17 Burst results for "Hank Horton"

"hank horton" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

Progressive Talk 1350 AM

05:37 min | 1 year ago

"hank horton" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

"The house pretty there was at least one two pound slab of bacon and he wrapped in a dish towel and then left on the floor of one of the bedrooms so weird there is a bowl of bloody water that was later found he he washed himself off he washed off the axe although he left it behind any apparently hung out for a little while in the house before leaving sometime before five AM so the murders took place around midnight yeah and then come five AM the house is dark still five AM so that's not the weirdest thing although we're talking about Iowa so many people were up at five including the neighbor a woman named Mary Packham and she noticed that there wasn't anybody up at the house which was a little odd it was a Monday morning now and by seven she thought it was just downright eerie that there was no sign of life at the house she went over and let the Morris chickens out so that they could pick around and feed she called Joe Moore's store and said Hayes has Joe showed up and found but from the employee that he hadn't and finally one of those two gets in touch with a guy named Ross more Joe Moore's brother and Ross comes over and unlocks the door the front door was locked and he goes inside any comes almost immediately rushing back out calling for the local Marshall to be called yeah and basically he gets Hank Horton is the marshals name he gets them on the scene in this this is where things just kind of go berserk it's it's such a small town such a grisly crime any chances of serving a crime scene and this is nineteen twelve I don't even know how much a small town like this knows about preserving a crime scene at the time but any hopes were lost within those first few hours after the discovery because by all accounts there were a hundred or more people that went through that house from doctors to corners to investigators who just townspeople right that were allowed to just go in there and check things out yeah so the the person group that comes with the the the Marshall hang cordon right was to two doctors and a minister J. Clark Cooper all right great doctor name Jacor Cooper and Edgar Huff and Wesley Ewing who was the minister of the church they were the first contingent to make it into the house after Ross more came running out yeah so they go in and they know enough to not disturb things too much yeah another guy gets brought in LA linguist he's the corner yep he tries to take some notes about the crime scene but the person who got the most information was another doctor his name was that's William DFS Williams was the one who examine the body in a later in quest he had the most details offer about the bodies of positions all that stuff so when those guys walked in they were at least well versed enough to note sure not disturb things as much as possible or at least more than the towns people there yeah N. F. as Williams allegedly came out of the house pretty shaken and said don't go in there boys you'll regret it to your last day now and the townspeople said nuts to you we're going inside we want to see some dead bodies and they all regretted it probably to their last day yeah because they they did not only mess of the crimes in the pokes around there was supposedly the town drunk took some fragments of Joe Morris goal as mementos like take the currency was toast like you said if if you could have ever been preserved was toast and even the local druggist showed up with his camera to help preserve the crime scene because he heard that the towns people were were tramping all over it in Ross more not understanding what he was doing through the guy out it is just being a goal trying to get pictures so the crime scene is utterly and completely lost yeah and one of the things about Alaska almost said bestseller is that it was a train down there were about thirty trains everyday that went through there and so by this time unless this person was local and may be hiding out locally by all accounts the murder had probably have to train was out of there right time but they don't go on they didn't realize this until they'd already released some blood hounds they search the countryside there was like a pretty pretty big search to find whoever did this and they didn't find anybody so the town is just terrified town of two thousand people eight including six children just been murdered with an axe in your town and now the sun starting to go down and nobody's been caught all right so let's take a break and we'll come back and talk about suspect number one right after this Albuquerque international son port I've forty both directions not seeing any problems at all you're looking good and you're running at speed no issues getting through the big guy I twenty five south Salem well on the on ramp I twenty five south bound to commit you we have an accident it's off.

"hank horton" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

Progressive Talk 1350 AM

05:50 min | 2 years ago

"hank horton" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

"I think in the serial killers are psychopaths mode though I've heard of stuff like that before though right like come you get the idea that the you that all the per the murder doesn't want the victim looking at him yeah which may also explain why ash their faces in yeah so the guy apparently hangs out for a little while it does other weird thing so the bacon he grabbed a two pound slab of bacon and for I saw elsewhere that there is another slab of bacon found in the house there was at least one two pound slab of bacon and he wrapped in a dish towel and then left on the floor of one of the bedrooms so weird there is a bowl of bloody water that was later found he he washed himself off he washed off the axe although we left it behind any apparently hung out for a little while in the house before leaving sometime before five AM so the murders took place around midnight yeah and then come five AM the house is dark still five AM so that's not the weirdest thing although we're talking about Iowa so plenty of people were up at five including the neighbor a woman named Mary Peckham and she noticed that there wasn't anybody up at the house which was a little odd it was a Monday morning now and by seven she thought it was just downright eerie that there was no sign of life at the house she went over and let the Morris chickens out so that they could pick around and feed she called Joe Moore's store and said Hayes has Joe showed up and found both from the employee that he hadn't and finally one of those two gets in touch with a guy named Ross more Joe Moore's brother and Ross comes over and unlocks the door the front doors locked and he goes inside any comes almost immediately rushing back out calling for the local Marshall to be called yeah and basically he gets Hank Horton is the marshals name he gets them on the scene in this this is where things just kind of go berserk it's it's such a small town such a grisly crime any chances of of preserving a crime scene and this is nineteen twelve I don't even know how much a small town like this knows about preserving a crime scene at the time but any hopes were lost within those first few hours after the discovery because by all accounts there were a hundred or more people that went through that house from doctors to corners to investigators who just townspeople right that were allowed to just go in there and check things out yeah so the the person group that comes with the the the Marshall hang cordon right was it to two doctors and a minister J. Clark Cooper all right great doctor name Jacor Cooper and Edgar Huff and Wesley Ewing who was the minister of the church they were the first contingent to make it into the house after Ross more came running out yeah so they go in and they know enough to not to serve things too much yeah another guy gets brought in LA linguist he's the corner yep hi he tries to take some notes about the crime scene but the person who got the most information was another doctor his name was and that's William DFS Williams was the one who examine the body in a later in quest he had the most details offer about the bodies of positions all that stuff so when those guys walked in they were at least well versed enough to note sure not disturb things as much as possible or at least more than the towns people knew yeah N. F. as Williams allegedly came out of the house pretty shaken and said we don't go in there boys you'll regret it to your last day yeah and the townspeople said not to you we're going inside we want to see some dead bodies and they all regretted it probably to their last day yeah because they they've not only mess of the crimes in the pokes around there was supposedly the town drunk took some fragments of Joe Morris goal as mementos like that the crime scene was toast like you said if if you could have ever been preserved was toast and even the local druggist showed up with this camera to help preserve the crime scene because he heard that the townspeople were were tramping all over it in Ross more not understanding what he was doing through the guy out thought is just being a goal trying to get pictures so the crime scene is utterly and completely lost yeah and one of the things about Alaska mustard basilar is that it was a train down there were about thirty trains everyday that went through there and so by this time in less this person was local and may be hiding out locally by all accounts the murder had probably have to train was out of there right time but they don they didn't realize this until they'd already released some blood hounds they search the countryside there was like a pretty pretty big search to find whoever did this and they didn't find anybody so the time is just terrified Turner to thousand people eight including six children just been murdered with an axe in your town and now the sun's starting to go down and nobody's been caught all right so let's take a break and we'll come back and talk about suspect number one right after this from the.

