35 Burst results for "Hanley"

"hanley" Discussed on The Dave Pamah Show

The Dave Pamah Show

03:53 min | 2 months ago

"hanley" Discussed on The Dave Pamah Show

"You're gonna believe Obviously limpets well actually the paralympics now but the before. The there was a lot of new sports like bmx and skateboard in skateboarding. And stuff like that. Yeah i believe what's coming up in paris and the next olympics and free time advocate break dancing. Oh wow i entertainment as well sports. Yeah skateboarding thing. I don't know how feel about that. All right yeah as well as obviously yes. Yeah well winter olympics. But i think there'd be some people in in california and colorado said it snowboarding and skateboarding kind of came from surfing and therefore they're derivatives sports. I don't know yeah. Yeah okay well. Let's just parents up. So yeah i mean what what you think what the against crosses summer what you think mile or should happen. I mean. obviously you could say there's going to be questions asked. Yeah i don't know. I i know there's going to be more chaos. I know that it's going to be a difficult transition and it's going to be very much wait and see You know for right now. It's it's apparent that there was not some sort of democratic reform. There was not some sort of reimagining of afghan society with a stable government Democratically responsible government with a strong military that that did not happen so right now there is going to be somewhat of a power. Vacuum nature abhors vacuum as they say and the taliban stepped in and so now it's going to be a a waiting game to see what exactly to what extent does their to their actions. Live up to their new newly polished rhetoric. Yeah yeah it'd be interesting another syria. I thought don't forget where we rushing lights. They russia china pakistan the neighboring countries on their side. So you really wanna mess with that situation right. So yeah we'll excellent the remainder of your podcast again and then the and the other website you have and yes so so yes my my podcast is keep it in perspective where we talk about politics and public affairs it's mostly us politics and public affairs but I i have been on plenty of european and canadian. Tv and radio and folks outside the us still get very interested. So yeah you are interested in the website is. Let's keep it in perspective dot com. You can also search.

olympics paralympics afghan society paris colorado california taliban syria pakistan russia china us
"hanley" Discussed on The Dave Pamah Show

The Dave Pamah Show

03:42 min | 2 months ago

"hanley" Discussed on The Dave Pamah Show

"Just certainly is well christian Good good can come on the show anyway. Just a bath ghanistan anymore. Closer to home with you. What's happening review and obviously in american domestic side. We will have to catch up with that absolutely not do another episode and talk about all that good stuff. Yes here in the us What is not going on. There's a a pandemic still raging. There are people who refused to take the vaccine because they earned medical degrees at the university of facebook the the misinformation and disinformation did not end with the twenty Sixteen in two thousand twenty elections dealing with that in cyberspace here in the us dealing with what the huge impact it's had in our public health and on our politics so there's that Good news though. Is that relatively new. President president biden Who campaign is very much. A good old fashioned. Centrists has actually had some. he's he's made some good progress in his policies that have been very beneficial to a lot of americans halting or at least we'll see how long it lasts but pausing payments on student loan debt. excuse me reinvesting in infrastructure in Human services childcare health. Care that sort of thing so that's all very positive Concerned about the midterms. you know. that's interesting and the other thing going on right now. Too is We have redistricting. So every ten years under the constitution we have a census and we measure the population. And we figure out how many people there are How many per state and then that tells you how many congressional districts how many seats in congress each state gets and then from there. The states have to draw the lines for each of those districts within those states and so in the us. It's hard to believe in other countries. It's very politicized process. Where state governments get to decide those things and it can very often be sort of political weapon to keep certain people in power and box others out of power. So i actually did. A an episode of my podcast. Keep it in perspective with dente acuna. Who is an expert on redistricting with a nonprofit organization. Here in the us that just went online yesterday so that was a great car as well. you can check that out at. Let's keep it in perspective dot com or on apple podcast or stitcher where your podcast But that's what we have going right now politically here in the us and it is. I will say one thing. It's nice from a media standpoint that when you have a press conference you have a Anything going on with the president or his Press secretary you actually have reason and explanation and no one yelling or name calling or being an insolent child in front of a podium. It's nice change of pace Yeah that's what's going on in the personally i Have my backup at the podcast as well. Keep it in perspective and Yeah dave it's been just a pleasure to be back here with you again. It's been sation. Yeah i mean my show is not all politics like yours but it makes the same politics news as well as some sport bit sports and entertainment bill cosa like to put some wellbeing and life life perspective stuff out there as well. I post five mixture of stuff. The i've been in my own life really say well. I don't have me on ruining sports related. I never even went. I think i went to one baseball game before my son was bothering. You like baseball. So now i go to baseball games but anything else see american football. I could not explain to you. If you put a gun to my head. I have no idea..

university of facebook President president biden us dente acuna congress apple dave baseball football
"hanley" Discussed on The Dave Pamah Show

The Dave Pamah Show

05:05 min | 2 months ago

"hanley" Discussed on The Dave Pamah Show

"They managed to get him out there as well but it was a big operation from the president. Yeah so there will able to place but you couse. Russia their new allies russia pakistan and china subtly nice groups taking over. Of course yeah well could see. With china that frame money at different countries you know develop getting develops of afghanistan alabama. Look at that side. Sure i mean if he referring to something like a new silk road that sort of initiative china its own center of the world again. wrote them belt. Yeah right and you know. That's that's possible i. i'm not sure. What their endgame would be in afghanistan. There maybe we'll a security perspective. But from what i can tell and this. Is you know non expert here. But what i can tell the money that they are throwing around in different countries around the world. It's one part buying influence. It's also another part buying resources need. They invest heavily in africa because africa so resource rich. I mean royale now. Yeah yeah. I mean not on the ground resources. Why do you right. Why do you build the infrastructure into those places so you can extract resources to build your technology right. That's right exactly show. That might be latin. That i can see something anyway but it was invested close. Civilly mums country in the caribbean invested in jamaica. Different places really so interesting. What up to yeah. We're interested to see there. But of course. Russia has a history of countries surrounding. Afghanistan is surrounded surrounding the still friends with some of them. Some countries around with belarus for example. You know the lady that has kind of pro russia the soviet whereas people didn't like that and want to get out and more pro. Ub like what's happening in ukraine so No i mean Yeah russia is always had. It's kind of. It's interesting because russia when you think about it even though it it was certainly a global superpower from the nuclear deterrent perspective..

china afghanistan russia Russia pakistan africa alabama royale jamaica caribbean belarus ukraine
"hanley" Discussed on The Dave Pamah Show

The Dave Pamah Show

05:08 min | 2 months ago

"hanley" Discussed on The Dave Pamah Show

"What point would they have not come back and seized control after a foreign power left really. I mean whether we withdrew in a couple of years in early two thousands or ten years ago or ten years in the future from now. Would that not still happen down in other words if there were clear objective that we were going to go in there and find bin laden and x. y. and z. And then leave. After that time that i think there'd be less of a shock about this but i think there is some sort of an unspoken expectation that after twenty years that something there was established. You can't just take you know western french and english enlightenment philosophy and american enlightenment implementation and constitutional norms and governance and just transplant that with me. You know men and guns and say here you go. I mean that's not going to work. It's a different culture. It's a different place in. It's not a western nation. As so this. The i think there's the unspoken expectation that the duration of time. The twenty years that had passed would have made that sort of difference than i think. It's very painful. For a lot of people to realize it. After the initial invasion and clearing out of the taliban and then the eventual finding and killing of bin laden again not in afghanistan pakistan they do the additional years not amount to a fundamental change in that society. Yeah yeah well. I mean it was always so You know even we've often barack obama's even mentioned what may be joined a troops of ink so there was always talk about that. Oh absolutely yeah probably could have been done a lot earlier because some of ex-military now that was in afghanistan twenty years. What was that all about. Vietnam you know. What the hell was that. That's a waste of time. You know going going through that torture thing. yeah right. Twenty years is a long state they welcoming be like in a nice way. Well right i mean and we wasted about by some estimates between direct expensive with the military contractors and third parties things like that around two point three trillion dollars which the last i checked i believe is basically the entire economy of canada for an entire year. It's a huge amount of money and you know Full disclosure for your listeners. He can tell what side of the political spectrum. I'm on my country but to my mind in a country where no but there are places in the deep south in the midwest that are economically depressed. That need revitalization. There are schools that are substandard in the richest country in the world. There are highways and bridges. That are structurally deficient and their children. Who are drinking unsafe. Water because the pipes are structurally deficient that two trillion dollars should have gone a very long way. Investing in children in this country. Now mean we we say the same thing in the uk equipment labor party all right well even and even some conservatives akon immortal left you know more understanding You know it's like well. You know when the iraq live we could use that for the schools in the united healthcare. Or wherever you know. Health care systems pretty good compared to.

bin laden afghanistan taliban pakistan barack obama Vietnam midwest canada uk united healthcare iraq
"hanley" Discussed on The Dave Pamah Show

The Dave Pamah Show

04:19 min | 2 months ago

"hanley" Discussed on The Dave Pamah Show

"From the british empire There's there's no place to You know establish any kind of You know an enduring system and during You know i it. Yeah right right. So they've got a slot quoting dr rich in the country. Of where where. Where do they belong that kind of thing. Well there's that and there's also just the the physical reality you're talking about a landlocked you know massive mountain ranges and desert and places that if you are an outsider. How do you gain a foothold. I mean it just sapped resources from now three. Successive superpowers always young enough channel pronounce. Fifteen when the russians invaded acquaintances. But that didn't last long because of the international pressure right because all's interest into track and field of the affected. The olympic games exactly took took a big sports. Politics is bigger reminded. You know already in my maliciousness but yeah yeah certainly. Certainly afghanistan does have a history like that one. That's a few of the other question things about What's going on the uk question. America is the cio military us military at the time was giving star trust in tank given them stuff. I mean this is just what i'm hearing from. News contact details people that need to be evacuated eden. Where were the people that worked with the us that will. I'm not sure they're talking about us. And british nationals or so us nationals because america or afghans was and to the us military time but the information given and now. It's giving him almost like a defcon of isn't it. I mean. I haven't heard that that particular detail i i do know that there are about. I want say it's fifteen hundred additional. Us nationals still have not been accounted for and then there's of course all the afghans who provided assistance translation guidance whatever to the us to the military. And now it's you again going back to the earlier point. How do they get out safely..

dr rich us olympic games cio afghanistan uk
"hanley" Discussed on The Dave Pamah Show

The Dave Pamah Show

04:21 min | 2 months ago

"hanley" Discussed on The Dave Pamah Show

"In women will fear for their safety. Oh absolutely i mean. That's that's something that we are Fiercely debating here in the. Us is what about all of the people who helped translate for american soldiers and contractors. But everyone who were guides to american soldiers and contractors at don't we owe a debt and obligation to get them out safely and heard so far is that the the process for doing that is been just completely labor intensive and that there essentially just a handful of individuals on the ground in kabul processing those applications and getting people ready to depart. Which if better plan there should have been an entire office dedicated to that expediting the process and they should have any already go. You know why should have been done in the first place. Yeah exactly because especially with the systems pro lobbyists low of all this because they just immigrations just very tired in terms of that says love of bureaucracy on cintas duping going on even with a quick in two days. People are waiting because of how spicy might be the same for us. Yeah i mean i. It's and maybe this is not as well known in the uk but actually our immigration system is very broken as well and it's c- you know there's not the same crunch for space and resources here obviously but it doesn't mean that there isn't still a big bureaucratic mess the same as in the uk and so and of course there's there's a lot of the anti-immigrant sentiment right now. It's the same as in the uk Seems to be this perennial thing that humans every couple of decades after. Blame everything on other people. What happened in just about every guy gets laid claim playing right So yeah and and so in our system as well. There's really is no one line or queue as you would say. There's not one pathway in there are you know. Work visas Refugees there several different channels or means of getting into the country..

