35 Burst results for "Halsey"

Bruins beat Golden Knights 3-1 in battle of division leaders

AP News Radio

00:39 sec | Last month

Bruins beat Golden Knights 3-1 in battle of division leaders

"The bruins want to match up of conference leaders by scoring twice in the third period to beat the golden knights three to one. Jake de bruss broke a one one deadlock two 11 into the final period off a perfect pass by Pavel zacha. I knew that JD was coming, so I would just make a pass through any score, but I think Halsey know making that play on the wall is really hard. And make the two one one for us there. Charlie Coyle doubled the lead about 7 minutes later. Lena Sue Mark handled 30 shots of Patrice bergeron also scored as the bruins improved to 11 and one versus the Western Conference this season. Boston split the two game season series and approved to a league best 22 four and one overall. Mark stone scored for Vegas and Logan Thompson May 23 saves. I'm Dave ferry.

Jake De Bruss Pavel Zacha Bruins Golden Knights Charlie Coyle Lena Sue Mark Halsey Patrice Bergeron Boston Mark Stone Logan Thompson Vegas Dave Ferry
"halsey" Discussed on Nightly Pop

Nightly Pop

03:33 min | 4 months ago

"halsey" Discussed on Nightly Pop

"Our social

Are Depressed Musicians Starting a New '28 Club' for Being Sad?

AJ Benza: Fame is a Bitch

02:23 min | 4 months ago

Are Depressed Musicians Starting a New '28 Club' for Being Sad?

"Here's another young millionaire unhappy with the life they chose. Remember I told you a few weeks ago, Shawn Mendes needed to stop his tour for mental health check. And then it was Justin Bieber who had to put a stop to his tour because he needed a break and the mental health he didn't feel right. He was tired, he's 28. Were you ever tired of 28 years old? Then there was Demi Lovato last week saying, you know, she hates this touring, and she's probably gonna stop doing this after this tour, you know, and I can't do this anymore. And now the latest one is Halsey. You know Halsey? She's a cutie. Halsey's a real cutie and a great singer. She revealed that sometimes she wonders if she chose the wrong life after confessing that she feels a deep sadness, obviously this article was written with the day them pronouns. I will not say them. Halsey is a female, and that's what I'm going to refer to as. She said, I find that often there's a deep sadness inside me that no amount of worldly pleasure can touch a loneliness, an emptiness. I wonder often if I chose the wrong life for myself, and the weight of it is suffocating, I'm sorry that melancholy has penetrated my art in a way that hasn't served a greater purpose other than my own self loathing. I'm approaching my 28th birthday in a week and just now exhaling and gasping for air for the first time since I took a single breath in this new life at 18, a breath that was meant to sustain me for a decade. What the fuck is she talking about? You're 28 years old. You've got millions. What are you quitting for? Is this the new magic age? At least Janis Joplin and Kurt Cobain, Jimi Hendrix, and others checked out in 27. Is this what happens when you turn 28 if you're in music?

Halsey Shawn Mendes Demi Lovato Justin Bieber Janis Joplin Kurt Cobain Jimi Hendrix
AJ Is Getting Nervous With All the Gender Fluidity Going Around

AJ Benza: Fame is a Bitch

01:38 min | 4 months ago

AJ Is Getting Nervous With All the Gender Fluidity Going Around

"But I tell you what, I am getting a little bit nervous of all these people just having no problem talking openly about their sexuality. I'm getting old, I guess, but you know what my daughter I took her to see that singer, youngblood, a couple of weeks back. She loves the guy. I want to be showing, puts on a good show. You know, and he's dating Halsey. Another little hot shit singer that I think is adorable and is great at what she does. And listen, both of them have come out and said, look, you know, sometimes we don't know who the boyfriend is or who the girlfriend is. Were that free with each other? Youngblood says, hey man, I can walk out of the house. If I see somebody who's a transgender or transsexual and I think they're cute and we hit it off, I'm gonna take a walk with that person. You know, she says, hey, he says, you know, look, I can come out of my house. We're in a dress. Think of all the generations ago, how many people wore dresses? I don't know where he's getting that from, but the point is, he can be with some money whether they're in a dress or they're in a tough shit outfit that looks like they're gonna kick your ass. Either way it turns him on. Same thing goes for Halsey. And those of my daughters two favorite singers. I don't know. I mean, when I was growing up, people that I liked had crazy predilections. It didn't, it didn't change me, but I'm a father now. So it's getting me a little bit concerned. And even if the people back in my day did feel that way, like David Bowie, we knew bully Bowie posed on a fucking album cover with a dress on. So he wasn't a shocker. But this little innuendo that some of these people are just getting out there and social media, now we're all we all get to know what they feel and what they want, what their desires are. Back then there was a mystery to it. I don't know, the whole fucking thing.