one two pound two pound
"hank horton" Discussed on News Radio 1190 KEX

News Radio 1190 KEX

16:52 min | 2 years ago

"hank horton" Discussed on News Radio 1190 KEX

"Bill James works for the advisers the Boston Red Sox. And and so it is that he spends a lot of his time in the sports world leaned was just talking before the top of the hour about the difference between being in that sort of positive place with very positive energy around people involved doing positive community things and writing the man from the train because he likes to write about crime. So do you want to finish that? You're you're fading out. The and I was not able to hear a lot of them. I'm fading out. No can have that. I was just saying that you were presenting a dichotomy of working in the sports world by day and writing crime at night. Yeah. The guy was saying that crime stories are fascinating too. Because they they come from the parts of ourselves. So we don't like to talk about. And don't normally talk about in the specific case of the man the train. I didn't make a deliberate and thoughtful entry into the subject, I just got hooked like a fish. I was I was I saw a documentary about the murders envelopes guy called living with a mystery. It's an extremely well done documentary and far above normal levels of crime documentary. I was interested in it. And it was clear that there was a part of the story that was missing which is that it's relatively obvious that the bliscoll murders are a part of a series. So I started just going to put an hour into into trying to learn more about the series. But the the hour became a we can the week of essentially became. Five or six years. So they didn't I didn't decide to get into it. I just wandered into it. It shows you. You can do you consider this a true crime book? Sure. Yes. It is. Yeah. You know? And that's the interesting piece too. Is that true crime? The tradition for true crime is I discovered in my research goes all the way back to execution sermons. Right. Sort of shares a similar DNA with American journalism. Except that in the case of true crime. It was the it was the preachers who was the circuit riding preachers. The ministers that would come to these towns in on the day of somebody's execution, and they would do a sermon just before the execution that would try to provide the context for why this person was being executed in why the community overall would benefit from his or her death. It became an important part of trying to understand executions in America. And and this is where when the preachers decided there they used to just print up their sermons and people would snap them up. And then he thought well heck this to sell it for a nickel. And so they started to sell their execution sermons, and then they would get passed around and these became some of the early bestselling true crime narratives, it it fulfills the same function is what you're doing in in the man from the train. You're trying to bring even though it's a hundred plus years later, in some cases, you're trying to bring a kind of a kind of healing. Anyway, not that anybody is still alive that was directly involved, but for these communities, maybe this this lingering sense of some tragedy that had happened. Maybe some closure. An exactly what happened to their town. And how their town was involved or not involved in in the the deaths of of somebody that at one point. You know, we're popular members of the community. There was an interesting that happened just a few weeks ago. I actually got a letter from a man in London England who was a a his great great and had been was one of the victims of the crime interesting always believed that the man who was accused of her murder and was locked up without any evidence for two years before he was released as he always believed that he had gotten away with it. And he says it reading it in my book that in our book that it wasn't. That was not actually what had happened was just a tremendous relief to him. That was a shock to me. I hadn't thought about. It was a you said he was just tremendously relieved to realize that it was just a random crime. And that this man hadn't actually that that van hadn't actually gotten away with it was this other fellow, and I don't know why it was important to him. Well, I understand the sense. It was important to have to know what had happened. But you know, one guy getting away with it or another guy getting away with it. Unpunished, I I don't know that there's a lot of difference. But he's still didn't have that reaction to it. Yeah. Okay. Go ahead. No, please. No. A lot of the book book is about is is all all books authored books. Our search for understanding a lot of the book is is trying to get people to understand the America in which these crimes occurred they one hundred years ago, and I grew up in a small town very much like the crimes that these that these murders occurred in and I grew up in them fifty sixty years ago. So it's sorta equidistant from me in them. And that's one reason. The story was powerful to me. But I am trying to get people to understand what what the criminal Justice system was like how fantastically primitive. It was. What how people lived? They lived rich meaningful lies. People in urban areas today think of people who lived in small towns one hundred years ago or often think of people who lived in small towns a hundred years ago, I was living these boring lives, which nothing ever happened. All of the things that happened to you and me and people in our lives happened to people in small towns. I mean, they got married they fell in love and got married, and they got divorced, and they started careers and got promoted and got fired they moved and they went on long trips and brought back souvenirs, they they had entertainment. So they went to literally every night all of the things that that happened to happen to us happened to them, and I was trying to create a a picture. Unfortunately, it is a picture of their death. So that's a terrible picture because they died terrible deaths. But also is trying to create a picture of how they live and and and give the reader. An understanding of what it was like to be in America. And in a small town Andrea years ago. I think you did that very effectively. In fact, I think that's one of the interesting things about true crime in general is that the the focus can be on things, which re Rian Vert the inverted pyramid of journalism. And you can spend a lot more time on the things which are less important to telling the story in proper journalism. You can spend a lot more time talking about the atmosphere of a town or the the things that people eight or the way that houses were constructed or communities were laid out you can you can do that. And it brings a fresh context to these murders. You know, as opposed to the traditional way that that crimes are covered in in straight storytelling in journalism context. That's what I really like what you were doing especially when you're getting into the fabric of of these communities. What is it always sticks? With me that the point you were just making that has to do with the the soccer the cases and vans. Eddie. One of them. I think it was Sako. Had an alibi for the time of one of the crimes what are the crimes committed on December twenty four th of I think nineteen nineteen or nineteen eighteen and he had a. He had witnesses who said that on that particular date. He was delivering a to his neighbors in an Italian community, a pickled eels because tickle deals were a a delicacy that were eaten on Christmas day. And there was there was. But there was conflict in testimony that said, no, no, no that couldn't have been done under assembly four because you never by the pickle deals on December on Christmas Eve, you have to buy them on December twenty second or something. So that you have time to prepare them and put them on on ice for a couple of days before you eat them the. It's a it's a tiny detail that you would never survive. I mean, you would never know that that was true of Italian as a way that the talian American communities live two hundred years ago, except that it's important in a crime story. That's why crime stories are are these little there's a flash of light. That eliminates the details of of something that would otherwise be totally forgotten. I think that brings us very effectively to Velasco Iowa, and the the crime story, which as you pointed out earlier is the one that starts to to give away. The communities are already catching on at this point to the fact that there's a killer on the railways take us take us through what happened invalid. On the night of June nine one thousand nine hundred twelve. The lights were out in Felicita due to a a dispute between the Velasco city council and the power company. So they had city lights and streetlights, but they were out and the town was it complete darkness is this Sunday night. There was a church service. A Sunday night church service organized by one of the victims. The woman who was the head of the house after the. After the service. I didn't get into this in the book. But I think it's true. I don't believe the murders would ever have happened when they did had the lights been on. And the reason that was true is that he had committed another atrocity just six days earlier about a hundred miles away. And he normally would not have had another outrage that quickly, but because the lights the city was plunged into darkness. It was a perfect opportunity for him. And he couldn't pass it up anyway, re two little girls named Anna Lena, still injure went home with a more family, the family of Henry Moore, they walked home after the church service, and and the little girl spent the night with their friends little girl is a member of the family on the morning of June. Ten they'll wanna stirring around in the house the. And the his brother finally comes and breaks into the house finds a couple of bodies and runs out of the house screaming they bring the town marshal. And he is name as Hank Horton. Mr. Horton, courageously goes through the house. You have to understand. He has no reason to believe anything other than that. A crazed murderer is hiding somewhere in this house. There's a dark house he's holding matches in front of him. With no gun no form of protection, holding matches in front of in front of his himself going from room to room finding bodies very eight dead bodies in the house longhouse in a small quiet, but western town, the and all of them hitting the head with an axe the access found as it usually is next to the body of a little girl. The mansion the train was a pervert. And he was interested in little little girl. Little girl was usually found in a in an attitude suggesting that she had been. She had been outraged after death the. In any case. The crime was not there was a great uproar as you can imagine. But the crime was not solved. Two years later, a con man named Jay and Welker Sohn came to Valenica and realized that he could sustain a phony investigation of the crime by keeping people angry. He could keep donations coming in by keeping people angry, and he did that by accusing a very prominent local citizen. Frank Jones of financing the crimes. There isn't any chance in the world of Frank Jones was guilty or that he had any any connection to it. But this campaign to prosecute Frank Jones divided fullest and a horrible and unprecedented way the city fought over whether or not Jones did it or didn't do it for several years and became a badly divided community, you know, families on one side of the line wouldn't play with families on the other side of the line. They wouldn't go they wouldn't shop at their stores. They wouldn't wouldn't have anything to do with them. This battle lasted ballista for even though. Wilkerson was eventually run out of town in nineteen seventeen. The the battle went on for a long time and the hard feelings emanating from it. Persistent in the city. I I would say so to an extent that they persist to the present day. You mentioned the that piece about the the person whipping up sentiment and making a false accusation to profit from it. And even that creates a pattern for all. Too often. How crime stories unsolved crime stories are treated yet at the same time. It it speaks to the fact that there weren't cold-case police officers working the crime still the crimes of that time might have been solved by after that period of time by somebody writing a letter confessing somebody knowing somebody that wasn't it went to almost literally like fall in their lap, which again comes back to the the power of storytelling and how key but just by keeping by telling a story the beginning middle and end of these events. It doesn't matter. How old the story is is that it will get people to listen again and to reconsider again and most likely to connect again to that sense of outrage about what had happened and so. Static police report won't necessarily, you know, anger people. But when you start telling the story again, people were feeling, yeah. Yeah. That's right. And and that's but also keeps kind of the idea of the murder alive. It makes it it gives you a sensation. Again, that is you know, the core of sensationalism. But it does it makes it sorta make you feel it again, the fact that this crime in happened had they had they built a, you know, any kind of memorial to the family of their been any Heather been what had the town done to try to come to grips with the fact that this murder had happened prior to even this conmen coming to town or afterward. The well there was I don't know that there was that kind of Santa. I don't know that anyone built a memorial to them. For many years, the ballista authorities, and I would say this is still true today. The peop- the the chamber of commerce types types, invalids cow wish that ballista was known for something else. Right, right..

murder America Bill James Frank Jones Boston Red Sox soccer Sako Hank Horton England Santa Rian Vert van Velasco Iowa Andrea Eddie Heather Velasco city council
"hank horton" Discussed on KGO 810

KGO 810

07:31 min | 2 years ago

"hank horton" Discussed on KGO 810

"Is a member of the family on the morning of June ten no one stirring around in the house. The and the his brother finally comes at breaks into the house finds a couple of bodies and runs out of the house scraping. They bring the town marshal. And he is as Hank Horton. Mr. Horton, courageously goes through the house. You have to understand. He has no reason to believe anything other than that. A crazed murderer is hiding somewhere in this house. There's a dark house he's holding matches in front of him with no gone to no form of protection. Olding matches in front of in front of his himself going from room to room finding bodies there are eight dead bodies in the house and longtime house in a small quiet, but western town, the and all of them hitting the head with an axe the access found as it usually is next to the body of a little girl. The man from the train was a pervert, and he was in stood in little little girl. Little girl was usually found in a in an attitude suggesting that she had been. She had been outraged after death the. In any case. The crime was not there was a great uproar as you can imagine. But the crime was not solved. Two years later, a con man named Jay Walker Sohn came to Alaska and realized that he could sustain a phony investigation of the crime by keeping people angry. He could keep donations coming in by keeping people angry. And he did that by accusing a very prominent local citizen. Frank Jones of financing the crimes. There isn't any chance in the world of Frank Jones was guilty or that he had any any connection to it. But this campaign to prosecute Frank Jones divided Felicita and a horrible and unprecedented way the city fought over whether or not Jones did it or didn't do it for several years and became Cape badly divided communities, you know, families on one side of the line wouldn't play with families on the other side of the line. They wouldn't go they wouldn't shop at their stores. They wouldn't wouldn't have anything to do with them that this battle lasted ballista for even though. Wilkerson was eventually run out of town in nineteen seventeen. The the battle went on for a long time and the hard feelings emanating from it. Persisted in the city. I I would say to an extent that they persist to the present day. You mentioned the piece about the. The person whipping up sentiment and making a false accusation to profit from it. And even that creates a pattern for all. Too often. How crime stories unsolved crime stories are treated yet at the same time. It speaks to the fact that there weren't cold case police officers working the crime still the crimes of that time might have been solved by after that period of time by somebody writing a letter confessing simply knowing somebody that wasn't meant to almost literally like fall in their lap, which again comes back to the the power of storytelling and how key but just by keeping by telling a story the beginning middle and end of these events. It doesn't matter. How old the story is is that it will get people to listen again and to reconsider again and most likely to connect again to that sense of outrage about what had happened and so. Static police report won't necessarily anger people. But when you start telling the story again, people are feeling, yeah. Yeah. That's right. And and that's but also keeps kind of the idea of the murder alive. It makes it it gives you a sensation. Again, it that is the core of sensationalism. But it does it makes you feel it again, the fact that this crime in happened had they had they built a, you know, any kind of memorial to the family had there been any had there been what had the town done to try to come to grips with the fact that this murder had happened prior to even this conmen coming to town or afterward. Well, there was I don't know that there was that kind of Santa. But I don't know that anyone built a memorial to them. For many years, the ballista authorities, and I would say this is still true today that peop- the chamber of commerce types types, invalid SCO, wished ballista was known for something else. Right. Right. The there is a house where the crime occurred is still standing and is operated as a kind of of tourism. It's it's shows up on paranormal TV shows and people pay to take tours of the house the, but if you drive around the Liska, there's no sign anywhere that says where the house is or know that we have signed saying where the doctors houses, but that, but where the what ballistic is known for is not mentioned anywhere. The that's not an appropriate. I goes without saying that that's not an appropriate memorial. Right. The. I don't know that you raise an interesting question. I don't know that in any of these cases there was a a proper memorial to the victims victims were mostly poor people mostly people without. Without well, one in the family was very well liked. They and the community. Thought well of them and the vigorous efforts to solve the crime were kind of memorial to them. But I don't think there was any physical memorial to them. Sometimes it's just a place where somebody always brings flowers. There's an effort to try to. So it doesn't mean enough to be like a statue. But it is interesting. How communities will will sometimes do that? Because that is their way of honoring. So, but I think you mentioned the economics piece that explains everything, you know, that that's one of the reasons why it's usually prominent citizens that enjoy that kind of status. The one of his one of the national chains crimes. The double murder in Colorado Springs. It murdered two families in one night and adjoining houses the, but if you if you go to that community where that happened now the people in that area still remember it it's still they they could tell ya. Oh, that's a house right there. It's still it has not forgotten many.

Frank Jones murder Hank Horton ballista Jay Walker Sohn Alaska Wilkerson Colorado Springs Santa Liska Two years
"hank horton" Discussed on WLAC