kabul uk Us
"hanley" Discussed on The Dave Pamah Show

The Dave Pamah Show

04:26 min | 2 months ago

"hanley" Discussed on The Dave Pamah Show

"We got obviously very good intelligent about our security national security in the military. Yes i have like the six and five and six which is why we have all the resources and it's kind of like well class other positive. Maybe maybe russia has a little bit of a system. You know historically that they buy back still. So yes but the us and uk have these pesky things like laws and human rights. So yeah well. that's the thing. The fact is that they could really seen his communist terrorist attack. Could have not use a different strategy. You know like many stretches us everywhere they use like. Hush quiet ones you know. We don't even see it coming. I mean i got bin laden in the end right and then they do some blatant ones and these seems like a blatant. Pull the rug out of your feet rather than less quantity get these refugees out slowly and before we even month monthly We hardly one left. When we say we're going to the military could heal. Yes different. And i think that's the question on everyone's lips here in washington. Why why wasn't the case. Why was that evacuation not happening. Happening slowly incrementally perhaps under the cover of night that by bit in the weeks leading up to now why is it. Why is it now happening after the official data gang. Get everybody at why. Why was that the timeline. It seems it seems completely backward. And you haven't heard an answer yet because isis for example wouldn't hurt a finger if i've used nine more of a quiet undercover way of doing it with their connor strongly intelligent system. Now what i will say. Is that in the press conference yesterday. president biden did say that the his his rationale was essentially that there had been an agreement between the trump administration and the taliban about if the implementation of the departure were to proceed. Then there'd be sort of an agreement or informal agreement that no americans would be harmed but then you have to think okay but why did the trump administration even believe that. Why would they even. It's it's still. It still is amazing to a lot of us here that the prior administration would even attempt to negotiate with the taliban. I mean we were told for years that they were you know. Criminals terrorists is that in the other and then all of a sudden. It's well we're tired of being there. So let's talk to the guys. They're saying that the taliban is a very different domina crew could be a from put in the nova sleep like anything in politics wherever you say one thing and something else could be done but with taliban obviously cannot don't trust them but american seems to be trusting them united cannot be speaking to the cia and kind of peace talks in america. The leaders and stuff like that yeah. What's what's really odd to you. Talk about the difference in twenty years is the taliban now. Seems to have a press secretary or someone who media advisor or something. I mean they're. They're posing for a photo ops. They're talking about Not having the same hard lines on a lot of issues they're promising. I don't wanna say reforms but Less harsh treatment of women. I guess is what they're attempting to say but look twenty years ago if you turn on the news in the..

taliban president biden trump administration bin laden russia uk america washington cia
"hanley" Discussed on The Dave Pamah Show

The Dave Pamah Show

03:22 min | 2 months ago

"hanley" Discussed on The Dave Pamah Show

"I mean from respective. When this all happened i was still in school now. I have you know white hair and my beard. And i have a child of my own. A lot has changed a lot of and we. We went from sort of this operation. That was there was To be honest sold to us it was marketed to the electorate. During the george w bush administration and by the media. Then as you know much like the way that world war one was sold you know. We'll all be home by christmas. Let's just get it done with. And then we got. We were stuck there for years and it became it from my perspective. It ended up being essentially a war of attrition. Right where you've got one empire one larger country if you will that has to keep on resupplying and sending in more people sending in more money sending in more fuel more machines more resources and then for those who actually live there on the ground it was With the taliban it's drew was the matter of waiting in there is there is no way in other words. I think the real discussion to be had right now is how could the tactics could. The details of the exit strategy have been better planned and executed but the departure had to come at some point. This couldn't last forever and there. I have not heard any reasonable argument yet. About how afghanistan would be self-governing democratic entity. After any western forces departed. Yeah was interesting. But i mean of course yesterday very sadly. We're we've seen this now attack by isis well. Isis kader khan cells per cent a chapter raw division of the terrorist group. And you see this happening or coming. Because i mean it doesn't make sense. I mean yeah we're going to withdraw and now all of a sudden even soldiers get blown up. I mean i'm not saying hallway that contract to me that spells out war. Yeah i and so. I mean there was a question. I'm not sure if you caught it in the uk would have been very late in the day for you yesterday but Late yesterday after you and here on the eastern on the eastern seaboard of the us President biden did hold a press conference. Where he he was asked about that did it. Are there any plans for reprisals on the part of the us. And as he said he's he's communicating with his generals with his commanders and he'll offer whatever resources they request and You know listen to their expertise again though. I think that's where we're really getting into the weeds about the details. Because i think at least media right now and i can only that for the moment. There's this conflicting of the overarching strategy. What was the plan for one. Five ten twenty years right and then what are the details of how that is wrapped up and those are two different conversations. One is how do you. What was the goal. What was the objective. What was what was supposed to be accomplished during that time in afghanistan and the other question is okay once that time is over which it has now been decided that it is how is the exit strategy implemented and that i think is where there's the image is show just how it was not properly executed. Yeah the i mean especially america number of the uk as well you know..

Isis kader khan george w bush President biden taliban afghanistan america uk
"hanley" Discussed on The Dave Pamah Show

The Dave Pamah Show

02:47 min | 2 months ago

"hanley" Discussed on The Dave Pamah Show

"And awakens your innermost capability. You have the training and the talent to succeed but do you have the guts to fail. I love we love what you do. You want to be the best at it. Today is about the power you you will change to find your path to success through the journey of those who have succeeded and now your host days pomme welcome. Welcome to the show today. We're gonna talk politics in this episode and Have a regular contretemps with me in this episode where we will talk about the afghanistan strong crisis two decays after they were driven out. The taliban return to power in kabul last weekend after the us invasion in two thousand one weeks after the nine eleven attacks. The taliban withdrew many of its flights took refuge in neighboring pakistan. Gonna ask the question. What's changed in the last twenty years and what's next so with me is christian hand in Kristen hanley christian hanley. Welcome back thank you. Thank you for having me my tongue. I'm not drown honestly. It's already dark the time difference here you know it's it's five. Pm in the uk. You're fine go for my sleep in ready famously. Layers so anyway. Going on at the moment around what people must be hanging all over the place bob. So you can use. When a forefront on europe obviously neighboring countries as well you know of pakistan and the borders must be fueled with people john escaping and stuff like that so i will ask the question We've got kennison's crisis. Why has changed in nas twenty years and what happens next so i can only speak to that so much from sort of the internal. Us domestic political side. Because i don't have the expertise of you know being on the ground there and fat and my own podcasts. Keep it in perspective. I'm gonna have a friend of mine. Join me in the coming weeks. who before. He was a journalist actually was an officer who trained afghan fighters to resist the taliban and resist terrorism. As a he'll be a great asset to talk to in the coming weeks but in terms of what's changed here in the us which spearheaded and led the fight in afghanistan and the resulting occupation. Is the the war weariness And it's not even i maybe war weariness as a strong term The sense of apathy that has come over the electorate where there was this this desire for not just justice but even perhaps vengeance twenty years ago and now it's it's been like you said two decades..

taliban Kristen hanley pakistan kennison kabul afghanistan hanley us bob uk europe john
Recounting the Yankees' Most Excruciating Losses

Yanks Go Yard: A New York Yankees podcast

00:58 sec | 3 months ago

Recounting the Yankees' Most Excruciating Losses

"How many times can you name the yankees How many games can you recall where they had a lead. In the ninth at fenway park recently recent history and lost only recent history. You got this one last night. Three one pretty bad very bad. Twenty seventeen year old is chapman walked the bases-loaded and blew a one run lead and they eventually got walked up. Andrew benintendi remember that very clearly 2016. They blew like a four nothing lead in its anarchist start and hanley. Ramirez walked off with a three run home. Run to dead center field. That happened two thousand eighteen. The three run lead in the ninth mcginlay do it with the throwing error the it and then eventually they got walked off. Of course they did. I mean that's four since two thousand sixteen fairly confident. That's not all of them didn't happen last year. There were no fans. Gary sanchez actually came back. In the ninth against the red sox. That was nice It's at least one a year. It's a kind of lost that should maybe occur in this rivalry once every five or six years

Andrew Benintendi Fenway Park Mcginlay Yankees Chapman Hanley Ramirez Gary Sanchez Red Sox
The Growing Popularity of Strength Training For Women With Trainer Alexa Towersey

Jungle Brothers Strength & Movement

02:04 min | 3 months ago

The Growing Popularity of Strength Training For Women With Trainer Alexa Towersey

"So i wanted to. We wanted to get you on today to have a chat about strings training because obviously this is a huge part of your life and it was something we didn't even touch on in the last episode and specifically strength training for women. I have a couple of things that i want to pick your brain on about it. But there's would it be safe to say that the the culture around strength training thing that women use as part of their fitness regime is shifting in recent years or is that just in a little bubble that we in. i think it's definitely shifting And i think i may china. I think it's kind of twofold. I definitely think that. When i first started being in the training industry a lot of women would come to mind concerns about. I want to lose weight. That was a. And then. I think i sort of i saw it starting to change when i came to sydney and i had a lot more coming in and being like i want to build a booty all i wanna get strong and you know i think again like i think it's i think you've got women like height spot kim kardashian. Who's come out you know. She made the booty jaylo here in july. Kind of like single hanley made the booty belfi the the belt. Yeah that's new terminology for today. They made that learning really sexy and really Something that women wanted to a spotty. They wanted this and they started coming in and asking specifically to get shape and strength and size in that area And then i think the advent of cross fit you know i mean crossovers called many things and all of us believe that the raise them with fixing a lot of people is because of the injury risk. I say it's just ought to do with the coaching in the programming. But you know. I think cross fit made lifting weights sexy for women. I think it really did. I think it really highlighted. That women can be all powerful and compete on the same playing field as main ken. And that's really fucking sexy. I think that did a lot for the strength.