Halsey Youngblood David Bowie Bowie
"halsey" Discussed on CRYPTO 101

CRYPTO 101

07:03 min | 6 months ago

"halsey" Discussed on CRYPTO 101

"Make the financial services world more efficient, more equitable, you know, et cetera, et cetera. I couldn't agree more. Those are great insights. Another question I was thinking of, you know, just while we were having this conversation, you know, with so many different ventures in your portfolio, what were some signs that you used in the past decide when to exit? It's one of the questions that I get asked most, you know, when do I sell, you know, when do I know it's like, well, I can't really tell you that. This is more of an art form than a science. There's no one thing, but are there any signs that you use, say, okay, well, I've done all I can do here, or this is done all it can do for me. It's time to move on to the next thing. Okay, there's sort of two things. The first thing is, is that most of the companies that I've started are still around today. So I think the thing that I'm probably most proud of is CNET still around today, Salesforce is still around today. I spun in $11 billion company out of publishing, they're called info tax. They were called vignette then and they're still around. Open DNS, Google Voice. Paul, you look at them. So the first and most important thing to me is to build a foundation that is capable of supporting a company for a very, very long time. And also independent of the founder. So it's a good enough company that if I leave, it can continue to run. In fact, it can even grow. The second thing that I always do is I never consider exit strategies. I don't build to sell. I help build to go public. I build to try to solve a problem. And if I say fixated on that, and not on whether I can sell or whatever, I've been I've been very successful. And so I think that's right. If you start a company because you intend to sell it and I think you end up not building a company that lasts a long time. I think your intentions will ultimately play themselves out in the kind of people that you end up hiring. So I would say that the big challenge for me is when to get in because I oftentimes get into early. I mean, I mean, I sat around, you know, I started seeing that in 1993. And we didn't launch our website until April of 1995. And even then we were the first website on the Internet. So sometimes I'm a little early in markets. But I try to philosophically stay away from that and just try to try to figure out what can we do this valuable, how do I hire the right kind of people who create a workplace where other people want to come and work and if you do those things in a few more, you end up finding out that your company's are you're still using their products 25 years later. Would you say finding the right people is not necessarily finding the hardest worker but finding vision alignment or what are you really looking for when you're hungry? Alignment. Yeah. Yeah. The executioner, obviously, too, but I don't have as many Harvard Business school Stanford business school people. As you'll find on a lot of successful ventures where you've got very, very impressive resumes. I want people who are as excited about what I'm doing. As I am and have that same sort of shared mission and I just find the work harder, go create a better work environment. And there'll be more successful than if you're trying to ask somebody how many rain gutters are in Russia or how many movie theaters are in Colombia. These are the kind of questions I love SpaceX and Microsoft and people Google answer to very, very passionate to me kind of trumps most other most other factors. And you know, again, I think it goes towards the how do you build something that's sustainable over the long term and it's a bunch of people who get together and they have a vision and they get excited every day about what they're doing and coming to work does not working and my job is always to make sure that people don't fight with each other so that they love coming to work and they love and to be able to build. So yeah, I mean sorry it's long answer, but I really, I really try to stay away from the sort of way of thinking about something. I think that was an incredible answer and I'm so glad that you were willing to give us the extended version and it's a great thing. Really just look at solving a problem in the world. The profits are going to come along the way. Don't worry about the money making part of it. But focus on building the future and it's all going to work out. And I really love what you said about finding the right people and focusing on that passion. There's a company in this space that unfortunately got caught up in some of the collapse and C 5 and the terror Luna ecosystem and they had to lay off their entire staff and their entire staff said, you know what? We're going to stay anyway because we believe in this project. We're still going to continue working. We don't care about getting paid. We want to keep on building. And it was just one of the most incredible things. And it says, well, you really got this solid group of people that have this shared passion, and that's really the power of people. Not everyone's driven by money. They're driven by problem solving by progress. And I think those are the kinds of things that you're going to find in crypto and blockchain that are so special. And web three is like a black hole sucking in all these individuals from all these other sectors of academia and web two and corporate finance saying, hey, all these things that you dreamed about, you can do here. And there's thousands and now hundreds of thousands of people that are like minded for you to build with. It's just the best time. Yeah, that's a great story. I'm glad to hear that. I mean, that's actually that's a remarkable story. That's probably

Harvard Business school Stanfo Salesforce CNET Google SpaceX Paul Colombia Russia Microsoft
"halsey" Discussed on Gloss Angeles

