35 Burst results for "Hamlet"

"hamlet" Discussed on Aria Code

Aria Code

05:54 min | 2 weeks ago

"hamlet" Discussed on Aria Code

"Actor Samuel west, professor Geoffrey Wilson, dramaturg Corey Allison, and tenor Allen Clayton, decoding to be or not to be from Brett dean's Hamlin, Allen will be back to sing it for you after the break. Arya code is produced in partnership with the metropolitan opera. Each season the Met presents ten Saturday matinee performances in movie theaters around the world as part of its award winning live in HD series. Next up, the Met premier production of Matthew coins eurydice, starring Erin Morley, followed by massenet's Cinderella in an all new abridged English language version. Find out more at med opera dot org slash HD. Hamilton had a really rough couple of months. Plus, he's a philosopher by nature, so his mind turns to the biggest question there is. What is the point of being alive? Here's tenor Allan Clayton as the Danish prince, singing.

Samuel west Geoffrey Wilson Corey Allison Allen Clayton Brett dean Matthew coins eurydice Hamlin Erin Morley massenet Allen Hamilton Allan Clayton
"hamlet" Discussed on Aria Code

Aria Code

05:47 min | 2 weeks ago

"hamlet" Discussed on Aria Code

"Sees ophelia. He sees he's not alone that feel has been listening to everything. And so then begins, you know, the sort of the heartbreaking duet where it's the last time they talk. And he says to a lady in thy origins be all my sins remembered, so he's you know he's asking her when she prays to remember him and to pray for his forgiveness as well. She then says good my lord, I have remembrance as the viewers that I have longed to read a liver. And she hands him back these love letters, these tokens of their love. And he takes them and then just throw them to the floor. This is not I, I never gave you all. I didn't give you anything at all. I didn't love you. He suddenly becomes wise to the fact that he's being spied upon. He becomes aggressive and violent and hostile toward ophelia. And here we have the breakdown, not only of the relationship between Hamlet and ophelia, but the beginning of her mental breakdown. She just simply doesn't understand why he's become so unhinged and why he doesn't seem to love her anymore. And this is where he very famously says to her get thee to a nunnery. And it's thought by Shakespearean scholars that a nunnery meant actually a whorehouse. So it's not that he's saying you're so pure that you should go be a nun, but that when you're damaged goods so I'm not interested anymore. Ophelia is just beyond words. She just can't handle it. So she starts making all these high skittery sounds. When.

ophelia Ophelia
"hamlet" Discussed on Aria Code

Aria Code

02:50 min | 2 weeks ago

"hamlet" Discussed on Aria Code

"And that kind of plants an idea in her mind and then you see ophelia enter into the realm of Hamlet's melancholy and suicidal depression in the second half of the play. And to me, there's a moment of suicide contagion that happens there. I love suicide contagion is a term social psychologist used to talk about the ways that when suicide or suicidal ideas are kind of in the air if there's a case or there's meteor reports on a case that that can increase the prevalence.

ophelia depression
"hamlet" Discussed on Aria Code

Aria Code

05:37 min | 2 weeks ago

"hamlet" Discussed on Aria Code

"Then you have these tuned guards, all hanging around this same core that started to piece that will end the piece that you keep hearing. So like a Hamlet theme and it's a sort of abstract chord. And you have stones being clicked and Clark as well. Is that all to be or not to be? No to sleep to dream. There's.

"hamlet" Discussed on Aria Code

Aria Code

06:04 min | 2 weeks ago

"hamlet" Discussed on Aria Code

"The tradition of composers writing roles for specific singers goes back way into the sands of time to the very beginnings of opera. It's not a new thing, but it is new in the sense that so much of our operatic repertory has been for so long a museum repertory where we're constantly reviving older pieces, so that singers are used to opening up a score and that's it, you know, maybe in a handle Arya or a Bel contour, they can ornament it. But other than that, they are stuck with what Mozart wrote for his sister in law with the freaky high voice. And they have to sort of fit into a role like Cinderella into the glass slipper. However, there's a great luxury and a great opportunity to be part of a creative process when a singer gets to collaborate with a composer and particularly composer who is as collaborative as Brett dean is. When you're a rehearsal studio for any opera, there comes a point no matter what show is. However, while it's known, whether director says, oh, for God's sake, if only Mozart were in a room. What the hell did he mean by the end of Don Giovanni about what hell am I supposed to do? And for this process, you can do that. Brittain was sitting three meters away with a score during a pencil and you could say Brett want earth who thinking when you wrote this music and he went oh, I thought this and this and this. And you go, oh, okay, fine. And sometimes he would say, look, I've written this, but actually, having seen what you want to do with the role or have you seen the staging or having, you know, just things like balance, you know, this doesn't work. I can't hear you. So let's put it off an octave. Or let's, you know, let's rewrite it. And so the day of the first night, I was emailed a new setting off this page of music. I was like, oh good, and I learned that in the interval. I mean, thankfully, glad bond has an hour and a half interval. So that was quite, you know, that was quite interesting and it's a perfect example of what happens when you have the composer living and in the room. They can change things as later as first night. The vocal and dramatic demands of the role of Hamlet are really quite formidable and a lot of that has to do with Alan Clayton. His capacity says an artist and all of that is written into this role. I had a sort of mini breakdown, not long afterwards. I got home and I was to go straight to Frankfurt to do a new again. And I got in the cab to the airport. And I just let my girlfriend during the process of Hamlet. I'd moved how straight afterwards. My dad is dad. I don't have a relationship with my mom. So there's all these sort of things. I think I was in the cab to the airport. I said, I don't think I can go to Frankfurt tomorrow. I don't think I can start rehearsals. And so I went to terminal 5 at Heathrow, I went to the bar before security, and I just watched my flight go the departed until it said left. It departed. And I got on a cab went straight home, and I said to my agent, I'm really sorry. I'm not going to rehearsals before. Can you please? Apologize to Frankfurt. For me, this is awful. I mean, I've never done anything so I'm profession in my life. But it was just those few months of everything going on with the terminal of everything. And it was what that was the reaction that my mind and body took. So Brett brilliantly uses a version of the speech that people know less well, which is from Q one, the bad quarto, which is basically a pirated copy of the play. This is what we call a memorial reconstruction of Hamlet. In other words, it's the play as remembered by somebody who was in it. It makes a deliberate decision to say, not to be or not to be, that is the question, but to be or not to be either the point. As the point and you think, yeah, kind of 7 other go. You're nearly there. So yes, Brett has very cleverly taken something that we think we know. And set it doubly in ways that wake us up. First of all, using a version of the speech, which was the first ever published version of it. And secondly, by setting it to music. The accompaniment continues in a very sparse way, very delicate pianississimo as quiet as can be. And the vocal line gradually gradually ramps up a little higher a little higher. Set in a very fragmentary way, a lot of rest between these sort of halting phrases. To die to sleep no more. And by a sleep to say we end the heartache and the thousand natural shocks that flesh is heir to. Tis a consummation devoutly to be wished to die to sleep. To sleep perchance to dream, there's the rub. For in that sleep of death, what dreams may come when we have shuffled off this mortal coil. Must give us cause. He's in so much pain that he thinks that death, nothingness would be better than the pain that he currently feels..

Brett dean Mozart Frankfurt Alan Clayton Brett Don Giovanni Brittain
"hamlet" Discussed on Aria Code

Aria Code

03:09 min | 2 weeks ago

"hamlet" Discussed on Aria Code

"No. To sleep to dream. Brett said everybody will be waiting for how you set to be or not to be. And he said, well, you know what on earth do I do? What the hell do I do? To be or not to be? To be or not to be just how do you set and go, oh, I was a bit disappointing. But if you sort of drip fed it, you dripped red elements of it, then the fact that I say it or not to be a billion times in the piece. I say to be once. That then makes an event separate of the text that everyone already knows and understands. So for Hamlet, it's very much the end of a conversation that he's been having with himself since he was 15. There is this choice between life and death. And it's all tied up with the death of his dad and whether he's going to kill his uncle, the king. It starts with a paradox. To be or not to be. That is the question. Well, that's not really a question, is it? Where do you put the question mark in that, to be or not to be? It could be to die or not to die to kill or not to kill to act or not to act, but it's not. It's something bigger and more general. He seems to be saying, I don't know. What's the point? And although it's an essentially felt personal thing. It doesn't really seem to be just about Hamlet's personal circumstance. It's about all of our circumstance. Hamlet is formulating the soliloquy very much like an academic investigation. Here's the question I'm going to answer to be or not to be and it feels very formal. He's drawing upon these sort of formal logical devices that were.

Brett
"hamlet" Discussed on Aria Code

Aria Code

04:10 min | 2 weeks ago

"hamlet" Discussed on Aria Code

"Who's studied philosophy at wittenberg goes revenge, we don't do that sort of thing anymore. I've always thought of it as Gladiator with Woody Allen playing Russell Crowe. He's miscast. And then we meet his love interest ophelia, who is the daughter of polonius, who's this sort of pompous court official..

Woody Allen Russell Crowe ophelia polonius
"hamlet" Discussed on Aria Code

Aria Code

05:39 min | 2 weeks ago

"hamlet" Discussed on Aria Code

"To be or not to be. That's got to be one of the most recognizable lines in English literature, and somehow everybody knows that it's from Hamlet. Shakespeare's longest play 400 years and still going strong. And even if you just know that one line, chances are, you've picked up bits of the story by osmosis. Some things are rotten. It's in Denmark. Prince Hamlet wants to kill his uncle, Claudius, because Claudius murdered Hamlet's father and then married his mother. Hamlet's dolls plays detective, contemplates suicide, breaks up with his girlfriend and then dies, along with pretty much everyone else. It's such an unhappy story, but people freaking love it. It's been played by some of the greatest actors of stage and screen, and has been adapted into a few operas. Most recently, by composer Brett dean and librettist Matthew joslyn. Now these two boil down the whole tragedy into just 12 scenes, the absolute essence. And of course, among these 12 scenes is Hamlet's famous soliloquy to be or not to be. It's the speech where a Hamlet thinks out loud about the hardships people face. And he wonders, is it really worth it? This whole life thing? Is it actually better to exist to be or not to be? For Hamlet, that is the question. But for us here today, there are a few more. Like, why do you and I and most random strangers on the street know the opening lines of Hamlet's famous soliloquy from hundreds of years ago? How does adding music change this text that we know so well? And what can it possibly mean to us today? Well, let me introduce you to the crack team of guests who are going to help us get to the bottom of it. First, Tanner Allen Clayton, he premiered the role of Hamlet at the glint worn festival in England back in 2017. And unlike the title character, he had no questions about taking on this role. I'd never sung a role that big before, and of course I said yes straight away. I've actually met Brett at a festival in Slovenia, bizarrely. And his first act when we first met was to put a kind of beer in my hand. So I knew we were going to be very good friends. Next, Cory Ellison, an opera drama tour who's on the vocal arts faculty at Juilliard. Corey worked closely with Brett dean and Matthew Jocelyn to develop this opera. It was great fun, reconfiguring it into operatic form. And in a way, trying to catch the spirit of it without necessarily the letter of it. And it was a real love fest to everybody got along, which is kind of amazing. And the scheme of things. Third, Jeffrey Wilson, he's a preceptor of expository writing at Harvard. What the hell is a preceptor? Basically I'm a lecturer I teach a course called Y Shakespeare and lo and behold every semester Hamlet just teaches itself Hamlet doesn't need Jeff Wilson in order for it to be a successful text much to my devastation. And finally, actor and director Samuel west, who knows the Danish prince vary, very well. I played Hamlet for a year and three days for the Royal Shakespeare Company in Stratford on Avon, and our version was very long. It was four hours. And we actually advertised it in the programmers three hours 55 minutes. And it was a bit like selling something at 9.99. It Sam's performance of the original Shakespeare still a queen that you'll hear in this episode. All right, off we go to Denmark and straight into the heart of elsinore, the castle were all the drama unfolds in Bret dean's Hamlet. Hamlet is a story about a Danish prince that is weirdly resonant to a lot of people who aren't Danish princes. It's a story about love and death and about what happens when the people that we love die and it's a story about international politics and medieval Europe. I would say this is the story of a man who thinks too much. He lives a very examined life, if not an active one sometimes. So, Hamlet is the young prince of Denmark, his father was the previous king of Denmark, who died under mysterious circumstances. And the present.

