key sort of foundational principles. My work is that as a leader. You came to solve problems. That's what you get paid to do. You know when you run an organization when you are promoted into management. You're basically you just got the job title problem-solver because that's what the company's paying you to do so one you have to think differently about adversity at work in problems. Because how could it be any other way I work mostly with organizations and leaders that are leading business transformation and change and i think we all know that leadership in the role of leadership in today's world is to navigate transformation and change used to have the transformation once every couple of years we'd have to say organization through now they roll one on top of another sort of constant pace of change so it's foundational skill as a leader to understand. One problems aren't the problem. They come every day all day. And it's your job to help solve them to the energy you bring into a room when there's a problem. Is everything about creating the ability to problem solve effectively with others. So if you're not able to do that and you're the leader then clearly you're gonna waste a lot of time and set back. The process of problem solving all of that is perfectly logical. Yeah makes a lot of sense powder you do. And why don't they do that. I mean why isn't that. The accepted norm instead of somebody. Exploding because and everybody you know diving under the table because we weren't taught you know think about it. How did you learn how to solve problems. What to do when things are when your situation or circumstance you're in greater than your capability you learn from your parents you know so we. We've learned by watching how the people the adults in our lives when we were young problems. And unfortunately you know. They weren't taught either so it's not a curriculum that we teach people so part of my work. I start with sort of three fundamental ways to think about work and the very first one is self mastery but you have to understand that before you can lead anyone else you have to be able to lead by example in the first place you have to be able to lead examples and adversity. So you i help people start looking at and understanding challenging moments and situations like this game on. This is where you build your leadership muscle. And i can i guess. Make the point by sharing a story about A guy named dorsey levens who the running. Back with the green bay packers. He played in two super bowls and he is a green bay packer hall of fame forty five years old and he has a mental toughness and sports utility training company. And my son who's a professional athlete His organization higher dorsey to train my son scott and after a couple of weeks of training. He said to dorothy. You should meet my mom to. You'd think so much. Like and dorsey tells the story now. I could sure i'd love to meet your mom. You know i'll work on that and he put it off and put it off and put off and then finally said georgetown. I don't think you understand. I think you really need to meet my mom. And so dorsey says later just to be nice to scotty agreed to meet me for a cup of coffee on morning and we were gonna meet from nine to nine thirty. This was his idea and at noon. We were still sitting there. And then dorsey came to work with me and what he said. Is you know as an nfl. Running back was tough. I thought i understood versi. And i thought that you know i wouldn't have survived an nfl. He goes but what you've taught me that. I didn't understand that why i was successful as a running back is because i could take a hit will keep on going. It was yards after contact. They measured my success by and the truth of it is if the defense party company and i ran straight into the end zone every time and scored nobody would share for me. And that's that we in life like as leaders and as teams that get in a foxhole together when we solve problems for our organization or for our team and we overcome like where we cheer ourselves. That's where we grow. That's where we where we build confidence so when we look at adversity or challenge of the problem. That shouldn't be happening is hilarious right in business today. How could we go through transformation. So everything into the air have competition like we've never had before have challenges in the world like we've never had before and somehow think that we're all gonna get together under that kind of pressure and not have challenged us so we have to change the whole way. We think about adversity at work and managing other people stress. When you're leader and step one is you can't begin to help people under stress if you do not understand where you hold where you fold and what i would say hannah. If it's a skill it is not a personality trait. You learn how to do it with a few simple tools and practice

Dorsey Dorsey Levens Chuck Green Bay Packer Hall Versi Super Bowls Green Bay Packers Defense Party NFL Dorothy Scotty Georgetown Scott Hannah
"hanna " Discussed on Way Too Broad

Way Too Broad

05:30 min | 9 months ago

"hanna " Discussed on Way Too Broad

"Okay i'm clicking clicking benz issues terriers and hanna hanna said terriers more like terriers take terriers and then looking at the clock. Yes hello.