WLAC

07:31 min | 2 years ago

"hank horton" Discussed on WLAC

"The little girl is a member of the family on the morning of June. Ten no one is stirring around in the house. The. And the his brother finally comes and breaks into the house finds a couple of bodies and runs out of the house scraping. They bring the town marshal. And he his neighbors. Hank Horton, Mr. Horton, courageously goes through the house. You have to understand. He has no reason to believe anything other than that a crazed murderers hiding somewhere in this house as a dark house. He's holding matches in front of him. With no gun to know, former protection Olding matches in front of in front of his himself going from room to room finding bodies very eight dead bodies in the house and longtime house in a small, quiet. Western town, the and all of them hitting the head with an axe the access found as it usually is next to the body of a little girl. The mentioned the train was a pervert. And he was interested in little little girl. Little girl was usually found in a in an attitude suggesting that she had been. She had been outraged after death the. In any case. The crime was not there was a great uproar as you can imagine. But the crime was not solved. Two years later at conman named Jay Welker Sohn came to Valenica and realized that he could sustain a phony investigation of the crime by keeping people angry. He can keep donations coming in by keeping people angry, and he did that by accusing a very prominent local citizen Frank Jones of financially the crimes. There isn't any chance in the world of Frank Jones was guilty or that he had any any connection to it. But this campaign to prosecute Frank Jones divided Felicita and a horrible and unprecedented way the city fought over whether or not Jones did it or didn't do it for several years and became badly divided community, you know, families on one side of the line wouldn't play with families on the other side of the line. They wouldn't go to they wouldn't shop at their stores. They wouldn't wouldn't have anything to do with that. This battle lasted Valenica for even though. Roxanne was eventually run out of town in nineteen seventeen. The the battle went on for a long time and the hard feelings emanating from it. Persist in the city. I would I would say to an extent that they persist to the present day. You mentioned the that piece about the. The person in whipping up sentiment and making a false accusation to profit from it. And even that creates a pattern for all. Too often. How crime stories unsolved crime stories are treated yet at the same time. It it speaks to the fact that there weren't cold-case police officers working the the crime still the crimes of that time might have been solved by after that period of time by somebody writing a letter confessing or somebody knowing somebody that wasn't it went to almost literally like fall in their lap, which again comes back to the the power of storytelling and how key but just by keeping by telling a story the beginning middle and end of these events. It doesn't matter. How old the story is is that it will get people to listen again and to reconsider again and most likely to connect again to that sense of outrage about what had happened and so. Static police report won't necessarily anger people. But when you start telling the story, again, people surfing like, yeah. Yeah. That's right. And that's but also keeps kind of the idea of the murder alive. It makes it it gives you a sensation. Again, that is the core of sensationalism. But it does it makes it sorta make you feel it again, the fact that this crime in happened had they had they built a, you know, any kind of memorial to the family of their been any Heather been what had the town done to try to come to grips with the fact that this murder had happened prior to even this conmen coming to town or afterward. The. Well, there was I don't know that there was that kind of Santa that. I don't know that anyone built a memorial to them. For many years of Alaska. Authorities and I would say this is still true today that peop- the the chamber of commerce types types in Velasco wished Velasco was known for something else. Right, right. The there is a house where the crime occurred is still standing and is operated as a kind of of tourism. It's it's shows up on paranormal TV shows and people pay to take tours of the house the, but if you drive around the Liska, there's no sign anywhere that says where the house is that we assign saying where the doctor's house has. But that but where the what ballistic is known for is not mentioned anywhere. The that's not an appropriate. I it goes without saying that that's not an appropriate memorial. Right. The I don't know that it you raise an interesting question. I don't. I know that in any of these cases there was a a proper memorial to the victims victims were mostly poor people mostly people without. Without one in the more family was very well liked and the community. Thought well of them and the vigorous efforts to solve the crime were kind of memorial to them. But I don't think there was any physical memorial to them. Sometimes it's just a place where somebody always brings flowers. In an effort to try to. So it doesn't need to be like a statue. But it is interesting. How communities will sometimes do that? Because that is their way of honoring. So, but I think you mentioned the economics piece that explains everything, you know, that that's one of the reasons why it's usually prominent citizens that enjoy that kind of status. The one of his one of the national chains crimes. The double murder in Colorado Springs, murdered two families in one night and adjoining houses the, but if you if you go to that community where that happened now the people in that area still remember it it's still they they could tell ya. Oh, that's a house right there. It's still it has not forgotten.

Frank Jones murder Valenica Hank Horton Jay Welker Sohn Alaska Roxanne Colorado Springs Velasco Heather Santa Liska Two years
"hank horton" Discussed on Newsradio 970 WFLA

Newsradio 970 WFLA

07:31 min | 2 years ago

"hank horton" Discussed on Newsradio 970 WFLA

"Girl is a member of the family on the morning of June. Ten no one is stirring around in the house. The and the his brother finally comes and breaks into the house finds a couple of bodies and runs out of the house screaming they bring the town marshal, and he is named as Hank Horton, Horton courageously goes through the house. You have to understand. He has no reason to believe anything other than that. A crazed murderer is hiding somewhere in this house is a dark house. He's holding matches in front of him. With no gun to form of protection holding matches in front of in front of his himself going from room to room finding bodies. There are eight dead bodies in the house and long house in a small quiet. Western town, the and all of them hitting the head with an axe the access found as it usually is next to the body of a little girl. The mansion the train was a pervert. And he was interested in little little girl. Little girl was usually found in a in an attitude suggesting that she had been. She had been outraged after death the. In any case. The crime was not there was a great uproar as you can imagine. But the crime was not solved. Two years later at conman named Jay Walker Sohn came to Valenica and realized that he could sustain a phony investigation of the crime by keeping people angry. He could keep donations coming in by keeping people angry, and he did that by accusing a very prominent local citizen. Frank Jones of financing the crimes. There isn't any chance in the world of Frank Jones was guilty or that he had any any connection to it. But this campaign to prosecute Frank Jones divided Felicita in a horrible and unprecedented way the city fought over whether or not Jones did it or didn't do it for several years and became badly divided community, you know, families on one side of the line wouldn't play with families on the other side of the line. They wouldn't go to they wouldn't shop at their stores. They wouldn't wouldn't have anything to do with. This battle lasted ballista for even though. Welker was eventually run out of town in nineteen seventeen. The the battle went on for a long time and the hard feelings emanating from it. Persisted in the city. I I would say to an extent that they persist to the present day. You mentioned the piece about the. The person whipping up sentiment and making a false accusation to profit from it. And even that creates a pattern for all too often. How? Crime stories unsolved. Crime stories are treated yet at the same time. It it speaks to the fact that there weren't cold-case police officers working the the crime still the crimes of that time might have been solved by after that period of time by somebody writing a letter confessing or somebody knowing somebody that wasn't almost literally like fall in their lap, which again comes back to the the power of storytelling and how key but just by keeping by telling a story the beginning middle and end of these events. It doesn't matter. How old the story is is that it will get people to listen again and to reconsider again and most likely to connect again to that sense of outrage about what had happened and so. A static police report won't necessarily anger people. But when you start telling the story again, people are feeling, yeah. Yeah. That's right. And and that's but also keeps kind of the idea of the murder alive. It makes it it gives you a sensation. Again, it that is the core of sensationalism. But it does it makes it of make you feel it again, the fact that this crime in happened had they had they built a, you know, any kind of memorial to the family had there been any had there been what had the town done to try to come to grips with the fact that this murder had happened prior to even this conmen coming to town or afterward. The well there was I don't know that there was that kind of sentiment. I don't know that anyone built a memorial to them. For many years of Alaska. Authorities and I would say this is still true today that peop- the the chamber of commerce types types in Velasco wished to bliscoll was known for something else. Right, right. The there is a house where the crime occurred is still standing and is operated as a kind of of tourism. It's it's shows up on paranormal TV shows and people pay to take tours of the house the, but if you drive around Liska, there's no sign anywhere that says where the house is now that we assign saying where the doctors houses, but that, but where the what is known for is not mentioned anywhere. The that's not an appropriate. I it goes without saying that that's not an appropriate memorial. The I don't know that it you raise an interesting question. I don't. I know that in any of these cases there was a proper memorial to the victims victims were mostly poor people mostly people without. Without in the more family was very well liked. They and the community thought well of them and the vigorous efforts to solve the crime were kind of memorial to them. But I don't think there was any physical memorial to them. Sometimes it's just a place where somebody always brings flowers. There's an effort to try to. So it doesn't even have to be like a statue. But it is interesting. How communities will will sometimes do that? Because that is their way of honoring. So, but I think you mentioned the economics piece that explains everything, you know, that that's one of the reasons why it's usually prominent citizens that enjoy that kind of status. The one of his one of the national chains crimes. The double murder in Colorado Springs emerged to families in one night and adjoining houses the, but if you if you go to that community where that happened. Now, the people in that area is still remember it. Still they they could tell ya. Oh, that's a house right there. It's still it has not forgotten many.

Frank Jones murder Hank Horton Jay Walker Sohn Alaska Welker Colorado Springs Valenica Velasco bliscoll Liska Two years
"hank horton" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

WCBM 680 AM

08:11 min | 2 years ago

"hank horton" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

"Member of the family on the morning of June. Ten no one is stirring around in the house. The and the his brother finally comes at breaks into the house finds a couple of bodies and runs out of the house scraping. They bring the town marshal. And he is named as Hank Horton. Mr. Horton, courageously goes through the house. You have to understand. He has no reason to believe anything other. Then that a crazed murderer is hiding somewhere in this house. It is a dark house. He's holding matches in front of him. With no gun no form of protection, holding matches in front of in front of his himself going from room to room finding bodies there. Eight dead bodies in the house long house in a small quiet, but western town, the and all of them hitting the head with an axe the access found as it usually is next to the body of a little girl. Imagine the train was a pervert. And he was interested in little little girl. Little girl was usually found in a in an attitude suggesting that she had been. She had been outraged after death the. In any case. The crime was not there was a great uproar as you can imagine. But the crime was not solved. Two years later, a con man named Jay and Welker Sohn came to Valenica and realized that he could sustain a phony investigation of the crime by keeping people angry. He could keep donations coming in by keeping people angry, and he did that by accusing a very prominent local citizen. Frank Jones of financing the crimes. There isn't any chance in the world of Frank Jones was guilty or that he had any any connection to it. But this campaign to prosecute Frank Jones divided Felicita in a horrible and unprecedented way the city fought over whether or not Jones did it or didn't do it for several years and became came badly divided community, you know, families on one side of the line wouldn't play with families on the other side of the line. They wouldn't go they wouldn't shop at their stores. They wouldn't have anything to do with them that this battle lasted Valenica for even though. Raucous and was eventually run out of town in nineteen seventeen. The the battle went on for a long time and the hard feelings emanating from it. Persist in the city. I I would say to an extent that they persist to the present day. You mentioned the piece about the the person in whipping up sentiment and making a false accusation to profit from it. And even that creates a pattern for all. Too often. How crime stories unsolved crime stories are treated yet at the same time. It speaks to the fact that there weren't cold-case police officers working the crime still the crimes of that time might have been solved by after that period of time by somebody writing a letter confessing or somebody knowing somebody that wasn't it went to almost literally like fall in their lap, which again comes back to the the power of storytelling and how key but just by keeping by telling a story the beginning middle and end of these events. It doesn't matter. How old the story is is that it will get people to listen again into reconsider again and most likely to connect again to that sense of outrage about what had happened. And so a static police report. Won't necessarily anger people. But when you start telling the story again people's refilling. Yeah. Yeah. That's right. And and that's but also keeps kind of the idea of the murder alive. It makes it gives you a sensation. Again, that is the core of sensationalism. But it does it makes you feel it again, the fact that this crime in happened had they had they built a, you know, any kind of memorial to the family of there been any Heather been what had the town done to try to come to grips with the fact that this murder had happened prior to even this conmen coming to town or afterward. The well there was I don't know that there was that kind of sentiment. I don't know that anyone built a memorial to them. For many years, the ballista authorities, and I would say this is still true today that peop- the the chamber of commerce types types, inva- Liska wished Velasco was known for something else. Right, right. The there is a house where the crime occurred is still standing and is operated as a kind of of tourism. It's it's shows up on paranormal TV shows and people pay to take tours of the house the, but if you drive around the Liska, there's no sign anywhere that says where the house is now that we signed saying where the doctor's house has. But that but what what ballistic is known for is not mentioned anywhere. The that's not an appropriate. I it goes without saying that that's not an appropriate in the Mario the. I don't know that you raise an interesting question. I don't know that in any of these cases there was a proper memorial to the victims victims were mostly poor people mostly people without. Without one in the family was very well liked. They and the community thought well of them and the vigorous efforts to solve the crime were kind of memorial to them. But I don't think there was any physical memorial to them. Sometimes it's just a place where somebody always brings flowers. There's an effort to try to. So it doesn't enough to be like a statue. But it is interesting. How communities will will sometimes do that? Because that is their way of honoring. So, but I think you mentioned the economics piece that explains everything that's one of the reasons why it's usually prominent citizens that enjoy that kind of status. The one of his one of the national chains crimes. It was the double murder in Colorado Springs, murdered two families in one night and adjoining houses the, but if you if you go to that community where that happened now the people in that area still remember it still they they could tell ya. Oh, that's a house right there. It's still has not forgotten many places many places where these crimes occurred it was so long ago that it's totally an absolutely forgotten. But in some of them, it's still quite well, remember, I want it. You know, I'm I'm gonna make a sacrifice here because I was really hoping to finish the book before the interview. But I really want to get to the part about how you think you have narrowed down this suspect. So let's let's go through. Let's go through that process. Ninety victims starting in the late nineteenth century going up to the early twentieth. Century of one man, the man on the train does he have a name next on.