Gloss Angeles

07:46 min | 7 months ago

"halsey" Discussed on Gloss Angeles

"For. You know? Not to bring it full circle like that or anything. But just put a little bow right on that. Yeah. And it is so good. All of it's so good. Congratulations. I see what you did there. I was gonna say Sarah. Okay, yes, we love the so good inclusion. Look at you. So now we're gonna head into this so good speed round. Sarah, do you want to kick it off? Who is the euphoria character you relate to the most? I think like in a way, I'm very jewels, like I feel like I'm very self destructive, but also very sweet inside and also, you know, I feel like aesthetically we're very similar in a way, but also I think I'm ashtray. I don't know how to explain that one, but it just feels right to me, so now. If you're not ashtray for Halloween, I'm going to riot. I will be in your DMs going insane. I don't know, I feel like I could look like him. If I shaved my head again and got a face tattoo, you know, I don't know, we'll figure it out. So as mentioned, you performed Kate Bush this past weekend, which was incredible. Do you watch Stranger Things? I haven't watched the latest episodes yet because I've been on the road and my partner, I love and I have promised we would sit down and watch them together and we haven't had the time yet so we're waiting for a section of off days to binge it because God bless everyone but like I am a working performer. I do not have time to watch a two hour special after the show. I need time. I need like a day to do it, you know? Yes, my partner and I had to take it in strides, but I guess like based on the past seasons, is there a character that you would want by your side to defeat the evil? Like if there was an evil in your life, like what character would you want to be with you? I mean, I feel like my answer is so cliche, but like obviously it's L, you know what I mean? It's definitely Elle. I don't know if she's like a super beloved character, but maybe like 8, just to get out there and kick some ass. I don't know. Could it be like those are like an obscure answer? I'll give you my cliche and then my obscure. Callie, 8. Is there a baby product that changed your life? Or if someone's having a baby or like you have to get this? Hold on. There's so many. The DACA top is a necessity. You need a Dakota. Absolutely necessity. The duna stroller for when they're really little is so great because it's immediately convertible into a car seat, which makes life so much easier. Not awesome to travel with though because they don't always let you bring it on to airplanes because it has wheels. Coconut oil is the best diaper rash cream, hands down. You don't need to try any of the medicated stuff. You don't need to overdo it. Coconut, I slather my baby in coconut oil from head to toe every day. He's a softer skin, his skin is beautiful. His butt looks great as far as baby butts go. You know what I mean? And he's like, he's super good to go. And then the bumbo seat for when they start solids and they're sitting at the dinner table with you. Definite necessity. You can tell I'm a real ass mom. You are. You really are. Oh, and then the already pop carriers. They're so cute. Already pop baby carrier. Love the already pop carriers. So chic, I love all those things. Zoey did not like her bumbo, unfortunately. Really? Yeah, I don't know why. But I have it. You are a real ass mom. Loved all those answers. Thank you. Yeah, of course. It's all stuff that you probably already know, but once we get off of this, I'll send you my real detailed list. Okay, last thing Halsey, this is kind of like a kumbaya moment, but what is inspiring you lately? What is the inspiration that's driving you right now? One of the things that I've been trying to do is to create more ritual in my life. I think that one of the hardest things about self care and mental health is realizing the annoying things that everybody tells you to do actually work. You know, like when people are like, go get more sun and you're like, shut up, and then you go out and you get sun and you're like, oh, I feel better. You know what I mean? It's annoying, but it works. So I'm trying to create more ritual in the sense of like, when I get into my dressing room every day, I'll set up like a candle and some Palestine and I collect things on the tour. Like I got seashells and golf shores on the beach when I did hang out and I like I'll pick flowers outside or like just kind of these like little things and I kind of set up like a little altar, like right at my vanity for where I do my makeup and then I burn a candle when I start my makeup like a little chime candle or like a tea light or something, something that has the ability to burn out was in like a few hours. And then kind of like when that candle has burned out is right around the time I'm about to go on stage and I'm kind of like, okay, it's stage time and I'm ready and I started doing it and then I realized in the days where I didn't do it I couldn't shake the feeling that I was forgetting something or that I was missing something or that I had anxiety about something. It's when I started doing it again and I felt a lot better and it's a simple thing. I'm not like a super religious person, but I think that it kind of takes the place of having faith or meditation or having a moment to kind of check in with yourself. I'm one of those people who will be like, as you need to check in with yourself and I'll be like, I'll do it later. I'll check in with myself later, which is just ridiculous, you know? So I've started kind of being more present about that. And those moments have been really inspiring for me. I think because they're really grounding. And they show that I am vulnerable and I am susceptible to effects of a quiet moment or a beautiful flower or a nice smelling candle, you know, despite all of the things that I've done and been through in my life at my core, I am still just a person who is so easily moved by something subtle and beautiful. And that's like really grounding, I think. It's your water placements. I am a human swimming pool. You know what else it is, it's not only just my water placements. I don't have a single fire sign in my entire chart. Interesting. So I'm basically like a waterlogged door mat. You know what I mean? Like that's who I am as a person. My son is a cancer. I love it. I love this. Yeah, he's a cancer. He's a mama's boy. Oh my gosh. He's big mama's boy. We know you have to go. This was truly incredible for Sarah and I, as much as we talk about the brand, we're just thrilled that you made the time for us. Go pick up about face at Ulta. Yay. I'm also gonna be like popping into Ulta stores on tour, so be on the lookout for me, 'cause you might run into me buying Q tips and lip liners, which would be so cool. Rearranging the products the way that you like it. Oh my God, I'm such a dork I went into the store in New York the other day and I legitimately went because I had to re up stuff from my kid and like the second I walked in and I was like, oh no, people are gonna think this is some like weird publicity stunt thing like oh hold me show up and get all the right before her announcement. Like no, I had to get stuff because for Fallon because I was doing Fallon and I needed stuff for my kit. And I'm so annoying. I like went to the counter and I was like checking out and I was talking to the manager there and I was like, did you know like I have a makeup line and it's gonna be an old soon? And she was like, yeah, I know. I was like, I wasn't sure if you knew I just wanted to tell you it's going to dot com first.

Sarah DACA Kate Bush Callie Zoey Halsey Dakota Palestine Ulta golf cancer swimming Fallon New York
"halsey" Discussed on Gloss Angeles