hanna hanna
"hanna " Discussed on Diaspora Blues

Diaspora Blues

07:41 min | 9 months ago

"hanna " Discussed on Diaspora Blues

"Fairly produce and distribute and organize economy under capitalism. So it is a tenant of socialism that says actually we must destroy the system of capitalism entirely and then there are people who say we can do that democracy and we can do that gently. And i say now eight needs to be destroyed and the only way to do that is by force. Many have it'll kinds of arguments. About how much force and a revolutionary process which is quite violent. Actually whether we support for that says that is the the kind of context in which these discussions take place while that was very thorough. And i had planned to ask you a question about whether you could Whether you could be a socialist in a capitalist society and i feel like sort of disgust that there's different strains of socialism and h. I guess group would group you good word on against group comes with different approaches to how they think it is to be radical to be revolutionary. Another word that you hear a lot about whether it's on the wheel center whether it's on even here at three. Ceo so we hear a lot about the word solidarity. And i don't know. Maybe i'm i don't know maybe this is my age showing but i'm getting a kind of like what does it actually even mean is that like is it the way we now think about feminist Feminism where it started off with like a radical and then now it's become just kind of like slogans and Things that you put on your instagram. So i guess what i'm trying to get at is what is solidarity like true solidarity and How do we go from talking about it to actually doing Again really really good question. And and i just want to commend you. I on in pulling pot all of these. Would that have just become so much. A part of the nakiele that we talked to that we file to stop to think about them and understand you know and i just think that the way that you're asking these questions brings a feeling gritty to. I'm trying to understand the struggle and trying to understand How best to contribute in the world so to your question. International solidarity likelihood socialist has very different meanings. Depending on what you'll politics but sollidarity in and of itself digest named unity agreement shade project Whatever you know the the right wing sollidarity we think together in the same way that the left wing can be in solidarity with one another outside eighties at these to give us the unity of action of struggle to. That's all that ease and they want. So i mean you mentioned feminist sollidarity. Well he i mean so then that would just be women who have a particular brand or idea of what feminism main work together band together. So it's not easy to answer you know singular kind of way. What i can answer is what he's if to me and tattoo why ensure that my practice he's real and meaningful and he's just Lip service to the language of international solidarity of solidarity of socialism. Because you know in certain circles. These things have Social currency And so i guess for me and You know for for the listen to who have ever heard any of my right ear pod casting. Its raytheon the do a show called asia pacific currents which is a to national solidarity. I mean i would consider myself a reeling to nationalist. Think any struggle and that he's an economic struggle must be international because the economy's international. So you know. I'm four or five years ago. We had A dispute at the bay come united brewery and so all. The unions came out and supported the eighty. You and i am w and the other workers in that factory but to that he sollidarity because it's from different industries workers from different workplaces places. Came out to stand. We've the work is at carlton united brewery but for me and my comrades who are international. So he said yes. This is very very good. Command command those efforts but also the company that runs the runs another company in india and the same companies. Doing the same thing to the work is there. And they're also doing the same thing in brazil. It's the same company. So does the stein people around the same board table. That are making the decisions about how to school over the workers at carlton united brewery and the workers. In you know. I don't know where the factory was but i think it was reporting india. I could be wrong. And and so so. It's the same people around the same board table making that decision. Why are we only focusing here. What is it about how we understand cross struggle that means we can only say the workers who are at the end of our knows what we see the workers on the other side of the world. And so that is how i understand and operate in relation to solidarity so i have a political framework that helps me understand the world that the club. The class is the way that we've divided not nationality. Not by not by these out special lines on a map. And when i sat official i know that there are tanks along those lines and this is lonzo very real to people because resulting you know massive wars. So i'm not trying to say. Oh the the of might up no. But they're out official in that they don't really designate a particular kind of different for me the way that the world is divided. He's own class. So it is that line around which i form solidarity and a great answer and anyway where all stronger together i mean that makes that makes sense and i guess that's one of the reasons i brought you on the show because it's so important for us to understand things like workers rights and understand the history and even understand the definition of socialism. Because if we understand the framework than it will help us move forward in life right in our relationships in the way we consume things in the way we see other human beings. So i guess that's for me one of the reasons i brought you on the show. I'm very wary of the time. So i'm going to try to Oneness through fast So let's just talk about. The men are a group of men are currently being held at park hotel Before that those men were held at mantra impressed in full our listeners. Who don't know what's going on. Can you tell us what's happening. Sure so i mean yeah before they were held at mantua. They were held up manage. So this is an ongoing Torture of these people who are refugees so The the howard government. The abbott government continued by the turnbull government and the marcin government but also the rudd government and the gila government. I mean australian. Government can't get away from firstly the consistency week which they are torturing and abusing.

brazil india turnbull government marcin government four instagram gila government five years ago abbott government carlton united brewery rudd government eight one of the reasons eighty united brewery howard government mantua agreement three firstly
"hanna " Discussed on Diaspora Blues

Diaspora Blues

08:00 min | 9 months ago

"hanna " Discussed on Diaspora Blues

"Yes put on your crown. That amazing amazing track is by thelma plume. It's cold homecoming queen. And it's from her two thousand and nineteen Album cold better in black back to black can't do that so On the show today we have very very special guest. I was gonna do a quick spiel and just talk about how amazing she is but you know. I thought i'd let her do that herself. Welcome to the s bar blues giselle. Hey thank you very lovely wife. You just take me. Hey you sound surprised. Surprised that thank. You always flooded and embarrassed when i get introduced that way. You know what me to the few times. I've been on every show. She gives me an fantastic bio the. I don't think i'm deserving. I will graciously gracefully accept So for those. Who don't know i've known you for a few years I know you started at three in early. Two thousands or thereabouts. But i don't know why so. What attracted you to radio. Giselle for very very good question actually up at three. Cs in nineteen ninety nine. I A little bit earlier than the t. Thousands and i was invited onto a comrades right here. I actually believe says will my ny patricia cabello to now. I'm ready i national dr chard Before they in patricia actually did have them. Revolutionary politics and we were activists together in the women's movement And sorry patricia told me how to be inactive and how to be a feminist and she taught me a lot of My early politics. That have changed a lot since then. I should say But she started at tracy. Allen is and When we were activists together she asked me to do the show. so that's all it took. It was just an invitation from somebody who wanted to do right. And i was never interested in a as a medium. It was always just a way to talk about politics and to get practice. More importantly in had to talk about politics in a way that successful to people that don't necessarily read prolifically about political issues and ideas And on the show that you do accent of women you cover a lot of important topics but in a very tangible way away that a lot of us can understand. And sometimes that's not the case With other radio programs. I think so. I've been at three. I think this marks my fourth year. I feel like an old barn really newbie. it's interesting because a lot of people who are actress. Who are programs had been here ten plus years right. So i'm in the minority What keeps you returning to look right. Firstly is sewing. Many things is the first answer to that. I mean You wouldn't keep volunteer upping volunteering for over twenty years now. You wouldn't coming back if they wasn't something special about apply so that's the thing there is something really special about tracia the community the staff the people that make up the place And that's one of the main reasons. I keep coming back but the other reason is that i do fundamentally believe in radio information. Alternative media as revolutionary to we don't on the mainstream media and i think he's The events of the united states and russia and the rest of the world have proven to up over the last Four or five years is the importance of information. You keep being following. If any of your listeners have been following the julian assange case. you'll say the You could not be more aware of the importance of alternative and progressive and dissenting Meteoroid information and so my activism we choose a part of what i do it tracy out that that the of pace that keeps me coming back And they're complementary peace and love that you call it a revolutionary tool. Because that's what it is and i guess a lot of us take what we do so seriously because it's such an honor to have like s space and it's a good way to think of it that way right. At least i do so during the american at least during the two thousand twenty american election. And when i think about it even before then there's there was a lot of talk about socialism being evil and even during obama's reign he. There was a lot of people. Saying or a bama care is like the socialist agenda. That's going to take forever. And and take away our rights and so on and even closer to home in australia when you hear socialism all when you think about socialists at least some segment of community think of them as you know like do-gooders or tradition not traditionalist sorry but too radical and it's like implausible to follow socialism I up what is socialism. And what is it essentially faisal. Yeah so i. I mean it's a it's a really great question But not an easy question for which there is easy. Enter or there's no singular enter socialism. Just means a political and economic idea way of organizing society that says that production is distributed. And well he's generated on behalf of the society socialist but that's there's no uniform. Oh yellow ido a cheese that and socially as bright breaking up in different but that different ideas and actually i think one of the forms of socialism. The most people will be aware of that. We are actually you know. E is the ideology of like the australian labor party or the uk labor party your to a certain degree the democrats is. He's been cold. Democratic socialism and democratic. Socialism says at the y. You organize for production and distribution and be conic girl of that today on behalf of the society through democratic elections and electing representatives and so on but we can say that well for many of us who are to the left of that democratic socialist idea. We would say that there a breakdown. In that the best thing. I wanna say starts. Losing is an inherently revolutionary that is a tenant as socialism cold revolutionary socialism. And so on so you could put it really simply socialist socialism. He's just a way of organizing konami that he's all the people and then there are a myriad way in number of ways to to organize and achieve that or to attempt to organize an achieve that and Lots of i would be critical of many of the different ways. I think what is criticized more Is that the element of socialism The revolutionary potter socialism. That actually says there is no way to.