Frank Jones murder Hank Horton Valenica Welker Sohn Jay Liska Heather Colorado Springs Velasco Two years
"hank horton" Discussed on KTRH

KTRH

07:31 min | 2 years ago

"hank horton" Discussed on KTRH

"Girl is a member of the family on the morning of June. Ten no one is stirring around in the house. The. And the his brother finally comes and breaks into the house finds a couple of bodies and runs out of the house, grabbing they bring the town marshal, and he is named as Hank Horton. Mr. Horton, courageously goes through the house you have to understand. He has no reason to believe anything other than that. A crazed murderer murderers hiding somewhere in this house as a dark house. He's holding matches in front of him. With no gun no form of protection, holding matches in front of in front of his himself going from room to room finding bodies very eight dead bodies in the house and long house in a small, quiet. Western town, the and all of them hitting the head with an axe the access found as it usually is next to the body of a little girl. The man from the train was a pervert. And he was interested in little little girl. Little girl was usually found in a in an attitude suggesting that she had been. She had been outraged after death the. In any case. The crime was not there was a great uproar as you can imagine. But the crime was not solved. Two years later at conman named Jan Walkerton came to Valenica and realized that he could sustain a phony investigation of the crime by keeping people angry. He can keep donations coming in by keeping people angry. And he did that by accusing a very prominent local citizens Frank Jones of financing the crimes. There isn't any chance in the world of Frank Jones was guilty or that he had any any connection to it. But this campaign to prosecute Frank Jones divided Felicita and a horrible and unprecedented way the city fought over whether or not Jones did it or didn't do it for several years and became came badly divided communities, you know, families on one side of the line wouldn't play with families on the other side of the line. They wouldn't go to they wouldn't shop at their stores. They wouldn't wouldn't have anything to do with them that this battle lasted ballista for even though. Roxanne was eventually run out of town in nineteen seventeen. The the battle went on for a long time and the hard feelings emanating from it. Persist in the city. I I would say to an extent that they persist to the present day. You mentioned the piece about the. The person in whipping up sentiment in making a false accusation to profit from it. And even that creates a pattern for all. Too often. How crime stories unsolved crime stories are treated yet at the same time. It it speaks to the fact that there weren't cold-case police officers working the the crime still the crimes of that time might have been solved by after that period of time by somebody writing a letter confessing or somebody knowing somebody that wasn't it went to almost literally like fall in their lap, which again comes back to the the power of storytelling and how key but just by keeping by telling a story the beginning middle and end of these events. It doesn't matter. How old the story is is that it will get people to listen again and to reconsider again and most likely to connect again to that sense of outrage about what had happened. And so, you know, a static police report. Won't necessarily anger people. But when you start telling the story again people's fulfilling. Yeah. Yeah. That's right. And and that's but also keeps kind of the idea of the murder alive. It makes it it gives you a sensation. Again, that is the core of sensationalism. But it does it makes it sorta make you feel it again, the fact that this crime in happened had they had they built a, you know, any kind of memorial to the family had there been any Heather been what had the town done to try to come to grips with the fact that this murder had happened prior to even this convent and coming to town or afterward. The well there was I don't know that there was that kind of Santa. But I don't know that anyone built a memorial to them. For many years of Alaska. Assorted. And I would say this is still true today that the chamber of commerce types types in Velasco wished to ballista was known for something else. Right. Right. The at there is a the house where the crime occurred is still standing and is operated as a kind of of tourism. It's it's shows up on paranormal TV shows and people pay to take tours of the house the, but if you drive around Liska, there's no sign anywhere that says where the house is that we assign saying where the doctor's house has. But that, but the what list is known for is not mentioned anywhere. The that's not an appropriate. I it goes without saying that that's not an appropriate memorial. Right. The. I don't know that you raise an interesting question. I don't know that in any of these cases there was a proper memorial to the victims victims were mostly poor people mostly people without. Without one in the more family was very well liked. They and the community thought well of them and the vigorous efforts to solve the crime were kind of memorial to them. But I don't think there was any physical memorial to, you know, sometimes it's just a place where somebody always brings flowers. There's an effort to try to. So it doesn't enough to be like a statue. But it is interesting. How communities will will sometimes do that? Because that is their way of honoring. So, but I think you mentioned the economics piece that explains everything, you know, that that's one of the reasons why it's usually prominent citizens that enjoy that kind of status. The one of his one of the national chains. Crimes the double murder in Colorado Springs, emerged to families in one night and adjoining houses the, but if you if you go to that community where that happened. Now, the people in that area is still remember it. It's still they they could tell ya. Oh, that's a house right there. It's still it has not forgotten many.

Frank Jones murder ballista Hank Horton Jan Walkerton Alaska Roxanne Colorado Springs Valenica Velasco Santa Heather Liska Two years
"hank horton" Discussed on News Radio 1190 KEX

News Radio 1190 KEX

16:52 min | 2 years ago

"hank horton" Discussed on News Radio 1190 KEX

"Bill James works for the advisers. The Boston Red Sox. And and so it is that he spends a lot of his time in the sports world leaders is talking before the top of the hour about the difference between being that sort of positive place with very positive energy around people involved doing positive community things and writing the from the train because he likes to write about crime. So do you want to finish that? You're you're fading out. The and I was not able to hear a lot of them. I'm fading out. No can have that. I was just saying that you were presenting a dichotomy of working in the sports world in by day and writing crime at night. Yeah. The guy was saying that crime stories are fascinating too. It's because they they come from the parts of ourselves that we don't like to talk about. And don't normally talk about in the specific case of the man the train. I didn't make a deliberate and thoughtful entry into the subject, I just got hooked like a fish. I was I was I saw documentary about the murders. Invalid sky called living with a mystery. It's an extremely well done. Documentary and far above the normal levels of crime documentary. I was interested in it. And it was clear that there was a part of the story that was missing which is that it's relatively obvious that the bliscoll murders are a part of a series. So I started. I was just going to put an hour into into trying to learn more about the series. But the the hour became a week and the week eventually became five or six years. They I didn't I didn't decide to get into it. I just wandered into. It shows you. Do you consider this a true crime book? Sure. Yes. It is. You know? And that's the interesting piece too. Is that true crime? The tradition for true crime is I discovered in my research goes all the way back to execution sermons. Right. Sort of shares a similar DNA with American journalism. Except that in the case of true crime. You know, it was the it was the preachers. It was the circuit riding preachers. The ministers that would come to these towns in on the day of somebody's execution, and they would do a sermon just before the execution that would try to provide the context for why this person was being executed in why the community overall would benefit from his or her death, and it became an important part of trying to understand executions in America. And and this is where when the preachers decided there they used to just print up their sermons and people would snap them up. And then he thought well heck this I'll just sell it for a nickel. And so they started to sell their execution sermons, and then they would get passed around and these became some of the early bestselling true crime narratives, it it fulfills the same function is what you're doing in in the man from the train. You're trying to bring in even though. Which one hundred plus years later, in some cases, you're trying to bring a kind of a kind of healing. Anyway, not that anybody's still alive that was directly involved, but for these communities, maybe this this lingering sense of some tragedy that had happened. Maybe some closure. An exactly what happened to their town. And how their town was involved or not involved in the deaths of of somebody that at one point. You know, we're popular members of the community. The. That happened just a few weeks ago. I actually got a letter from a man in London England who was a a his great great aunt had been was one of the victims of the crime interesting always believed that the man who was accused of her murder and was locked up without any evidence for two years before he was released as he always believed that he had gotten away with it. And he said it reading it in my book that in our book that it wasn't. That was not actually what had happened was just a tremendous relief to him. That was a shock to me. I hadn't thought about. But it was it was a shy. You said he was just tremendously relieved to realize that it was just a random crime. And that this man hadn't actually that madman hadn't actually gotten away with this other fellow, and I don't know why it was important to him. Well, I I understand. Understanding the sense. It was important to to know what had happened. But you know, one guy getting away with it or another guy getting away with it. I'm punished I I don't know that there's a lot of difference. But he's still have that reaction to it. Yeah. Go ahead. Please. No, the book book is about is is all all books. All good books are search for understanding. A lot of the book is is trying to get people to understand the America in which these crimes occurred Baker two hundred years ago and. I grew up in a small town very much like the crimes that these that these murders occurred in and I grew up in them fifty sixty years ago. So it's sorta equidistant from me and them, and that's one reason that the story was powerful to me. But I am trying to get people to understand what what the criminal Justice system was like how fantastically primitive. It was the what how people lived that. They they lived rich meaningful lies. People in urban areas today think of people who lived in small towns a hundred years ago or often think of people who lived in a hundred years ago. I was living these boring lies which nothing ever happened. All of the things that happened to you and me and people in our lives happened to people in small towns. I mean, they got married they fell in love and got married, and they got divorced, and they started careers and got promoted and got fired they moved and they went on long trips and brought back souvenirs, they they had entertainment. So they went to literally every night all of the things that that happened to happen to us happened to them, and I was trying to create a picture. Unfortunately, it is a picture of their death. So that's a terrible picture because they died terrible deaths, but also trying to create a picture of how they live, and and and give the reader an understanding of what it was like to be an American in a small town years ago. I think he did that very effectively. In fact, I think that's one of the interesting things about true crime in general is that the the focus can be on things which re Rian Vert the inverted pyramid of journalism, and you can spend a lot more time on the things which are less important to telling the story in proper journalism. You can spend a lot more time talking about the atmosphere of a town or the the things that people eight or the way that houses were constructed or communities were laid out you can you can do that in and it brings a fresh context to these murders, you know, as opposed to the traditional way that that crimes are covered in in straight storytelling in journalism context. That's what I really like what you were doing especially when you're getting into the fabric of of these communities. What is that always sticks? With me to the point. You were just making that has to do with the the soccer in the case of soccer fans. Eddie. One of them. I think it was Sako. Had an alibi for the time of one of the crimes what are the crimes committed on December twenty four th of I think one thousand nine hundred ninety nine hundred eighteen and he had a. He had witnesses who said that on that particular date. He was delivering a to his neighbors in Italian community a pickled deals because pickled eels were a delicacy that were eating on Christmas day. And there was there was. But there was conflict testimony that said, no, no, no that couldn't have been done under Semper twenty-fourth because you never by the pickle deals on December on Christmas Eve, you have to buy them on December twenty second or something. So that you have time to prepare them and put them in on on ice for a couple of days before you eat them the. It's a it's a tiny detail that you would never survive. I mean, you would never know that that was true of Italian as the way that the talian American communities live two hundred years ago, except that it's important in a crime story. That's why crime stories are there are these little there's a flash of light. That eliminates the details of of something that would otherwise be totally forgotten. I think that brings us very effectively to ballista Iowa, and the the crime story, which as you pointed out earlier is the one that starts to to give away. The communities are already catching on at this point to the fact that there's a killer on the railways take us take us through what happened invalid. On the night of June nine one thousand nine hundred twelve. The lights were out in Felicita due to a a dispute between the Liska city council and the power company, so they had city lights and streetlights, but they were out and and the town was in complete darkness Sunday night. There was a church service. A Sunday night church service organized by one of the victims. The woman who is the head of the house after the. After this service. I didn't get into this in the book. But I think it's true. I don't believe the murders would ever have happened when they did had the lights been on. And the reason that was true is that he had committed another atrocity just six days earlier about a hundred miles away. And he normally would not have. Had another outrage that quickly, but because the lights the city was plunged into darkness. It was a perfect opportunity for him. And he couldn't pass it up anyway, re two little girls named Anna Lena, still injure went home with a more family, the family of Henry Moore, they walked home after the church service, and and the little girl spent the night with their friends. The little girl is a member of the family on the morning of June. Ten they'll wanna starting around in the house. The and the his brother finally comes and breaks into the house finds a couple of bodies and runs out of the house scraping. They bring the town marshal. And he is neighbors. Hank horton. Mr. Horton, courageously goes through the house. You have to understand. He has no reason to believe anything other than. Than that crazed murderers hiding somewhere in this house it as a dark house he's holding matches in front of him. With no gun, no form, former protection holding matches in front of in front of his himself going from room to room finding bodies very eight dead bodies in the house house in a small, quiet. Western town, the and all of them hitting the head with an axe. The axe is found as it usually is next to the body of a little girl. The man from the train was a pervert. And he was interested in little little girl. Little girl was usually found in a in an attitude suggesting that she had been. She had been outraged after death the. In any case. The crime was not there was a great uproar as you can imagine. But the crime was not solved. Two years later at conman named Jay Walker som came to Valenica and realized that he could sustain a phony investigation of the crime by keeping people angry. He could keep donations coming in by keeping people angry, and he did that by accusing a very prominent local citizen Frank Jones of financially the crimes. There isn't any chance in the world of Frank Jones was guilty or that he had any any connection to it. But this campaign to prosecute Frank Jones divided Felicita and a horrible and unprecedented way the city fought over whether or not Jones did it or didn't do it for several years and became came badly divided community, you know, families on one side of the line wouldn't play with families on the other side of the line. They wouldn't go they wouldn't shop at their stores. They wouldn't wouldn't have anything to do with them that this battle lasted Valenica for even though. Walkerton was eventually run out of town in nineteen seventeen. The the battle went on for a long time and the hard feelings emanating from it. Process in the city. I would I would say to an extent that they persist to the present day. You know, you mentioned the piece about the. The person in whipping up sentiment and making a false accusation to profit from it. And even that creates a pattern for all. Too often. How crime stories unsolved crime stories are treated yet at the same time. It speaks to the fact that there weren't cold-case police officers working the the crime still the crimes of that time might have been solved by after that period of time by somebody writing a letter confessing or somebody knowing somebody that wasn't it went to almost literally like fall in their lap, which again comes back to the the power of storytelling and how key but just by keeping by telling a story the beginning middle and end of these events. It doesn't matter. How old the story is is that it will get people to listen again to reconsider again and most likely to connect again to that sense of outrage about what had happened. And so a static police report. Won't necessarily anger people. But when you start telling the story again people start feeling, yeah. Yeah. That's right. And and that's but also keeps kind of the idea of the murder alive. It makes it it gives you a sensation. Again, that is the core of since anal ISM. But it does it makes it sorta make you feel it again, the fact that this crime in happened had they had they built a, you know, any kind of memorial to the family had there been any had there been what had the town done to try to come to grips with the fact that this murder had happened prior to even this conmen coming to town or afterward. The well there was I don't know that there was that kind of Santa. But I don't know that anyone built a memorial to them. For many years of Alaska. Authorities and I would say this is still true today that peop- the the chamber of commerce types in Velasco wished to ballista was known for something else. Right, right..