Belfi Kim Kardashian Hanley China Sydney KEN
Content Marketing and Blogging With Ann Handley

Brands On Brands On Brands

01:54 min | 6 months ago

Content Marketing and Blogging With Ann Handley

"All right. Let's get going. I'm so excited to welcome our guest today and hanley to the show and first and foremost thank you for being here brand. Thank you for having mamik. I'm excited to to talk with you me as well and the reason i'm excited we get to talk about one of my favorite marketing topics which is content marketing especially around the field of personal branding. And your background speaks for itself in that in that space and it seems more people than ever are getting comfortable creating content which is exciting in some form or another But i'd love to set the stage here for the show in terms of the value of creating content Why does it matter. you know. it's funny. I don't even think about content as being separate from marketing. Necessarily i mean think about everything that you do on line. That's content in whether you are on twitter whether you are are on instagram. Where you and. I met where you are writing a blog post or emailing your list. It's all of that is content. And so i don't think it necessarily as two separate things you know. How do you use content in your marketing. Your content is literally your marketing. So i think if you the first thing is just to shift your mindset and think about everything that you do as an opportunity to tell your story to brand yourself to let people know what value you can offer them and grow your own business. That's the value of content on. I think what if we take it a step further if we have to think about 'cause creating content aids intimidating but we'll get to that But the idea of what makes a good especially good for your business. You know what defines good content versus just content that is cluttering things up a hear your perspective on that. Yeah i mean. I don't think it's very complicated. I think a good content is what meets the needs of your audience. What has value for them

Hanley Twitter Aids
Lawyer: Soldier charged in Rockford shooting may have PTSD

AP News Radio

01:01 min | 10 months ago

Lawyer: Soldier charged in Rockford shooting may have PTSD

"An attorney for the U. S. army special forces sergeant accused of killing three people at an Illinois bowling alley this past weekend says her client may suffer from PTSD Winnebago county state's attorney J. Hanley says thirty seven year old Duke Webb who had just completed a fourth tour of duty in Afghanistan has admitted to the shooting rampage inside a bowling alley that left three people dead a fourteen year old male was shot in the face he is alive but hospitalized in critical condition sixty five year old Thomas first half was on the first floor when the defendant began shooting first a first test began running toward the stairs when the defendant shot him in the torso he tells W. LS TV that victim died as did two other men but Webster Turney says he'll undergo a mental health evaluation suggesting he suffers from post traumatic stress disorder Webb is assigned to Eglin Air Force base in Florida and was visiting family in the Rockford Illinois area I'm Jackie Quinn

Attorney J. Hanley Duke Webb Bowling U. S. Army Winnebago County Illinois W. Ls Afghanistan Webster Turney Thomas Eglin Air Force Base Webb Florida Rockford Jackie Quinn
How Blogging Strengthens Your Business with Mike Allton

Brands On Brands On Brands

03:48 min | 11 months ago

How Blogging Strengthens Your Business with Mike Allton

"But i want to get into some of the the the media side of things here and talk a little bit about blogging specifically content creation memo. We started blogging. I wanna get into like the value of it in. What's the importance of it. She someone out there who's an entrepreneur and building their business. What's the value of you can slice it how you want blogging. Where are the creation. What is the value there behind. That i love this question. Because there's there's a lot of nuance here the that we can dig into so for those of you listening. You probably have some social profiles. You've probably created some content for social media. You maybe haven't criticism much content for your web property itself and to your point you might be wondering as a listener do i even really need to create content on my website today and unfortunately the answer is very much. Yes it's an emphatic. Yes and i send. Fortunately because i know not everybody likes to right. I'm kind of blessed in a little bit freakish in that regard where i love to write. I'm really good at writing. Does probably where. That blogging brute. Nomenclature comes from is that i can blog super fast. I can write really really fast now. Writing stealing kind of contents. That exists out there you gain creates video content. You grow your content which is a large part of what we're doing right now rights but that's not the best converting content write. We can publish all kinds of video content onto youtube and we can create audio content on podcasts and you can create visual content for social media but ultimately if we wanna make money that content has to drive people to a website and wants to on the website. People need to read. They have to read so whether it's a landing page or a blog post or an article on ethic your white paper is lots of written content out there in terms of types but is all written so we have to be able to write and so do you have to blog in the traditional sense. No you don't you don't have to create that kind of regular reverse chronologically published content if you don't want to if that doesn't make sense for your business or your audience but you're going to have to write. This is why in hanley rid wrote the book everybody rights because we all right whether we want to or not but we all can right which is the other nuance of what she was saying. And the the the dual meaning behind the title that particular book. Everybody has to write but everybody can rights so one thing that i teach. People often is if you're thinking about writing in terms of creating a reports like you might have for college or an assignment of some kind where you acted to teach. These things in all has to be well researched and that sort of thing that may be. What's tripping you up right. I've been helping stephanie. For instance with her writing since we first met and she's a fantastic writer. She didn't know it because she was getting caught up and challenged by preconceived notions of what that writing should look like and when i started talking to her over a year ago about hey if you just right the way you talk if you just share with me in writing form the same way that you share with me in video or face to face. It'll be just as good if not better. That kinda cooter in an open a lightbulb moment in her mind and now she writes. She writes really really well. She communicates well now. She maybe doesn't publish articles as often. Maybe some of the writing is in email which is another great place to put written content. That's going to drive business results. So i would encourage you. Who are listening to rethink how you want to right now. You wanna communicate information about yourself about your business about your customers your industry and try to frame that in a sense that what i wanna do is share with you in written form the same thing that i share with you verbally or via video

Hanley Youtube Stephanie Cooter
"hanley" Discussed on Jo's Art History Podcast

Jo's Art History Podcast

04:02 min | 11 months ago

"hanley" Discussed on Jo's Art History Podcast

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"hanley" Discussed on Jo's Art History Podcast

Jo's Art History Podcast

01:30 min | 11 months ago

"hanley" Discussed on Jo's Art History Podcast

"Tensions collection of sex paintings completed by the greek artists under the patronage of soon to be spanish king. We speak a boat not so much the stories of but rather the pet street behind the paintings themselves and just so far away to the scripted. Sex painting has actually traveled there currently brought together for an exhibition which is hardly at the time of recording. Which is november bird tweet. Detroit savior currently the national gallery in london. An expression of tech love desire death on will be there until so what we believe. Thank you very much cooler until january before they go into unless open worlds as a group. Sex the beheading up to age umbro after london and then the heading to the pro.

national gallery Detroit london
How Plants Fight Disease

In Defense of Plants Podcast

05:51 min | 11 months ago

How Plants Fight Disease

"The microbial world and to my listeners. Probably the most. Famous interactions are the mike arousal associations or maybe some of the bacteria that form in the knowledgeable lls and help fix nitrogen but there is a wide spectrum. Oftentimes pathogenic interactions between plants and microbes. So what made you go sort of the pathogenic or at least like disease route with them. Tie back to where. I kind of realized that when they get sick they actually died and when they died. Then there's less moves go around the world that means prices will go up and that means people that are less fortunate probably not gonna be able to bottles plants or bottles products eventually and it just kind of tie back to where i wanted to katina help others. So it's still tana original passionate helping others. i'm just doing it at a bigger in a much broader implant. That's really cool. Yeah and thinking about sort of all of the threats we face with climate change and just habitat loss. And you know everything. We're going through society right now. Understanding how plants are going to either survive. Stressed out or die has huge impacts across the board whether you're an ecologist worried about conservation or the idea of like food security and just getting people with their right to have access to good food. All of this can tie back to plants on some level and really that stressor. It's not like they're all just gonna fry because it's too hot out a lotta times. They're getting stressed and dealing with a lot of other stuff. Which is where your research. A lot of your research comes in so you mentioned They have similar ways of fighting disease but not exactly because their plants. They're not animals and so let's think about how plants interact with microbes. Do plants have and immune system on a broad spectrum. Is it anything akin to like what we have so. Am i get some backlash for this. But i go hanley. Okay always been. That's always been this debate whether plants have immune system and i some people like to use it I don't like it at all. Okay just put a bad. That they don't have white blood cells. They don't have antibodies. They don't have this like adaptive immunity like we do. I don't really consider that as amused. Glance what. I like to call that. Halfway is planning needs. So they have immunity something. They have components that they made themselves the fan against grows okay but they don't really have that adaptive like components that you will call an immune system so i think If we want to go down with differences so plants and humans One thing they do have in common is they both. Have these receptor like proteins or something that helps them to chat micros. Okay so the way. That dataset microsoft similar invoke lanson mammals. The difference with the malians is Wadis components that water similar allow these receptors are intracellular and Mammals while plans are intracellular. So they stay outside of plant sale and they perceive those microbial related is cool now thinking about all of the different sorts of microbes that can cause an issue for a plan. I mean there's bacteria viruses fungi. I mean does the response. Sort of differ depending on. What's coming in or is it. Just kind of all lumped in and sort of the mechanisms of detection might have some variants. Or where does it begin depending on. What kind of micro talking about here. And i think that's what kind of Fascinate me about this. Feel is like Depending on what the pathogen is or what motive of affection is doing like you get a totally different defense mechanism front of land. So let's say bacteria for example That's half jello. So that receptor. Or the estrogen receptor of plants dakin that said a certain points of jello or from some better and when they detect that part of on they send like a sidney lynne halfway or finland was biased. Light through the plant sales down the activate a defense response or to defend ourselves against the pathogens. So that's like the plant site first response to it But bacteria what they have evolved to do as they had these small proteins or relatively small proteins call factors and these factors what they can do. They can kind of turn off that plants. Though plans they try and go for gel on. They'll try to turn the pathway on and a bacterial cells secrete of that. There's an plant sale and l. Shut off that halfway. Jeez yeah no and that allows the bacteria to continue to invade the vet the planned sale with some cases plant sales. They of all some of these Resistant genes components which are located intra zillur so when arafat their turns off there signaling pathways. You have somebody's resistant. Genes that can detect those offenders and entered on this really robust defense response to kind of just get rid of packaging and so it's just this back and forth on race between planning micros is kinda fascinated with and i'm so glad you said the arms race analogy because that's all i was thinking of is like it's like tit for tat. Every new thing that one develops the other one kind of has two counter end to think that you know obviously there are different players nowadays but this is something that's probably been going on. Ever since plants evolved are crawled onto the land with their roots. And to think of all of the ways. This has been going on through time. It's just this constant change evolutionary pressure to just constantly be going back and forth with these potential pathogens and the ways you can fight them. That is so cool. Yeah i mean it's still kinda going still going on to this day like they're still evolving is still trump

Katina Tana Hanley Sidney Lynne Dakin Microsoft Finland
Fort Worth Police Responding To Reported Stabbing At Dallas-Area School

Jim Bohannon

00:22 sec | 1 year ago

Fort Worth Police Responding To Reported Stabbing At Dallas-Area School

"What worth police are investigating after a student was stabbed at handling mental school for war. ThisDay officials did confirm that the altercation occurred in math class. The district says two students got into an argument and one stabbed the other in the arm. Officials say the student is only suffering from minor scratches, and the other student is in police custody. Hanley Middle School is an East Fort Worth off Cook's lane close to

Hanley Middle School Thisday
NYC restaurateurs proceed with lawsuit despite plans to reinstate some indoor dining

WBZ Afternoon News

00:43 sec | 1 year ago

NYC restaurateurs proceed with lawsuit despite plans to reinstate some indoor dining

"Against New York's mayor Bill de Blasio, as well as New York Governor Andrew Cuomo over New York City's indoor dining. It'll still be heard in court. Despite the announcement this week that endured dining can resume. Assemblywoman Nicole Mallow Takis, his backing restaurant owners, and she says indoor dining is at 50% capacity across New York state, except in New York City, where it will be 25% when it resumes September. 30th New York City's being discriminated against in treated differently, and there is a double standard. We meet the metrics like every other municipality. Robert Hanley manages Bocelli restaurant on Staten Island. It's a terrible business model to operate under right now, and we could not keep ourselves afloat much longer with the 25% model. Not his correspondents Got Pringle reporting for 38.