australia fourth year Allen julian assange Giselle today ten plus years one obama patricia cabello thelma plume Firstly two Two thousands nineteen ninety nine over twenty years american patricia first answer russia
Are You Addicted To Stress

Break The Rules

04:57 min | 11 months ago

Are You Addicted To Stress

"While hello hello hello. Welcome to another edition of the breakable podcast. Where he's quieting with noise in the health food infants world today and superstock. How dr heidi hannah in hosni is chief. Energy officer of synergy s accompanied writing brain-based hell if performance for instance individuals and organization. She's also a senior researcher with the brain health initiative and fellow an advisory board member of the american institute of stress and today is the episode of stress. We're talking all about obsolete concept Addiction which i never really heard of thought about intel deduct. Heidi hearing a little bit about your take on that. A doctor dr gary. Thanks for coming in and play. Just give us a little bit about crown about who you are. And what got you into doing. Worker in the world around stress neighboring. Yeah well first of all. Thanks for having me. I love that used the word stoked because it's one of my favorite words. We were just talking a little bit before we went on about our backgrounds and where we come from and i actually grew up in portland oregon which i love. I love the pacific northwest. Still feels like home. But i always full actually it with affective disorder pat a lot of anxiety and depression growing up and felt like i needed to live in a sunny. Climate ironically ended up getting rights. Our shift to play softball penn state which was not much better than i moved to orlando for ten years thinking that would give me some sunshine and it really just gives me a lot of like under storms and eventually made my way to san diego and one of the things that i have been doing for the past few years with reef which is a global beach brand looking the benefits of the beach on our brain health and performance. So anytime i hear someone say you can see me. I know people are just listening to this. But i've got my relief hat and it's at palm trees and i just i really feel like we can benefit from taking our brain to the beach even when our bodies stuck at home are second office and there's some strategies you can talk about a little bit later about how Do that so. I'm background my history really. I got into this. Because i had to to survive. I was i was misdiagnosed. Has a child A lot so around the age of ten started having debilitating headaches and stomach aches and panic attacks and panic. Attacks were so extreme. I would actually faint and lose consciousness so my parents you know not knowing what to do about it to say misdiagnosed me with things like kimia food allergies kind of like throwing darts on a dartboard and ultimately they said you know probably just stress so hard. Remember like okay. I'm ten eleven. Twelve how How bad could stress be. Why is it literally like hijacking my brain and the most inconvenient circumstances like on flights on first dates on job interview so i am a life journey. Like trying to figure out how to help myself. Just get through the day and became fascinated with these different topics. So it started. I got a master's degree in psychology. And i wanted to become a therapist. So it's working with a lot of people struggling with different things and just saw. How much nutrition was playing a role in their mental health. So then i got my first in holistic nutrition looking at the different ways that behavior mood and things and then always do not. I got certified and different fitness strategies exercise physiology and then i ended up working for this really awesome company called the human performance institute and it worked for them for ten years where we worked with professional athletes and executives really helping them understand energy management like their physical emotional mental spiritual energy and that was amazing. Except i do. I feared the most every day which was public speaking and flying so i was traveling all around the world kind of teaching people what to do but the not coping well with my own stress and wallo. That was happening. I had my third emperor diagnosed with alzheimer's disease. And i started looking the research about the brain and the nervous system and realized that the number one risk factor for cognitive decline in dementia was actually chronic stress. Live off of wait a second. I'm living with chronic stress. And i know this. Why am i acting us way. And that's actually one of the reasons. I wrote the book stress a holic and started looking at stress addiction was. I know this is good for me by yet. I kinda don't wanna stop. And then the more started talking about that book to my clients. They would all say. Oh my. gosh that's me. i'm addicted distress. But the funny up part and we can. Then they'd say well. But i don't want you to take it away from

Dr Heidi Hannah American Institute Of Stress A Dr Gary Hosni Heidi Pacific Northwest Intel Softball Portland Oregon Orlando Anxiety Depression Human Performance Institute San Diego Panic Attacks Headaches Alzheimer's Disease Dementia
"hanna " Discussed on Business Confidential Now with Hanna Hasl-Kelchner