murder America Boston Red Sox ballista Bill James Frank Jones Felicita soccer Sako Alaska Hank horton England Rian Vert Jay Walker Valenica Iowa Santa
"hank horton" Discussed on KGO 810

KGO 810

07:31 min | 2 years ago

"hank horton" Discussed on KGO 810

"A member of the family on the morning of June. Ten no one is stirring around in the house. The. And the his brother finally comes at breaks into the house finds a couple of bodies and runs out of the house scraping. They bring the town marshal. And he is neighbors. Hank horton. Mr. Horton, courageously goes through the house. You have to understand. He has no reason to believe anything other than that. A crazed murderer is hiding somewhere in this house. There's a dark house he's holding matches in front of him. With no gun. No, former protection holding matches in front of in front of his himself going from room to room finding bodies. There are eight dead bodies in the house and long towel in a small quiet, but western town, the and all of them hitting the head with an axe the access found as it usually is next to the body of a little girl. The man from the train was a pervert. And he was in in little little girl. Little girl was usually found in a in an attitude suggesting that she had been. She had been outraged after death the. In any case. The crime was not there was a great uproar as you can imagine. But the crime was not solved. Two years later. Conman named Jay Walker Sohn came to Alaska and realized that he could sustain a phony investigation of the crime by keeping people angry. He could keep donations coming in by keeping people angry. And he did that by accusing a very prominent local citizen. Frank Jones of financing the crimes. There isn't any chance in the world of Frank Jones was guilty or that he had any any connection to it. But this campaign to prosecute Frank Jones divided Felicita and a horrible and unprecedented way the city fought over whether or not Jones did it or didn't do it for several years and became Kepa badly divided community, you know, families on one side of the line wouldn't play with families on the other side of the line. They wouldn't go to they wouldn't shop at their stores. They wouldn't wouldn't have anything to do with them that this battle lasted Liska for even though. Wilkerson was eventually run out of town in nineteen seventeen. The the battle went on for a long time and the hard feelings emanating from it. Persisted in the city. I would I would say to an extent that they persist to the present day. You mentioned the that piece about the. The person whipping up sentiment and making a false accusation to profit from it. And even that creates a pattern for all. Too often. How crime stories unsolved crime stories are treated yet at the same time. It it speaks to the fact that there weren't cold-case police officers working the crime still the crimes of that time might have been solved by after that period of time by somebody writing a letter confessing somebody knowing somebody that wasn't it went to almost literally like fall in their lap, which again comes back to the the power of storytelling and how key but just by keeping by telling a story the beginning middle and end of these events. It doesn't matter. How old the story is is that it will get people to listen again and to reconsider again and most likely to connect again to that sense of outrage about what had happened. And so, you know, a static police report. Won't necessarily anger people. But when you start telling the story again, people are feeling, yeah. Yeah. That's right. And and that's but also keeps kind of the idea of the murder alive. It makes it it gives you a sensation. Again, that is the core of sensationalism. But it does it makes you feel it again, the fact that this crime happened had they had they built a, you know, any kind of memorial to the family had there been any had there been what had the town done to try to come to grips with the fact that this murder had happened prior to even this conmen coming to town or afterward. The well there was I don't know that there was that kind of Santa bat. I don't know that anyone built a memorial to them. For many years of Alaska. And I would say this is still true today. The peop- the chamber of commerce types types, invalids go wished to ballista was known for something else. Right, right. The there is a house where the crime occurred is still standing and is operated as a kind of of tourism. It's it's shows up on paranormal TV shows and people pay to take tours of the house the, but if you drive around the Liska, there's no sign anywhere that says where the house is or you know, that we have signed saying where the doctors houses, but the, but where the what ballistic is known for is not mentioned anywhere. The that's not an appropriate. I it goes without saying that that's not an appropriate memorial. Right. The I don't know that it you raise an interesting question. Don't know that in any of these cases, there was a proper memorial to the victims victims were mostly poor people mostly people without. Without the more family was very well liked. They and the community. Thought well of them and the vigorous efforts to solve the crime were kind of memorial to them. But I don't think there was any physical memorial to them. Sometimes it's just a place where somebody always brings flowers. There's an effort to try to. So it doesn't even have to be like a statue. But it is interesting. How communities will will sometimes do that? Because that is their way of honoring. But I think you mentioned the economics piece that explains everything that that's one of the reasons it's usually prominent citizens that enjoy that kind of status. The one of his one of the national chains crimes. The double murder in Colorado Springs. It murdered two families in one night and adjoining houses the, but if you if you go to that community where that happened. Now, the people in that area is still remember it and yet still they they could tell ya. Oh, that's that house right there. It's still it has not forgotten many.

murder Frank Jones Alaska Hank horton Liska Jay Walker Sohn Wilkerson Colorado Springs ballista Santa Two years
"hank horton" Discussed on 600 WREC