Brett dean Claudius Prince Hamlet Hamlet Matthew joslyn Tanner Allen Clayton Shakespeare Cory Ellison Denmark Matthew Jocelyn Jeffrey Wilson Samuel west Juilliard Slovenia Brett Corey Jeff Wilson England Royal Shakespeare Company Bret dean
The Arctics Mysterious Ping

Unexplained Mysteries

01:50 min | 5 months ago

The Arctics Mysterious Ping

"In two thousand sixteen. A man piloted his sailboat. Through the fury and hecklers straight in the northern canadian territory of nunavut as he cut through the water his sonar equipment emitted a peculiar sound. It was a single long tone high pitched and shrill to consistent to be run of the mill background noise after a few moments. The sound stopped but it had already kick started a mystery. The sailor was the first person to hear the nunavut ping. We don't know how word spread but soon news of the pain had reached the local at town of igloo. Lick as with many small hamlets in northern canada. A lot of glue lick residents relied on the ocean. They made their living hunting seals and other water mammals and they usually found their prey in the fury and hecklers straight. This waterway boasted an abundance of seals and was free from ice year round but recently hunters had struggled in the fury and hekla straight. Nobody knew why but the animals were disappearing win. The glue lick heard about the ping. They assumed a connection. The southbound must be driving the seals out of the fury and heckler straight even more concerning the ping hadn't done away over the next few weeks other hunters and if few vacationers on yachts detected it as well. If they listened carefully they could hear it through their hall but it appeared clear as day on sonar witnesses described it as a beep abuzz or most commonly ping no one could figure out where it came from

Nunavut Igloo Canada
"hamlet" Discussed on Harvard Classics

Harvard Classics

05:19 min | 6 months ago

"hamlet" Discussed on Harvard Classics

"Him demand his fill. Okay he did not be juggled with to hell allegiance vows to the black sterile conscience and grace to the profoundest pit. I dare damnation to this point. I stand that. Both the world's i give to negligence let come what comes only i'll be revenged most story for my father who shall stay you. My will not all the world and for my means. I'll husband them so well they shall go far with little good layered. He's if you desire to know the certainty of your dear father's death is rich in your revenge that sweepstake you will draw both friend and foe winner and loser none but enemies. Will you know them then to his good friend since wild l. my arms and like the and life rendering pelican replace them with my blood by now. You speak like a good child and a true gentleman that i am guiltless of your father's death and most sensible in grief for it it shall as leveled your judgment pierce as day does to your i. I don't know what noise is that reenter ophelia sheets dry up. My brains t is seven times. Salt an out the sense in virtue of mine. I i haven't i manage shall be paid by wait till are scaled. Turn the beam. A rose of may made kind sister sweet failure. Oh heavens possible. A young mates which should be as moral as an old man's life. Nature is fine love and where to find. It sends some precious instance of itself after the thing loves. They boy him face stone the beer. Hey non ninety ninety nine ni and in his grave rained many are tier fare. You well my at style. That whitson did persuade revenge. A could not move us. He must sing a down a down. And you call him a downer. Oh how do we will be comes it it a slow fall steward. That stole. His master's daughter is nothing more than matter. There's rosemary that's for remembrance pray love remember and then there's pansies that's for thoughts document in madness thoughts remembrance fitted there's fennel for you and columbine 's there's rue for you and here's some for me. We may call it herb. Grace of sunday's oh you must wear your rue with the difference. There's a daisy. I would give you some violence but they withered all when my father i. They say he made a good end for bonnie sweeter oven is all my joy often affliction passion itself. She turns to favor and to prettiness. Not not calm and come august no no he instead go to bed he come his does. Oh relax was his he has gone. He's gone do we. Cast oh god see on his so and oh christian so i pray god god be exit. Do you see this. Oh god layered. He's i must commune with your grief. Or you deny me right. Go but apart make choice of whom your wisest friends you will and they shall hear and judge twix do you and me. If by direct or by collateral hand they find us touched we bill our kingdom give our crown our life and all that we can hours to you in satisfaction but if not be you content to lend your patients to us and we shall jointly labor with your soul to give it do content that this be so his means of death his obscure funeral. No trophies will no hatch mott or his bones noble right nor formal ostentation cry to be heard as toward from heaven to earth that i must called in question so you shall and where. The offense is. Let the great tax fall. I pray you go with me excellent..

twix seven times Both bonnie ninety ninety nine ni columbine earth both friend sunday christian august
"hamlet" Discussed on Túnel de vento

Túnel de vento

11:09 min | 6 months ago

"hamlet" Discussed on Túnel de vento

"Ola season being vindicated image but gust into camin issue Diversion the canario is phonic knowing Bulinov it could dance. Malia the hashtag you'll noticed mattera greenwich devos at that thing meal that the mid these vehemently see that and that he knew who do get seem motion house leadership. Fleecy that with the new assault at. Who's that that bush was. Dan would view mench pursue paul in liberal. We mentioned that. Turn quickly that schooled. Image new or shall tinge comes fulsome put who's could have divided that much amazing split because for them push others pooping towards into the zap cash. School few cleanly. Tim our you do mystery. Man who will tony tau influence yet. Be open to pay mundial schmeichel as we've added. Wien she to them all to the fail. My staff caravaggio simaltaneous. But chilly resemble that tours the audit botticelli. Up to that of liz gop ledge beneath the judicial sin sin leash dish after to meet the vitamins are easings vitus. Study is bait. No i know all where the botticelli been. Doodo optimism screen kizzee but to plan door moment. Kommt our shout gauche cook there. Noah it push follow markup to blizzard commute say bashed the perez breach the asian behind to interview. I'll in cooma vizo year.

Maggie OFarrell on Hamnet

The Book Review

01:33 min | 7 months ago

Maggie OFarrell on Hamnet

"This is john williams in hammett. Her eighth novel maggie o'farrell imagines the life of william shakespeare. His wife anne hathaway or agnes and the life and death of one of the couple's children hamlet who died at eleven fifteen ninety six in o'farrell's novel. He died of the plague. And the book imagines the impact that this event might have had on arguably shakespeare's greatest play hamlet. Hamlet won the national book critics circle award for fiction and it was named by the new york times book review as one of its ten best books of twenty twenty with the editors calling it a bold feat of imagination and empathy and magill. Farrell is here to talk about it from edinburgh. Hi how you doing. i'm good. What do we know historically. That's in this novel. How bearer the bones that you were working with when you sat down well i they expire himself is quite a shadowy figure. There's an awful lot about him. We don't know despite the very best efforts of the world's most brilliant scholars and shakespearean academics. So it is mysterious. You know we only have six examples of his signature which is spelt differently so there are lots of lawmakers and gaps in his story. If we think we know very little about him we know even less about his wife. The woman weeping told to call anne hathaway and his children. We only hamlet himself. The boy is lucky if he gets possibly to mentions in these big biographies of shakespeare them night and he was born and they mentioned that he died in fifteen ninety six. But i see i mean to be honest. That is all we do know about little. Unfortunately

Maggie O'farrell Anne Hathaway Hammett John Williams William Shakespeare National Book Critics Circle A Agnes Farrell Plague Shakespeare Magill The New York Times Edinburgh
What Separates Humans From Other Animals?

No Stupid Questions

02:15 min | 7 months ago

What Separates Humans From Other Animals?

"Animals. I mean my dog has a 401k. Also why do we pace. When we're stressed or anxious like in the bugs bunny cartoons. Somebody's waiting outside the delivery for so andrew came across a paper in the journal. Frontiers in psychology which. I was so charmed by that. You've read as we can talk about it. It's called acquisition of a joystick operated video task by pigs. How could i forget for the listener. I'll just explain. These experiments were carried out at penn state university. There were four pigs. A pair of yorkshire pigs named hamlet an omelette and a pair of panna pinto micro pigs named ebony and ivory. I guess after stevie wonder and paul mccartney or the song of that name or after piano keys and the paper describes what the pigs were and were not able to learn in these experiments manipulating video game joystick with their snouts. And what i really want to know is tell us how it changes your thinking as a psychologist if it all about non human animals their capabilities. The way we should think about them perhaps differently about ourselves differently. Well thank you for broadening. My academic horizons. I would not have read this paper on video games and makes were it not for our friendship so i i will just say that when i read this line i literally laughed out loud after twelve weeks of training. Hamlet and omelette were terminated from the experiment because they had grown too large no fit within the constraints of the test pen. Academic research is tough. You lose fifty percent of your research pool just like that so anyway now down to two test subjects by the way. So one of my intuitions is that one ought not an. I understand that this research is hard. But maybe not generalize to olive pig them based on this very small number of pigs because look at wilbur wright some pig yeah so maybe ebony or ivory were some one of them was much better than the other in the research so there's various across pigs even yes. It is

Penn State University The Journal Stevie Wonder Paul Mccartney Andrew Yorkshire Wilbur Wright
"hamlet" Discussed on Harvard Classics

Harvard Classics

02:15 min | 9 months ago

"hamlet" Discussed on Harvard Classics

"Mine is will give it to his face and after we will both our judgments join in censure of his seeming. Well my lord if he still ought the whilst this players playing and scape detecting. I will pay the theft. They are coming to the play. I must be idle. Gets you a place. Danish march a flourish enter king. Claudius queen gertrude. Polonius ofi leah rosencrantz guild and stern and others. How fares cousin. Hamlet excellent phase of the chameleons dish. I each the air. Promise crams you cannot feed capons. So i have nothing with his answer. Hamlet these words are not mine. No no mine now to polonius my lord you played once in the university you say but do the high. My lord was accounted a good actor. What did you enact. I did enact. A caesar killed in the capital. Brutus killed me. It was a brute part of him to kill so capital. A calf there be the players. Ready i my lord based upon your patients come his am idea. Hamlet sit by me. No good mother. Here's metal more attractive to king. Claudius who do you mark that lady. Shall i lie in your lap. No my lord. I mean my head upon your lap. I my lord. Do you think i meant country matters. I think nothing my lord. That's a fair thought to lie between maids legs. What is my lord. Nothing you marry my lord. Who i. I my lord. Oh god you're only jig maker. What should a man do but be merry for. Look you how cheerfully my mother looks. And my father died within these two hours. Nee tis twice two months my lord so long nave and let the devil wear black for. I'll have a suit of sables. Oh heavens die. Two months ago and not forgotten yet then. There's hope a great..

two months Two months ago two hours Claudius both twice Claudius queen gertrude each Polonius ofi leah once Danish
"hamlet" Discussed on Harvard Classics

Harvard Classics

03:53 min | 9 months ago

"hamlet" Discussed on Harvard Classics

"This was some time a paradox. but now the time gives it proof. I did love you once. Indeed my lord. You made me believe so you should not have believed me for. Virtue cannot so inoculate our old stock but we shall relish of it. I loved you not. I was the more deceived. Get the to anonymity ary. Why would stabby a breeder of sinners. i am myself in different honest. But yet i could accuse me of such things that it were better. My mother had not borne me. I am very proud. Revengeful ambitious with more offense is at my back than i have. Thought to put them in imagination to give them shape or time to ask them in. What should such fellows as i do. Crawling between earth and heaven. We are arranged knaves all believe none of us go die ways to a nunnery. Where's your father at home. My lord let the doors be shut upon him that he may play the fool. Nowhere bannon's own house farewell. Oh help him. You sweet heavens. If thou dost. Mary i'll give this plague for the dowry be that was chased as ice as pure snow. Thou shalt not escape calumny get the to a nunnery go farewell or if thou wiltz needs mary mary a fool for wiseman not well. Enough what monsters you make of them to a nunnery go and quickly to farewell. Oh heavenly powers restore him. I have heard of your paintings to well enough. God has given you one face and you make yourselves another you jig. You ambulance lisp and nicknamed god's creatures and make your oneness your ignorance goto on no more aunt. It had made me mad. I say we will have no more marriages. Those that are married already all but one shall live. The rest shall keep as they are to a nunnery go exit. Oh what a noble mind is here. Overthrown the courtiers soldiers scholars. I tongue soared. The expectancy and rows of the fair state the glass of fashion and the mold of form the observed of all observers quite quite down and i of ladies most eject and wretched that sucked the honey of his music vows. Now see that. Noble and most sovereign reason like sweet bells jangled out of tune in harsh that unmatched form and feature a balloon. Youth blasted with ecstasy. Oh whoa is me to have seen what i have seen. See what i see re enter king. Claudius and polonius love his affections. Do not that way. Tend nor what he speak. Though it lacked form little was not like madness. There's something in his soul or which melancholy sits on brewed. And i do doubt the hatch and the disclose will be some danger which for to prevent. I haven't quick determination. Thus set down he shall with speed to england for the demand of our neglected tribute happily. The and countries different with variable objects shall expel this. Something settled matter in his heart where on his brain still beating puts him thus from fashion of himself. What thank you want to do. I believe the origin and commencement of his grave sprung from neglected. Love how celia you need to tell us. What lord hamlet said. We heard it all my lord do as you please but if you voted fit after the play lettuce queen mother all learning..