Gloss Angeles

14:18 min | 7 months ago

"halsey" Discussed on Gloss Angeles

"At this stage of my career or you know what I mean that I have a self sustaining lifestyle just based simply on the music that I make, which is incredible. So I wasn't going to do it. And I was sad about that. And then I got approached by two women, Jeannie and Dina, who founded hard candy. And they were like, we love you. And have you ever thought about doing a makeup brand? And I was like, yes, every single day of my life, I think about it. I dream about it. I already have a Pinterest board. I think about it all the time. And, you know, I remember how just disruptive, hard candy was as a brand when I was growing up. You know what I mean? They were provocative. They were sexual. They were female empowerment. They were also kind of like redefining a lot of the markets. I know they were like one of the first brands ever to have eye safe glitter in their eyeliners. They revolutionized the marketplace palettes for nail polishes. A lot of stores weren't wanting neons and blacks and glitters and nail polishes. It was kind of a lot of neutrals and reds, burgundies. And they really took a risk on it. And so the reason I fell in love with them is because we have the same mentality about makeup, right? Which is that if someone approaches us and they say to us, these are the products that are doing really well right now and these are the products that everyone is making. That is an instant to me. Cool. I don't want to make that then. I want to do something else. I want to fill a different space. Like one of the driving forces of the brand is innovation. It's like, how can we create formulas in packaging and products that really don't have an existing market or market category rather? And just right away from my first meeting with them, we just kind of started waxing poetic and going off. I remember I dumped my makeup bag out in the living room and I was like, this is my favorite lip liner, but like what if this lip liner was like, this instead and what if we did it, you know? The hours got away from us and then they left and I was like, oh shit, I have to do this. You know, this wasn't just a meeting. This was like the start of something. And so I started flying out to where I was and we would go through products and we would go through formulas and I was crazy at first. I was. I was crazy. I was like, there were some stuff I sent back more than ten times. Like, was just like, nope, and it was even subtle changes to where we get something, and it was like, almost okay, but that wasn't good enough. I think the hardest lesson for me to learn was that I was making products that they weren't just about what I wanted or what I liked. You know what I mean? They were for a lot of people with different needs than what I particularly have. But again, one of the sentiments of the brand was like, we wanted to kind of find a way to draw together the idea of makeup that is starter friendly and foolproof, but makeup that also appeals to professionals. The impetus isn't on the consumer, the makeup lover, to be perfect at doing makeup. You know what I mean? That's not really what it's about. And I think that the beauty industry is incredible right now. I think that we have a wealth of information available to us. And I think that it operates in almost kind of like an academic way where people who are doing PhDs and stuff are constantly sharing what they're learning with other academics and sharing their papers and their research, they're not like gatekeeping things and I love that about the beauty industry too, because they give someone discovers like a secret or like a trick or a hack. They're like, check this out. Instead of like, you know, gatekeeping it the way makeup professionals did for literally decades before social media. It's pretty crazy. It was like 2008 where we were like, oh, contour. You know, like, what do you mean contour? How come we didn't know about contour? What the hell? And then you go back and you see like Marilyn Monroe had been doing it. The max factor era. They were gatekeeping beauty secrets. That's why all of the high school kids look so cute 'cause they all know how to do their makeup from YouTube and when we were in high school, I don't know what the fuck I was doing. I literally had no idea. I mean, I know this is like a cliche, but it's like all of us putting the dream map moose foundation on our lips. Like, what the hell was going on? We're also like our parents being like, you can wear mascara, you can wear clear mascara, clear mascara, what? What? Like you might as well have given me a safety razor or like a plastic razor and told me I was shaving in front of the mirror. Clear mascara. That is just that. You are placating me, ma'am. That is placating. But with that being said about all these secrets and all that stuff, I also feel like there's so many rules. There's so many rules and there's such an expectation where it's like if your makeup isn't like not only do you have to be good at makeup, but you also have to be good at editing the photo and editing the content and making yourself look poreless and the lines look perfect and it's like, okay, so it's not even enough to be like a great makeup artist. You also have to be like an incredible photo editor as well, which is like the whole other thing so with about face we were like no, no, no, no. We're gonna take advantage of the benefits of this industry, which is like everyone wanting to share and everyone wanting to try, but we're kind of going to reject the rules, the expectation of perfection. And I think a lot of people want to do that with their brands, but you have to really commit to being okay with that. Like to being okay with putting out on retouched images, I put up how to videos and get ready with me. It's not perfect. You know what I mean? It doesn't look great. And I'm just like, this is my face. Thanks for watching, bye. You kind of have to be okay with letting people see behind the curtain. Because that's what it looks like behind their curtain too, you know? And I think that's really important. Was the name always going to be about face? So I came up with the name. I'm really proud of it. And I did it because my initials are AF. So my government name is Ashley frangipane. I wanted to kind of touch back on that. In about faces like a complete turn in direction. It's actually like a military term, which is really interesting. But it's like when someone doesn't about face, they change their trajectory or change their path. And so it kind of was like too good to be true. It just totally came together. And then of course there's the third element, which is like, it's a makeup brand, so it's about face, you know, what I mean. It kind of is one of those meant to be moments, which is only ever happened to me once before in my life, and it was with Halsey. Because I fell in love with the name because I lived just off the Halsey stop on the L train in Brooklyn. And then found out that it's an anagram of my name. Ashley. So it's all the same letters rearranged. So it's kind of one of those moments