600 WREC

17:03 min | 2 years ago

"hank horton" Discussed on 600 WREC

"R, E C and ninety two point one FM. Bill James works for the vises. The Boston Red Sox. And so it is that he spends a lot of his time in the sports world leaned was talking before the top of the hour about the difference between being that sort of positive place with very positive energy around people involved doing positive community things and writing them from the train because he likes to write about crime. So do you want to finish that? You're you're fading out. The and I was not able to hear a lot of them. I'm fading out. No can have that was just saying that you were presenting a dichotomy of working in the sports world by day and writing crime at night. Yeah. The saying that crime stories are fascinating too. It's because they they come from the parts of ourselves that we don't like to talk about and going on my talk about in the specific case of the man the train. I didn't make a deliberate and thoughtful entry into the subject, I just got up like a fish. I was I was I saw a documentary about the murders in blue sky called living with a mystery. It's an extremely well done documentary and far above normal levels of crime documentary. I was interested in it. And it was clear that there was a part of the story that was missing which is that it's relatively obvious that the bullets murders are a part of a series. So I started going to put an hour into into trying to learn more about the series. But the the hour became a week and the week eventually became. Five or six years. So I didn't I didn't decide to get into it. I just wandered into it. It shows you. Do you consider this a true crime book? Sure. Yes. It is. Yeah. You know? And that's the interesting piece too. Is that true crime? The tradition for true. Crime is discovered in my research goes all the way back to execution sermons. Right. Sort of shares a similar DNA with American journalism. Except that indicates of true crime. You know, it was the it was the preachers. It was the circuit writing preachers, the ministers that would come to these towns on the day of somebody's execution, and they would do a sermon just before the execution that would try to provide the context for why this person was being executed in wide the community overall would benefit from his or her death, and it became an important part of trying to understand executions in America. And and this is where when the preachers decided they used to just print up their sermons and people would snap them up. And then he thought well this to sell it for a nickel. And so they started to sell their execution sermons. And then they will get passed around these became some of the early bestselling true crime narratives, it it fulfills the same function is what you're doing in in the man from the train. You're trying to bring in even though. Which a hundred plus years later, in some cases, you're trying to bring a kind of a kind of healing. Anyway, not that anybody's still alive that was directly involved, but for these communities, maybe this this lingering sense of some tragedy that had happened. Maybe some closure. An exactly what happened to their town. And how their town was involved or not involved in in the deaths of of somebody that one point, you know, we're popular members of the community. Faded happened. Just a few weeks ago. I actually got a letter from a man in London England who was a a great great and had been was one of the victims of the crime interest. He had always believed that the man who was accused of her murder and was locked up without any evidence for two years before he was released. He always believed that he had gotten away with it. And he said that reading it in my book that in our book that it wasn't. That was not actually what had happened was just a tremendous relief to him. That was a shock to me. I hadn't thought about that. But it was it was a shot. He said he was just tremendously relieved to realize that it was just a random crime. And that this man hadn't actually that madman hadn't actually gotten away with it was this other fellow. And I don't know why it was important to him. I understand. Understanding the sense. It was important to to know what had happened, but you know, one guy getting away with it or another guy getting away with it. Unpunished, I don't know that there's a lot of difference. But he's still did have that reaction to it. Yeah. Go ahead. No, please. No of the book. Book is about is is all all books. All good books are search for understanding a lot of the book is is trying to get people to understand the America in which crimes occurred Baker two hundred years ago and. I grew up in a small town very much like the crimes that these that these murders occurred in and I grew up in fifty sixty years ago. So it's sorta equidistant from me and them, and that's one reason that the story was powerful to me. But I am trying to get people to understand what what the criminal Justice system is like how fantastically primitive. It was the what how people lived. They lived rich meaningful lives. People in urban areas today think of people who lived in small towns one hundred years ago or often think of people who lived in small towns two hundred years ago. I was living these boring lies in which nothing ever happened. All of the things that happen to you and million people in our lives happened to people in small towns. I mean, they they got married they fell in love and got married, and they got divorced, and they started careers and got promoted and got fired and they moved and they went on long trips and brought back souvenirs, they they had entertainment. So they went to literally every night all of the things that that happened to happen to us happened to them, and I was trying to create a a picture. Unfortunately, it is a picture of their deaths. So that's a terrible picture because they died terrible deaths, but also is trying to create a picture of how they live and and and give the reader. An understanding of what it was like to be an American in a small town. Hundred years ago. Did that very effectively? In fact, I think that's one of the interesting things about true crime in general is that the the focus can be on things which. Rian Vert the inverted pyramid of journalism. And you can spend a lot more time on the things which are less important to telling the story in proper journalism. You can spend a lot more time talking about the atmosphere of a town or the the things that people eight or the way that houses were constructed or communities were laid out you can you can do that. And it brings a fresh context to these murders. You know, as opposed to the traditional way that that crimes are covered in in straight storytelling in journalism context. I that's what I really like what you were doing especially when you're getting into the fabric of of these communities. What is it that always sticks with me that straight the point you were just making and that has to do with the soccer in the cases, SoKo invented daddy? One of them. I think it was. Doc, oh had an alibi for the time of one of the crimes. What are the crimes was committed on December twenty four th of I think nineteen nineteen or nineteen eighteen and he had a. He had witnesses who said that on that particular date. He was delivering a to his neighbors in an Italian community a Khalil. Heels because tickled eels were a delicacy that were eating on Christmas day. And there were there was, but there was conflicting testimony that said, no, no, no that couldn't have been done on December twenty four th because you never by the pickle deals on December on Christmas Eve, you have to buy them on December twenty second or something. So that you have time to prepare them and put them in on an ice couple of days before you eat them the. It's a it's a tiny detail that you would never survive. I mean, you would never know that that was true of Italian as a way that talion American communities live two hundred years ago, except that it's important in a crime story. That's why crime stories are these little. There's a flash of light that illuminates the details of of. Something that would otherwise be totally forgotten. I think that brings us very effectively to Iowa and the the crime story, which as you pointed out earlier is the one that starts to to give away. The communities are already catching on at this point to the fact that there's a killer on the railways take us take us through what happened invalid. On the night of June nine one thousand nine hundred twelve. The lights were out in Felicita due to a a dispute between the Velasco city council and the power company, so they had city lights and streetlights, but they were out and and the town was in complete darkness this Sunday night. There was a church service. I a Sunday night church service organized by one of the victims. The woman who was the head of the house after the. After this survey, I didn't get into this in the book. But I think it's true. I don't believe murderers would ever have happened when they did had the lights been on. And the reason that was true is that he had committed another atrocity your six days earlier about a hundred miles away. And he normally would not have had another outrage that quickly, but because the lights the city was plunged into darkness. It was a perfect opportunity for him. And he couldn't pass it up anyway, re two little girls named Anna Lena, still injure went home with a more family, the family of Henry Moore, they walked home after the church service, and and the little girl spent the night with their friends. The little girl is a member of the family on the morning of June. Ten no one is stirring around in the house, the uh. And the his brother finally comes and breaks into the house finds a couple of bodies and runs out of the house scraping. They bring the town marshal. And he is neighbors. Hank Horton, Horton courageously goes through the house. You have to understand. He has no reason to believe anything other than that. A crazed murderer is hiding somewhere in this house. It is a dark house. He's holding matches in front of him. With no gun to no form of protection. Olding matches in front of a friend of his himself going from room to room finding bodies very eight dead bodies in the house and long towels in a small quiet, but western town, the and all of them hitting the head with an axe the access found as it usually is next to the body of a little girl. The match the train was a pervert. And he was interested in little little girl. Little girl was usually found in a in an attitude suggesting that she had been. She had been outraged after death the. In any case. The crime was not there was a great uproar as you can imagine. But the crime was not solved. Two years later at conman named Jay in Walkerton came to Valenica and realized that he could sustain a phony investigation of the crime by keeping people angry. He can keep donations coming in by keeping people angry. And he did that by accusing a very prominent local citizen. Frank Jones of financing the crimes. There isn't any chance in the world of Frank Jones was guilty or that he had any any connection to it. But this campaign to prosecute Frank Jones divided fullest and a horrible and unprecedented way the city fought over whether or not Jones did it or didn't do it for several years and became badly divided community, you know, families on one side of the line wouldn't play with families on the other side of the line. They wouldn't go they wouldn't shop at their stores. They wouldn't wouldn't have anything to do with them that this battle lasted Liska for even though. Wilkerson was eventually run out of town in nineteen seventeen. The the battle went on for a long time and the hard feelings emanating from it. Persist in the city. I I would say to an extent that they persist to the present day. You mentioned the piece about the the person whipping up sentiment and making a false accusation to profit from it. And even that creates a pattern for all. Too often. How crime stories unsolved crime stories are treated yet at the same time. It it speaks to the fact that there weren't cold-case police officers working the crime still the crimes of that time might have been solved by after that period of time by somebody writing a letter confessing somebody knowing somebody that wasn't it went to almost literally like fall in their lap, which again comes back to the the power of storytelling and how key but just by keeping by telling a story the beginning middle and end of these events. It doesn't matter. How old the story is is that it will get people to listen again and to reconsider again and most likely to connect again to that sense of outrage about what had happened. And so a static police report. Won't necessarily anger people. But when you start telling the story again, people are feeling, yeah. Yeah. That's right. And and that's but also keeps kind of the idea of the murder alive. It makes it it gives you a sensation. Again, that is you know, the core of sensationalism. But it does it makes it make you feel it again, the fact that this crime in happened had they had they built a, you know, any kind of memorial to the family had there been any Heather been what had the town done to try to come to grips with the fact that this murder had happened prior to even this conmen coming to town or afterward. The well there was I don't know that there was that kind of sentiment. I don't know that anyone built a memorial to them. For many years, the Liska authorities, and I would say this is still true today that peop- the the chamber of commerce types types in Velasco wish to ballista was known for something else. Right, right..

murder America Boston Red Sox Bill James Liska Frank Jones soccer England Iowa Rian Vert Heather Velasco city council Felicita Anna Lena Velasco Baker Hank Horton
"hank horton" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

WIBC 93.1FM

17:07 min | 2 years ago

"hank horton" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

"Say, the keyword free bottle. Bill James works for the vises the Boston Red Sox. And so it is that he spends a lot of his time in the sports world. Lingers is talking before the top of the hour, but the difference between being in that sort of positive place with very positive energy around people involved doing positive community things and writing them from the train because he likes to write about crime. So do you want to finish that? You're you're painting out the and I was not able to hear a lot of them. I'm fading out. No can have that just saying that you were presenting the sort of a dichotomy of working in the sports world by day and writing crime at night. Yeah. I was saying that crime stories are fascinating too. Because they they come from the parts of ourselves. So we don't like to talk about and dog on my talk about in the specific case of the man the train. I didn't make a deliberate and thoughtful entry into the subject, I just got like a fish. I was I was I saw documentary about the murders. Envelopes guy called Velasco living with a mystery. It's an extremely well done documentary far above them, mama levels of crime documentary. I was interested in it. And it was clear that there was a part of the story that was missing which is that it's relatively obvious that the bliscoll murders are apart of a series. So I started I was just going to put an hour into into trying to learn more about the series. But the the hour became a week and the week of actually became five. Five or six years. I didn't I didn't decide to get into it. I just wandered into. It shows you. You can do you consider this a true crime book? Sure. Yes. It is. And that's the interesting piece too. Is that true crime? The tradition for true. Crime is discovered in my research goes all the way back to execution sermons. Right. Sort of shares a similar DNA with American journalism. Except that in the case of true crime. It was the it was the preachers was the circuit riding preachers. The ministers that would come to these towns in on the day of somebody's execution, and they would do a sermon just before the execution that would try to provide the context for why this person was being executed in the community overall would benefit from his or her death. And became an important part of trying to understand executions in America. And and this is where when the preachers decided there they used to just print up their sermons and people would snap them up. And then he thought well, heck, I'll just sell it for a nickel. And so they started to sell their execution sermons, and then they will get passed around and these became some of the early bestselling true crime narratives, it fulfills the same function is what you're doing in in the man from the train you're trying to bring in even though it's a hundred plus years later, in some cases, you're trying to bring a kind of a kind of healing. Anyway, not that anybody's still alive that was directly involved, but for these communities, maybe this this lingering sense of some tragedy that had happened. Maybe some closure. An exactly what happened to their town. And how their town was involved or not involved in the deaths of of somebody that at one point. You know, we're popular members of the community. The. That happened just a few weeks ago. I actually got a letter from a man in London England who was a a his great great aunt had been was one of the victims of the crime interest. Here at always believed that the man who was accused of her murder and was locked up without any evidence for two years before he was released as he always believed that he had gotten away with it. And he said that reading it in my book that in our book that it wasn't. That was not actually what had happened was just a tremendous relief to him. That was a shock to me. I hadn't thought about. It was it was a shot. He said he was just tremendously relieved to realize that it was just a random crime. And that this man had actually that madman haven't actually gotten away with this other fellow, and I don't know why it was important to him. Who I understand? It was important to to know what had happened, but you know, one guy getting away with it or another guy getting away with it. Unpunished, I've I've I don't know that there's a lot of difference. But he's still have that reaction to. Go ahead. Please. No. A lot of the book book is about is is all all books. All good books are search for understanding a lot of the book is is trying to get people to understand the America in which these crimes occurred they could a hundred years ago, and I grew up in a small town very much like the crimes that these that these murders occurred in and I grew up in fifty sixty years ago. So it's sorta equidistant from me and them, and that's one reason that the story was powerful to me. But I am trying to get people to understand what what the criminal Justice system is like how fantastically primitive. It was. What how people lived that? They they lived rich meaningful lives. People in urban areas today think of people who lived in small towns a hundred years ago or often take people who lived in small towns a hundred years ago, living he's boring lives, which nothing ever happened. All of the things that happened to you and million people in our lives happen to people in small towns. I mean, they got married they fell in love and got married, and they got divorced, and they started careers and got promoted and got fired they moved and they went on long trips and brought back souvenirs, they they had entertainment. So they went to literally every night all of the things that that happened to happen to us happened to them. And I was trying to create a a picture. Unfortunately, it is a picture of their death. So that's a terrible picture because they died terrible deaths. But also is trying to create a picture of how they live and and and give the reader. An understanding of what it was like to be an American in a small town years ago. I think he did that very effectively. In fact, I think that's one of the interesting things about true crime in general is that the the focus can be on things which Rian Vert the inverted pyramid of journalism, and you can spend a lot more time on the things which are less important to telling the story in proper journalism. You can spend a lot more time talking about the atmosphere of town or the the things that people eight or the way that houses were constructed or communities were laid out you can you can do that. And it brings a fresh context to these murders as opposed to the traditional way that the crimes are covered in in straight storytelling in journalism context. That's what I really like what you were doing especially when you were getting into the fabric of of these communities. What is it always sticks with me to the point you were just making and that has to do with the the taco in the case asako invent Zeti? One of them. I think it was SoKo. Had an alibi for the time of one of the crimes one of the crimes committed on December twenty four th of I think nineteen nineteen or nineteen eighteen and he had a. He had witnesses who said that on that particular date. He was delivering a to his neighbors in Italian community a pickled eels because tickled eels were a delicacy that were eating on Christmas day. And there were there was, but there was conflict testimony that said, no, no, no that couldn't have been done under similar twenty four th because you never by the pickle deals on December on Christmas Eve, you have to buy them on December twenty second or something. So that you have time to prepare them and put them in on on ice wreck. Couple of days before you eat them the. It's a tiny detail that you would never survive. I mean, you would never know that that was true of Italian talian American communities live two hundred years ago, except that it's important in a crime story. That's why crime stories are these little. There's a flash of light that illuminates the details of. Something that would otherwise be totally forgotten. I think that brings us very effectively to Iowa and the the crime story, which the as you pointed out earlier is the one that starts to to give away. The communities are already catching on at this point to the fact that there's a killer on the railways take us take us through what happened invalid. On the night of June nine one thousand nine hundred twelve. The lights were out in politica. Due to a dispute between the Velasco city council and the power company, so they had city lights and street lights, but they were out and the town was in complete darkness this Sunday night. That was a church service. I Sunday night church service organized by one of the victims have the woman who was the head of the house after the. After the service. I didn't get into this in the book. But I think it's true. I don't believe the murders would ever have happened when they did had the lights been on. And the reason that was true is that he had committed another atrocity just six days earlier about a hundred miles away. And he normally would not have. Had another outrage that quickly, but because the lights the city was plunged into darkness. It was a perfect opportunity for him. And he couldn't pass it up anyway, re two little girls named Anna Lena, still injure went home with a more family, the family of Henry Moore, they walked home after the church service, and and the little girl spent the night with their friends. The little girl is a member of the family on the morning of June ten is stirring around in the house. The and the his brother finally comes it breaks into the house finds a couple of bodies and runs out of the house scraping. They bring the town marshal. And he his name was Hank Horton, Horton courageously goes through the house. You have to understand. He has no reason to believe anything other than. Than that. A crazed murderer is hiding somewhere in this house. He as dark house he's holding matches in front of him. With no gun to know, former protection holding matches in front of in front of his himself going from room to room finding bodies there are eight dead bodies in the house and long towels in a small quiet, but western town, the and all of them hitting the head with an axe the access found as it usually is next to the body of a little girl. The man from the train was a pervert. And he was instead in little little girl. Little girl was usually found in a in an attitude suggesting that she had been. She had been outraged after death the. In any case. The crime was not there was a great uproar as you can imagine. But the crime was not solved. Two years later. A conman named Jay in Walkerton came to Valenica and realized that he could sustain a phony investigation of the crime by keeping people angry. He could keep donations coming in by keeping people angry. And he did that by accusing a very prominent local citizen. Frank Jones of financing the crimes. There isn't any chance in the world of Frank Jones was guilty or that he had any any connection to it. But this campaign to prosecute Frank Jones divided Felicita and a horrible and unprecedented way the city fought over whether or not Jones did it or didn't do it for several years and became a badly divided community, you know, families on one side of the line wouldn't play with families on the other side of the line. They wouldn't go they wouldn't shop at their stores. They wouldn't wouldn't have anything to do with them. This battle lasted Valenica for even though. Welcome STAN was eventually run out of town in nineteen seventeen. The the battle went on for a long time and the hard feelings emanating from it. Persist in the city. I I would say to an extent that they persist to the present day. You mentioned the piece about the the person whipping up sentiment in making a false accusation to profit from it. And even that creates a pattern for all. Too often. How crime stories unsolved crime stories are treated yet at the same time. It it speaks to the fact that there weren't cold-case police officers working the crime still the crimes at that time might have been solved by after that period of time by somebody writing a letter confessing or somebody knowing somebody that wasn't it went to almost literally like fall in their lap, which again comes back to the the power of storytelling and how key but just by keeping by telling a story the beginning middle and end of these events. It doesn't matter. How old the story is is that it will get people to listen again and to reconsider again and most likely to connect again to that sense of outrage about what had happened. And so a static police report. Won't necessarily anger people. But when you start telling the story again people's revealing. Yeah. Yeah, that's right. And and that's but also keeps kind of the idea of the murder alive. It makes it it gives you a sensation. Again, that is the core of sensationalism. But it does it makes make you feel it again, the fact that this crime in happened had they had they built a any kind of memorial to the family had there been any had there been what had the town done to try to come to grips with the fact that this murder had happened prior to even this conmen coming to town or afterward. The. Well, there was I don't know that there was that kind of sad about I don't know that anyone built a memorial to them. For many years of Alaska. Authorities and I would say this is still true today that people the the chamber of commerce types types in Velasco wish to ballista was known for something else. Right..