Business Confidential Now with Hanna Hasl-Kelchner

02:32 min | 11 months ago

"hanna " Discussed on Business Confidential Now with Hanna Hasl-Kelchner

"Engagement <Speech_Female> thing and i think when <Speech_Female> you get into the <Speech_Female> workplace violence. <Speech_Female> There's been a big <Speech_Female> disconnect <Speech_Female> in people's <Speech_Female> expectations <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> and their ability to contribute <Speech_Female> in a positive <Speech_Female> way and <Speech_Female> so they do the only <Speech_Female> thing they <SpeakerChange> know how they <Silence> start shutting down. <Speech_Male> That's <Speech_Telephony_Male> correct a <Speech_Male> brings <Silence> to another <Speech_Male> issue because <Speech_Telephony_Male> with the focus <Speech_Telephony_Male> in on <Speech_Telephony_Male> blaming mental <Speech_Telephony_Male> health and <Speech_Telephony_Male> blame me <Speech_Telephony_Male> mental health for the problems <Speech_Male> that exist from <Speech_Telephony_Male> the violence perspective <Speech_Male> creates <Speech_Telephony_Male> the problem. <Speech_Telephony_Male> The low level <Speech_Telephony_Male> problem that <Speech_Telephony_Male> mental health may be <Speech_Male> affecting <Speech_Telephony_Male> employees <Speech_Male> to shut <Speech_Male> down <Speech_Male> and and this <Speech_Male> happens with that <Speech_Telephony_Male> particular victim <Speech_Telephony_Male> of mental health sets <Speech_Male> down. They <Silence> become less productive. <Speech_Male> They become <Speech_Telephony_Male> less engaged. <Speech_Male> They spend <Speech_Telephony_Male> more time away from <Speech_Male> the work <Speech_Male> environment <Speech_Telephony_Male> there on the phone frequently. <Speech_Telephony_Male> And <Speech_Telephony_Male> you know what that attracts. <Speech_Male> That attracts a supervisor. <Speech_Telephony_Male> Who wants to <Silence> know what's going on <Speech_Male> and do you <Speech_Male> think that victim <Speech_Telephony_Male> of mental health is <Speech_Male> going to disclose <Speech_Telephony_Male> to that <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> That supervisor <Speech_Male> who is less <Speech_Male> sensitive lesson <Speech_Male> tune to his or <Speech_Male> her issues <Speech_Telephony_Male> they further withdraw <Speech_Male> and they've <Speech_Telephony_Male> actually become the <Speech_Telephony_Male> management's <Speech_Male> me to discipline <Speech_Male> and that <Speech_Telephony_Male> person unfortunate <Speech_Male> leaves the organization <Speech_Male> or is <Speech_Male> terminated from the <Speech_Male> organization. So <Speech_Telephony_Male> it's very complex. <Speech_Telephony_Male> It takes effective <Speech_Male> leadership. It <Speech_Telephony_Male> takes an engaged <Speech_Music_Male> effort <Speech_Male> at understanding <Speech_Telephony_Male> the people <Speech_Telephony_Male> from the other side <Speech_Male> of the desk perspective <Speech_Male> as opposed to <Speech_Telephony_Male> decide. <Speech_Male> I need you do things <Speech_Male> regardless <Silence> of your moments <Speech_Male> <Speech_Telephony_Male> and not understanding <Speech_Male> that sometimes. Those <Speech_Male> moments involve <Speech_Male> victimization <Speech_Telephony_Male> home from. <Speech_Male> It's an apartment <Speech_Male> violence <Speech_Male> victims ation at home <Speech_Male> from <Speech_Music_Male> children who <Speech_Male> do not listen to <Speech_Telephony_Male> parents anymore <Speech_Male> and threaten and <Speech_Telephony_Male> confronted pants. <Speech_Male> I mean the midst <Speech_Male> of possibilities <Speech_Male> run the <Speech_Telephony_Male> realm of <SpeakerChange> of credibility. <Speech_Male> When <Speech_Male> you hear the issues <Speech_Telephony_Male> that is here as <Speech_Male> to why people <Speech_Male> have <Speech_Male> issues in <Speech_Male> the workplace that <Speech_Telephony_Male> come from <Speech_Male> issues away <Silence> from the workplace <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Female> not <Speech_Female> to mention the ones <Speech_Female> that could be created <Speech_Female> in the workplace <Speech_Female> because of <Speech_Female> poor leadership <Speech_Female> so it <Speech_Female> gets compounded <Silence> it gets compounded <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> will thank you so <Speech_Female> much for joining <Speech_Female> me today felix i <Speech_Female> really appreciate <Speech_Female> your being here <Speech_Female> and educating <Speech_Female> us about <Speech_Female> workplace violence <Speech_Female> that it's more <Speech_Female> than physical violence <Speech_Female> and <Speech_Female> that there are <Speech_Female> ways to mitigate <Speech_Female> it it just <Speech_Female> takes asking <Speech_Female> the right questions <Speech_Female> and the right <Speech_Female> management approach. <Silence> Thank you <Speech_Male> you're <Speech_Male> welcome. <SpeakerChange> thank you. <Speech_Female> That's our show <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement>

workplace violence supervisor
"hanna " Discussed on Business Confidential Now with Hanna Hasl-Kelchner

Business Confidential Now with Hanna Hasl-Kelchner

02:33 min | 11 months ago

"hanna " Discussed on Business Confidential Now with Hanna Hasl-Kelchner

"The question that will get you in. The most trouble is asking someone. Tell me about yourself. Because most people aren't thinking work initially they're thinking me so they start off with the o. Married or i'm just got recently divorced. I just had a baby or just relocated because my girlfriend broke up with me and all of a sudden you kind of down this rabbit hole because the candidate thinks she wants to get to know them and the employer doesn't know that they're really setting that candidate up which is ultimately setting them up to ask leading questions that are simply not just inappropriate but actually illegal. Yeah that can get into some trouble. I'm not that small business owners need any more trouble to get into but it's an easy. It's an easy trap to fall into. And i i hear it all the time. And so. Peer groups reaching out to community colleges Going to places like Your small business and technology development centers. There's many of them across the country so all of these things are free. So i wanna make a point of saying if you're a business owner and you're looking for a way to be able to deepen your human resources acumen. Become a little more savvy about what you can ask. You can't ask get some help questions. That would be appropriate to illuminate competencies and capabilities. In an objective way across the entire candidate pool. You can tap into all of these resources including your career centers across the country. Some of them call them workforce development centers we call them here in our state career centers but every state has these resources available to employers at zero cost and which is phenomenal so there really is no excuse especially for a small business owner specially for an entrepreneur or startup company. There's no excuse to get caught. You know in that. Hr you know hamster wheel. I don't know what i'm doing. I don't know what i'm doing. Because the resources are plentiful and they cost absolutely nothing. Yes that sounds very budget friendly to fit any and it just takes a little time to invest but it sounds definitely like it's very smart investment because it's an investment in protecting your liability in risk management but also and being able to have a better workforce.