Claudius england polonius one face Mary celia earth mary
Scott Disick Says He'd Marry Ex Kourtney Kardashian

Daily Pop

02:59 min | 10 months ago

Scott Disick Says He'd Marry Ex Kourtney Kardashian

"Daily is their car. Dashing wedding in our future today on daily pop scott says he is ready to marry. Courtney check this out courtney and scott so when he was going to get back together we just have like a courtney scott wedding that would be at my guy proposed. I love you. And i'm ready to marry you right here right now. Courtney knows that eventually we'll get married live a good life when what else. You're kidding my sister. My sister this is why baby fighting. Like if i corden. Kim because you know what my sister does this too. She knows everything. I tell everything. She will wait before the perfect moment to bring something like this up in. Make it awkward for everybody at the table. And it's like come on. We just talked about this two days ago. But i do feel like there's something to that because he didn't use the word benchley say now by what may seventy who knows but he knows there's a connection. They have three kids together. He's like we're going to go through all this. I'm a date emily. You trams we go come together later in life. That's what he meant see. Men are very tricky with their words. Yeah i mean. I do think they have this. Of course huge connection and a great love between them. But i truly feel like coordinate has mentally close that door i mean i think she likes attention from sky and you'll always appreciate the flirts that he does. She will always probably the back of her head thankless that she is the number one choice for him but i think she would never actually marry him. I agree with you and sometimes it's hard for people to understand and to realize that maybe you will never be the person that you're love need you to be and sometimes you gotta take yourself off the hamster wheel because women aren't gonna straight up. Tell you hey. I don't want to be with you. This is never going to happen. Go let us follow. You like puppy dogs for the rest of our lives and give us a false hope. I hope so. I hope that one day he takes himself out of the race. No he's in a relationship prior now. Hamlin so i call her hamlet. That was absolutely agree. Both blue there. He said eventually they're going to get married. She eventually he's like we're gonna go through. All i think the benchley in life it might be later on and she loves him and they have the accused always come. Family loves them and their understand family pushes you together. But i feel like he is saying. Hey after we played the field and had a good time. We're gonna be together.

Courtney Scott Courtney Benchley Scott Corden KIM Emily Hamlin
Pigs Can Play Video Games Using Their Snouts, Scientists Discover

Daily Tech News Show

00:59 sec | 10 months ago

Pigs Can Play Video Games Using Their Snouts, Scientists Discover

"Pigs can play video games. Everyone you heard that right. Scientists at pennsylvania state university said they trained to ponder pinto micro pigs and yorkshire pigs to use an arcade style joystick to steer onscreen cursor into a target that was displayed on a wall in front of the pigs. Now when the pigs were successful they learned over time. They'd get a food reward so they were like okay. We want that. However the scientists say during testing the food dispenser broke and the pigs kept plane apparently because they enjoyed the encouragement they were getting from the scientists. Did keep getting things right now. You might say this is amazing. Wow east sports really is going to change the game of the yorkshire pigs. Hamlet was better at the game than omelette both struggled at harder. Levels of the pinto micro pigs ebony hit the target thirty more percent of the time ivory was a better shot at seventy six

Pennsylvania State University
David Price on Colonel John Haslet's World

American Revolution Podcast

08:13 min | 11 months ago

David Price on Colonel John Haslet's World

"David price. Thank you for joining me on the american revolution. Podcast thank you very much. It's a pleasure to be here. you're here today. Because britain a new book. About colonel john hazlet. What prompted you to write a book about john has let at. How important is he to the story of the american revolution. Well the genesis of this book. Mike was my first literary effort rescuing the revolution on sung patriot. Heroes in their ten. Crucial days are america's war for independence. John has was one of several individuals who i profiled in that book in a series of graphical vignettes which focused primarily on the contributions that each of these people need to patriot caused during what was perhaps the ten most inspirational days in american history. And perhaps the most pivotal moment in the war for independence. Now why did i choose hizbullah. Well you know. His name kept popping up in various things that i was reading most especially in a hackett fischer's pulitzer prize winning work. Washington's crossing which is the bible for people like me who are historical interpreters or so case graphs historical interpreters. I washington crossing historic park. That's a joke. By the way you have to read that book and you have to have a decent command. Say the material in order to be able to give a tour there under the auspices of a fringe group. So the more read about him. The more i was impressed by what he did. And and the kind of character he displayed in the course of his revolutionary service. So around the time that. I was reading that book and i guess the germ if you will of the seed when he's right. Metaphor here have been planted. The perhaps do something a little more elaborate on has land. And i came across the book by fred walters. John has led a useful one. Which far as i know. That was the only book that about him. It's a self published work came out. I believe in two thousand and five. Mary engaging read. I enjoyed it immensely. But it's written in the form largely not entirely but largely in the form of a historical novel. There's a good deal of well. Frankly fictional material an air imaginary dialogue scenes useful information to improve to be very helpful to me my initial reaction after reading. That was well. Fred has the subject covered pretty well. And i don't need to pursue curl has let any further the more i thought about it. The more i felt it deserved an effort by someone to craft more conventional kind of a non fiction work about curl and his delaware regiment now. I should add parenthetically that since his first book. Fred walters did polish. What i gather is a more conventional work and non fiction account. Biography of the kernel which i believe is entitled. John has lots eric journey. But it was published exclusively in a kindle edition. I decided to go ahead and pursue this idea of trying to write a book. Hamlet just to see you know when i was starting out i was just with the mindset of well. Let's see how this goes and what looks like and it wasn't challenge to produce something. That is a book length. Because as i pointed out in the preface to the book. There's not a lot known about his pre-revolutionary war life. We don't even know exactly when it was born is a someone about whom an agent is to in the preface or introduction. We don't even know exactly what he looks like. Physical descriptions of him but there's no authentic rep visual representation of inviting eighteen artists. Not by anyone. Who was alive when he was only two images that. I'm aware which i discussed under book. Which is the coverage. The stanley arthurs painting a reversal of the image of has lead in the stanley arthurs painting that hangs in the delaware public archives building. But in any case i could push ahead with the project so ultimately when it became was an effort to inter we three things one is the has the biography. One is the story of his seventeen seventy six regimen the first incarnation of delaware regimen with a little bit about the proposed hasler regimen is the reconstituted regimen in non truncated form that was created in seventeen seventy seven after his death and then a last name of courses or general one. It's quitting this whole context of the seventeen seventy six campaign. washington's army the new york and the campaign. Which of course culminates in what we call the ten crucial days campaign from december twenty fifth. Seventeen seventy six through january. Seventeen seventy seven. When has what has killed about princeton. The other thing. I think that was pushing me to do. This was at some point. When i was writing the second book it occurred needed. It would be a neat idea. If i could do a trilogy on the ten crucial days. I'm not aware that any other offer done. So what distinguishes has led from anyone else in terms of his contribution to the patriot. Cause well he created one of the elite regiments and continental army in seventeen. Seventy six as i believe the largest regiment in the army in the early months of that year they started recruiting january by me erupt. Almost eight hundred men. They were full uniformed. And i think they were. Perhaps the only regimen in the army that could make claimed for uniform to fully armed under has let's to of his agitate thomas holland formerly of his britannic majesty's army day molded these this forced into a efficient elite fighting unit. Bouffe or get too much into the details of the door blues. I wanna ask one thing you said. We don't know much about hamlet's prewar life. We do that. He came from northern ireland right and that he settled in kent county delaware. Do we have any information about why he left ireland and why he settled in delaware. Well he may have had personal indoor political reasons leaving ulster when he did his wife died his first wife got about five years before he came to the colonies which he did in seventeen fifty seven or thereabouts. Minor standing as they may have personal issues between him and members of the congregation. Her guests may have had an emotional toll on him. Such that believe she dialed probably died in childbirth so he was left with a young daughter. This may have taken a toll on him and as such impacted his ability to perform his ministerial duties. And that may lead to some ancient. Shall we say between young minister and members of his parish more generally when he came to the colonies. it was in the context of this larger immigration movement. If you will of the scotch-irish from northern ireland to the new world during the early and mid eighteenth century with was because of the harsh economic into the adverse economic conditions under which many of them live in the restrictions rather onerous restrictions have been imposed on him by british policy towards ireland towards the presbyterian church that was regarded as unwelcome adversary adversaries. You will to the established anglican church. So i think there's a plausible logger be made. That was part of. let's motivation. Maybe dominant part of his motivation.

Fred Walters Stanley Arthurs Colonel John Hazlet Hackett Fischer Washington Crossing Historic P Eric Journey David Price John Delaware Delaware Public Archives Build Hasler Britain Army Mike Fred America Washington Thomas Holland Britannic Majesty's Army
"hamlet" Discussed on Christoph Trappe: Business Storytelling Podcast

Christoph Trappe: Business Storytelling Podcast

05:02 min | 11 months ago

"hamlet" Discussed on Christoph Trappe: Business Storytelling Podcast

"Christoph trap here your host and author of content performance culture we are live streaming again to all the different channels twitter periscope youtube linked in. I think that's it today. Let's talk about seo. And if you follow me on instagram twitter. I always cheer might seo successes to more p words in the top five ten more in the top fifty whatever it might be and seo does matter but how long does it take by the way before we jump into this topic. You may have seen my article on the topic. Sometimes you can really quickly s. i wrote something during the super bowl and they ranked within moments. I wrote about instagram. I ranked within moments so it doesn't always have to take a long time. But i know that's what people will tell us. It's going to take six months. it's gonna take a year and stuff does sometimes take time. But today's against them on the show here in a second hamlet but teesta. He's the ceo of rank sense. We ran across each other. I believe i heard him talk on another podcast member. Who's podcast was. He can fill as in when he comes on air but his he does not like to hear that it takes six months. It should take should be quicker. So let's find out what he has up his sleeve to make it work quicker hammond. How's it going today. Thanks for joining us on the show. Thank you for having me so really starting to be here. I'm really privileged. As i said you said you'd set him better Seo shouldn't take six months definitely. Should ideally six weeks or months than faster. So so why do we have all these people running around telling us. It's going to take six months. It's going to take longer. What is that based on that. Like a brand new site. Or what's the i mean. Are they just making it up for what's what's happening. No they're not making it up. It's that the is the problem. Is that your generalized. In saying you know as you mentioned you can just inner licensed at all all. Seo work that you are going to do is gonna take six months right. So there is..

six months six weeks youtube twitter instagram today top fifty Christoph trap second hamlet top five ten year super bowl
How monkeys played an instrumental role in the development of polio vaccines