murder Velasco America Bill James Frank Jones Boston Red Sox Alaska Velasco city council England Iowa Rian Vert Valenica politica Anna Lena ballista Hank Horton STAN
"hank horton" Discussed on KTOK

KTOK

13:36 min | 2 years ago

"hank horton" Discussed on KTOK

"You listened the more, you know, NewsRadio one thousand KT. Okay. Oklahoma's first news. Bill James works for the advisers the Boston Red Sox. And so it is that he spends a lot of his time in the sports world leaned was talking before the top of the hour, but the difference between being in that sort of positive place with very positive energy around people involved doing positive community things and writing from the train because he likes to write about crime. So do you want to finish that? You're you're fading out. The and I was not able to hear a lot of them. I'm fading out. No can have that. I was just saying that you were presenting a dichotomy of working in the sports world by day and writing crime at night. Yeah. The was saying that crime stories are fascinating to us because they they come from the parts of ourselves. So we don't like to talk about. And don't normally talk about in the specific case of the man the train. I didn't make a deliberate and thoughtful entry into the subject, I just got hooked like a fish. I was I was I saw documentary about the murders. Envelopes guy called bliscoll living with a mystery. It's an extremely well done documentary and far above them, mama levels of crime documentary. I was interested in it. And it was clear that there was a part of the story that was missing which is that it's relatively obvious that the bliscoll murders are apart of a series. So I started going to put an hour into into trying to learn more about the series. But the the hour became we can can the week eventually became. Five or six years. They I didn't I didn't decide to get into it. I just wandered into it. It shows you. Do you consider this a true crime book? Sure. Yes. It is. Yeah. You know? And that's the interesting piece too. Is that true crime? The tradition for true. Crime is discovered in my research goes all the way back to execution sermons. Right. Sort of shares a similar DNA with American journalism. Except that indicates of true crime. It was the it was the preachers who was the circuit riding preachers. The ministers that would come to these towns in on the day of somebody's execution, and they would do a sermon just before the execution that we try to provide the context for why this person was being executed in wide the community overall would benefit from his or her death. It became an important part of trying to understand executions in America. And and this is where when the preachers decided there they used to just print up their sermons and people would snap them up. And then he thought well heck this to sell it for a nickel. And so they started to sell their execution sermons, and then they would get passed around and these became some of the early bestselling true crime narratives, it fulfills the same function is what you're doing in in the man from the train you're trying to bring in even though it's a hundred plus years later, in some cases, you're trying to bring a kind of a kind of healing. Anyway, not that anybody's still alive that was directly involved, but for these communities, maybe this this lingering sense of some tragedy that had happened. Maybe some closure. On an exactly what happened to their town. And how their town was involved or not involved in the deaths of of somebody that at one point. You know, we're popular members of the community. The. There was an interesting that happened just a few weeks ago. I actually got a letter from a man in London England who was a a his great great and had been was one of the victims of the crime interest. Here at always believed that the man who was accused of her murder and was locked up without any evidence for two years before he was released as he always believed that he had gotten away with it. And he said that reading it in my book that in our book that it wasn't. That was not actually what had happened was just a tremendous relief to him. That was a shock to me. I hadn't thought about. But it was it was a shot. You said he was just tremendously relieved to realize that it was just a random crime. And that this man hadn't actually that that man hadn't actually gotten away with it was this other fellow, and I don't know why it was important to him. Who I am? Understand the sense. It was important to have to know what had happened. But you know, one guy getting away with it or another guy getting away with it. I'm punished. I I don't know that there's a lot of difference. But he's still did have that reaction to it. Yeah. Go ahead, please. No lot of the book book is about is is all all books. All good books. Our search for understanding a lot of the book is is trying to get people to understand the America in which crimes occurred. They one hundred years ago, and I grew up in a small town very much like the crimes that these that these murders occurred in and I grew up in fifty sixty years ago. So it's sorta equidistant from me and them, and that's one reason that the story was powerful to me. But I am trying to get people to understand what what the criminal Justice system was like how fantastically primitive. It was the what how people lived that. They they lived rich meaningful lives. People in urban areas today think of people who lived in small towns one hundred years ago or often think of people who lived in small towns a hundred years ago, I was living these boring lives in which nothing ever happened. All of the things that happened to you and me million people in our lives happen to people in small towns. I mean, they got married they fell in love and got married, and they got divorced, and they started careers and got promoted and got fired they moved and they went on long trips and brought back souvenirs, they they had entertainment. So they went to literally every night all of the things that that happened to happen to us happened to them, and I was trying to create a a picture. Unfortunately, it is a picture of their deaths. So that's a terrible picture because they died terrible deaths, but also trying to create a picture of how they live and and and give the reader. An understanding of what it was like to be an American in a small town. Years ago. Did that very effectively? In fact, I think that's one of the interesting things about true crime in general is that the the focus can be on things which. Rian Vert the inverted pyramid of journalism. And you can spend a lot more time on the things which are less important to telling the story in proper journalism. You can spend a lot more time talking about the atmosphere of town or the the things that people eight or the way that houses were constructed or communities were laid out you can you can do that. And it brings a fresh context to these murders. You know, as opposed to the traditional way that that crimes are covered in in straight storytelling in journalism context. That's what I really like what you were doing especially when you're getting into the fabric of of these communities. What is it that always sticks? With me that illustrates the point you were just making and that has to do with the chocolate cases SoKo event. One of them. I think it was Sako had an alibi for the time of one of the crimes what are the crimes committed on December twenty four th of I think nineteen nineteen or nineteen eighteen and he had a. He had witnesses who said that on that particular date. He was delivering a to his neighbors in an Italian community a pickle deals because pickled eels were a delicacy that were eating on Christmas day. And there were there was, but there was conflicting testimony that said, no, no, no that couldn't have been done on December twenty four th because you never by the pickle deals on December on Christmas Eve, you have to buy them on December twenty second or something. So that you have time to prepare them and put them in on on ice for a couple of days before you eat them. The it's a it's a tiny detail that you would never survive. I mean, you would never know that that was true of Italian talian American communities live two hundred years ago, except that it's important in a crime story. Stories are these little there's a flash of light that illuminates the details of of. Something that would otherwise be totally forgotten. I think that brings us very effectively to volition Iowa, and the the crime story, which as you pointed out earlier is the one that starts to to give away. The the communities are already catching on at this point to the fact that there's a killer on the railways take us take us through what happened invalid. On the night of June nine one thousand nine hundred twelve. The lights were out in politica. Due to a a dispute between the Velazquez city council and the power company, so they had city lights and street lights, but they were out and and the town was in complete darkness is this Sunday night. There was a church service Sunday night church service organized by one of the victims. The woman who was the head of the house after the. After the service. I didn't get into this in the book. But I think it's true. I don't believe murderers would would ever have happened when they did had the lights been on. And the reason that was true is that he had committed another atrocity of just six days earlier about a hundred miles away. And he normally would not have. Had another outrage that quickly, but because the lights the city was plunged into darkness. It was a perfect opportunity for him. And he couldn't pass it up anyway, re two little girls named Anna Lena, still injure went home with a more family, the family of Henry Moore, they walked home after the church service, and and the little girl spent the night with the their friend. The little girl is a member of the family on the morning of June. Ten no one is stirring around in the house. The and the his brother finally comes and breaks into the house finds a couple of bodies and runs out of the house scraping. They bring the town marshal. And he is name, Hank Horton. Mr. Horton, courageously goes through the house. You have to understand. He has no reason to believe anything other than that. A crazed murderer is hiding somewhere in this house. It is a dark house. He's holding matches in front of him. With no gun to no form of protection holding matches in front of in front of his himself going from room to room finding bodies. There are eight dead bodies in the house and longhouse in a small quiet, but western town, the and all of them hitting the head with an axe the access found as it usually is next to the body of a little girl. Imagine the train was a pervert. And he was interested in little little girl. Little girl was usually found in a in an attitude suggesting that she had been. She had been outraged after death the. In any case. The crime was not there was a great uproar as you can imagine. But the crime was not solved. Two years later at conman named Jay and Walkerton came to Valenica and realized that he could sustain a phony investigation of the crime by keeping people angry..

murder America Bill James Oklahoma Boston Red Sox Hank Horton England Iowa Rian Vert Sako Velazquez city council Jay politica Valenica Anna Lena Henry Moore one hundred years
"hank horton" Discussed on KOA 850 AM