New York City Assemblywoman Nicole Mallow Ta Andrew Cuomo Got Pringle Bill De Blasio Robert Hanley Staten Island Bocelli
Breaking Down Valve's Response to DPC

We Say Things - an esports and Dota podcast with SUNSfan & syndereN

06:16 min | 1 year ago

Breaking Down Valve's Response to DPC

"So I wasn't sure how to approach US exactly but this may seem a little weird. We're going to read off the entire post that vowed made. We're going to split it up so that people don't get sick on my voice, of course. It's essentially read it in your normal voice or you're going to read it in your dramatic voice because if you read it a new dramatic voice, people get sick of it after one minute I what I was not planning on doing anything in my normal voice. But now that you brought it up, it would annoy people it makes me want to do it more now but regardless how you are. Valve has responded Holy Shit in valve has finally responded. To the community regarding the season that is to come. We've kind of split up between that and the Doda TV slash streaming. News. So let let's talk about the first thing which is the DPC's. So again, it's going to be a bit of a along read. We've heard a lot of the complaints re recently about the state of the DP and we agree that there's more that we should do. We want it to use this blog to walk you through what happened before what our thoughts were and what we will do going forward. Spring Twenty twenty. Once the extent of the covid nineteen pandemic became clear. We posted our plans to delay the international started pre-booking arenas for various alternative dates and countries around the world. We then began researching how to execute the international based on how different, how the different pandemic scenarios could play with the hope that we'd be able to host it as soon as possible since the spring DPC events could no longer operate anymore we started reaching out to the organizers to see what they wanted to do going forward. Some of these organizers shared their desires to run third party events to cover the period march through the end of summer. Summer Twenty twenty twenty one split this up between you and You keep going. I'll do the summer twenty, twenty, do the rest. Sorry Twenty twenty as we approached the middle of the summer, the volatility of the pandemic had grown significantly. We became very concerned about the impact it would have on future deep-sea events and the International. The global situation meant that cross regional play would be unlikely for a period of time and we have since seen scenarios globally and other competitions where teams from certain countries had to be excluded after qualifying do abrupt travel restrictions and complications. Americans can't go anywhere syndrome unless it's Ukraine Hanley while we had that was not part of the quote just to let you guys. Inter and you're. Not The competent then I would love under sprinkle in a little couple things like that just to spice it up you know but anyway. While we had already assumed that having a cry for the events was not in the cars we wanted to at least have confidence able to bring all teams together across region competition. We felt that was a very important component of how we allocate DC points for the International. We were also unsure of when the international itself would happen and given the significant lead time needed. The increase spread and the virus made harder to model out a timeframe with confidence. The potential of the season as narrative feeling to detach from the path towards the international was negative for us doing that would also necessitate a DP point decay system, which in and of itself isn't a bad thing but having to abruptly introduced decay midseason if the landscape changes has some additional downsides. Furthermore, we had also received some feedback from a couple of or that were either worried about the quality of the broadcast being lower or reluctant to want to operate GPC events in the fall altogether while neither the Cross region competition nor the relative distance to the international or absolute requirements. We felt the DPC as both the function of the international, and also as a coherent product for fans would be better served by holding off on them for. Now given that our plan was that we'd make the upcoming months open and clear for other leagues and Events to operate. Our approach historically has been to want third party tournus be able to exist outside of the international though the degree of that has been fluid over the years demands from fans and players for more structured circuits to lead to increased. Our hope was that we could both achieve a better and more coherent relationship between DC and TI. By approaching it this way as well as still along for third party events to have an impact with the overall Anders Zolt for fans still being that, there would be entertaining content to watch. In the fall. I'll give you this parrot this last section center in the you're not paying attention or you want me to read everything still you don't want them finish talking about this one I mean, do you want to break it up that way? That's fine as well as I guess, we should read the next. Okay. Moving forward. Soon. After we announced that there were not immediately proceeding that we were not immediately proceeding with GPS planned we received a lot of negative feedback from fans. We think that a lot of the points that were raised were reasonable criticisms toward us especially because we did not communicate what our intentions were and what they could expect in the future. that it doesn't say there guys. For this upcoming competitive season, there are going to be at least four third party events and leaks in the EU CIS, three in China and a few others that are still in the preliminary planning stages and are not able to commit at this time. However, there is still going to be a lot of teams, Casas organizers and fans around the world that are not going to be meaningfully served based on the current trajectory, and that is our fault for not pushing on those and supporting them enough. With that in mind, we started reaching out to many more tournament organizers to offer help and financial support in order to be able to create increased coverage globally for the remainder of the year we expect that these eventually gradually announced over the remaining season as they as soon as they are ready to communicate to fans and teams. And other feedback we got from players as well as fans was wanting more clarity in what we were thinking where the likely dates for deep-sea and tied to resume. Our look right now is that we're anticipating the start of the in the first month or two of twenty twenty one. Our hope is that by the end by the time, the first deep-sea leak concludes travel limitations will be more predictable. Spontaneous restrictions will be less likely this allowing for majors with Cross region competition happen where also operating under the assumption that the most likely outcome is for the International to happen in Stockholm in August twenty, twenty one. while. We have other countries backups. We recognize that fans would be upset if we moved to another location if the time savings

Summer Twenty Twenty Twenty Spring Twenty Twenty Twenty Twenty Valve United States EU Stockholm Anders Zolt Ukraine China
"hanley" Discussed on Taking Care in Business

Taking Care in Business

07:57 min | 1 year ago

"hanley" Discussed on Taking Care in Business

"This is taking care in business. A podcast dives into the topic of corporate social responsibility from many different perspectives host. Kathy Potty Hayes is an expert in CS armed philanthropic giving and her co host. Vicky Bolson is the founder and CEO of Bulletin Group A unified marketing company that was also the first B. Corp certified, company. In Indiana Cathy Vicky became friends and equally passionate about CSSR when they first worked together several years ago, join them as they talk about why it is always worthwhile to take care in business. Hey, making. Cathy how're you doing today? Good how about you? Great. Doing doing. Great. So, we are not together today we are working remotely because as our listeners probably know we're in the middle of the Cova nineteen and so Vicki is at her house and I'm at my house. And we have our guest on the line but I'm sitting here looking out my window and I wonder if this has happened a lot in your neighborhood, I see the people walking and biking people. I've never seen before and doing exercise that I don't think they've ever done before. Have you seen that too? Oh Yeah. Definitely and I think I drive about five miles per hour through the neighborhood now because of that, I mean it's just incredible. So many people are out and I I can see them all out there again today walking and talking and biking and running into the streets and chase after their balls. So. yes. Youthful Day. So it's good to be. It's good to be extra cautious. So this has been kind of fun. So our son Ethan. is now just about to be fifteen and he has gotten really into cycling over this whole pandemic I'm thrilled with because you know it's a great form of exercise and all of that but. One of the challenges is is that he's outgrown his bike and we've been trying to get him a new bike though can't because the supply is really really limited right now do cove it, and then some of the some of the riots in fact, he he purchased a bike. Out of France and then they took the money out of the account and then they gave it back because they said, they wouldn't be able to to get it back up and running until twenty twenty one. So it's Kinda interesting, but it's a good tie into our guest who we have today and I'm really excited. For you to learn more and our listeners to learn more. So we have Tom Handley, who is the founder of thirteen sports he he founded the organization in twenty eleven after a career as an elite level track cyclist winning four national championships while attending Marian. University. unfortunately in the aftermath of a commercial vehicle accident it ended his cycling career and he took sort of that That change to make a change in the direction of his intended career passive becoming a lawyer. So the city of Indianapolis has really rallied around him and he made it his mission to give back to the city in the best way how using the power of the bicycle. Nine thirteen is brown from one person. Serving about a thousand kids in the first year to an eleven person team serving over fifty thousand kids annually. Started nine thirteen sports I know to make the lives of Central Indiana kid better and continues to leave the team making it happen also during this whole cove nineteen thing nine thirteen really has done some interesting pivots with their business model, and so I'm really excited for everybody here a little bit about how all that came about two. So welcome. Good Morning Tom. Good morning how are you guys doing this morning? While and it's hard to top that interests I. Thank you so much for the kind words and give them a little bit of back store in context about what we're fortunate to be able to do in today's this. Telephone works. in days that are not Cova Jill how does nine thirteen work? How do you impact all of these lives using the bike? We've got a few different programs but I'll start with what we watched with back in two thousand twelve when a it was just a crazy idea and I was blissfully naive at the age of twenty four we we take stationary bicycle simulators into schools and youth organizations on basically put youth in the middle of a big stationary bike video game, and we actually integrate our curriculum into physical education classes across schools all across and plenty on. So what that looks like because we actually work alongside the Physical Education teacher. Now, we work with kids as young as kindergarten all the way through high school. And we become part of their gym class and I it's not unusual for us to go into school for the first time and know that about ten percent of the students we see have never been on a bike before they get on the stationary bike that we bring in and start pedaling. So it's been it's been absolutely humbling and rewarding experience to be able to build this from the ground up since twenty twelve and. That is by far our largest the programmers, the largest amount of students Additionally, we've got a couple of other really cool programs launched over the past two years. One of the program called Kids Building Bikes and we know we try to keep our branding pretty simple. So kids riding bikes, kids building bikes a whole lot of the imagination and and self explains but. Kids. Building bikes are designed to be an after school program smaller more. Boutique type of program we work with eight students at a time typically twice per week for four weeks about sixteen hours of curriculum, and we have a big forty eight foot trailer that we've actually built out a mobile bike shop. So I was able to take it to the students. We we roll up outside the school and We bring our staff, bring the trailer, and we bring this awesome mobile bike shops at as a learning experience and education space itself. And with that, we actually teach kids how to work with tools typically, Kazan grades four through eight. Many of which have never held a wrench before, don't know how to use a screwdriver. So we're teaching the basics with that which goes to workforce development and employability skills and getting kids to think about what they might want to be as they grow up. And ultimately, over the course of eight classes, they are learning how to work on a bicycle, maintain a bicycle, and then ultimately upon successful completion of these classes, they get to graduate with a brand new giant bicycle, a brand new helmet, and a brand new locks they get to take home. So were physically putting tools in their hands, and then we're physically creating an opportunity for them to earn a bike that they can use for many years to come. And then the other the other lines we've got one is called exploring Andy and that focuses on actually connecting not just but family with the community here in. Central Indiana. So we do a lot of work any parks we do a lot of educational experiences for school organizations. And we're actually taking people of all ages out and learning the the history of Indianapolis Power of two wheels whether that's why monument circle exist or why on on trailer there, and the history behind the on trail was a railroad really just trying to create place making opportunities and create long-term connections for for Hoosiers to help highlight how awesome Indianapolis really is. So everything we do is focused on using the bicycle as an education tool and we've been very fortunate to grow from This crazy Eddie I had to where we sit today. Wow Wow I would I miss the pre interview? So I'm thankful.