BrainStuff

05:28 min | 1 year ago

How monkeys played an instrumental role in the development of polio vaccines

"In the nineteen forties. America was under a constant threat from polio. A disease that had a then unknown cause and devastating effects especially in children. It spread quickly through unclean water and unwashed hands leading to symptoms like nausea fatigue. Fever and a stiffening of the body summers especially saw surges infections particularly around swimming holes leading to post polio paralysis and in some cases death on average thirty five thousand people were disabled each year. According to the centers for disease control and prevention president franklin delano roosevelt was among the most notable people to get the condition putting a face to a still uncertain disease. A vaccine was desperately needed as scientists learned about the transmission process including the fact that anyone could be a carrier in the next few years rival scientists jonas and albert sabin worked with teams in their labs on two completely different vaccines. Sabin worked on an oral vaccine. While sulk created an injectable vaccine that using a kill version of polio in the book polio and american story. David m ocean ski writes about the urgency of work. During the time quote. I talk there was reason to hurry the year. Nineteen fifty two was the worst polio year. On record with more than fifty seven thousand cases nationwide the headlines screamed of plague season and polio time. Twenty one thousand victims suffered permanent paralysis and about three thousand died from the very beginning of the polio epidemic. Monkeys were considered to be essential for research before human trials could take place becoming the unsung heroes of the fight to defeat the disease was through animal research that scientists i discovered that there were three strains of the deadly disease. The monkeys were purchased at a high cost from india and the philippines and shipped to the united states. Many died in transit so the national foundation for infantile paralysis now known as the march of dimes began overseeing their import in nineteen forty nine. A foundation established a special facility known as ot farms and rural south carolina to process the monkeys arriving from abroad oak tree farms operated in the picnic colony a beaufort county in coastal south carolina. Originally called the prichard bill primate center. The forty acre or sixteen hectare tract of land along. The river was called by local newspapers. The ellis island for thousands of monkeys from india naturalist john. Hamlet had the job of finding a space for the primate center. That was both connected to deep water ports and airports but also remote enough for neighbors the area he chose closely approximated the natural habitats of the monkeys with its abundance of shady long leaf pines and a mild climate. The monkeys were originally brought into savannah. Georgia one of the region's biggest ports and taken by truck the thirty odd miles or fifty some kilometers to the farm. When air travel became more popular they were flown by a london and new york before travelling by train to the low country. Once they arrived at the farm veterinarians treated the two thousand or so recess and sign a mogus monkeys before clearing them for transport to research facilities around the country. The monkeys spent twenty one days. Getting acclimated and eating a special diet was scientists carefully monitoring their status many went to sell nukes facility in pittsburg and sabin in ann arbor where they were given vaccines to test the vaccine. Strength against the three strains of poliovirus a few locals were aware of the research that was going on at the farm. Despite rumors of people encountering the animals we were unable to discover any opposition to the research facility perhaps because it was not well known and also because opposition to using animals and testing was not very common at the time in the united states. The movement against animal testing didn't pick up steam until around nineteen eighty in any case. The farms purpose wasn't permanent. Once sox polio vaccine was deemed a success and released to the public in nineteen fifty-five the work of qatif arms was no longer necessary and the facility closed in nineteen fifty-nine saban's oral vaccine came into use in nineteen sixty one the foundation that had established the facility. Its attention to reducing premature births. The monkeys found new homes and labs across the country. According to a former employee named louise crawford things at the farm were left just as they were including the monkey cages. A caretaker kept the grass and plant life at bay. The lab was locked up ready for someone new to take on the important task of preparing monkeys for research but that day never came in nineteen eighty the land and its contents were sold to development group. The lab equipment was donated to a local school science department while a farmer claimed the former monkey cages for his own animals. Today acreage along. The river is mostly residential and privately owned thanks to south and saban's vaccines polio cases of plummeted from three hundred and fifty thousand nine. Nineteen eighty eight to just twenty two in two thousand seventeen

Polio Nausea Fatigue Polio Paralysis Centers For Disease Control An Albert Sabin David M Ocean Ski National Foundation For Infant Prichard Bill Primate Center Franklin Delano Roosevelt United States Sabin South Carolina Jonas Fever India Beaufort County Paralysis Swimming
MK Yifat Shasha-Biton, first Likud lawmaker to defect to New Hope

The Promised Podcast

06:03 min | 1 year ago

MK Yifat Shasha-Biton, first Likud lawmaker to defect to New Hope

"First we have a matter that we're following with alert interest. Great concern is part of an occasional series. We call the premise. Podcast ponders the politics of pentameter and the use of the bard to advance a canard last week. The chair of the knesset corona virus committee. He fought shasha beaten announced that she was leaving the likud to join the new right-wing. Hope party where she would become. Don't sars number to an announcement that right away added five seats to the tally. New hope was showing in early polls. Shasha beaten is a popular politician. Mostly because as the head of the corona committee she overturned government decisions to close pools and gyms and stores in schools and even though her decisions were themselves overturned right back again by the government people came to see her as a straight shooter and someone fighting for the people trying to get to work and pay their bills and maybe grab a little exercise if they can. And who doesn't like a truth to power rebel. Also most everything about josh abi tone is wonderful. She grew up in the development town of kiryat shmona the daughter of a nurse from morocco and moshe feed a guy born in iraq who built up a bus company. She had a phd before she was thirty was deputy mayor of kyoto before he was thirty five and was a college vice president forty. It's partly because shasha tone has so much going on that folks and the likud were furious mad when she announced that she was switching parties and they insisted that she resigned right away. Shasha beaten refused on the grounds that she had been elected in this term and she would serve out. There are practical issues in play each sitting. Mk gets government allocated campaign funds when they run for the successive knesset. So if on stays and she'll have one point seven million shekels to use for new hopes campaign but if she quits now she'll be replaced and some other likud member. We'll get that cash lee cooed transportation minister miri regev tweeted quote. You've thought shasha beaten if you have a drop of integrity left resign. Immediately from connecticut and return the mandate to the national camp which you took for a ride for your own benefit a disgrace and when shasha baton refused the likud petitions something called the knesset house committee basically a rules and procedures committee to declare shasha beaten a quote unquote deserter which status would allow them to strip her of her likud campaign funding at the very least anyway. The committee met a few days ago. And because by then blue and was on the outs with the likud they supported chechen tone and she remains in the knesset with her one point seven million shekels in election funding which is when this happened. Uzi they on a likud. Backbencher angry by the outcome of the committee meeting convinced that chechen beaten had not gotten the come up and she deserves asked to be recognized by the chair leaned into the microphone and said quote. I would like to give some free literary advice to get on the of shasha zones new party that it was for matters such as these that shakespeare wrote in fellow i believe and then diane went onto quote not on alternate translation. I think of rabbani ios warning at the end of act one in fellow look to her more if thou has is to see. She has deceived her father. And may the shot a mile invoked up via gumbo which couplet was met by pandemonium in the committee with shasha be tone saying the volume clement. Actually came on the la. I have heard low things. But i must say that. I have never heard things as low as this. At this point mikhail cutler launch a religious blue and white. Mk screened uzi. Why are you referring to shakespeare. Why not refer to the woman who strays and you'll at least be using our own sources. The woman who strays as a reference to the book of numbers by bar chapter five verses twelve through sixteen about what to do with a wife who acts on faithfully to which topic an entire track date of the tomlin. My second sota is devoted later. Uzi dayan said quote. Someone wrote me and said on your life man. What a sexist remark. if that's how it was perceived. I really apologize and quote. And i know what you're thinking. That's a lousy apology. If that's how it was perceived blah blah blah blah blah. But i'd like to think the best of who was married to my favorite zoologist environmentalists tamar. Diane i adore her and she's lately been. The person who by force of character and charm willed into existence. The amazing new natural history museum at tel aviv university which is among other things. A brilliant polemic for sustainability and there ain't no one more feminists then tomorrow diane uzi on also mostly diane's nephew and yours on geffen's cousin so there's that he thought shasha zone for her part. Classically accepted the apology. And the matter seem to be over but all week. I've been thinking that there was an opportunity. Missed here and i can't get it out of my mind. Would it have hurt chubby tone to respond rather than with. I have never heard things as low as this. By saying with catherine from the taming of the shrew my tongue will tell the anger of my heart or else my heart concealing it will break. Would it have hurt. Shasha beaten to insist with don john and much ado about nothing. Let me be that. I am and seek not to alter me. Would it have hurt. Shasha be tone to say with polonius in hamlet this above all to be true and it must follow as the night the day thou cancer not be false to any man. Am i asking too much from shasha tone. I think not because truly. Now is the winter of our discontent. Elections are nine but a week and a day after the ides of march. But i'll stop. I'll stop because who knows better than me. That truly brevity is the soul of wit and that this is a tale told by an idiot full of sound and fury signifying nothing. This is how safe. Because i am that idiot today.

Shasha Knesset Corona Virus Committee Hope Party Corona Committee Josh Abi Shmona Moshe Feed Lee Cooed Miri Regev National Camp Shasha Baton Knesset House Committee Kiryat Mikhail Cutler Kyoto Morocco Shakespeare Uzi Dayan UZI
Canon EOS RP, The Affordable Full Frame Mirrorless Camera

The Digital Story

04:35 min | 1 year ago

Canon EOS RP, The Affordable Full Frame Mirrorless Camera

"So if i put this camera in your hands this one that i'm holding right now with the twenty four to five and i told you it was full frame. I told you it was new. And i asked you to guess how much it costs. I'm thinking you would probably say more than one thousand two hundred ninety nine dollars. I know i would because again a lot of spec for that relatively humble price tag now. Thirteen hundred dollars is not chump. Change for sure. But we're talking about full frame with an image stabilize land so if this were a poker game the anti would be a thousand dollars right. You just the play and so if you're coming in thirteen hundred dollars you have a winning hand like this camera. You're probably sitting pretty already. What i'd like to do is start out talking about some of the features because it has some good ones and then talk about a few the disappointments because there were compromises that had to be made to keep the price where it was and really comes down to a matter. Are those compromises. Something that you can live with or would you rather spend more and get a different camera. That's for you to decide. I do want to frame this camera by saying that. It's really a triple threat. First of all it's a good stills camera raw files in the j. pigs are quite good and i was very pleased with jay pigs out of this camera. The second thing is it's a solid movie camera really as in a lot of the features a lot of physical features really lend themselves to this being a good movie camera. The articulated lcd. For example and then the third thing is that it is compatible with canon's webcam software video conferencing and the software works on both mac and windows platforms in the software has just come into full release. It's out of beta now. And if you look at the specs for the software for both mac and windows. It's compatible with a lot of cameras and is compatible with a lot of different platforms for videoconferencing. It looks really good. I tested it with the. Rpd in the r. p. works great with the video conferencing software. The webcam software. So there's that as well so in terms of a camera for modern times especially at this price tag. I think it checks of boxes so let's take a look at some of the features here some of the highlight features. The first one. I want to mention is that it has a nice twenty six megapixel full frame cmos sensor with the digital age processor. Twenty six megapixels. For most of us i think is a sweet spot Shirts great sometimes having more megapixels but you know this resolution is six thousand two hundred forty by four thousand one hundred sixty that. That is a nice framed work. With right you have room the crop. You can make big prince if you want and the file sizes are manageable. So i i really liked the the six megapixel choice for this camera. I think it's a good one. And the iso. The native iso range goes from one hundred to forty thousand. And tell you the truth. I didn't really think about when. I was shooting with his camera. I just really didn't. I knew it could hamlet now when i looked at the pictures in light room afterwards. I go that was that iso eight thousand that was that iso twelve thousand or you know whatever it happened to be but the images look good and you know i would only look at the isos just because i was curious because i was doing this review. Not because of Image quality so one of the first things out say is a plus for this camera that if you do wanna shoot high. Iso and you don't want to spend a lot of money for camera that can do that. This is one to consider because it does the higher. Iso's quite well all right. Let's take a look at framing sean. In viewing the shots so you have an integrated two point three six million dot electronic viewfinder and then on the back you have a one million dot lcd with that. Very angled design. This is the first thing that we start to see. That really lends itself towards movie making a cannon does these lcd's articulating lcd very well.