Kurt
The "Innocent" Job Interview Question You Never Want to Ask

Business Confidential Now with Hanna Hasl-Kelchner

02:33 min | 11 months ago

The "Innocent" Job Interview Question You Never Want to Ask

"The question that will get you in. The most trouble is asking someone. Tell me about yourself. Because most people aren't thinking work initially they're thinking me so they start off with the o. Married or i'm just got recently divorced. I just had a baby or just relocated because my girlfriend broke up with me and all of a sudden you kind of down this rabbit hole because the candidate thinks she wants to get to know them and the employer doesn't know that they're really setting that candidate up which is ultimately setting them up to ask leading questions that are simply not just inappropriate but actually illegal. Yeah that can get into some trouble. I'm not that small business owners need any more trouble to get into but it's an easy. It's an easy trap to fall into. And i i hear it all the time. And so. Peer groups reaching out to community colleges Going to places like Your small business and technology development centers. There's many of them across the country so all of these things are free. So i wanna make a point of saying if you're a business owner and you're looking for a way to be able to deepen your human resources acumen. Become a little more savvy about what you can ask. You can't ask get some help questions. That would be appropriate to illuminate competencies and capabilities. In an objective way across the entire candidate pool. You can tap into all of these resources including your career centers across the country. Some of them call them workforce development centers we call them here in our state career centers but every state has these resources available to employers at zero cost and which is phenomenal so there really is no excuse especially for a small business owner specially for an entrepreneur or startup company. There's no excuse to get caught. You know in that. Hr you know hamster wheel. I don't know what i'm doing. I don't know what i'm doing. Because the resources are plentiful and they cost absolutely nothing. Yes that sounds very budget friendly to fit any and it just takes a little time to invest but it sounds definitely like it's very smart investment because it's an investment in protecting your liability in risk management but also and being able to have a better workforce.

Leadership Business Job Interview Hiring Workforce Ready Skills Olalah Njenga Hanna Hasl-Kelchner Business Confidential Now
The "Innocent" Job Interview Question You Never Want to Ask

Business Confidential Now with Hanna Hasl-Kelchner

02:33 min | 11 months ago

The "Innocent" Job Interview Question You Never Want to Ask

"The question that will get you in. The most trouble is asking someone. Tell me about yourself. Because most people aren't thinking work initially they're thinking me so they start off with the o. Married or i'm just got recently divorced. I just had a baby or just relocated because my girlfriend broke up with me and all of a sudden you kind of down this rabbit hole because the candidate thinks she wants to get to know them and the employer doesn't know that they're really setting that candidate up which is ultimately setting them up to ask leading questions that are simply not just inappropriate but actually illegal. Yeah that can get into some trouble. I'm not that small business owners need any more trouble to get into but it's an easy. It's an easy trap to fall into. And i i hear it all the time. And so. Peer groups reaching out to community colleges Going to places like Your small business and technology development centers. There's many of them across the country so all of these things are free. So i wanna make a point of saying if you're a business owner and you're looking for a way to be able to deepen your human resources acumen. Become a little more savvy about what you can ask. You can't ask get some help questions. That would be appropriate to illuminate competencies and capabilities. In an objective way across the entire candidate pool. You can tap into all of these resources including your career centers across the country. Some of them call them workforce development centers we call them here in our state career centers but every state has these resources available to employers at zero cost and which is phenomenal so there really is no excuse especially for a small business owner specially for an entrepreneur or startup company. There's no excuse to get caught. You know in that. Hr you know hamster wheel. I don't know what i'm doing. I don't know what i'm doing. Because the resources are plentiful and they cost absolutely nothing. Yes that sounds very budget friendly to fit any and it just takes a little time to invest but it sounds definitely like it's very smart investment because it's an investment in protecting your liability in risk management but also and being able to have a better workforce.

Leadership Business Job Interview Hiring Workforce Ready Skills Olalah Njenga Hanna Hasl-Kelchner Business Confidential Now
2 Common Interview Questions That Are Totally Useless

Business Confidential Now with Hanna Hasl-Kelchner

01:57 min | 11 months ago

2 Common Interview Questions That Are Totally Useless

"One question where somebody could Wind up with skewed answers. That's with a k. guy. Actually i'm gonna give you to avoid near the two most popular questions. Okay and they absolutely. They do absolutely nothing in terms of being able to eliminate competency or capabilities. The first question is what's your biggest weakness. Oh gosh the second is. What's your greatest strength. And how often do those questions get asked all the time right all this okay. Because there's so many ways that that the answer can be presented so there is no context for a question like that a more efficient and even effective question would be to give a candidate a scenario that has happened in that workplace maybe in that division or that department and say this is the scene that happened last week and this was the challenge that was presented. Can you walk me through how you would solve this challenge. Can you share with me the thinking that you would put into remedying a situation like this because in telling the interviewer how you solve the problem you're disclosing in a very objective way. What your strengths are how you think. And whether or not you really look at challenges the same way another candidate might and that ability to look at a challenge and be proactive about a solution might be tantamount to that role and you haven't even gotten that far in the interview in question yet to being able to posture a question and a better way giving a candidate and to answer in a way that is meaningful to that role really levels the playing field for every candidate who will be asked the everything question

Leadership Business Hiring Job Interview Workforce Ready Skills Olalah Njenga Hanna Hasl-Kelchner Business Confidential Now
Biggest Mistakes People Make on Video Conferencing Calls

Business Confidential Now with Hanna Hasl-Kelchner

01:59 min | 1 year ago

Biggest Mistakes People Make on Video Conferencing Calls

"Marvelous. Well we've covered a lot of dues. Do this do that. I'm curious because you have a lot of zoom calls that that you deal with and and just your general experience and know people on camera and so forth. What are some mistakes. You've seen people make so the biggest mistakes i see is something. We've mentioned just a little bit earlier. Which is the camera positioning or not paying attention to what is behind them. So i mentioned one person i talked to. She was way too close to the camera and actually our head was all the way to one side. There's all this empty space with nothing. Really there There's somebody else. I talked to yesterday. In fact and this person had just moved. So i don't fault them but there were all sorts of moving boxes behind them. I didn't know they moved. I suspected they did because they were moving boxes and It was it wasn't the most flattering shot that was there. So it's giving us all this extra information that gets in the way and actually right in the beginning of the same conversation she has. Her computer turns slightly to the side. So i didn't see the all the other things that were there I did i did do a zoom call with somebody right as this whole new world started and they had laundry on the bed behind them so not only was staring at their bed and i'm in their bedroom having a business call and virtually but there was laundry that needed to be folded so That was different. So i would. I would say right you know. Oh i can't tell what launcher is there. But i probably shouldn't see so. Yes i would say the biggest ones would be not paying attention to what's behind you next to you really just taking a little extra time for