Indianapolis Cathy Vicky Indiana founder and CEO Kathy Potty Hayes Vicky Bolson Bulletin Group Tom Handley Cova Central Indiana B. Corp France Eddie I Andy Vicki Ethan. founder Kazan
Sol de Janeiro Co-Founder Camila Pierotti

Breaking Beauty Podcast

03:10 min | 1 year ago

Sol de Janeiro Co-Founder Camila Pierotti

"So Camilla you're from Brazilian from Rio, tell us about what life was like growing up there. I had a very happy childhood. Brazil is a very special place for me my sister and I grew up very her suction at Hanley. We Love fancying we love eating. So an obstacle up the beach. So it was a very outdoorsy place to to grow up in and just a lot of energy and happiness beauty for you in Brazil how is that different and who were some of your beauty icons growing up? Oh, Gosh. The beauty icon for me growing up I mean obviously started my mom and my grandma there just seeing them and their approach to beauty what was their approach to beauty? It's this concept of always be ready Brazil's have a word they word. In particular is actually considered a good thing. Versus be overly produced Brazilians of spend a lot of time making sure that they're always ready. You know taking care of it. It's like a daily control versus you have a party and he spent three hours getting ready. It's about what you do every single day is there a diy Brazilian beauty secret that everyone does but that might surprise our listeners in north? America like about bridges are very big into going to the So that aren't many betrayal to there's one thing that resilience love and they do this either at whom or on the beach, and it's lightning the hair on your arms or your I on your belly. Always do at home or on the beach. What do you do? It's diy you have a mixture at home and you Li-. You know like the says share or a lot of. Women think that. Brazilian, remove. Hair. Body about his not true. A lot of women will keep the here on the side and the belly to that's something that that they'll do at home depot lighten dot that Peach Fuzz just getting rid of it. Yeah. Right now we're out of stock of our original product of it and will be to bring it back but we have a product I got which one of the products launched with what's that called it hold Golden Body Veil we'll get that back in. Stock Soon yes. So it's like a cream that bleaches the hair is that right? Yeah and even I read that Brazilian women are obsessed with taking care of their feet. Is that true or is that a myth? Now? It is true. It is very, very true. We have fetish obviously a lot of this is because of the weather, right? It's a very, very hot humid tropical country and we were sounded almost all the time I mean why are resilient and it's basically everyone. Parachute, to every household has. Vienna's so yeah, we show them off and you know president going back to this concept of always being ready. You always keep your feet soft mood touchable and I'm I am personally obsessed with my feet is my favorite body part.

Brazil Camilla Vienna America President Trump
"hanley" Discussed on The Dave Pamah Show

The Dave Pamah Show

02:02 min | 1 year ago

"hanley" Discussed on The Dave Pamah Show

"I have the host of the key pits in perspective. Cost Democratic Strategic Communications consultant. Not, currently practicing attorney, and still figuring out author and founder off defiant strategies, LLC Christian Hanley Welcome back to the farmer show. Thanks for having me Dave good to be back with you. Yeah, Yeah Nice Gray and It's good that we had these. Every six monthly. Catch up on what's going on? Between! Europe and the US and it's pretty much a global situation. Since we last spoke last time, we spoke about the recent elections in a UK. Donald Trump's impeachment and what's to come for twenty twenty, but it's different. It's a different picture painted at the moment, isn't it? Yeah, it's. It's really wild over here right now. but it's it's it's A. It's a positive change overall that that needs to happen. I mean the reality is what ignited the protests here in the states, and globally after they started here, was horrific, but it's the fact that these protests are happening. Are It's to address? Issues that really have not been ever fully addressed of of racism of systemic racism of police brutality, and at it, so these are things that have have longs happen, and so the fact that they are happening now is really a positive side, even though it is unrest, it is a lot for the process to explain to their children at something that has needed to happen for for quite some time. Yeah, I mean I can I. Put my trade union head on. You know was a representative fanatic get. Pretty applicable speaking to politicians in the UK. Ladies like people from like latest. Black lives matters. Use in UK now that has similar kind of. Generic.

UK twenty twenty Strategic Communications consu Donald Trump Christian Hanley Europe attorney founder Dave US representative
"hanley" Discussed on Inspirational Interviews with Jen Rodd

Inspirational Interviews with Jen Rodd

03:44 min | 1 year ago

"hanley" Discussed on Inspirational Interviews with Jen Rodd

"So that is an emotional response so that so that's so. That's typically a wolf right, but the wolf is I mean it's an important character, because if you walk down the road and a caveat out of. Out of control that is the character in your brain. That's going to actually help you. Jump out the way. It's a very important part of your brain that is they develops for early on in the brain as well because obviously babies for them. They do need to survive. That's the main thing. The Knicks characters parrots, so the parrot is all about your beliefs, values and your experiences, and I it's almost this part of your brain is like a computer, so it just takes in all your experiences just records at things you hear things you see experiences, et Cetera, and the more emotional, the experienced, the greater proximity in your brain. It's going to give you. It's going to remind you of that one often. But actually what's interesting about the brain? Not Want to get you know to to technical, but you experiences can actually change based on the way you access that Mary, so what you think happened as a child may be framed in a certain emotion, and if you start applying a different emotion to it, you can actually change your memory so for example. okay I'm. I'm just GONNA drown an example for myself sir, my mom, my parents had the own factory furniture factories, so they will always at the factory, and so I was home a lot alone because then I had three older brothers, but then I was Tony Girls Star, often I would come home alone so I've got sort of semi association is very much about You know the importance of being for the kids and stuff molded my whole life around your. Working from home to be there for the kids are sorry, So so my association is Woman that you know the working women are. It's a choice obviously, but then you know you're. You're making that choice, so that sacrifice. So give me an example like so. How do you multi? Example, you'd now needed to not work from home and you needed to go at an office. You would have a bit of a conflict of your values. Because now you have grown up. You know having experienced this I. Don't WanNA use woods and put them in your mouth, but let's say for example you felt isolated or you felt. Maybe even would use with neglected. My mom would come home and I would have written notes left him like on the mantelpiece as she walks in the door that say run away. But. A stable child actually so they you know they. They seem to strike the balance, but it definitely affected me, but yeah, carry on. So now. Let's say for example you know we're in a situation where you did need to. At work in an office and you weren't able to be there for your kids. You would have the conflict of values happening, but if you were to go back into your child and new et actually set yourself to know what the fact that my mom did this. Look at how they provided for us. Look at the stability that we had look at the business that they ran. You're a businesswoman. You understand how difficult it is to get a business off the ground, and what that all entails and you set yourself look kind dependent. I became because of it. Look how how You know what a survivor I am. Look at all in you, and you suddenly started to give it a new context. You started to look at it through a different frame, and you said actually of these benefits came because of this, so you changed..

Knicks Mary
"hanley" Discussed on Inspirational Interviews with Jen Rodd

Inspirational Interviews with Jen Rodd

04:08 min | 1 year ago

"hanley" Discussed on Inspirational Interviews with Jen Rodd

"Yes, it's about empowering the child, but it's also about as you say empowering the whole family to stop making sense of things, and it's not just about bullying. It's about. You know we won the best rock heads we want our kids to. achieve great things we you know always say that there's a universal truth and that is parents that we want our kids to have more than we had. And this to me is an advantage. This is how you can actually get your kids to that point to find out who it is that they all what they passions all. What they really really great. And help them move towards at Foster, not give up on the goals, because for kids who are very emotional when things don't go the way when the universe seems to be saying no, it's very easy to give up. It's very easy to give when you live in an emotional state, but when you live in a state of logic and reasoning and actually seeing the big picture, and you live in a place where you have taken those limiting beliefs, you know those things that you've been conditioned to believe about yourself, and you squash those and you replace it with actually big picture thinking all of a sudden you, you know heavy ability to fast track to your goals and. One, I think it's not only will do to just quickly. It's not only big picture thinking, but it's also detached thinking so being detached from the emotion, because it's the emotion look driven by. But when you are stuck in an emotion, especially as teenagers when you're stuck in these emotions that can be really doc. Sometimes, that's becomes disempowering. So that's one thing but I think also what you said is about universal truth of US wanting. Kids have more than us. A for me. I think it's more about you just want your kids to be happy and to to be connected with a truth some simple. It's not about having more. It's just about having. And everything is happiness wrought. Because I think that one can get confused between what's everything you know? Because Society also leads people to believe that having everything is having the on mansion, and that at that and you know so far from my perspective, I think what's important is that? Which I I believe your you know your material can help with as is about connecting. Kids to their emotions. But also to as you always talk about the logic, but it's about having emotional and I think yes, definitely, that is something that's important and what I find interesting Sydney. It's come up in conversations on the show as through different interviews. Is that people do talk about what's taught in school and. And I do agree and Sydney. This corona virus brings up the dynamic of you know. What actually is the schools responsibility and whatnot? And also you know when you're in a situation where you go to self H., kids and everyone's child is at harm now and the whole Tokyo's homeschooling, etc.. I. Think that that is imperative that these kinds of conversations are had at the table and. You talk about your child feeling safe with you and I think certainly, if appearance do have tools. To work with way, they can just use it as sort of a conversation point. For example another another woman I interviewed on the show Sofia Truscott. She's She's a home schooler and she's inspired me beyond belief all she you know. She's a mom and she home schools the kids. She's also a sort of an odd teacher, but. Her real. Commitment has been homeschooling her three kids now here oldest has just completely gone. Down Her matric certificate of finally a significant, all Anna and she just basically gave them the tools and empowered them to be self, learning, self learners, and but what she talks about also again at the table, just creating that safe environment for your kids away. At the dinner table, it's.

US Sofia Truscott Sydney Foster Anna Tokyo
"hanley" Discussed on Inspirational Interviews with Jen Rodd

Inspirational Interviews with Jen Rodd

05:26 min | 1 year ago

"hanley" Discussed on Inspirational Interviews with Jen Rodd

"Been I don't know if it was on purpose or accidentally, but she'd been included in this whatsapp group with these goals have created. They were literally slate her personality, ripping her tisch rates. It was almost a that left voice messages and video clips and pictures on how much they hated and have it what they would love to detour. And all these things was just really radio. Awful thankfully she. Knows that she can trust me. She knows she feel safe with me, insert. She came to me and she showed me what had actually gone on. but we managed to. Actually you know talk through the situation in a very logical way, so the first thing is as we manage to separate what had actually happened from who has a person, so yes, there was this emotional thing that happened. Why were these kids? Doing this, would they thinking this way that had nothing to do with the had everything to do with their own experience growing up vase stories growing up. And we within able to. Also deal with her emotions around it and face affected. Yes, she was feeding this way and I too was feeding. Pretty cut up about it. Any Momma, who is you know dealing with a child who's being bullied yet again? It's very very hard thing to go through and your own memories and experiences are popping in and going Oh. Gosh, here we go again and this was really difficult the last time round. So we had to sort of sit and. The reality is. that. This is not the same we know how to deal with us. And we all going to deal with us, but we were able to frame it. Using the characters that we have in the book to actually understand what was happening to understand that face story had nothing to do with her story and. Then worked through those emotions with three, what the beliefs were in what was being, said in her mind, and actually go right now we're at a point where we can start applying logic and reasoning, so it was also a way for me to make sure that I was keeping myself in check that I was in letting my emotions..