where I was like, this name has literally been like spitballs through a straw into my ear by the stars. You know what I mean? And I think about face really felt that way too, so it was a great start. There's a lot of synchronicity. But the other name that I was toying around with was 94. Spelled out completely because it's the year that I was born and I thought that it was a, it was a cool name. But I actually ended up saving that for something else that I can't tell you guys about right now. Okay, okay, we love a teaser. Yeah, no, it's something else. It's something else. And that's all I can say 'cause I'm getting the look from across the room. I'm getting in so much trouble right now. Anyway, moving on about face, you guys came out and said, we are lowering our price points permanently on some collections, which I know a few other brands that do this. It's not a common practice, but I love it when it happens, what was the decision behind doing that for about face? I mean, I listened to my audience, you know, we've done it before with other stuff too. It was like merchandise concert tickets, you know what I mean? There's been a lot of times in the past where I've lowered the price of my concert tickets. I have like a pretty industry non standard ticket price because I keep them as low as I possibly can. And it's because I know what it's like to be a fan and a consumer, you know? And it's like, as long as everything is self generating and as long as the people who are working really hard on all of this are getting paid and compensated in a way that they deserve. And everyone loves it. And like, I'm happy. You know what I mean? I think this is something that's really important to be said, right? And I'm gonna get like heady here for a second, but it is very, very difficult to be someone who creates products that they are passionate about, whether it's like music, albums, t-shirts, makeup, in a capitalistic world. You know what I mean? Like, I have to walk a very fine line between making things because I love them and I want to share them with people and it's my passion and I live to do this and I love to do this and not wanting to participate in a system that takes advantage of people. You know what I mean? So I think that that's something that's really important is like, you know, at the end of the day, when we talked about navigating the celebrity brand space, you know, it was very, very important for me that it was clear that I'm doing this because I love this and I get so much joy out of this being a part of my daily life. Every call, every creative meeting, every product, every sample that flies in that I get to test on the road. I think there was like a real mentality for a while that was like a lot of these things are cash grabs, you know what I mean? And I have no desire to do that. And I'm going to be completely honest with you guys. This company, if this were a cash grab, it would be the dumbest cash grab in history because I lose sleep because of how much I work on this thing. I am working so hard on this all of the time. Constantly. I am putting arguably as much if not more effort into this brand and this community and creating a lifestyle out of this brand than I do in anything else and when I first started the Halsey project, I learned through watching my peers that one of the ways you make a brand an artist, a product successful, is when the fan is identifiable. When you can look at someone on the street and you can say, I bet that person is a Halsey fan. And for me, back in the day that was a kid had blue hair or glitter makeup or they were wearing like an American apparel tennis skirt or dressing how I did on stage and then a little while later it was that they were had a shaved head and cool tattoos and you could look at someone and you could go, I bet that person's a hosie fan. And I really wanted about face to feel the same way where you could look at someone and you could go, I bet they used about face, you know? Or it just has kind of just like a real identity. And for any brand music makeup, it requires a tremendous amount of work and compassion and paying attention. And because of that, we're listening to what the fans are saying. All of the time, whether it's about prices or products or formulas or performance and just constantly wanting to make sure that we're evolving in a positive way. Because this isn't fun for me if people don't love it. So we obviously have to talk about Ulta. Yes. You just got into Ulta, hall of freaking Lou ya. I'm sure, though, there were other retailers clamoring for this partnership. So what makes Ulta special? We talk about all the time. So we tell people why it's a special. So why do you think Ulta is special? Assess ability, accessibility that mix of kind of like, you know, high end and affordable, I have that kind of mentality about everything in my life. You know what I mean? I love a good thrift store Jean and like a Jean-Paul Gaultier top. And I love a good H and M boot and Louis Vuitton jacket. And to this day, I still there's drugstore products that I absolutely adore. And one of my favorite things about Ulta is being able to go in there and kind of access everything all at once. You know whether I'm looking for nyx colored eyeliners or I'm looking for depending on the store and looking for like a nars product or a Mac product or a benefit product. Being able to have access to all of that. So I feel like it was kind of the perfect intersection of our audience in the sense of like, it's for people who are just starting out, but it's also for professionals who want really high performance innovative products and that was kind of like a no brainer for me. I've always had a really incredible experience shopping there. It's one of the stores where I can like walk in with no makeup on and I don't feel like every single person is looking at me, being like, you don't know what you're doing. And then it's like, I want to like walk up to every single employee and be like, I'm really good at makeup. I promise. You just can't tell right now, 'cause I don't have any yawn. And I'm sure you guys know what that experience is like, you know, so I just loved that so much about them and also because they also was really excited about the brand right away and that was my we made it moment, you know? When we started working on this partnership, I was like, he's a huge release of arrow. I was like, oh, we made it. This is gonna work out. It's like back when I was saying to you guys, I used to get on stage every night and be like, I have to prove myself. Or tomorrow, all of this is gonna go away. And this partnership was like kind of kin or parallel to that feeling, which is where I kind of released the air and I went, okay, this is happening. This is a thing. We've done a good job. And we're going to be able to give these products to so many more people now. And now my getting ready for stage mantra is kind of the same as my about face founder mantra, which is my only job is to have fun, you know? And for the people using the products, that's the same thing. Your only job is to have fun. That's what it's.