Leadership Business Skype Zoom Presentation Communication Jess Todtfeld Media Ambassadors Hanna Hasl-Kelchner Business Confidential Now Video Conference
Fastest Way to Lose Your Zoom Audience

Business Confidential Now with Hanna Hasl-Kelchner

01:42 min | 1 year ago

Fastest Way to Lose Your Zoom Audience

"When it comes to sound quality i mean i even saw this on american idol. Somebody was doing their little spiel in a stairwell. And it had this fishbowl effect. Well what what should we be focusing on on sound quality. Well it's interesting because people are more apt to let go of the video not being perfect if it was grainy or the lighting wasn't just perfect but the second the audio is off and we can't even hear what it is that the other person's saying we start to two now. So you're right. That would be a stairwell would be The worst choice for I guess second to being underwater for a zoom or video broadcasts right and what we what we should really do is experiment with either. The the headphones that came with your phone or A little microphone. They sell all sorts of external microphones. Whether it's your computer or your ipad or your phone that really can make it. Sound much warmer or richer. I'm staring across the room. I have a fancy microphone. That looks like a johnny carson type. Microphone with the little angle. And i have a little clip on microphone which i often use and right now. I'm using airpods. Which i put into my ears and even before we started i said you which what does this sound. Good this better this way or that way and we go with what works best so yeah audio. Sound quality is very very important. If you lose that you lose people altogether

Leadership Business Skype Zoom Presentations Jess Todtfeld Media Ambassadors Hanna Hasl-Kelchner Business Confidential Now Johnny Carson
"hanna " Discussed on Business Confidential Now with Hanna Hasl-Kelchner

Business Confidential Now with Hanna Hasl-Kelchner

02:32 min | 1 year ago

"hanna " Discussed on Business Confidential Now with Hanna Hasl-Kelchner

"Suppose you have a superstar that you're managing and you suddenly feel threatened by them. You know the friend issue. Just even put aside for a second. And i don't mean threatened in physical bullying kind of way Not not at all but that yet superstars. They're smarter than me. They could do my job better than me. Oh my gosh what what do you do. Then you make the best use of that wonderful talent because they're making you as a manager. Look good and if you have that confidence in yourself and say. I've got a superstar two or three or whatever And i'm going to maximize how their contribution Results in good work that my department is doing. That's gonna reflect on me. Certainly it takes. Confidence used the word threatened than and. I hope that that's too strong a word but i know exactly what you mean. There are people that are threatened and then they try to get that person out and it usually backfires because other people in the organization are well aware. If you've got a superstar in your organization that person getting some attention for probably well above your your job so if if it happens you're lucky you've got a great employee. Use that person's talents. To the max and Used them perhaps as a mentor. Ask them if they will help. You develop some other people skills but don't let them threaten you in terms of They want your job terrific if they want your job. Maybe you can apply for one to five where you are right now. I loved when i was an internal. Hr person i love hiring. The absolute best person i could who they need ro- and learn But i know a lot of people don't feel that way. I know that a lot of people really don't like someone who might want their job. But personally i think that makes me a better man at sure and it helped me advance in my career. Because if i had someone who could replace eight then i could take a higher level job. So they'll be threatened. Use it appropriately. That's a great way to look at it. And i hope that our listeners do take that to heart because it's about the whole growth mentality that the pie gets bigger not smaller and that everybody has get have a bigger

"hanna " Discussed on Business Confidential Now with Hanna Hasl-Kelchner

Business Confidential Now with Hanna Hasl-Kelchner

05:05 min | 1 year ago

"hanna " Discussed on Business Confidential Now with Hanna Hasl-Kelchner

"Or whoever is more convenient, but if you add the Personal Touch to it, if you have a human-to-human conversation when it's needed you've elevated that to an emotional connection and often times that turns into repeat business and ideally Customer Loyalty over time. I love that that you can't automate the relation wage. Yep, so people that think they can set it and forget it are really setting themselves up for like you said commoditization because that's just a downward spiral, you know chasing prices. Yeah wage and if it's and if it works that's fine. You're still a commodity but what if it doesn't work what happens if there's frustration, you know, you mentioned you hated the, you know, interactive, you know Touch Tone dial pads. And all you want to do is talk to a human and you start yelling at the phone representative. You don't have to talk about the system off training and you know, not long ago. I called the company for support and they they said we're really sorry were busy your hold times are going to be longer than usual but they didn't tell me how long it was going to be in 30 minutes later. I'm still on hold wondering is this really and I really on hold and I just stuck in somewhere in the world and I'm never going to talk to a soul when today's technology dead. So inexpensive to add on there your whole time will be 35 minutes. We're really sorry. If that doesn't work for you. We can call you back at 35 minutes in a punch at a time that's more available, you know better available for you after 35 minutes and we'll call you at that time their systems that do that and they're very inexpensive to implement an issue. You've got a situation where you've got that many people calling you and that many people are on hold then you could probably afford to use this technology Chef. I hear the passion in your voice for this subject, you know, you just add so much depth and dimension to it and make make it sound intuitive..

representative
"hanna " Discussed on Business Confidential Now with Hanna Hasl-Kelchner

Business Confidential Now with Hanna Hasl-Kelchner

02:53 min | 1 year ago

"hanna " Discussed on Business Confidential Now with Hanna Hasl-Kelchner

"And speaking of pricing cuz I know especially startups and woke preneurs that are starting their business. They're very price-sensitive and rightly so cuz they have limited resources limited budget and you know not too long ago. I was talking to someone about logos and they had previously worked at a very very large consumer product company and they spent thousands of dollars on Logo work. He was in marketing and so he was so excited to discover these online Logan services that provide a really very inexpensive type logos. What's been your experience with these types of services Pros cons. Which could you took us about the what what do we need to know about them? I will tell you that I have redone at least three or four lately people that have ordered these logos online. What you what a lot of these there are some very talented artists that do this work. But the problem with the online services. Yes, it is. Maybe you'll spend $99 on a logo wage, but you're going to get one file and after hearing all this field. I just went through but all different types of files and color formulas. You can imagine how they you know, how limited you are in using that logo. It's not a one-size-fits-all situation when it comes to a logo. So that's what I woke the only the pros I can see in the Online logo service. You need something in a hurry you're strictly an online company and you're really not dead. I have a lot of options for like I say with my different rounds of design you're going to get one or two designs and be maybe you'll just get one and they'll say basically take it or leave it you like it you can pay for if you don't like it. You don't have to pay for it. But you still in the end wind up with one logo that is not usable and all circumstances and always you need to use it off so that the type of files is is really one of the things people would need to ask about if they pursue one of these online options that are dead. I'll call them cut rate for lack of a better a better word, which is nothing very wrong with them. But you need to understand what you're getting for the money and what you're not getting that you might need at a later date so that you don't mix it up and are spending extra time and then being disappointed with the result because you're using a 72-month DPI a low resolution JPEG and you're trying to print t-shirts and it's not going to work. So never work. Yeah,