Reducing The Perception of Risk  The Art of Pre-handling Objections

All The Responsibility Podcast

09:35 min | 1 year ago

Reducing The Perception of Risk The Art of Pre-handling Objections

"Go to market is really a complex and kind of many-faceted activity and not only are there interesting cross cutting interactions across the organization in the process. But there's a lot of interesting through lines from one. End of the product management process itself from finding invalidating market problems. As I describe in what I call the secret product management framework all the way to go to market now in this episode. I'm going to talk about a tool that I think technologists like us. I E those of us who kind of like technology for its own sake. We're kind of technical so you might say we often don't give enough credence to the topic of risk reduction are really reducing the perception of risk on the part of the prospect. And that's done to a large degree by a technique called pre handling objections. Now we have to bring all of our product knowledge and tools to bear when we're handling objections or even more importantly preparing our sales and marketing teams to do that pre handling of objections. This is really a simplified version of buyer psychology the idea of the subconscious perception of risk. But it's really very useful even just as a mental model and of course it does actually have some basis in psychology. So it's not the only thing you need to do while selling this idea prehensile objections but it's really a big one and it can go a long way to keeping the sales process going forward. Now I'm going to talk about how you do it how the perception of risk arises Wyatt arises even if no one is saying anything about it essentially what happens is we have the subconscious and it's big job one of its big jobs just to keep us from being eaten by a lion? Metaphorically speaking it's looking out for problems and it's trying to ignore stuff that's not a problem we're actually trying to keep the brain from even being impacted by things. That aren't problems. It's really looking for things to worry about. And the problem is that the subconscious is very sensitive. And it's not actually that accurate and it can interpret kind of any little thing as a problem. For example maybe you have a spelling error on a slide. Now the subconscious mind immediately interpret that as danger now spilling aren't really that dangerous but the subconscious kind of crisis is whole story instantaneously along the lines of well. This person doesn't know enough to spell correctly. How can I trust him or her to solve my real problems now? This is a legitimate thing that your subconscious does it. Does this kind of thing now. In some sense your subconscious will grasp at straws to protect you. I mean it looks for the tiniest little indicators of danger you can imagine when we lived out in the Bush. The Mirror snap of a twig. Might say to the subconscious. Oh that's danger. We better run now. We'll go ask questions later. So you can think of an objection to bring this back down into the world of sales as a question. That's voiced or on voiced from the prospect that indicates there some perception of risk. So for example the first thing a prospect is going to be thinking when you first reach out to them. If you're doing sales is who is this person. What does this person want from me? What does this person have for me? And is this person. GonNa be wasting my time and what I mean is the objections. Start from the first contact with the prospect. They really start from the first marketing message. That reaches the prospect because the prospect is going to have those same questions about a marketing message. What are you GonNa do about these? Well one thing you can do is to be well groomed and I mean that in a highly general sense you personally should be well groomed. You need to be well-spoken you need to appear welcoming and open and these are all things that against set the subconscious a little bit at ease so you don't appear dangerous now your presentation you're using one should also be well-groomed so no spelling errors. For example. Little Nets like alignment and capitalization should be consistent. Those those things don't bother everybody but they bother some people a lot including me but this kind of grooming only goes so far a prospect will like you better in this has often again a subconscious reaction if you reduce their fears so remember this is happening below the level of consciousness if the prospect associates of feeling of risk with you here she will not trust you and probably will not like you. If you mitigate that feeling of risk then the prospects subconscious might fully flip to. This person is taking care of me therefore I trust and like them so what you want to do is take care of them now. There's two more important ways to put the subconscious cities one of them is to show that you care and understand about the person by anticipating their needs and concerns and the other is to use stories about other people to pitch your product. I've talked multiple podcasts about using stories and I'll actually talk a little bit more about using stories in this episode because I talked about stories all the time but this will mostly be in the context of item one showing that you care about and understand the person by anticipating their needs and concerns. I'm talking about these objections or the questions. About risk arising in the context of a sales engagement but it really applies to any situation where you're trying to communicate about an idea or sell a concept or product. Even when you're just giving a status report about your project the audiences likely to have some objections. That is they're likely to perceive some risks and those perceptions even if they aren't voiced our objections there away for the person to reject your ideas. Your facts your information. Whatever you're trying to communicate if you don't handle them so let's talk about what pre handling objections really means. It means knowing in advance what is going to cost the prospect to perceive a potential risk. And just show why. That risk either isn't worth worrying about or doesn't really exist. There's different ways to do it and we'll talk about this later. So part of go to market though is enabling the sales organization and did the Marketing Organization to pre handle objections effectively. Without you even being there the reason I mentioned that is because a lot of the objections. There's going to be coming up. A lot of the perceptions of risk are related to things that we know as product managers because we went and did Mark Discovery. And because we've talked to lots of customers and so we need to communicate those to the people that actually go out and talk to prospects which is a sales people and the people that try to get the prospects into our sales funnel which is of course the marketing team. So let's think briefly just to drill down a little bit more on that what happens between somebody out in the market becoming a lead for us and then eventually becoming a customer. I'm GONNA talk about an enterprise software style sales process but roughly the same steps occur in any sales process. They might not include the same people. Some steps might be automated sometimes. A webpage stands in for a salesperson. But in general in enterprise sales it goes something along these lines so a person season ad or some other marketing material it piques his or her interests and they respond in some way. Now we might also be reaching out to those people but it's the same idea right we we're trying to touch them with an ad or with call or something like that they enter our sales funnel become a lead now obviously not everybody who sees our ad becomes the lead. This is a funnel. So there's a certain number of people who come in at the top and they attribute out through the course of the process. So what we have a lead. The salesperson doesn't initial qualifying and discovery call with the lead to determine if they're really a good match for our product to learn some things about them that we can use later on in the sales process and so on now. If that lead is qualified they become a prospect and the salesperson then starts to sales process in earnest and this may actually be multiple steps eventually if that lead is then going to become a customer. There's a some kind of a negotiation that happens. The prospect agrees to buy and then the final step is the prospect becomes a customer now. There's things have happened after that once. They become a customer. But that's really the sales process reduction perceived risk or pre. Hanley objections is really critical. In all of these steps so initial steps were going to be reducing the perception. That the salesperson's just wasting the prospects time for example. How do we do that by showing that we understand the prospects situation? They're big problem and that we've successfully solved this problem for other customers. Who are similar to them now. During the qualifying discovery conversations. The salesperson is going to ask intelligent questions about the prospects situation and the challenges they're facing. The goal is for the prospect of feel like they're in good hands with us. In addition the salespeople is often gonNA use kind of customer success stories to show how we've solved similar problems before for people just like them as a sales process goes along. The perception of risk is going to change especially for talking enterprise software. Like what I work on. The actual monetary cost of the solutions likely to be very high and the cost of failure is even higher both from the standpoint of the money and maybe from the standpoint of the person's job so their perception of risk is going to be very very high. It has additional components. Besides just cost. They're worried of course if the product won't actually work we've been telling them it'll work. We've been giving them customer stories. But of course they're still worried the more stories that we can tell that they can identify with and that are about people like them the lower that perception of risk is GonNa be. They're also worried that the product will be too expensive or that will be very difficult to implement that they won't actually be able to make it work even if it could work. That won't work in their instance. So that's the thing we have to tell stories about as well and then of course there are also thinking well. There's other things that I could spend this money on. Maybe the other things are a better thing for me to buy than solving this particular problem and I'm not talking about competitors in this case I'm talking about solving a completely different problem altogether with that same money. So that's kind of opportunity cost

Marketing Organization Wyatt Mark Discovery Hanley
Harnessing the Power of Stem Cells with Christopher Kennedy, President at Elixell Therapeutics

Outcomes Rocket

11:56 min | 1 year ago

Harnessing the Power of Stem Cells with Christopher Kennedy, President at Elixell Therapeutics