dream map moose foundation Halsey Ashley frangipane Jeannie Dina Pinterest Ulta Marilyn Monroe YouTube Ashley Brooklyn Lou ya Paul Gaultier tennis Jean Mac
"halsey" Discussed on Gloss Angeles

Gloss Angeles

08:05 min | 7 months ago

"halsey" Discussed on Gloss Angeles

"Sarah, the weather is getting warmer and we have so much travel coming up. Yeah, it's so fun and Ulta Beauty has the both of us covered with an array of travel sized products, like nars radiant, creamy concealer, a glam gleno fave, benefit cosmetics is 24 hour brow setter, another fave that we both can't live without. Supergroup's unseen sunscreen, so, so good. And then also a mini straightening iron from Kristin ess, which is so cute, but also very necessary. Plus, they're available in easy to pack sizes so whether you're packing your purse or your check luggage Ulta Beauty has your passport to great products and small packages. Okay, so let's talk about obviously you have always loved makeup. You've been doing your own makeup for so long. You come from like an artist background. But what made you want to be like, yeah, I'm going to start a makeup brand. I'm going to join all of these celebrities because I want to do it. What was the impetus? And it's like, did someone come to you or was this something you've just always wanted to do? And you're like, I want to do this, I'm going to do this on my own. Yeah, so honestly, I had wanted to do it for a long time and was adamant that I never would, because I'm on the same page as you guys that the celebrity beauty market is just so oversaturated. I kind of just like swallowed it. I was like, I missed my window. I wasn't a relevant enough artist in the time where this boom was happening. And that's just something I'm going to be sad about for the rest of my life, and it is what it is. I'm also hyper cautious about overselling products to my fans. I also, I don't do a tremendous amount of brand endorsements or collaborations. I'm not someone who's like my brand out very often because I want my audience to know that when I speak about a product, it's something I really believe in. I don't want them to just feel like, oh, this is just like a sponsored post on Instagram. Whatever. And I have that luxury at this stage of my career or you know what I mean that I have a self sustaining lifestyle just based simply on the music that I make, which is incredible. So I wasn't going to do it. And I was sad about that. And then I got approached by two women, Jeannie and Dina, who founded hard candy. And they were like, we love you. And have you ever thought about doing a makeup brand? And I was like, yes, every single day of my life, I think about it. I dream about it. I already have a Pinterest board. I think about it all the time. And, you know, I remember how just disruptive, hard candy was as a brand when I was growing up. You know what I mean? They were provocative. They were sexual. They were female empowerment. They were also kind of like redefining a lot of the markets. I know they were like one of the first brands ever to have eye safe glitter in their eyeliners. They revolutionized the marketplace palettes for nail polishes. A lot of stores weren't wanting neons and blacks and glitters and nail polishes. It was kind of a lot of neutrals and reds, burgundies. And they really took a risk on it. And so the reason I fell in love with them is because we have the same mentality about makeup, right? Which is that if someone approaches us and they say to us, these are the products that are doing really well right now and these are the products that everyone is making. That is an instant to me. Cool. I don't want to make that then. I want to do something else. I want to fill a different space. Like one of the driving forces of the brand is innovation. It's like, how can we create formulas in packaging and products that really don't have an existing market or market category rather? And just right away from my first meeting with them, we just kind of started waxing poetic and going off. I remember I dumped my makeup bag out in the living room and I was like, this is my favorite lip liner, but like what if this lip liner was like, this instead and what if we did it, you know? The hours got away from us and then they left and I was like, oh shit, I have to do this. You know, this wasn't just a meeting. This was like the start of something. And so I started flying out to where I was and we would go through products and we would go through formulas and I was crazy at first. I was. I was crazy. I was like, there were some stuff I sent back more than ten times. Like, was just like, nope, and it was even subtle changes to where we get something, and it was like, almost okay, but that wasn't good enough. I think the hardest lesson for me to learn was that I was making products that they weren't just about what I wanted or what I liked. You know what I mean? They were for a lot of people with different needs than what I particularly have. But again, one of the sentiments of the brand was like, we wanted to kind of find a way to draw together the idea of makeup that is starter friendly and foolproof, but makeup that also appeals to professionals. The impetus isn't on the consumer, the makeup lover, to be perfect at doing makeup. You know what I mean? That's not really what it's about. And I think that the beauty industry is incredible right now. I think that we have a wealth of information available to us. And I think that it operates in almost kind of like an academic way where people who are doing PhDs and stuff are constantly sharing what they're learning with other academics and sharing their papers and their research, they're not like gatekeeping things and I love that about the beauty industry too, because they give someone discovers like a secret or like a trick or a hack. They're like, check this out. Instead of like, you know, gatekeeping it the way makeup professionals did for literally decades before social media. It's pretty crazy. It was like 2008 where we were like, oh, contour. You know, like, what do you mean contour? How come we didn't know about contour? What the hell? And then you go back and you see like Marilyn Monroe had been doing it. The max factor era. They were gatekeeping beauty secrets. That's why all of the high school kids look so cute 'cause they all know how to do their makeup from YouTube and when we were in high school, I don't know what the fuck I was doing. I literally had no idea. I mean, I know this is like a cliche, but it's like all of us putting the dream map moose foundation on our lips. Like, what the hell was going on? We're also like our parents being like, you can wear mascara, you can wear clear mascara, clear mascara, what? What? Like you might as well have given me a safety razor or like a plastic razor and told me I was shaving in front of the mirror. Clear mascara. That is just that. You are placating me, ma'am. That is placating. But with that being said about all these secrets and all that stuff, I also feel like there's so many rules. There's so many rules and there's such an expectation where it's like if your makeup isn't like not only do you have to be good at makeup, but you also have to be good at editing the photo and editing the content and making yourself look poreless and the lines look perfect and it's like, okay, so it's not even enough to be like a great makeup artist. You also have to be like an incredible photo editor as well, which is like the whole other thing so with about face we were like no, no, no, no. We're gonna take advantage of the benefits of this industry, which is like everyone wanting to share and everyone wanting to try, but we're kind of going to reject the rules, the expectation of perfection. And I think a lot of people want to do that with their brands, but you have to really commit to being okay with that. Like to being okay with putting out on retouched images, I put up how to videos and get ready with me. It's not perfect. You know what I mean? It doesn't look great. And I'm just like, this is my face. Thanks for watching, bye. You kind of have to be okay with letting people see behind the curtain. Because that's what it looks like behind their curtain too, you know? And.