Abby first things first Hannah
"hanna " Discussed on Business Confidential Now with Hanna Hasl-Kelchner

Business Confidential Now with Hanna Hasl-Kelchner

02:23 min | 1 year ago

"hanna " Discussed on Business Confidential Now with Hanna Hasl-Kelchner

"Don't know if anybody's ever printed their logo printed something off the internet and and it was a a red logo or a red square and when you printed it ma'am. Think it was maroon. That's because your printer and your screen talked to different languages and it gets saved gets lost in the translation. So I will create jobs that are also for printing and also for web use so that if you're sitting at your computer, And your insurance company your website and you pull out your brochure the color on your brochure looks as close as possible to the color on the screen. I hope that didn't get too technical well wage if I can translate the it sounds like we need two sets of files one that you can use on your computer for your website and for any type of online presentations, you know, if you're doing power points or something like that and then another set that would be for print so that you can have consistent professional-looking branding as far as the colors between it's all it's all about. I'm sorry. It's all about consistency and for Branding the screen when you're looking at light that's the screen off its RGB. I'm sure everybody's heard RGB before it's red green and blue. Those are the only three colors that create gazillion. Colors and it's hard to believe how do you create colors with light? Well, that's just the nature of the of the Beast. It's a screen. It's like old TV sets that used to have the three different color guns, which was the wage. But now I'm really aging myself red green and blue now for print you're talking about physical ink think about buckets of paint and you've got blue or actually CMYK K C being in the blue or cyan and being magenta, why being yellow and K being believe or not K stands for black and all those colors are combined in in a different in percentages to create color. If you want an orange, you're going to take a certain percent of the magenta and a certain percent of the yellow and you're going to get orange and it's a physical language of Ink on a piece of paper or the screen is made up of beams of color that come together to create

Abby first things first Hannah
"hanna " Discussed on Business Confidential Now with Hanna Hasl-Kelchner

Business Confidential Now with Hanna Hasl-Kelchner

03:34 min | 1 year ago

"hanna " Discussed on Business Confidential Now with Hanna Hasl-Kelchner

"You can also assess if that's the right place for your frankly I would say about if you are a leader or an entrepreneur someone who oversees a company or team and that's the way that you're behaving. It's pretty hard. This is why we have professional development. This is why we have 360 reviews. This is why we have performance reviews as well. It's all the idea of growth and development and getting feedback and if there's a couple sure where that kind of behavior either tolerated, even though it's not effective then there's really not a strategy to set people up for success and reach their potential in the long term. That's a very fair assessment. Now. Let me give you another situation. Let's say you're at a company or let's say you join a new company in a leadership role. Basically, you've got a pretty much a clean slate to walk with in terms of establishing relationships with employees. They don't know you you don't know them. Everybody's kind of doing a little bit of a circle dance. What's this person? Like can I talk to them? But what about the employer who is promoted within a company and is now supervising their friends. What advice do you have for them? It's a good question. And it's one that comes up often. I'll try to answer it in a couple of ways kind of so it could maybe hit home for someone who might be listening. If you are moving from a position of you know, same status to one of the higher status if you will within a company may end up managing a friend. I think what's really important especially with your friends is to understand up front what it is you expect of them and what they can expect it to you. So really comes down to set an expectation. And I think that's goes across the board for any other people that you are starting to lead. Even if you move from the same type of level to a higher higher Optical level. One of the things that you also have to establish friends is the fact what what your what Your Mo together right? Are you friends first? What's your Mantra and you can actually have conversations of how you would like to interact with that person and really set boundaries for what applies to your friendship versus what applies to your work? And so if you're picking up on my team here, it's really about communication about expectations to make sure you're aligned now. What I'll say is that I've been through this personally, right? I I would last company. I worked at actually came to work with a friend of mine from business school and we always said friends first month now, I'm not saying we were batting a thousand all the time, but the bottom line is that we knew where we stood as friend and they made it things a lot easier to interact and work together. I also work in coach off the number of companies who have family members. That's a whole different Dynamic right? So you have a whole different Dynamic there and family Dynamics from childhood or dead. During into your workplace. And so one of the things I advise people on in those situations and to become aware of again. It comes down to awareness is Which hat might you be wearing at a given time throughout the day. Are you wearing the CEO hat right now or are you wearing the child had because you're in a father-son or a you know, a a mother daughter type relationship in a place. Are you if you have brothers, you know, which how do you were know you my brother right now? Are you my CFO and so using language and labels again and studying expectation create a structure where you can actually operate that's how you can navigate this for your skillfully..

CFO CEO
"hanna " Discussed on Business Confidential Now with Hanna Hasl-Kelchner

Business Confidential Now with Hanna Hasl-Kelchner

01:47 min | 1 year ago

"hanna " Discussed on Business Confidential Now with Hanna Hasl-Kelchner

"Professional growth might sound like accumulating notches on a belt a bigger title more money more responsibility, maybe even your own business but professional growth is so much more than a resume check list of accomplishments successfully moving from a contributor role to a leadership role requires new ways of thinking and new ways of doing things and when we come back down.