JAY Canon Hamlet Sean
An Interview with Corporate Anthropologist Andi Simon

Breakfast Leadership

04:52 min | 1 year ago

An Interview with Corporate Anthropologist Andi Simon

"Welcome back I've got Andy Simon, online Andy, how are you? I'm just wonderful. How are you Michael I am awesome. I'm vertical. That's always a good way to be a especially during times of pandemics and whatnot. So that looking forward to this interview for a bit of time now. So let's let's dive in. So tell the audience a little bit about yourself in in the. Work that you're doing. So my name is Andy Simon I'm a corporate anthropologist, a doctorate, and I am an expert in helping organizations and the people inside them change and I've had a background in both academics, and in business I was vp of a bank and S who've another bank can in healthcare during change. But what I learned to said people humans eight to change. And if nothing else a little anthropology might help them step back and see things through a fresh lens an essay due. You'd be amazed how their brain goes from fighting and resisting the changes to embracing them and saying Oh that's right here. So I would say, the way forward is all around you. If only you can see it and our job has been to help people do just that. So I'm an author and award winning author of a book called on the brink of fresh lens to take your business to new heights, and I'm a podcast like yourself and I totally enjoy sharing on podcast video and audio how people can help us change and humans really do hate to change they love the idea, but they hate to do it. So that's who I am. Changes a dirty word to a lot of people. I. See it all the time when I advise people to and I even use the word adjustment I don't even bring in the word change because they hear that word they automatically just tense up and you make some minor adjustments here and there and like okay I can do that and. I'm with you on that. It's so many people are afraid of because they think it's this big job in for some people it might be it might be really transformational for them to go through the work because they have to look within and sometimes people are afraid to look within because. You know we're our own worst enemies in many ways, and especially now during this pandemic, where we do have an opportunity to make some adjustments or changes in our lives that make us better off once we get to the next normal. So many people feel paralyzed and they don't want to take the necessary steps that they need to do in order to get to the goals and the things that they want in life. You know it's not personal. The brain hates it because that's how we. Ourselves to survive and our cultures and the stories we share our really our conversations are our reality. The way the brain works is it takes data informs a story about it, and once you have that story, you think that's reality. It's just a perception of it and you're always a hero in that story. So you only see the things that a firm believe to be true and the line I liked to say is the only truth is there's no truth but once you have that wonderful perception of reality, your brain is very happy. Keeping it everything around you has changed and it's no longer often, and so now the question is, how do I get you to change your story and how do you visualize a new or a new business and really come to grips with the changes that are taking place? I often tell my clients think if this is a play, you really know hamlet very well the tomorrow we have to play, Macbeth what would you do? You find the script or you'd write the script and then you begin to rehearse the script and then you'd have. A director to help you figure out where to stand on stage but we're trying to do that today in a moment you know used to say, if you want to change have a crisis or create one little I know cove it was going to give me my crisis and I tell people don't waste the crisis I have clients who have been trying to do something for three years and all of a sudden. I can do I wanted to go after that market and I can't tell you how easy it is now because everybody. Is unsettled and unsure and all the certainty that we want to protect ourselves is gone and so in uncertainty you know don't waste a crisis and so as we help companies change to your point, they do resist until they realized maybe this is a crisis that you have to address. Now, the question is, what's the new script? How do I play it and I appreciate that humans resist because it's scary new fell we'll have my job. How do I do this my business grow all the uncertainties but yesterday is tomorrow and we are futurists. Are podcasts was ranked in the top twenty futurist podcasts but humans are futures. We have to see you tomorrow to lift today, and that's what we begin to help them do. So as your listeners are listening in thinking about the story, you believe to be your truth and what are you going to have to do to change it and then change it manager mind. So it's exciting times for us. We're having a great time lots of customers and lots of interesting work to do.

Andy Simon Macbeth Michael VP Director
Bob Rosenberg & the Lessons Learned From Running Dunkin Donuts

Dose of Leadership

07:44 min | 1 year ago

Bob Rosenberg & the Lessons Learned From Running Dunkin Donuts

"Bob Rosenberg on dose of leadership, former CEO of Dunkin donuts. I am so excited to have you on the show. Welcome pleasure. Well, you got this new book coming out in October, round the corner to round the world, your lessons of that you learn running Dunkin donuts I love Dunkin donuts by the way I think copies outstanding pilot. Now, go through the airport I always bypass starbuck's sorry starbucks and I always go straight to Dunkin donuts that coffees just so good to music to my ears. You know I was reading your bio and it said you graduated from Harvard Business School. Told me this right and your twenty five and you became the CEO when you're twenty five is that right? That's correct within weeks of my graduation I had in my early career I basically virtually grew up. Over the store I worked in lots of different jobs within my family business, which is not call Dunkin donuts gone universal food systems and a variety of different jobs I went to hotel school and went into the army, and then went on to graduate school in. Expected to join the family business but Lord knows I had no expectation that it's twenty five I dad who is only forty seven at the time eighth grade educated Guy Returns to me. And asked me if I wouldn't take over the responsibility of CEO. At his business said the REF aching request and that one third few weeks to decide upon. But ultimately best decision I ever made man the yeah. Obviously a life altering one of those decisions in life that that. was definitely a y intersection the road, and you had to make a choice. You went down that path and there was no looking back. Once you did. But Man Twenty, five, I can't imagine you know that was almost twenty seven years ago for me just the the leadership lessons I've learned from twenty five to fifty, two AB. been. I can only imagine you with your experience it had to be a minimum exponential. So the type of leader you were at twenty five to when you stopped in one, thousand, nine hundred and what do you think the big differences were one of the things that was an advantage early on in the first soda, era I break the book down into the six areas that I that I see as the company history from nineteen, sixty, three to. Nineteen Ninety Eight. But in the first era, the big help was business school and it was there that I learned the language to strategy. I would love to say that I came to the job as a copy twenty, five year old into it. All right I think I matured and and made my mistakes and boy did I make a lot of mistakes over those thirty five years if that the thing that I think the grew was my emotional intelligence. To better understand myself an-and away to. Hopefully understand my teammates around me franchise on his and the people that I came in contact with end consumers. and. It was a journey I. Mean I would absolutely say that It's an old saying, but it's true in my case no, you can't put an old hat on a young body. You do have the Soda Lauren through trial and error and I think truthfully, in my case, the setbacks experience were more informative and more useful. than the successes in fact, a big mistake the after the five I five is of tremendous success, the second five years or really difficult, and it really came as a result of the success of the first five years. It became an impediment to future success in it wasn't until. Unfortunately almost led the team off a cliff in the second five-year era that I really began to start to learn the more effective lessons about who I was what my responsibilities were. As a leader. and. It came from a book of all places. Really my my soda moment transformational moment for me. He uses a book that you read was kind of a transformation moment, moment or. Second Year of a second era of Maya my stint as CEO, and after the first five years basically was under pressure to go publican. And when I came out of Business School Isaiah inheritance universal systems where eight little businesses it was it was excused chaos and fundamentally what the team did is we basically narrowed that down a one we had really been experimenting with far too many businesses and we say basically decided to exploit the the sort of the diamond in the rough that we. Had which was a bunch of stores in many cases, soul breakfast lunch called Dunkin donuts and made donuts and coffee, and we decided to focus on our core business and quiz extraordinarily successful and we went from one hundred thousand dollars in pretax profit within five to seven, hundred, fifty thousand and we went public because my dad I've been trying to sell the business. While I was in business school was unable to sell from billion dollars. It'd become the billionaire always wanted to be after taxes and that was the reason he turned to me I. Think at that Young Age is he wasn't quite sure what to do and. Put me in charge. Then I changed the vision, change the dried to keep up unreasonable injectors and. Drove the business off a cliff I was sitting there amidst. Stockholder suits, franchisee lawsuits reading a book called the best and the brightest by David Halberstam. And it was a book about the Johnson and Kennedy Administration of the Vietnamese War, and what he maintained was even though the administration are governmental Mister show run by these Ivy Leaguers the best the brightest our country at the offer they never really went into the hamlets and into the front lines where the war was being waged the final what the true story was while the con-, winning the hearts and minds of the townspeople in the leadership in the towns. And Halbe Sam said the great fault lie in the fact that our leadership. Suffered from what he called Hubris the Greek word for arrogance in sitting in that chair and I remember like it was yesterday I said Oh my God Halberstam could be talking about me. Yeah it was in that and I decided I. You know I was blaming Franchisees for suing us and. Problems that we're having in terms of Mike. One of my key executives left the company because he had lost faith leadership fellow had gone out of business school with. An and basically we convened our management team. We decided that as leadership we'd never blamed. Martine. Mates are followership take a hundred percent of the responsibility hundred other responsibility. And that we that invite, we apologize for the Arab always we invited franchise on his end to noodle out with us what we did on how we can improve it. We decided we're GONNA go each of us to visit a hundred stores a year each in order to touch the front is travel with the district manages visit the store talk to the owners. Get very important in we created an advisory council. So fundamentally, we did a one eighty in terms of our attitude about how were leaders particularly need what my responsibility was in it all came from that that insight that momentary it's insight from that one book that was transformation I love that story the book was called the best and brightest what what was the full in the brightest by David Halberstam? Think Nineteen, seventy-three, it's it's it's bestseller it was. An important book at the time. In my view, it's still a great management.

Dunkin Donuts CEO Harvard Business School David Halberstam Starbucks Bob Rosenberg Lord Advisory Council Halbe Sam Martine Mike Kennedy Administration Johnson
Swastika, New York, Is Keeping Its Name

Morning Edition

03:22 min | 1 year ago

Swastika, New York, Is Keeping Its Name

"There's a debate in this country over symbols and statues and place names that are tied toe white supremacy. So what to do about a small community in rural northern New York? Called swastika. This summer visitor proposed just changing the name, but local officials opposed the idea. Julia Richie from North Country Public Radio explains why Michael Al Kamo lives in New York City but loves visiting the Adirondack Mountains and upstate New York to cycle through its tiny towns and Hamlets and past historical cemeteries. He was on a trip like this winding through a remote stretch this summer when he noticed something else. Suddenly I came to a town called Watch. The Hamlets name was printed on a small brown street sign. He says he found the name jarring and disrespectful to Veterans of World War two, some of whom are buried in graves nearby, So I think it should be obvious that the town Should update its name and should pick a name that is not so offensive to so many Americans and so emblematic of intolerance, hate and tyranny. So al Comer reached out to county officials in August to see if they would consider it. He was soon directed to email the town of Black Brooke. Which has jurisdiction over swastika. The town agreed to add it to the agenda for their September meeting. And after about five minutes of discussion, the town's for counselors unanimously voted against it. So basically Was named by the founders of the area that settled there. That's black Brooke Supervisor John Douglas, who was at the meeting but didn't have a vote. None of the counsellors returned to request for comment. Douglas Saysthe Hamlets named far predates World War two and came from the Sanskrit word meaning well being the foresighted geometric character that represents the swastika has been used for thousands of years in Indian religions and seen as a symbol of good luck. Of course, That meeting was overshadowed beginning in the 19 thirties with the rise of Adolf Hitler, who co opted the swastika as a symbol for Nazism and anti Semitism. Douglas says. This is not the first time the Hamlets name has been scrutinized. There was concern that due to the Germans that everything that people may I have a different outlook on the name and some of the residents that were from that area actually fought or two and refused to change the name just because Hitler tried to tarnish the meaning of swastika. Douglas says the council didn't see a reason to change the name despite its widespread use as a symbol of hate and white supremacy today, I think that probably Maybe some viewpoint that it's associated with a butt that I believe there's others that do not associate it with. Hey, did the Hindus in the booth and All them today erase it from their religious history because of the Germans, Al Kamo. The cyclists who submitted the request was disappointed by the town's reaction. I didn't expect a quick, apparently quick, unanimous vote to reject the proposal. Social media response to the decision has been murkier, with some locals of the region bristling on Facebook at an outsider from New York City trying to meddle in rural affairs. But Malcolm Oh says he simply wants more people to see the Adirondacks for its natural beauty and deep history history, he says, at odds with the meaning of swastika today

Brooke Supervisor John Douglas New York Michael Al Kamo Al Comer Douglas Saysthe Hamlets New York City Adolf Hitler Malcolm Oh Al Kamo Adirondack Mountains Black Brooke Julia Richie Facebook
"hamlet" Discussed on Revisionist History