"I WANNA welcome Christopher and Chris if you can Say Hi and fill in any other blanks of the intro. That may be. I may have missed that. You want to educate the listeners. Great thank you for hosting this morning and I and I look forward to a really good discussion. Yes so exciting. Time for us here in Kansas City as you mentioned Our offices actually at the Bio Science and Technology Center that's Housed on Kansas University Medical Center campus here in Kansas City. Kansas so this area is essentially set up perfectly for collaborative organization like ourselves. We're really trying to pull in best in class. Researchers best in class practices when it comes to the laboratories themselves the clinical work excited or and so we feel like. We're kind of in a hub here in Kansas City. Even though sometimes we don't think of the midwest of being a hub of innovation. Things are changing here in Kansas City. So I'm excited to represent the the eulex style therapeutic specifically but in the greater community as well. Well I think it's awesome and Christopher the work that is happening outside of those traditionally thought of focal centers like Francisco or Boston or where a lot of the effort seem to be happening. There's more happening in in the flyover states and being in Chicago. Lot happening here. That maybe doesn't always hit the radar so. I'm glad you're plugging in the word for your neck of the Woods Casey. So what exactly inspires your work in healthcare. Yeah so just before we move onto that question saw just kind of highlight what you just mentioned there Interestingly enough we have thirteen patents and our Ip actually comes from the Towers Institute which is based here in Kansas City. And before I moved to the area I also was not as aware of the great technologies that have come out of this particular geography but the Stars Institute for for listeners. That aren't familiar with. It is a global research institute. It's a six hundred thousand square foot facility here in Kansas City. And this is one of the first license out license technologies. That has come out of there. That eulex therapeutics has the privilege of working on. But Yeah it's to your point as well. I mean I grew up in the Chicago area. Also another great hub of innovation and ironically on this project that I'm working with there's actually a Chicago footprint as well as a Kansas City footprint. So yeah more than ever my wave in the Midwest flag so love it represents you get to your question about what inspires healthcare. I I find it interesting when I think of your title so outcomes rocket my career has been really focused on patient outcomes and I I love the term. I know that it's probably becoming more and more use potentially over using some regards now on the healthcare circle but I love it because it really aligns with a scoreboard right like a performance scoreboard where we at and where we going and he looks. Therapeutics was constructed on the premise of we can go further when it comes to stem cells particularly the advanced themselves sciences and when. I say themselves from our perspective. I'm talking about poetics. Themselves with adult stem cells versus the embryonic stem cells. That are in the media today so H. SC's are the focus for us because there is so much potential around the therapeutic side of what can be in the future in a lot of our umbilical cord banks throughout not just the US but worldwide and so- outcomes are clearly are focused. Here's walls. We feel that we can utilize a new technologies to really impact the patient at the bedside here in the near future. Yeah that's interesting and appreciate the differentiation there. Christopher what would you say? The business is doing specifically to add value to the healthcare ecosystem. Help US diving deeper and understand what the value prop is. Yeah and I think. This is a benefit to watching a company in twenty twenty to be frank right that we've been able to capitalize maximize the opportunities that exist. Now you mentioned earlier on the intro. Some of the work that I had done the telemedicine virtual care space and never. Is that more important in. Today's I think clinical time but also when it comes to clinical research so we're global organization and we have ties to Asia Europe. And then of course here in the US but our researchers are really in a full term of collaborative research together. And so we've cut down. I think a lot of the time. Line that traditionally this taken to get all the parties set up and ready to go when I come. You know for clinical work for example or just on a project in general and working with academic institutions large research institutions like the University of Chicago or Kansas University of Kansas and being able to transition Ip out and then get the research up and running is really been something that we focused on early on and successfully. I feel that we are implementing that and the proof point of that right. The outcome of what I just mentioned would be our scientific advisory board so traditionally in my experience. The Scientific Advisory Board for Big Pharma Small Pharma Biotech Med device and all of those spaces is very critical in the direction organization. Takes but just on our scientific advisory board. We've got six globally world-renowned research academic type Individuals who I think in years past without the you know. The advent of some of our current technologies would have taken a lot longer to get together and working on the same project so institutions like Penn. Yeah we have University of Chicago Ball University of Indiana researchers from University of Kansas. That I mentioned earlier Stars Institute all sitting on our advisory board and it allows for us to cut down the time it takes potentially to have a novel concept or an idea in them tested on the laboratory taxi tested in our early clinical phase. To See if it's viable or not and then to get feedback from a global perspective from the SAB. The Scientific Advisory Board has been instrumental. So the right now. We know the to pass. The Ron have the best chance to reach their outcome at the end for patients. Love it so if you think about what makes what you and the company does different and better than what available today. What is it so let's talk about the technology rising when to that ASPECT OF HSE STEM CELL? Topic is big. And there's essentially what I feel some sort of a race going on for getting technology into the marketplace that allows us to really recognize all of the stem cell opportunities within Belco cords themselves. Right so just says as a layman that I was entering into this project really understanding of the D. N. A. M. R. N. A. Aspect of of how life is working and uncovering the researchers that we have the privilege to interact with on our team published a really important and I would definitely classify this as a breakthrough paper and this was specific to and cell research the suppression of success a reader. Which is the White Dwarf to that? We're focused on under these. This category of an fix a reader and six say reader modulators essentially an expression of of Mres right so when we talk about DNA and the communication channels within cells. There's a communication that happens that really specific to stem cell fate determination. And what we've done is uncovered that with whites. Hdf to Professor Lynne. Hanley in Schwann. He both uncovered the fact that when you knock out whites. Hdf to all of the sudden we start to see a really successful stem cell expansion so one becomes two to become a three and so on and so forth and this stem cell expansion allows us to take potential biblical cord banks that are out there today and really go head into the challenge of having limited cells that are available and these banks. So you have all these blood cord banks that are out there. But the issue is both uncovering the actual cells themselves. So how many cells are stored right within the blood cord and then getting them so that we can have more of them essentially and what we're learning now on what's going on in our lab is how do we use this white T H D of. Two knockout or blocking mechanism to then help those cells. We already have in a bank expand and they'd be more therapeutically viable for diseases. Let's talk about oncology. For example where one of our first pipeline products is currently underway. Also from an orthopedic application when you think about cartilage regeneration so stem cells and set them themselves allow us to have the potential to really impact in a really large number of different disease states. And I think we're on the cutting edge of being able to recognize how powerful discoveries like this can be and that's our big differentiation. Salt as you know and my stays being a part of an early stage biotech. We pivot often. So we're we're starting right now. We've already moved a few places to the left or to the right to get to our early clinical work but that's our differentiation. Today is definitely the publication that kind of expresses what we're doing under why Tgif to interesting and so appreciate you you're honing in on that Whitey HD F two and it's basically this isn't my specialty but it's a protein right that basically encodes a gene and potentially is responsible for some of the diseases. Were seeing cancer will. What we know is. The setback forced themselves their piece today. Is it's hard to get the volume of a number of cells and into the correct location. Potentially do their job. And because of that that limitation. It's almost a self limitation of pure numbers. Race is on to find out well. How do we unlock the potential for those souls that we currently have banked become more and so when you block white t? Hdf to their allows in a particularly in the actual article that was published by Lynne. Hanley and Sean. He led the more than tenfold increase and the bench. So big you're looking and then when you look at measuring evidence no you can't no it is a From a scientific terminology standpoint. It's an say reader. But there's a modulation aspect of that right because these in Marin as when you essentially modify or work with the actual Ima- reader than the the results can happen like we're seeing in this clinical work. Now we still have more more work to do on this front right. And so that's where research is currently going on and the human element of things but in the animal models It's really impressive. And so where we sit today were versus where we'll sit even twelve. Eighteen months from now is exciting and every day. We're looking at Trends right and so I feel like you know again back to our term outcomes. That's the common language between layman like ourselves. That aren't biochemist right or molecular biologist and for us to hang in conversations with our backgrounds on more the business side of healthcare we all can agree upon is. What are the outcomes that we're looking for in the clinical work in what our objectives are overall? And so we've done that. I think successfully Here in the early stages to kind of keep us on track and also we've been very very fortunate to sit on University of Kansas medical centers. Campus where we are working with. It's called Ami if you're here locally but it's Institute for Advancing Medical Innovation at Ku and this group is essentially a gold standard for what we've been talking about in this call so so far and that is taking best in class practices and taking a true collaborative approach to getting something that was discovered in a laboratory getting through clinical trial work. And then. Really getting out to patient bedside. Where it's driving these outcomes so I think that's been refreshing for me to see not just like the theory of how do you launch a biotech company but then to actually being a place where these resources already set up and it's really helping our

Kansas City Christopher Chicago United States Kansas Advisory Board Scientific Advisory Board Stars Institute Bio Science And Technology Cen Kansas University Medical Cent University Of Kansas Medical C Professor Lynne Kansas University Of Kansas Hanley Midwest University Of Kansas
NCAA reportedly considering releasing March Madness bracket

Chicago's College Tailgate

00:43 sec | 1 year ago

NCAA reportedly considering releasing March Madness bracket

"Less than twenty four hours ago there was a reports via CBS sports bags the NC double a what is considering still releasing the sixty eight team brackets in order to perhaps as you heard Bruce pearl talk about in the update there for Phil you know the dream of some kids just hearing their team being announced as part of the of the NC double a tournament and you heard Bruce pearl make a compelling argument as to why he thought it was a good idea perhaps in these in this crazy time that we're living in Brian Hanley perhaps give us some sense of normalcy to people right now when they're looking for anything

Phil NC Bruce Pearl Brian Hanley CBS
Several States Looking To Shift Recycling Costs Back To Manufacturers

Environment: NPR

03:48 min | 1 year ago

Several States Looking To Shift Recycling Costs Back To Manufacturers

"Disposing of voice can be complicated. Does it go in the recycling bin or the trash and who pays for it? That's become a hot button issue for cities across the country because those cities bear the brunt of the cost so now lawmakers in several states including Maine are considering laws that would shift the recycling and disposal costs of products back to the companies. That make them. It's called extended producer responsibility or Apr Choi Moon the Sustainability Coordinator in Portland. Maine joins us now to explain. Good Morning Good Morning. So what does through some of the problems that? Portland's having with with recycling right well. A lot of people are aware that recycling markets have been challenged in the last few years basically because of some changes in the international market with China Shutting the door for most products Some places are experiencing difficulty even moving Products to the market So costs for municipalities. Are rising rapidly in some communities. The price that they have to pay to the recycling plant is more than they have to pay to dispose of their trash. How much does this all cost? The city so In our case our recycling costs have risen over two hundred thousand dollars in the past year So it's you know it's a pretty significant jump from zero which we used to. We had an agreement with our recycling facility that we didn't make any revenue but we didn't have to pay any costs. I mean I buy things that are packaged in plastic and cardboard and parts of it are clean parts of it dirty and it's kind of hard to figure out how to throw it away properly but also how did it become the responsibility of the consumer to not only throw it out believe but basically pay for it. Yeah no that's exactly The point I think that You know Portland. And the communities are supporting on the extended responsibility hearing me and trying to make We have city employees vehicles ago and pick it up and take it to the recycling plant and waste to energy facility But that's the cost borne entirely by the local tax payers Despite the fact that the you know the goods that are being disposed of are produced and packaged by some of the largest brands in the world. These companies supportive of a bill like this that would put the the cost on them No I think you know it's a change here in the United States particularly but if you look at other parts of the world you know all of Europe has Ep Are we're maybe the first state in the US really pushing hard at this. So is the goal to get the manufacturer to change the way. A package is as well absolutely currently the producers. You know lack any real incentive to make sure that the products they make are fully recyclable. They are thoughtful about the amount and type of packaging. They use You know if they're going to be responsible for the costs of them they're more apt to make cost of Hanley and disposing them less expensive now. Portland's the biggest city in May but what about smaller cities or towns that don't have the resources Portland might have. How how does it work there? I think This type of legislation will benefit rural communities especially on a percentage basis. Uh small community spends more on solid. Waste GonNA BE CYCLING COSTS THAN WE DO And many small communities Trashing handling waste and recycling and trashes. And it's you know the second most expensive line item in their budgets after school so So it It would be a great benefit for or small communities as well that was Troy Moon Sustainability Coordinator of the city of Portland name. Thank you so much

Portland Maine Troy Moon Sustainability Coord United States Coordinator Hanley China Producer Europe
Chicago Bulls Head Coach Jim Boylen Is “Not Worried” About Team’s Win-Loss Record

Kap & Company

02:35 min | 1 year ago

Chicago Bulls Head Coach Jim Boylen Is “Not Worried” About Team’s Win-Loss Record

"Next real covers the NBA for ESPN also featured on the jump on ESPN television he joins Brian Hanley age Jonathan hood on captain company right here on ESPN one thousand Nick earlier Brian and I were talking about developing verses wins and losses in the pregame yesterday for Jim Boylan he was talking about how his won loss record is something that doesn't concern him he's not worried about wins and losses from his standpoint but then of course there is that development pieces well because you do have young parts on this team and the over arching story about the bulls and to be in the season is that their goal was to playoffs so when you're the teams like the bulls although Charlotte in there the pistons sacramental and maybe Phoenix at this point as well what's more important for the bulls at this point some of the other teams that are not in the playoffs yet development or wins and losses thirty it's always wins and losses and like so many others I read that quote last night that I should buy it and I I I do this is part of the issue and this is going to parties you for your help fight with when Jim speaks and he says stuff I just cannot believe it used to be the public face of basketball and the NBA level it's it's starting in it not only are the bowls are waiting they're they're not developing guide you know call me white got a few guys games in a row okay that's great well Larry marketing was supposed to take that step he is regressed badly active improved a little bit but you know what what is I think this is kind of the best those of what he's going to be and then after that on that team who's gotten better loosen through so it's always gonna be wins and losses when you hear the quotes like you made last night the twenty twenty said they'll talk about shot profile we're was believe we're third in the league in shot profile well you know I can't are you gonna be the rally for that one when they given the the trophy for shopping he said to just mention what what would Donald Porter do once he gets S. R. profile I I mean I laughed a lot what do you want to show you someone here Brian does the quotes you hear from coaches who are getting the job done that's the kind of excuse making thank you heard it from Fred Hoiberg in years past you're all good at the state it's a whole lot of speed all the

NBA Espn Jonathan Hood Nick Jim Boylan Bulls Charlotte Pistons Phoenix Basketball Larry Marketing Fred Hoiberg Brian Hanley Twenty Twenty Donald Porter S. R.
How Video Content Marketing Can Learn From Good Writing with Ann Handley from Marketing Profs

HEY.com - Video Content Marketing Tips

09:14 min | 1 year ago

How Video Content Marketing Can Learn From Good Writing with Ann Handley from Marketing Profs