"hanna " Discussed on Business Confidential Now with Hanna Hasl-Kelchner

Business Confidential Now with Hanna Hasl-Kelchner

02:55 min | 1 year ago

"hanna " Discussed on Business Confidential Now with Hanna Hasl-Kelchner

"And that's the I think the part of the the challenge is that there's no one-size-fits-all certain. Someone has a judgment. Let's say it's a money judgment. I understand your recommendations for pursuing. These are a little different than the normal approach to judgment enforcement. So tell me what steps would you take and why are they more effective than what people typically would do something like the example. I just gave you before we ever we typically hire and supervise the attorneys for our clients so that we know exactly what's going to be done in the case and when ma'am Agree and make them a part of our team to enforce the Judgment. So we do the financial forensic research around the world. And I I mean that literally not trying to sound big time. But if it's offshore money and assets that are off sure, you know, that is not a deterrent. It's just another hook to jump through but we do the research we find where their bank accounts are legally and in strict compliance with gramm-leach-bliley act. We know where to have the attorney send the subpoenas for the bank accounts and the garnish let's say you never garnished an account unless you send a subpoena for at least 24 or 36 months for all the credits and debits including wire transfers. And when you get that you get every source of income that they have that's gone into that account. And then from the debits you see their wire transfers and the checks that are written to move money into other accounts. You see where they've Invested in real estate you see where they've invested in the stock market and who their broker is and they get the next subpoena and garnishment and you start getting a roadmap up of their Financial Resources where the money's coming from if they're making deposits for oil and gas income. You don't want the monthly check you want to own the oil and gas royalties. So you see where they came from you trace it back and then garnish those royalties or get a turnover order for them. So you own the oil and gas rights, not the get month of each a month same thing if they're getting deposits from rental rather its commercial rental or residential rental. You don't want the rental checks you want on the rental property. So you find out where it came from what the check was for and you go take the property. If there's a lien on the property you want to get the loan application to support documents the tax returns and financial statements that go over those loan application. Questions and it just keeps continuing to grow and grow and grow exponentially. So getting this stuff is not impossible. It's looking at the various places then working with the attorneys to get properly worded subpoenas to get the result you want. So you do want

Joe Dickerson Hannah US Sheriff's Department Houston Police Department attorney financial forensic Services LL Texas Jose Houston Harris County District Attorne founding member CEO Joe organized crime Bureau
"hanna " Discussed on Business Confidential Now with Hanna Hasl-Kelchner

Business Confidential Now with Hanna Hasl-Kelchner

04:06 min | 1 year ago

"hanna " Discussed on Business Confidential Now with Hanna Hasl-Kelchner

"I know it is a mouthful and you know, I always felt like with any problem. If we don't correct it diagnosed the problem. How can we properly prescribed a solution to it? So we spend a lot of time figuring out what's wrong and then what needs to be done and of course my job my motivation in doing that was the fact that eighty percent of the Civil judgments. The United States are never collected and I think that's a fallacy in the Civil judgment system that has to be corrected. So, you know people always say I don't want to talk to the person that wrote the book that read the book. I want to work with the person that wrote the book and I figured a phone number. 55 years of doing this stuff the more young investigators and others that I can share this information with the better so they can learn to do this long after I'm gone and also let the people that have judgments know that there is hope there is a way to do this and we've learned a lot through trial and I just don't accept no as an answer. So we'll keep going till we get it done. Well, where do most people go wrong? You said there's a right way to go about it. Why do things get off track less than 80% get collected. Well, first of all, it was the mentality four years in the legal system. That doing judgment enforcement was the Dirty Work the attorney that that couldn't get real clients might take judgment enforcement work. That was the attitude in the thirties and forties and even up into the fifties and early sixties by some. Yep. Other problem is that most attorneys well attorneys in general are not trained on how to do the work. I had my staff do a survey of the Top fifty law schools in the United States and we personally interviewed either the dean of the registrar not some student that was answering the phone and the interview had one question anything else sir or ma'am. What do you have in your curriculum at Harvard or Yale or whatever the University was we were speaking at what do you have in your curriculum that teaches your law school students how to enforce judgments and there was always a pause and the response from 47 of them was no, we don't we don't actually cover that subject and the other three said oh, yes judgment enforcement. Well, actually we we talked about that. Or let me see about two or three hours each semester and our creditors rights course. And we wonder why attorneys are not trained in how to do judgment enforcement. Now, that's not to say that they're not a quite a few good attorneys that do know how to do this. And the ones that don't know are not necessarily not good at tourneys. They just don't have the expertise. But the ones that do have taken the initiative to learn it on their own through continuing legal education courses, mostly through finding mentors that have been there done that by trial and error and have mastered the process along with their ongoing education and have taken the younger attorneys under their wing and taught them. So we are starting to make some progress but there's a long ways to go and the processes that are used, you know are typically that's not the ones that are most effective. They're the ones that have always been used and you know, if you have time we can talk about two or three brief examples on that. Well, yeah, I'd like to get into that but I can vouch for the fact that I went to law school and how to collect a judgment was not part of it. The job was to win in court and actually most cases get settled so that took care of that issue. But yes, the enforcement part was was not something part of the curriculum..

attorney United States Harvard Yale
"hanna " Discussed on Business Confidential Now with Hanna Hasl-Kelchner

Business Confidential Now with Hanna Hasl-Kelchner

02:17 min | 1 year ago

"hanna " Discussed on Business Confidential Now with Hanna Hasl-Kelchner

"So I find in my research that that people who are older employees, for example, are less likely to get raises to get hired into positions to get promotions to get funded for their ventures. All sorts of things, and the lay perception is that it's because of things like older individuals not being as technologically proficient, right we have les perceptions of people but what I find my research is that there are underlying perceptions that drive those attributions. So for in the case of Ageism, there's one perception one perception only that typically drives these these these negative. Attributions, and that's curiosity that we assume that older employees are older visuals are less curious and so before going into an interview situation, for example, I would how older candidates I would say to them. The one perception that they have about you is that you're less curious and so then they would go into these interviews and I hear them saying remarkable things, things like you know I'm curious about your company's strategy and how it's evolved over time or I'm curious about the vision you had and how it's sort of change based on the current circumstances a now what I find is not only are they. Rated higher in terms of things like curiosity, they're rated higher in terms of things like technological proficiency things that they never talked about it all and in fact they were and based on this they're more likely to be hired for the job more likely to get the promotion, the raise the funding for venture than otherwise not only are they more likely than than other than other people who are older candidates but more. So even than candidates who who are not facing ages, and so it's sort of an an and this is not just about ageism I find this for gender, race ethnicity class sexual orientation. Things where there are these underlying perceptions that are driving these these negative outcomes but we can actually sort of guide once we know what these underlying perceptions are. So that's sort of one category like how we how we guide traits.