KOA 850 AM

13:36 min | 2 years ago

"hank horton" Discussed on KOA 850 AM

"Eight fifty AM and ninety four one FM. Bill James works for the advisers the Boston Red Sox. And and so it is that he spends a lot of his time in the sports world leaders is talking before the top of the hour about the difference between being in that sort of positive place with very positive energy around people involved doing positive community things and writing the from the train because he likes to write about crime. So do you want to finish that? You're you're fading out. I was not able to hear a lot of them. I'm fading out. No can have that. I was just saying that you were presenting sort of a dichotomy of. Working in the sports world by day and writing crime at night. Yeah. The saying that crime stories are fascinating too. It's because they they come from the parts of ourselves. So we don't like to talk about. And normally talk about in the specific case of the man the train. I didn't make a deliberate and thoughtful entry into the subject, I just got like a fish. I was I was I saw a documentary about the murders in blue sky called Velasco living with a mystery. It's an extremely well done documentary and far above normal levels of crime documentary. I was interested in it. And it was clear that there was a part of the story that was missing which is that it's relatively obvious that the bliss commercials are a part of a series. So I started going to put an hour into into trying to learn more about the series. But the the hour became we can the week eventually became prime. Five or six years. They I didn't I didn't decide to get into it. I just wandered into. It shows you. You can do you consider this a true crime book? Sure. Yes. It is. Yeah. And that's the interesting piece too. Is that true crime? The tradition for true crime is I discovered in my research goes all the way back to execution sermons. Right. Sort of shares a similar DNA with American journalism. Except that in the case of true crime. You know, it was the it was the preachers. It was the circuit riding preachers ministers. That would come to these towns on the day of somebody's execution, and they would do a sermon just before the execution that would try to provide the context for why this person was being executed in why the community overall would benefit from his or her death. And it became an important part of trying to understand executions in America. And and this is where when the preachers decided there they used to just print up their sermons and people would snap them up. And then he thought well heck this I'll just sell it for a nickel. And so they started to sell their execution sermons, and then they would get passed around and these became some of the early bestselling true crime narratives, it it fulfills the same function is what you're doing in in the man from the train you're trying to bring in even though it's a hundred plus years later, in some cases, you're trying to bring a kind of a kind of healing. Anyway, not that anybody is still alive that was directly involved, but for these communities, maybe this this lingering sense of some tragedy that had happened. Maybe some closure. On an exactly what happened to their town. And how their town was involved or not involved in the deaths of of somebody that at one point. You know, we're popular members of the community. There was an interesting thing that happened just a few weeks ago. I actually got a letter from a man in London England who was a a great great and had been was one of the victims of crime interesting always believed that the man who was accused of her murder and was locked up without any evidence for two years before he was released as he always believed that he had gotten away with it. And he says it reading it in my book that in our book that it wasn't. That was not actually what had happened was just a tremendous relief to him. That was a shock to me. I hadn't thought about it was it was a shot. You said he was just tremendously relieved to realize that it was just a random crime. And that this man hadn't actually that madman hadn't actually gotten away with it was this other fellow. And I don't know why it was important to him. Well, I understand I understand the sense. It was important to know what had happened. But you know, one guy getting away with it or another guy getting away with it. Unpunished, I I don't know that there's a lot of different. But he's still did have that reaction to it. Yeah. Go ahead. Please. No lot of the book. What book is about is is all all books. All good books. Our search for understanding a lot of the book is is trying to get people to understand the America in which these crimes occurred. They Kurt a hundred years ago and. I grew up in a small town very much like the crimes that these that these. He's murders occurred in and I grew up in fifty sixty years ago. So it's sorta equidistant from me and them, and that's one reason that the story was powerful to me. But I am trying to get people to understand what what the criminal Justice system was like help fantastically primitive. It was the what how people lived that. They they lived rich meaningful lies. People in urban areas today think of people who lived in small towns one hundred years ago or often think of people who lived in small towns a hundred years ago, I was living these boring lives, which nothing ever happened. All of the things that happened to you and me and people in our lives happen to people in small towns. I mean, they they got married they fell in love and got married, and they got divorced, and they started careers and got promoted and got fired they moved and they went on long trips and brought back souvenirs, they they had entertainment. So they went to literally every night all of the things that that happened to happen to us happened to them, and I was trying to create a a picture. Unfortunately, it is a picture of their death. So that's a terrible picture because they died terrible death. But also is trying to create a picture of how they live and give the reader an understanding of what it was like to be an American small town two years ago. I think you did that very effectively. In fact, I think that's one of the interesting things about true crime in general is that the the focus can be on things which Rian Vert the inverted pyramid of journalism. And you can spend a lot more time on the things which are less important to telling the story in proper journalism. You can spend a lot more time talking about the atmosphere of town or the the things that people eight or the way that houses were constructed or communities were laid out you can you can do that. And it brings a fresh context to these murders. You know, as opposed to the traditional way that that crimes are covered in in straight storytelling in journalism context. That's what I really like what you were doing especially when you're getting into the fabric of of these communities. What is that always sticks? With me that the point you were just making that has to do with the the taco in the case asako and vans. Eddie. One of them. I think it was Sako. Had an alibi for the time of one of the crimes what are the crimes committed on December twenty four th of I think nineteen nineteen or nineteen eighteen and he had a. He had witnesses who said that on that particular date. He was delivering a to his neighbors in an Italian community a pickle deals because pickled eels were a delicacy that were eating on Christmas day. And there were there was. But there was conflict in testimony that said, no, no, no that couldn't have been done on December twenty four th because you never by the pickle deals on December on Christmas Eve, you have to buy them on December twenty second or something. So that you have time to prepare them and put them in on on ice for a couple of days before you eat them the. It's a it's a tiny detail that you would never survive. I mean, you would never know that that was true Italian as a way that the talian American communities live two hundred years ago, except that it's important in a crime story. Stories are they're these little there's a flash of light. That eliminates the details of. Something that would otherwise be totally forgotten. Yeah. I think that brings us very effectively to volition Iowa, and the the crime story, which as you pointed out earlier is the one that starts to to give away. The the communities are already catching on at this point to the fact that there's a killer on the railways take us take us through what happened invalid. On the night of June nine nineteen twelve. The lights were out in politica. Due to a a dispute between the ballista city council and the power company. So they had city lights and streetlights, but they were out and the town was in complete darkness the Sunday night. There was a church service. I Sunday night check service organized by one of the victims. The woman who was the head of the house after the. After the service. I didn't get into this in the book. But I think it's true. I don't believe the murders would ever have happened when they did had the lights been on. And the reason that was true is that he had committed another atrocity of just six days earlier about a hundred miles away. And he normally would not have. Had another outrage that quickly, but because the lights the city was plunged into darkness. It was a perfect opportunity for him. And he couldn't pass it up anyway, re two little girls named Anna Lena, still injure went home with a more family, the family of Henry Moore, they walked home after the church service, and and the little girl spent the night with the their friend. The little girl is a member of the family on the morning of June ten wanna stirring around in the house. The and the his brother finally comes and breaks into the house finds a couple of bodies and runs out of the house scraping. They bring the town marshal. And he his name was Hank Horton, Horton courageously goes through the house. You have to understand. He has no reason to believe anything other than. That a crazed murderer is hiding somewhere in this house. It is a dark house. He's holding matches in front of him. With no gun no form of protection, holding matches in front of in front of his himself going from room to room finding bodies very eight dead bodies in the house and long towels in a small quiet, but western town, the and all of and hitting the head with an axe the access found as it usually is next to the body of a little girl. The mansion the train was a pervert. And he was interested in little little girl. Little girl was usually found in a in an attitude suggesting that she had been. She had been outraged after that the. In any case. The crime was not there was a great uproar as you can imagine. But the crime was not solved. Two years later, a con man named Jay and Welker Sohn came to Valenica and realized that he could sustain a phony investigation of the crime by keeping people angry. He could keep donations coming in by keeping people angry..

murder America Bill James Boston Red Sox Kurt Sako Iowa England Rian Vert Velasco Hank Horton ballista city council Eddie politica Jay Welker Sohn Anna Lena
"hank horton" Discussed on Stuff You Missed in History Class

Stuff You Missed in History Class

01:54 min | 3 years ago

"hank horton" Discussed on Stuff You Missed in History Class

"Still answer girls before exiting the home he mentioned that before opened the opening the bedroom door and making the discovery nothing in the home seemed like it was out of place and he also couldn't offer any information about possible enemies the family may have had a witness number eight was fenwick more and this was another more brother there were several brothers in the mix here uh his testimony was not particularly illuminating he indicated that he really didn't know anything about his brother's business or if he had any enemies and he was dismissed from the stand pretty quickly the ninth witness was marshall hank horton and the marshalls testimony was really brief he basically said he'd been contacted by silly to go into the more home he corroborated entering the house with sally and then again with the doctors witness number ten was leaving guilder and this was designs nephew but he also did not have a whole lot of information to impart he had briefly been considered a suspect because he had some kind of shady uh happenings in his background his record was not entirely clean but he was cleared pretty early on witness eleven was another more brother harry more and he also had really nothing new to add in the proceedings like fenwick his other brother he had neither knowledge of tapie's business nor of any possible ill intentions against him witness twelve was blanche cylinder and remember this was lena on his older sister she was the one that had spoken with desire over the phone about the girl sleeping over at the more house and she was the one that kind of said yeah i think that will be fine i will tell my parents and a 13th witness was a joseph still injure so lena and either ida's father he also didn't know of anyone who might commit such a crime and he indicated that his wife had to the more several times in the morning the morning that the.

guilder tapie lena ida fenwick marshall hank horton sally harry
"hank horton" Discussed on Stuff You Missed in History Class

Stuff You Missed in History Class

01:50 min | 3 years ago

"hank horton" Discussed on Stuff You Missed in History Class

"And when ross more arrived at the home of his brother's family he shouted and he knocked he attempted to peer into the house through the windows but they were covered and he got neither reaction nor information like he couldn't there was nothing so eventually he went through his keys until he found the one that unlock the door like he had a copy of their key but it took him a little while to sort out which when it was mary peckham was there with ross more but she didn't venture passed the porch and into the house the surviving more brother didn't go past the second room of the house he opened the door to the bedroom are off the parlor and he immediately saw the bodies of two children on the bed as well as an enormous amount of blood he went back to the porch ends hold mary pack them to call the police yeah and this is a very small i mean by today's standard home so the bottom floor was only three rooms it was like a parlor the front room this small bedroom and a kitchen so after they raised an alert us city marshall hank horton responded he quickly arrived on the scene and his investigation of the house revealed that in addition to the two bodies ross more had seen the young still injured sisters there were six more bodies upstairs the entire more family in their guests had been killed in their beds blues about nine in the morning when the county coroner finally got there and took a look at the situation he later reviewed his findings with the sheriff in the marshall and then he called a coroner's jerry to the home so once word spread of what had happened uh in a small community these things do spread rather quickly many townspeople made their way to the scene in this ended up being a real problem we've talked about similar things happening before with crime scene so.

mary peckham ross hank horton jerry
"hank horton" Discussed on Thinking Sideways Podcast

Thinking Sideways Podcast

01:44 min | 4 years ago

"hank horton" Discussed on Thinking Sideways Podcast

"Where he sees the news nothing good so mary waited on the porch while ross went into the parlor he found iena and llinas bodies in the bedroom in a guest bedroom on the bed the ross at that point and that's on the first floor on the first floor yeah so ross at this point calls to mary and says pay go get hank horton he was kind of like the police chief used the the primary peace officer of the town at the time bear the shomar schartau watch runaway iraq audio some some something some the person in charge basically we were those those words you've gotta do drove also we'll see what happens is you know ross minds bodies so ps you know either goes back out or cost mary and says go get hank and then ross waves from all the reporting i can see waits until hank shows up and either mary called her there's not the details are not clear here on how hank got saw their yes she went and ran to get him or she called or what but he was somehow summoned from europe i'm gonna guess was phone call either because i would guess that as well but i dunno where hank well i mean maybe hank lived to doors down and so she was like mary scan down report anyway hank gets back tank and mary and ross all go in to the house and upstairs they find the entire more family had also been bludgeoned to death i didn't say that i wanna an llinas bodies showed signs being bunge death but there you go early been bludgeoned to death and as had the entire more family go up here with their virtual worlds or we could pick up the covers over brutes.

ross hank horton police chief officer mary the house ross iraq europe