"My name is gain golden from video up and bid target. Along with my co-host my new coast. She's R. E. N. W. T. W. E. L. E. Y. Rene tea leaf video explained a lower Ni. Lo I am absolutely thrilled because hosting this podcast with you. I am so excited so much fun. And today we have a special guest and Ham. We from Marketing Profs. Welcome in. I'm so excited to be how come I don't get a big. You know a big little little rhyme around my last name. She's she's an H. A. N. D. L. E. Y. Just one letter of each. But she's Hanley for marketing Ross. That is so much better. I feel I feel now. I feel honored to be here fantastic and we asked you here because you are the expert for marketing. Profs about content marketing. And and we see you and you can tell us. Farrah we see you as the expert in writing principles but we want you to help inform us about how those principles can help with video. We know you video two and you talk about it. But how do these writing principles affect videoed? Is that a good topic for today at the perfect topic for today right so this is going to be a very short conversation next week. Thanks for being here so my first question to you is i. I WanNa talk in your training. You talked about writing writing rough drafts and outlines. Everyone does it differently but when we do videos at least personally what I do is I sort of write an outline because I find if I write a script. I'm too formal and and could you help us understand how video creators and business video creators can write better outlines that serve the videos. Yeah I mean first of all what I think is important to highlight in. What you just said was that you write an outline right and you know I do a lot of interviews like this. I do a lot of podcasts. And sometimes the host will say. Oh we're just GONNA wing it. We're just going to have a conversation. And that's fine like you want to allow for that sort of free whaling back and forth. You want it to feel conversational but you do want to have an outline right. You want to have a sense of guideposts and I think of them like you know sort of bumpers on the bowling lane right. It kind of keeps the ball from from going too far astray so that you know you're next thing you know you're you're completely in the gutter in zone. Metaphorically speaking I mean and so I think it's important to to write for video number. One and part of that is an outline. Sometimes it's a full blown script but depending on you know your project but I think it's important to involve some sort of writing in in your video creation process. So how do you do that You know I think. Writing for video is a little bit different than writing for text You know I published an email newsletter every other week For through my own personal website at an Hanley Dot com and how I approach that newsletter is not how I approach a video script. You know where to where to create you know by a Bi weekly or monthly video which I do not by the way but just having a sense. That video is much more conversational And that the the the tone and the effect of a video is a little bit different than taxed but nonetheless. I I still think you need some sort of guideposts along the way so a very specific tip around. That is whenever I read video script. This is gonNA sound. You know maybe Maybe a little bit elemental. But I don't use periods I use ellipses because when you like as we're speaking now for example it's not exactly like there is a hard stop as I'm speaking to you. Dane Andrey Comma. It's much more conversational. And so I find that when speaking in video that one line more or less does sort of morph into the other so when you put in on the lips versus a period. I think if you're following a script when you do that it prevents you from actually reading. You know what I'm saying. That's a great point because I was writing a script for someone the other day and I wrote and they didn't. It didn't sound like I had written it so I will be using that Well like you said like it doesn't sound like I had written it. Dot Dot dot dot dot nine series. That's how I would write that you know because I think if you say they'll Howard written it so you know it just it. It has a different sort of flow in a different tone. If you don't plan for a a real hard stop if instead one-sentence does roll into the other and that's the importance of the Ellipse by lips by the way for anybody who doesn't know it's like a literal dot dot dot instead of a period. Yeah I think that's a really great tip and I've actually been given scripts and as I start to read it out loud it just. It's grammatically correct. But it just sounds so formal and nothing. I would actually say in person so what I personally do was go through the script. Read it out loud and then change anything. That doesn't sound like I would naturally say like I'm speaking to someone And so I think you're tip is it's spot on. I love that So I have a question a little bit different. It's really around. You know I've I've heard you mention that marketers play it safe. They don't take big risks so as a marketer myself I I find this topic to be fascinating. So why is it that you think that marketers are playing it safe? And what advice do you have for them to sort of maybe get them out of their comfort zone to be able to take big risks for something that might be risk worthy? Yeah that's a really good point Risks are not worth taking all the time but I do think you just. I love how you term that you know. There are some things that I think are risk worthy An are there you know so. Why do marketers not take risks? I think there are a few reasons. It depends on the organization and it depends on the marketer. I think as well but number one from an organizational standpoint. It can be really difficult to rally team around something. That's risky because you're always going to have that person on the team who's like. Oh I don't know you know it's like we never we try to do something different. You know it it just feels like less of ashore thing my philosophy though is that if a sure thing it's probably not the best thing when it's one of those moments that matters right and so So you know a classic example would be if you are you know if you're launching a new product for example and you're launching a brand new marketing campaign you have to have the the the mindset that you want it to to do two things like you wanted to to breakthrough as everyone in marketing and every business everywhere wants to do But the second thing is you know you want it to reflect who you are as a company as an individual as a team depending on your point of view depending on who you are and so. I think it's important to take risks with that in mind right so you want something to actually resonate with your audience but you also want it to reflect who you are as a as a person and as a company and. I think it's difficult to do that. If you're always worried about offending somebody You know I I just I think if you try to appeal to everybody as the saying goes you know you're not going to be able to to anybody and so I would rather have one hundred raving fans than you know. One hundred thousand people who are sort of you know an on me right and you know that that one hundred thousand space is maybe it feels like it's a better place to be but ultimately for most businesses. I don't think it's the place we want to be. I mean most businesses don't really want to fit in with everyone else and kind of do the same things that everybody else is doing. It's just hard for people to kind of break out of that and do something. That's maybe untested know that it's even GonNa work Yeah so yeah and I I think one way around that is is to you know D- so determine those moments that matter most determined those moments when you you feel like you need to take a risk of some kind that you need to approach it with a different kind of mindset and start there I mean I'm I'm not saying that you need to to do crazy things and push the envelope all the time but I definitely think that there are moments when it's our jobs as marketers to appeal to the the the mindset of the person who's going to connect with you the very most so find that person figure out what will resonate most with them and don't worry about everybody else.

Hanley Dot Hanley R. E. N. W. T. W. E. L. E. Dane Andrey Comma Farrah Bi Weekly H. A. N. D. L. E. Howard
How The Massage Gun Could Elevate Your Spa Offering

Trent365

02:01 min | 2 years ago

How The Massage Gun Could Elevate Your Spa Offering

"Your spot tape massage guns. You know what I'm talking about. It looks like a little gun type of thing. It's got that nozzle on the end with padded a bit allows you to basically pull the trigger and give yourself a message in targeted areas now. A quick search google trends shows that it's gone through the roof freely over the last six months so it's having a bit of a monument and I actually think that could be an opportunity for spots first of all. There's the retail component because people will are perhaps more likely to buy this at a SPA than they would. Maybe from anywhere else you can help show them how to use it. You can run little causes and lessons on how to use use it you buy it for free you will give you a free treatment with that kind of option and also. I think it's a it's a form of home care in a way and I like it a little bit too car. I've been using this for years and in the early days of Chiropractic Hanley doing the manipulation but in more recent times they've used these little applicators which are very similar to these massage guns. Now if you could send someone have somebody in your spa do a treatment with them which also includes the message gun as part of the technique which you do on the Modi could potentially do on themselves. Then you offer that tree that massage massage gone for sale in the retail space. Then you give them a whole bunch of instructions and updates which you could be doing progressively right. You could send them updates on a monthly basis with a new way to use their massage gum. And then you could have treatments throughout that brings people back in bringing your message gun and we'll use is your message gone and you get twenty percents off. I think there is definitely a way to tie these massage guns into our existing SPA business. The problem is I think a lot of people are gonNA take a puritan approach. which is it's not true? Massage therefore doesn't add value. I do think they add value. They're not gonNA

Chiropractic Hanley Google Six Months
Purdue Pharma owners reportedly willing to surrender company, pay up to $4.5B more to settle suits

Morning Edition

03:36 min | 2 years ago

Purdue Pharma owners reportedly willing to surrender company, pay up to $4.5B more to settle suits

"Morning the owners of Purdue pharma are just about ready to surrender it the company that makes oxycontin reached a tentative deal that would settle thousands of lawsuits stemming from the opioid crisis houses that might work let's find out from north country public radio's Brian man who follows opioid litigation for NPR Brian good morning hi Steve what are the tentative terms so here's what it looks like the Sackler's would give up control of Purdue pharma the company would go through a structured bankruptcy all the sad news that the billion or family that is controlled Purdue pharma for a long time right going gone that's exactly right so we knew from would be created to any revenue from future sales of oxycontin would go to help communities struggling with the addiction crisis soccer's would also give up three billion dollars in cash and contribute money from the sales of an overseas subsidiary Paul Hanley help negotiate this deal on behalf of local governments around the U. S. and I asked him if this penalizes the Sackler family enough financially for their role pushing opioid sales we are certainly believe based on representations made to us by their counsel that these are numbers that represent a significant portion of of what the shock we shop bailable. it's clear though here Steve is that even after the settlement the Sackler's will remain one of the richest families in America and they're also doesn't appear to be any admission of wrongdoing I guess that explains why New York state's Attorney General among others are very unhappy with the settlement. yeah we've seen a really fierce response from attorneys general around the country Connecticut Massachusetts and other states of the soccer family is hugely controversial a lot of evidence that they played a big role in pushing opioid sales over the year at years and remember you know two hundred thousand people have died and now there is a very real prospect that members of the family will walk away fabulously wealthy because of oxycontin sales well you have some states are even half the states were to reject this deal does the deal still go through and is it a settlement. yeah this is going to go to bankruptcy court and there could be a whole lot more litigation in negotiations there if these states refused to get on board billions of dollars going to flow from this and whenever there's that much money there's going to be a big fight there's no formula for dividing up the cash meanwhile the one thing that's interesting here is the state attorneys general even more of them now are promising to continue suing the sector family directly going after that personal wealth even after this company produ pharmacy says to exist well I'm curious about that wouldn't this settlement to affectively preclude other lawsuits and if it didn't when the Sackler's be refusing to sign off at all well that's gonna be an interesting question in fact these attorneys general say that they think they can pursue the Sackler's and the money that they pulled out of this company over the years a lot of the litigation focuses exactly on that question what happens now with thousands of other lawsuits that focus on other pharmaceutical companies and distributors and pharmacy chains and everybody else right negotiations going on right now with other big drug companies name plan companies like Johnson and Johnson the federal trial is scheduled for next month in Ohio so there's pressure to get more of these deals done one other big development Steve that happened yesterday is that the federal judge overseeing that federal case damn poster he approved a massive expansion of local governments included in his case it now involves tens of thousands of cities and counties other local jurisdictions they all have a stake now and how this litigation plays out so the pharmaceutical industry's financial liability for this epidemic is still potentially massive Brian thanks for your close attention to all

Purdue Three Billion Dollars
"hanley" Discussed on 600 WREC

600 WREC

01:30 min | 2 years ago

"hanley" Discussed on 600 WREC

"On that Hanley rescue, and cleanup continues, at least two people have been killed and dozens injured after a tornado held El Reno Oklahoma. Very trying time for us. And we're going through and emotional, mayor met, white avail, Reno says the tornado that the weather service says, was at least in the f two devastated, a motel and flipped homes at a trailer park where lives were lost mayor Smith says even now people are coming together. We've been to this before with our experience just have come off a flood. Fox's Grenell Scott bullets fly to Chesapeake Virginia. House party last night, a party in that city's Holly cove neighborhood turned deadly one man was shot dead. Nine other victims all male were wounded and hospitalized witnesses say the area hosts a Memorial Day block party every year. Fox's Karen McCue? This is Fox News. Boxster teen weather update, thirteen meteorologist, Elizabeth Demore aid tracking sunny skies again, for this Sunday temperatures on the warm side afternoon. The nineties more kindness at times into your Memorial Day conditions, stay hot and dry more on this forecast. Tonight on FOX thirteen at five. You're listening to Russia's week in review.

Fox El Reno Oklahoma Fox News Reno Hanley Holly cove Chesapeake Virginia Karen McCue Elizabeth Demore Russia Smith