Kristin ess Ulta Beauty Jeannie Instagram Dina Pinterest Sarah dream map moose foundation Marilyn Monroe YouTube
"halsey" Discussed on Gloss Angeles

Gloss Angeles

07:39 min | 7 months ago

"halsey" Discussed on Gloss Angeles

"Yeah, I was really inspired by kind of like 90s artists. My Pinterest board is full of like Fiona Apple, hopes and evolve, mazzy star, Alanis Morissette, you know, I was even playing references from Drew Barrymore in the 90s, a lot of Winona Ryder and stuff. And kind of like pared down effortless styles really cool to me, especially for this tour, because at this stage in my career, it's funny, I said this on stage the other night. I used to go out on stage every single night feeling like I had something to prove. And that mentality that sentiment blood into everything that I did, what I wore, the way I did my makeup, how they shot me, you know, being just so nervous all the time. Like, don't shoot me from this angle. I look bad here. Don't do this light. My makeup needs to look great. My clothes need to look great and this anxiety of like, every single show, if it wasn't perfect, everything was going to disappear the next morning, you know? It was going to be over when I woke up. And I think a lot of that has to do with kind of the fickle nature of social media and just the media in general, where you really can go to bed and then wake up one morning and you check your phone and you're like, what happened while I was asleep? Who did I saw? Or how did I embarrass myself? What did everyone decide today? I had a lot of nervousness because of that. I think that getting pregnant in the pandemic, not being able to do the thing that I loved, wondering when I'd ever be able to do it again. Getting into the core identity of what this brand was going to be, you would about faces going to be, you know, thinking about telling my audience and our consumers saying, this is really about being who you are with your flaws launching without complexion products and saying, this is really about play and experimentation and art and excitement, you know, recognizing that I despite being in this totally transient time of my life where my body doesn't look how I'm used to and I don't feel how I'm used to and I just am really struggling with my sense of self. I needed to kind of take that mentality and apply it inward and it really worked for me because on this tour, I've had the luxury of going out every night and being like, okay, it doesn't have to be perfect. I don't have to be anyone that I'm not in my affirmation walking to stage every night in my affirmation while I'm like putting on my makeup every day is my only job is to have fun and then they'll have fun too. My only job is to have fun and then it'll be perfect. It's literally just my only job is to have fun, you know? And so as I'm doing my makeup or as I'm doing the show, that's the one thing I'm just telling myself the whole time and it's been working pretty well for me so far, you know? So we'll see. I was also pregnant during pandemic. Really? Yeah, I was COVID babies. Love it, you know? Yeah. The weirdest I've ever to be pregnant. But you were talking about how your body looked different and obviously having the baby during COVID and then having your own beauty brand and then looking at yourself after all of it. What was your beauty outlook? Did you experience hair loss? Obviously, I had a roller coaster of emotions on top of all the hormones. What has your experience been like as a new mom has it affected the way that you look at beauty and the way you think about face? Yeah, I mean, I was not prepared for anything. I was so arrogant. I went into pregnancy, like this is gonna be easy. I wanted to be a mom my whole life. I'm going to take milk baths every day with rose petals and keep organic and I'm going to be glowing and amazing and I'm so athletic. I'm not going to gain a lot of weight. I gained 65 pounds during my pregnancy. And I think a lot of people see photos of me or they see whatever and they're like, oh, he barely gained any weight. And I'm like, I gained 65 pounds. I just wasn't in the public eye. As much. And I also think people kind of have like a weird perception on celebrity pregnancy, where it's like they either feel like they're pregnant for like two years or their pregnant with like two minutes, you know? I always like JT's Katie all the time because when Katy Perry was pregnant, I felt like she was pregnant for two years. And I was like, when is this baby coming? You know? Same. I'm like, is this woman ever giving birth? Like, what's happening here? I know. And then there's like, you know, Beyoncé who just like has twins one day, and you're like, oh, okay, cool. But you know, again, 65 pounds and I lost a lot of hair. And I dealt with a lot of skin issues. I have bear Cassidy's like spider veins all over. All over because I carried my pregnancy really low. So there was a lot of pressure. But you know, that was a really interesting thing too. It was like having the permanent changes being like, okay, there's some things that are happening to me right now that aren't temporary, which was tough because you go through the pregnancy, reminding yourself this is temporary. This is temporary. This is temporary. But then some things happen, that quite frankly are not temporary. You know, so after I gave birth, there was a lot of people being like, oh, you'll get your pre baby body back. You get your pre baby body back, and I was like, I'll never get my pre baby body back because this body has had a baby. That is a altering experience, emotionally spiritually. I'm a different person. I might look the same one day, but that won't be my pre baby body, because this body has been through an altering experience, you know? And I also was like, I don't know that I really want it back. I've been going on stage on this tour a lot, and a lot of people are pretty angry with me for it, wearing low rise pants. I wear like really low rise pants every day. And I've seen a lot of people being like, Halsey, please don't bring this back. We don't want this trend to come back. Don't bring back low rise dance. But I love them. I'm just like obsessed with them. And I go out there every night, you know, I have stretch marks. And I wear my little rice pants because I like how they look, you know? So that was something I think if you would ask me a couple of months ago if I would ever have had the confidence to do that. I don't know that I would have said yes. But now, the answer is yes. You know? So I think that growth happens at its own pace. That's the spiritual answer. The technical answer is I used rosemary water to grow my hair back. I used K 18. It's a lifesaving hair product. I adore it. One of the things I've gotten super into, it's not a hair product, but I use it as one, is the Jones road miracle bomb. I use that on all my baby hairs, so I don't have like crazy flyaways because it's like a really nice kind of like dewy product. It's like, if you take a brush, like a makeup brush in the miracle bomb, the universal shade that's like not too pigmented. And you kind of brush it along your ponytail. It kind of like flattens all the flyaways down and it gives your hair like a nice little shine. So that's been my kind of like Macgyver product, and it's great for me on stage 'cause I'm usually, you know, they can't see me, but you guys can, and I'm like, I look like an Addams family character with all this hair on my head right now. So much hair. I love it. Yeah, it's all fake, all of it is fake. That's what the fake hair is here for. Okay, Halsey, we're gonna kind of switch gears. We have a lot of people write in and ask questions. And a lot of people want to know what type of skin do you.