Revisionist History

09:02 min | 1 year ago

"hamlet" Discussed on Revisionist History

"The patron saint of hiring nihilism without question was the author and educator Lawrence Peter. . All of us in the hiring community worship at his feet. . When I was a boy I, , used to leave my parents and believe my teachers can have respect for your elders and betters. . The men upstairs knew what they were doing. . That's Peter. . He was a Canadian as a my of course and I don't know if you remember from the lottery episode but Adam Cronk right went to university in Canada. . The nihilists strain runs deep in the land of the frozen prairie. . Anyway Lawrence, , Peter was a great first famous for saying things like the noblest of dogs is the hot dog. . It feeds the hand that bite did. . He was also deeply involved something called the Kinetic Sculpture Race in Humboldt County California, , which is really hard to explain except to say that it's kind of like the triathlon of the art world involving sculptures on wheels that are required to perform certain feats. . Peter Famously proposed a special prize called the Golden Dinosaur Award to be given to the first machine to break down immediately after the start. . which if you knew Lawrence Peter, , you would recognize as being very lawrence. . Peter. . Because his great professional obsession was with incompetence. . He had a CONNOISSEUR'S I for it. . And as looked around me. . I. . Saw a sign on the door that said emergency exit authorized personnel. . Only I, , wondered who'd written <hes>. . But then <hes>. . Later I saw another sign and said emergency exit. . Not to be used under any circumstances learns Peter. . Formulated one of the most famous laws in. . Social. . Science. . He called it the Peter Principle. . The Peter Principle states very simply than in any hierarchy and employ tends to rise to the level of incompetence that's where he stays. . People get promoted based on a prediction about their ability to handle the next job on the hierarchy. . And they keep rising until the prediction is wrong. . You see in any organization. . Where competence is essentially eligibility for promotion and incompetence is a bar to promotion. . Wherever, , those rules apply people were rise to the level of incompetence and tend to stay there. . Lawrence Peter. Wrote . a book called Peter Principle in nine, , hundred, , sixty nine and it is delightful exactly in a Lawrence Peter sort of way like he has a whole riff on the special case of someone who is incompetent per promoted anyway kicked upstairs a move he calls progressive sublimating. . Or the case when an incompetent person is moved out of the way but given a long job title as compensation. . Peter Call that a lateral arabesque. . No chances are you've heard of the Peter Principle I'm guessing as a kind of joke ha ha that's why my boss is so bad. . But it's not a joke. . Allow me to direct you to the work of a fellow member of the Hiring Nyas Club on Benson economist at the University of Minnesota. . While he was doing his doctorate mit he got bitten by the Peter Principle bug. . I started to go to sales management conferences. . And they found that there is this adage that the best salesperson doesn't necessarily make the best manager. . <hes> but then people would laugh and say, but , we do it anyway. . And I wanted to find out why the great advantage of using salespeople debilitate. . The Peter Principle Benson realizes is that you can measure performance really easily is not like assessing the performance of engineers or politicians. . No, , it's super straightforward. . You just look at how many sales salesperson is made and it's also easy to measure good sales manager is you just add up the sales of the salespeople, the , manager managing. . So Allen Benson finds a tech company that sells one of those software platforms for sales organizations, , kind of like salesforce dot com and gets access to all of their customers data four, , hundred firms hundred thousand salespeople. . The first thing he finds is a confirmation of the famous eighty twenty rule that twenty percent of the sales people are responsible for eighty percent of the sales across the board. . It's not that we don't know who's a good salesperson we definitely know. . People are really good. . Second thing he finds those superstars get rewarded. . What we found in the data look that type salespeople are far far more likely to be promoted into sales management than people who are outside of that top twenty percent who aren't the best person on on the team. . Of course, , the makes sense you give the stars promotion. . That's what everyone does. . Okay. . Now it gets interesting one happens when those stars take over as manager. . Fair sales, , people, , themselves people who they managed. . Their performances becomes worse under them than it was under their prior managers. . The Stars get promoted in their terrible managers. . How terrible really terrible. . Benson looked at an alternate promotion scenario where companies decide to promote not stars but the sales people who are good at collaborating. . Nice friendly people who work well with others and teams managed by the friendly people do thirty percent better than the teams managed by the superstars. . Thirty percent is huge. . You. . Might say what does this have to do with nihilism? ? This is just an argument promoting friendly people over superstars does not I rolling or even shrugging? ? Well I haven't told you about Bentsen's last finding. . Because Benson found a fatal flaw in the ultimate promoting scenario. . The one that seems to work thirty percent better, , which is this. . If you promote the friendly sales people over the top salespeople then the top sales people get upset. . So upset that their performance suffers and they aren't so top anymore. . The, whole , thing is so magnificently perverse, , isn't it? ? All your sales come from the same small group of people who expect to be promoted as a reward for their excellence. . But if you promote them out of sales, , which you get returned is a lousy manager and if you don't promote them. . And you pass them over in favor of some warm and fuzzy into personal wuss. . The top performers will pout and stop trying. . So what are you supposed to do? ? You could pay the superstars more and more and give them fancier titles in the maneuver Lawrence Peter called the Lateral Arabesque But you still insulted them by passing them over for the friendly was. . Another idea that some Peter principle theorists have floated his lotteries they end up where Adam cronkite ended up put everyone's name and a hat and promote the winter I mean, , why not? ? But then why have a boss at all? ? No concept of boss is it a boss knows more than the people that bossing? ? There's even a school of thought in the Upper Reaches Peter Principle world at the best solution is just to man up forget everything else and deliberately promote the incompetent because this way you won't lose one of your superstars by them into a lousy manager. . You'll just transfer an incompetent person from their present position of incompetence to another position of incompetence up stairs somewhere where they will occupy a position which according to Peter Principle was bound to be occupied by an incompetent person sooner or later anyway. . Did you follow that? ? Peter principle theorizing gets very Meta ferry quickly. . which. . Is Why most people would rather console themselves with a soothing banalities of Merit and prediction and hierarchy? ? Only. . A select few. . Are Willing to face the truth. . And who are those brave and lonely heretics? ? The nihilists. . People like me. . Who Look at the world with a cold and unflinching eye and say Under the circumstances, , why bother to learn the first thing about any new perspective job candidate? ? and. .

Sarah Peter Principle Benson Stacey Lawrence Peter sales management Nakas Dr Lori Sand Dunes Bentsen PROFESSIONA Adam cronkite Michael Lewis Yale University America Jewish Organization Boston Lucas A. Yiddish professor
The Peter Principle

Revisionist History

09:02 min | 1 year ago

The Peter Principle

"The patron saint of hiring nihilism without question was the author and educator Lawrence Peter. All of us in the hiring community worship at his feet. When I was a boy I, used to leave my parents and believe my teachers can have respect for your elders and betters. The men upstairs knew what they were doing. That's Peter. He was a Canadian as a my of course and I don't know if you remember from the lottery episode but Adam Cronk right went to university in Canada. The nihilists strain runs deep in the land of the frozen prairie. Anyway Lawrence, Peter was a great first famous for saying things like the noblest of dogs is the hot dog. It feeds the hand that bite did. He was also deeply involved something called the Kinetic Sculpture Race in Humboldt County California, which is really hard to explain except to say that it's kind of like the triathlon of the art world involving sculptures on wheels that are required to perform certain feats. Peter Famously proposed a special prize called the Golden Dinosaur Award to be given to the first machine to break down immediately after the start. which if you knew Lawrence Peter, you would recognize as being very lawrence. Peter. Because his great professional obsession was with incompetence. He had a CONNOISSEUR'S I for it. And as looked around me. I. Saw a sign on the door that said emergency exit authorized personnel. Only I, wondered who'd written But then Later I saw another sign and said emergency exit. Not to be used under any circumstances learns Peter. Formulated one of the most famous laws in. Social. Science. He called it the Peter Principle. The Peter Principle states very simply than in any hierarchy and employ tends to rise to the level of incompetence that's where he stays. People get promoted based on a prediction about their ability to handle the next job on the hierarchy. And they keep rising until the prediction is wrong. You see in any organization. Where competence is essentially eligibility for promotion and incompetence is a bar to promotion. Wherever, those rules apply people were rise to the level of incompetence and tend to stay there. Lawrence Peter. Wrote a book called Peter Principle in nine, hundred, sixty nine and it is delightful exactly in a Lawrence Peter sort of way like he has a whole riff on the special case of someone who is incompetent per promoted anyway kicked upstairs a move he calls progressive sublimating. Or the case when an incompetent person is moved out of the way but given a long job title as compensation. Peter Call that a lateral arabesque. No chances are you've heard of the Peter Principle I'm guessing as a kind of joke ha ha that's why my boss is so bad. But it's not a joke. Allow me to direct you to the work of a fellow member of the Hiring Nyas Club on Benson economist at the University of Minnesota. While he was doing his doctorate mit he got bitten by the Peter Principle bug. I started to go to sales management conferences. And they found that there is this adage that the best salesperson doesn't necessarily make the best manager. but then people would laugh and say, but we do it anyway. And I wanted to find out why the great advantage of using salespeople debilitate. The Peter Principle Benson realizes is that you can measure performance really easily is not like assessing the performance of engineers or politicians. No, it's super straightforward. You just look at how many sales salesperson is made and it's also easy to measure good sales manager is you just add up the sales of the salespeople, the manager managing. So Allen Benson finds a tech company that sells one of those software platforms for sales organizations, kind of like salesforce dot com and gets access to all of their customers data four, hundred firms hundred thousand salespeople. The first thing he finds is a confirmation of the famous eighty twenty rule that twenty percent of the sales people are responsible for eighty percent of the sales across the board. It's not that we don't know who's a good salesperson we definitely know. People are really good. Second thing he finds those superstars get rewarded. What we found in the data look that type salespeople are far far more likely to be promoted into sales management than people who are outside of that top twenty percent who aren't the best person on on the team. Of course, the makes sense you give the stars promotion. That's what everyone does. Okay. Now it gets interesting one happens when those stars take over as manager. Fair sales, people, themselves people who they managed. Their performances becomes worse under them than it was under their prior managers. The Stars get promoted in their terrible managers. How terrible really terrible. Benson looked at an alternate promotion scenario where companies decide to promote not stars but the sales people who are good at collaborating. Nice friendly people who work well with others and teams managed by the friendly people do thirty percent better than the teams managed by the superstars. Thirty percent is huge. You. Might say what does this have to do with nihilism? This is just an argument promoting friendly people over superstars does not I rolling or even shrugging? Well I haven't told you about Bentsen's last finding. Because Benson found a fatal flaw in the ultimate promoting scenario. The one that seems to work thirty percent better, which is this. If you promote the friendly sales people over the top salespeople then the top sales people get upset. So upset that their performance suffers and they aren't so top anymore. The, whole thing is so magnificently perverse, isn't it? All your sales come from the same small group of people who expect to be promoted as a reward for their excellence. But if you promote them out of sales, which you get returned is a lousy manager and if you don't promote them. And you pass them over in favor of some warm and fuzzy into personal wuss. The top performers will pout and stop trying. So what are you supposed to do? You could pay the superstars more and more and give them fancier titles in the maneuver Lawrence Peter called the Lateral Arabesque But you still insulted them by passing them over for the friendly was. Another idea that some Peter principle theorists have floated his lotteries they end up where Adam cronkite ended up put everyone's name and a hat and promote the winter I mean, why not? But then why have a boss at all? No concept of boss is it a boss knows more than the people that bossing? There's even a school of thought in the Upper Reaches Peter Principle world at the best solution is just to man up forget everything else and deliberately promote the incompetent because this way you won't lose one of your superstars by them into a lousy manager. You'll just transfer an incompetent person from their present position of incompetence to another position of incompetence up stairs somewhere where they will occupy a position which according to Peter Principle was bound to be occupied by an incompetent person sooner or later anyway. Did you follow that? Peter principle theorizing gets very Meta ferry quickly. which. Is Why most people would rather console themselves with a soothing banalities of Merit and prediction and hierarchy? Only. A select few. Are Willing to face the truth. And who are those brave and lonely heretics? The nihilists. People like me. Who Look at the world with a cold and unflinching eye and say Under the circumstances, why bother to learn the first thing about any new perspective job candidate? and.

Lawrence Peter Peter Principle Benson Peter Principle Peter Call Sales Management Sales Manager Adam Cronk Canada Humboldt County California Hiring Nyas Club University Of Minnesota Bentsen Adam Cronkite
"hamlet" Discussed on Revisionist History

Revisionist History

03:04 min | 1 year ago

"hamlet" Discussed on Revisionist History

"A Plane Gallagher. Del Rotate. Dream cheat seeing how Sunday, KABC? B. O. L. L. S.. When this is over, look her up. This season, the interview that surprised me, the most was with someone named Adam. Cried I talked about him in the episode. On Democratic, Lotteries Adam has made it his life's work to convince grade school kids to Choose Student Council governments by picking names out of a hat. Actually. Since Adam Works in Bolivia by picking father beans out of a clay. Pot. Can I ask you a question? That's Adam. After we talked, he seems slightly mystified about why I had emailed him one day out of the blue. So. How'd you find out about lottery selection like democratic lottery condoms is just interested. I've always been interested in lotteries. and. I just. was rooting around online I met across through Cuba. Doing I mean it's as simple as. Sitting in my coffee shop over there. That was the day I contacted you. I was like this is really interesting and. Still Random. Now there's a very important distinction with his whole lottery thing. It's between agnostic schism and nihilism. Agnostic, schism is about indifference. It's an elaborate gallic shrug. They're gonNA stick would say the reason to choose people randomly for positions of leadership is that basically anyone can do the job. The army in wartime has an agnostic position. Their belief is they can take almost any able bodied person and turn them into a reasonably effective soldier. But that's not Adam crock writes position. He absolutely thinks there are good leaders and bad leaders and not everyone is cut out to be student council president. He just doesn't believe that the systems we currently use her any good. So he says why bother just pull a name out of that. Now. Adam would argue that's in the interest of a fair system. But let's be clear. He's anaylyst. He does not look at the best apparatus democratic selection honed and perfected over many centuries and Shrug That's what the agnostic would do. No. He looks at those elaborate rituals and he rolls his eyes. He says, give me a break. That's my position to when it comes to hiring. I look at all the folklore and ritual around predicting how well people will perform and I say give me a break. I am an eye roller, not Schroeder, I am anaylyst. And my task in this episode of revisionist history is to convince you to be anaylyst too. I had a long chat with no recently gaps.

"hamlet" Discussed on Revisionist History

Revisionist History

06:01 min | 1 year ago

"hamlet" Discussed on Revisionist History

"Pushkin. A question was nagging me who killed truth? This truth problem, it isn't just bad. It's deadly. I'm Jill Lepore and I'm a historian at Harvard and a staffer at the New Yorker. I spent a lot of time trying to solve mysteries like this one. So I decided to start a podcast. It's called the last archive. Hell. Tell ten stories from the last hundred years a history of America and our arguments about truth and evidence. The last archive brought to you by Pushkin Industries. Here's what we're doing today. But he did, I'm to do an episode revisionist history. In which I you know I'm I'm obsessed with hiring of always been obsessed with. What I'm doing is I'm interviewing people I ever hired and you you the first riot. Wear that badge pretty proudly. We'll tell you what. Stacey cash my first assistant. Never had an assistant before the maybe fifteen years ago. Right? After publishing my second book blink I realized, I was spending all my time answering emails and booking travel instead of writing. So I. decided I needed some help. I didn't remember the circumstances under which you can't work for me. So I thought I would just ask you. Remind me again. How found you? A big theme of what follows is that I have no memory names, faces, dates, I. Basically forget everything. A normal person doesn't have to do research on their own life, but I'm afraid I do. Okay. So I have some funny funny memories. Around the whole hiring situation. So you found me how how it happened was I had just finished Grad school and is looking for a job. Stacy knew someone who knew someone who had an assistant who knew me or something like the very complicated anyway got stacy's name and just emailed her onto blue. Like you don't know me but I'm looking for an assistant. You know, would you be interested? We met the next day for coffee. We chatted for literally. I'M GONNA say all of thirty minutes. and. So yeah, we will. You are going to you traveling to south. Africa. Always spoke about of what I can remember is you'd sit, oh, you have an ax, you have an accent I'm like, yeah. I was born in South Africa and then move to Australia on going to South Africa for business or for. Your speaking engagements the next day, and so I think for about twenty minutes, all we talked about was like recommendations of what you should do in south. Africa that pretty much. I think was. Rigorous job in rigorous like, yes, you really vetted me through and through my knowledge on where best to eat in South Africa. We talked about that of an high remember hilariously being very concerned because I just got an a nose ring. And I remember thinking Oh. I don't know. Is he going to? I, take the nose ring out for the interview. Will he noticed this? Is. It. Proper professional of me and I? Literally, remember like maybe six months to a year later when I was obviously had been working for you that time and I said to you something about like, do you ever noticed that something about my nose ring came out? Oh, I didn't even know you had one. Agonized over whether to keep this nose ring in or not for fear that it would. No, it would be a bad look and you did not for the entire year. The first year that I worked for. You did not even notice that I had a nose ring. I didn't notice. Then I don't remember. Now, this is getting off to a bad start. My Name Is Malcolm Gabrielle. You're listening to my podcast about things overlooked and misunderstood. In this episode, I turned the unflinching analytic gays that is revisionist history upon myself. US Use our texts, the immortal lines, the New Testament. Matthew. Seven Verse Five Thou. Hypocrite. I cast out the beam out of nine own I. And then Shalt, thou. Seek clearly to cast out the moat out of THY BROTHER'S I. You had emailed me and we'd met the next morning because you're leaving. I think shortly after that for South Africa, we spoke for about thirty minutes twenty, twenty, five of which was about South Africa, and then you left and you said to me said Okay Great. You know I've got a couple of people that interview and I guess I'll be in touch when I'm back from my travel in like two weeks. Oh. Okay. Good to meet you a moving kinda nervous. You left the Holcombe after wait now for two weeks to find out and about I'M GONNA say ten to fifteen minutes later. My phone rang. I odd said it and you're like, Hey, it's Malcolm again. So listen you seem nice enough. Why are you just combined start tomorrow? The least professional IRA drive advert. Five years thing as well is I was like this must've been like a blink moment for him. I. Mean you had just

Conscience of the Country: A Tribute to John Lewis

On One with Angela Rye

07:54 min | 1 year ago

Conscience of the Country: A Tribute to John Lewis

"Congressman John Robert Louis was born in Troy Alabama on February twenty first nineteen, forty, two sharecroppers, Willie Mae, and Eddie Lewis. He is known for telling the story of preaching chickens at the boy from troy as he was nicknamed went on to become revered world leader and fearless advocate for voting rights organizing sit ins in. Nashville in nineteen sixty and becoming one of the original freedom writers Mr Lewis joined the Movement for civil rights and never looked back. As the chairman of snake he served as the youngest speaker at the march on Washington in nineteen, sixty three. In nineteen, sixty, five alongside reverend hosea, Williams Congressman Lewis led a march for voting rights across the Edmund Pettus Bridge in Selma Alabama where he endured violent attacks by state troopers and vigilantes. Mr. Lewis fell to the ground with a fractured skull and five months later, president Lyndon B, Johnson signed the voting rights act of nineteen, sixty five until now. On the other side of that bridge Mr Lewis marched on into a life in career of activism and public service. He lost his first attempt at running for Congress in nineteen seventy seven was appointed the same year by President Jimmy Carter to the Director of action a Federal Agency for volunteerism. He then won a seat on the Atlantic City Council in nineteen eighty one and five years later ran for Congress in one. So much of the conversation about congressman, John. Lewis has been about his activism, but he stood on so many legislative accomplishments including sponsoring or co sponsoring more than eleven hundred bills. One of the most notable bills gave us the National Museum of African American History and culture in two thousand three. He served as a subcommittee chair for oversight for the prestigious ways and means. Committee, and after the retirement of Congressman John Conyers. became the dean of the Congressional. Black Caucus in twenty nineteen, he presided over the House floor as Congress passed hr four. Since his passing the bill was renamed the John Lewis Voting Rights Act which was adopted by unanimous consent. Before being admitted to the hospital, MR? Lewis stood in the heart of Black Lives Matter Plaza. He took his last breath on July seventeenth twenty twenty. But his legacy lives on in all of us. We begin this John Lewis. Tribu. where he also began with civil rights joining me for this very important conversation are Vanita Gupta President and CEO of the Leadership Conference on civil and Human Rights Derek Johnson, president and CEO of the of Lacey Pe-. Reverend, Michael Pfleger the senior pastor of the faith community of Saint. SAVINA. Reverend Dr William J Barbour, the second president of repairs of the breach and Co Chair of the poor people's campaign. An latasha Brown, Co founder and chief doer of black voters matter. A thank you all so much for making time to talk with me today about on. John Lewis. So I want to start with I'm. VANITA. Because of your work at the Department of Justice of course. I believe the year before you got to DOJ. The the case, the decision that gutted the voting rights act shelby versus holder, and so I wanna hear from you on some of the things that you experienced working with Mr Lewis on the other side of that because we know that right after that, all of the advocacy picked up to reinstate section five to get the voting rights on provision where they needed to be in Congress. And so just talk a little bit about some of your work with Mr Lewis on those issues. Shore. Is Truly an honor to be here with my. Warrior colleagues and friends and loved ones in the movement. Especially on today Angela. I think probably all of us were in tears watching Mr Lewis Funeral you know twenty thirteen is you mentioned that United States Supreme Court gutted the heart of the voting rights act in a devastating decision the shelby county versus holder decision. That really took away the longstanding tool of one of the most effective pieces of federal legislation in our nation's history in the voting rights act. That quired states with long histories of racial discrimination in voting to pre clear with the United States Justice Department changes made at the local level for election practices that had racially discriminatory impact. And the removal of that tool within hours of that decision coming down for the United. States. Court states like, North Carolina Texas enacted, Monster? Voter. Laws doing everything from. Putting forth restrictive voting laws cutting back early voting same day registration. And it took years to litigate and to hamlet the Justice Department did working with advocates and activists in all states. Where so years for federal courts in a place like North Carolina finally say that the State legislators North Carolina had enacted there. Monster Voter Suppression Law would such surgical precision to disenfranchise African Americans and meanwhile countless elections had taken place but Mr Lewis of legacy was that in the face of this overwhelmingly bad decision for voting rights he immediately. Went to action, which is always his way was never in a would not allow despair to hold him back inside we need to do everything we can restore it in went to work with legislative partners in the Congressional Black Caucus to put forth a bill immediately to restore it on every prior reauthorization of the voting. Rights. Act angelides always been done under. The Watch of Republican president and at least one house of Congress being Republican the unfortunate thing is after this decision, the really has not been bipartisan support and but Mr Lewis Year after year would stand at the podium introduced the law in say or in it for the long haul I've been there before I almost lost my life fighting for this law. In one, thousand, nine, sixty five, and we will persevere to us and we've got to keep our eye on the prize and we're not gonNA. Let go until the day that the bill becomes law. So in this moment. On where we're seeing a lot of performance morning by Senate Republicans who obstructed day after day everything that he has stood for and fought for with his life. It is time not only for us to restore the voting rights act passed the voting rights advancement act but to do everything else that we can to ensure open voting and go beyond it as President Obama said today won't be enough to rest and return to the status quo. It is time for this country to unregarded into make our democracy work for all of us in Gulf Far Beyon- restoration of the voting rights act in this moment.

Congressman Lewis John Lewis Congress United States Justice Departme President Trump Mr Lewis Mr Lewis Funeral Congressional Black Caucus Congressman John Robert Louis North Carolina Congressman John Conyers. Derek Johnson Edmund Pettus Bridge President And Ceo
To the People

5 Minutes in Church History

04:15 min | 1 year ago

To the People

"Welcome back to another episode of five minutes in Church history. On this episode. We're going back to one of our favorite times to the time of the reformation and one of our favorite figures, Martin Luther. Well, there's a recent book on Luther welts five years old now, but relatively recent. That talks about how luther used the printing press. To advance these ideas and the theology of the reformation. But in addition to using the printing press, this book also talks about how Luther uses something rather innovative for scholars theologians. At the time he used the language of the people and not Latin. The author of this book Andrew Pedigree Says Luther was a cultured and purposeful theological writer. He wrote fine Latin and his. Latin works measured up well against those of talented adversaries by saying that he was cultured meant he was educated. And saying that he was a purposeful theological writer means that he could get into the technicality. He could be exacting in his writing and in his logic, and he could go toe to toe with those in the academy, but then Dr Pedigree says that Luther made the decision to make the case in German. This was with a very crucial moment publication, his fifteen eighteen sermon on indulgence in grace. Now we know in fifteen seventeen. Of course we have the ninety five theses. They were written in Latin. They were intended to be a debate within the church. We also know that they were quickly translated from Latin into the German and through the printing press, and these printing presses popped up all over the hamlets and cities of Germany. That Luther Ninety, five theses were quickly distributed spread like wildfire cross German speaking lands. But what he wrote in fifteen eighteen this sermon, he purposely wrote it in German. An had it printed in German. And the reason is very simple. The people needed to hear this message. They needed to hear this message because they lived in darkness. Well going back a few decades to nineteen fifty. We have that wonderful biography of Luther that classic biography by Roland Bayton. Here I stand. This is how Bayton and biography. The God of Luther. Moses. Was the God who inhabits the storm, clouds and rides on the wings of the wind. At his nod, the earth trembles, and the people before him are as a drop in the bucket. He is a god of Majesty and Power, inscrutable, terrifying, devastating and consuming in his anger. Yet the all terrible. Is The all merciful to. Like as a father piteous his children. So the Lord. But. How shall we know this? In Christ. Says only in Christ. That was luther message that was luther trembling before a holy God. Feeling the anger, the wrath of a righteous God against him. A very unrighteous man. And yet he realized that in Christ. This all terrible one. Is, the all loving one. And loved Luther with a love that would not let him go. Well. That was the message of Martin Luther. He preached his whole life. Any new was a message that was far more than simply a debate within the academy. It was a message that had to be taken directly to the people, and that's what he did. Through the use of the German language and the use of a printing press. He sent that message around Germany. And even as the centuries-old on around the world.

Martin Luther Luther Ninety Germany Writer Andrew Pedigree Roland Bayton
Hidden Histories - Rosewood, Tulsa, Chicago

Your Brain on Facts

04:22 min | 1 year ago

Hidden Histories - Rosewood, Tulsa, Chicago

"Halfway between Tampa and Tallahassee, a hundred yards off state route, twenty four and ten miles from the next town stands a handsome Pale Yellow House with decorative white trim on the two story porch. The house was the only survivor of an episode of such extraordinary violence that it boggles the mind how quickly and completely it was swept under the rug. An entire community was burned to the ground in an incident of racist asymmetrical warfare. And most people have never even heard of it. My Name's Moxy and this is your brain on facts. The community had been or technically still is Rosewood, Florida. It was settled by both black and white people twenty years before the civil war, but the Jim. Crow segregation in the Post Bellum decades put a clear divide into the community. The town was incorporated in eighteen seventy after it got a post office on a train stop and was named Rosewood for the Pink Cedars that were also the base of its economy. Residents worked in lumber, yards, mills, and even a pencil factory. Until the cedars had been overharvested, and the factories began to close. Most of the white residents moved to nearby sumner. But one couple John and Mary right who ran the general store? They were kind to their neighbors, and were known to Slip Candy to the black kids who hung out at the store, possibly because their own children had died young. The white flight continued into the nineteen twenties when Rose Woods population of about two hundred was entirely black plus the rights. The little hamlet got by just fine. Until New Year's Day nineteen twenty-three. Over in Sumner, a woman named Fanny Taylor woke her neighbors, saying a black man had broken into her house and attacked her. Rather than alert sheriff, her husband immediately gathered a group of men. Including clansmen who were in the area for a rally and a tracking dog. the, dog, lead them to the railroad tracks, which led to Rosewood. The mob, which would grow to be three hundred strong got it in their head that they were looking for a black man named Jesse Hunter who had escaped from a chain gang. The dog ran through the open door of a house and back out with that of wagon tracks. When the homeowner swore that no one else had been in his house, the mob tied him to the back of a car and dragged him down a dirt road. Then they tracked down the owner of the wagon whose tracks the dog sniffed. When he also claimed ignorance and innocence, the mob mutilated and killed him. The mob came to the House of Sarah carrier the Taylor's laundries. Two dozen people most of them. Children were hiding inside having heard what was going on already driven out of their homes by fear. For whatever reason the mob was sure that carrier was hiding Jesse Hunter. They fired on the House and carrier. Sons returned fire. When it was over both Sarah and her son Sylvester carrier had been fatally shot, though Sylvester had managed to kill two of their assailants. Had, anyone bothered to talk to Sarah carrier about Fannie, Taylor. She would have been able to tell them about Taylor's lover. Her white lover who she had been with before the attack. As, the mob kicked in the front door of the carrier house, the people hiding inside fled out the back door to the relative safety of the nearby. Swampy Woods. Not. All were able to get away though. Carriers, other son James was found by the mob who reportedly made him dig his own grave before killing him. The newspapers of the nearby towns caught wind of what was happening. They ran exaggerated. Retailing's of the siege of the carrier House and blatantly false reports of roving bands of armed black citizens. Seeing that even more white men poured into Rosewood believing that a race war had broken out. Apparently it's only a race war when the race you're targeting fights back. The manhunt and terror campaign wasn't confined to that single night, but stretched on for nearly a week.

Pale Yellow House Rosewood Sarah Carrier Fanny Taylor Jesse Hunter Sylvester Carrier Sumner Pink Cedars Rose Woods Tampa Florida Swampy Woods James Tallahassee JIM
Hidden Histories

Your Brain on Facts

04:55 min | 1 year ago

Hidden Histories

"Four and ten miles from the next town stands a handsome Pale Yellow House with decorative white trim on the two story porch. The house was the only survivor of an episode of such extraordinary violence that it boggles the mind how quickly and completely it was swept under the rug. An entire community was burned to the ground in an incident of racist asymmetrical warfare. And most people have never even heard of it. My Name's Moxy and this is your brain on facts. The community had been or technically still is Rosewood, Florida. It was settled by both black and white people twenty years before the civil war, but the Jim. Crow segregation in the Post Bellum decades put a clear divide into the community. The town was incorporated in eighteen seventy after it got a post office on a train stop and was named Rosewood for the Pink Cedars that were also the base of its economy. Residents worked in lumber, yards, mills, and even a pencil factory. Until the cedars had been overharvested, and the factories began to close. Most of the white residents moved to nearby sumner. But one couple John and Mary right who ran the general store? They were kind to their neighbors, and were known to Slip Candy to the black kids who hung out at the store, possibly because their own children had died young. The white flight continued into the nineteen twenties when Rose Woods population of about two hundred was entirely black plus the rights. The little hamlet got by just fine. Until New Year's Day nineteen twenty-three. Over in Sumner, a woman named Fanny Taylor woke her neighbors, saying a black man had broken into her house and attacked her. Rather than alert sheriff, her husband immediately gathered a group of men. Including clansmen who were in the area for a rally and a tracking dog.

Pale Yellow House Rosewood Pink Cedars Sumner Fanny Taylor Rose Woods Florida JIM John Mary
Is It Rolling, Bob? Talking Dylan: James Shapiro

Rock N Roll Archaeology

06:20 min | 1 year ago

Is It Rolling, Bob? Talking Dylan: James Shapiro

"And so going back to think twice you were talking about about more about the writing. Yeah and it's something that I didn't know enough about until I was invited onto your program. But what are the things that interest me about? Shakespeare is the fact that you know. He wrote thirty six so plays that we know of and almost none of them may be. The tempest may be midsummer. Night's dream are his original story but for the most part Shakespeare was not interested in creating a new story. He looked around at the stories others had told whether they were Italian. Novellas or English plays or history's any thought I understand what's slightly off for not really fulfilled in this version older version and he did what architects call a gut renovation. He kept the frame and he just cleared out the inside and made it is. Oh so when Dylan writes. Don't think twice. He knows Paul Clayton Song. Who's going to buy you ribbons? When I'm gone? He worked with Klay knew who sadly killed himself in in one thousand nine hundred sixty seven. Eight toward together collaborated a little bit and I'm sure that there is kind of cross pollination if you will between Clayton Song. And and don't think twice and dillon with a little techy from what. I've learned about that you know he said I steal the word a or the word so whether we're done you know Ed is a good question. Although he was a little defensive even steal those words but he is reaching into a tradition a tradition that goes further back than Clayton to. What I learned was an African American Song that circulated in Virginia. Who's GonNa Bring you chickens? So what we're talking about. Our traditions and Shakespeare comes out of traditions. Really in very similar ways. To how Dylan does and plagiarism is. A useless category the only useful category. Can you take something old and make it speak to the moment? In a way that makes people feel connected to that song ways. Nobody has ever felt connected to it in dealing did that for me. I think I'm right in saying and correct me. If I'm not the Sean Wilentz I think wrote a book called Bob Dylan and America. And he I believe explored this notion and said you know what it's Alchemy. What he's doing is he's taking base matters and is creating something new out of it that shines and I thought that was really damage. It is in trouble. Lens is A friend and a very smart guy and I think he wrote brilliantly about about Dylan. Christopher ricks did as well They're just a people recognize. That is work rises to the level of seriousness. And it is how chemical it is a transformation but for me. It's really the lack of thoughtfulness beyond the magic of the transformation and the thoughtfulness I suppose has to do with. I see what's not there. That's a hard thing to to grasp and Shakespeare was really good at it. Didn't create the story of Hamlet. He didn't create the story King. Lear those were all plays bouncing around in the stage. You probably acted in a spear holder when he was young. He's onstage they could. God I can write this great Soliloquy at this point or I could tweak it in this way. And maybe it's not occurring Bob Dylan in a cerebral way. But it's occurring to him in a way that lets them know. Yeah I. I know the folk he sang exists but that song is dead on arrival. Something has to be done to reanimated and I suppose it's as much Raising the data's alchemy. And where do you think Dylan? Shakespeare intersect particularly? I think oddly even though four hundred years or so separates their birth. They both products of a similar education system. You know it's it's remarkable if you listened to to Dylan's account of education in his Nobel lecture in two thousand Seventeen. He talks a lot of doubt grammar. School you know. He learned things in Grammar School. The devices techniques secret mysteries whatever. He's talking about. He talks about gullivers travel. Dickins Don Quixote all these stories and of course we know he had a great teacher in school. Who taught him the poetry John Donovan? The poetry plays of Shakespeare so shakespeare learn what he learned in Grammar School. I mean this is a Western tradition that span than in now and both of them sat there probably frustrated probably demise racing as they were exposed to this stuff and taking it all in and a decade later or or ten years later figuring out how to turn this into into gold if you will and I mean that both literally and figuratively because you have to make money as an artist or like pulled claim you can end up desperate and suicidal and both of them figured out how to do that. And if you think you know as a thought experiment Dylan or Shakespeare Been Born twenty years earlier or twenty years later whatever genius they had could not have been fully rely so yes. They were both remarkable artists but they had great luck in being born at what they recognize. Both of them were pivotal moments in in their culture in the arts in the possibilities that were now available to young

Bob Dylan Shakespeare Clayton Song Grammar School Christopher Ricks Sean Wilentz John Donovan Don Quixote ED Virginia Dillon Klay Lear America
"hamlet" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

06:47 min | 2 years ago

"hamlet" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Marvin hamlet should Scott Joplin a Mexican serenade known as solace and fleshed out with a beautiful arrangement, for the soundtrack of the film, the sting, the guy Clark song shares, a lot of structure, if not actual melody with solid. I think the guy Clark song being my favorite picture review as performed by Willie Nelson on his new ride me back home. But the more obvious connection in terms of straight melody line. I think is here. Linda songbook on WNYC. Since. Baby. Happy. The. Sweep. Two. Just one. Yes. Just what? Yes. See. Eva Cassidy, having.

Clark Willie Nelson Marvin hamlet Eva Cassidy Scott Joplin WNYC Linda