Fiona Apple Alanis Morissette Winona Ryder Drew Barrymore Pinterest Beyoncé Katy Perry JT Cassidy Katie Halsey Addams
"halsey" Discussed on Gloss Angeles

Gloss Angeles

07:57 min | 7 months ago

"halsey" Discussed on Gloss Angeles

"Y'all before we got on before y'all heard this recording, we were talking with Halsey just about the celebrity industrial beauty complex and like what that means to them and how that affected their view of what their brand was going to be. Halsey, please proceed. You do your so you do your own makeup, which is so special. Yes. You do your makeup for your album covers for your magazine covers while you're on tour. I was just watching your video with Manny MUA where you were saying you like stay up until I'm to wash your own brushes, which I was like, I don't even do that. Yeah, I do. This is my brush bag for today that I just washed. I'm holding like this giant ziploc bag of brushes and so embarrassing. You love it. I do. I love it. It's like one of my greatest passions. I'm beauty obsessed. It's so bad too, because obviously with, you know, about face being like a sustainable brand and like really eco conscious, you know, I try to be really conscious about over consuming and over consumption, but it is so hard for me with beauty because I'm one of those people who is like a collector and I just want to own every product and try every product. And I started getting into doing my own makeup because, well, first it was out of necessity, you know? I was signed to a boutique electronic dance label out of New York. And I had no budget, none. You know, like I had peers in contemporaries who were signing deals for like millions of dollars, you know, my first record deal, I think, was like a 5 figure deal. And that sounds like a lot of money, but when you need to make an album and pay producers and pay musicians and do promo and all that stuff, it literally disappears in a second, which means there was nothing left for me when I went to the label and was like, hey, I need a stylist and a makeup artist and I want to be a pop star and they were like, yeah, we signed DJs, dude. They show up with like a USB drive and a laptop. We don't have the budget for that. So I was like, oh, okay. And I think at first it was like a lot of that kind of impostor syndrome, like I was looking at pictures of other people on red carpets and you know what's so funny is I remember specifically the picture that did it for me. And this is so funny 'cause you just had her on the show, but I remember seeing a picture of Hailey Bieber. And Haiti Baldwin at the time. And she was posing on this carpet and she was just glowing and beautiful and contoured and just like gorgeous and I remember looking at this picture of her and being like, okay, I don't look like that. So what's going on? I'm doing something wrong. I don't have the budget. I look so different. There's something missing. So, you know, and I had already been like a huge lover of makeup and I paint, you know, I'm an artist by our original trade. I'm a painter. So I just became obsessed. I just became obsessed with YouTube and researching and buying and trying products being like, I will get on that red carpet and I will look like a superstar if it kills me, you know what I mean? And so that's kind of how I started and I had to get really creative. I started with a lot of drugstore brands, you know, because it's what I could afford. And eventually I kind of started expanding. I went through a period where I used to makeup artists for a while, and I had the luxury of working with some really talented and incredible professionals, but one thing was always very apparent to me, which is I never felt like I looked like myself. That was a really big deal as a musician, you know, because I'm not an actress. I'm not a model. I have a responsibility to look like the person who is singing the songs and telling the stories that people are connecting with. So if I don't feel like myself, I don't act like myself, and if I don't act like myself, I'm not doing the art, any service, you know? So eventually I just took it into my hands full time, I remember the first big magazine cover that I ever did was paper magazine and Ellen von unwerth was shooting and she's an iconic photographer and I convinced her said, I am going to do my own makeup for this cover. And as soon as she said yes, it was like the gates opened for me. And then I did Rolling Stone, billboard, allure, L and I had already been doing my own music videos and my tour, my album covers, all that stuff. And then it just kind of just became part of life for us over here at Halsey, where it was like, oh, she does her own makeup. I show up everywhere two hours early. I unpack my kit. I am stalking my kid, always researching new brands, you know, like we said, washing my brushes late at night and it's kind of like I'm doing two full-time jobs, you know what I mean because I'm also my own touring makeup artist, but I love it. I wouldn't have it any other way. It's my time to kind of center myself, put on my war paint before I go on stage, not have someone's touching me while I'm trying to focus and so I was like, let me just get to sideline it right. I'm like, get out of my face. I need to go on stage. Yeah, that's how that started. I love that because I feel like a lot of artists often want people to do their makeup so they can just kind of like sit back and not think, but I think you make a really good point. When someone's trying to do, oh, I just gotta touch this and you're already in your head. Like, I'm about to go out and perform for thousands. I need a minute. Give me a breather. Let me just decompress for a second. I love it. Does your makeup change from show to show? Maybe your outfits are the same, like your makeup is like a representation of how you're feeling in that moment. Yeah. So the tour I did before this one was the manic world tour. I did that one in the UK. It was in Europe. It was supposed to be the world, but obviously, you know, because of the pandemic, we never got the chance to do the tour in the United States, but one of the things that I was doing on stage whatever they liked was the album cover for manic featured me with like a blue glitter black eye. A lot of the album was really symbolic of kind of me healing from different, you know, relationships with abuse that I have been through in my life be it like self abuse, familial abuse, relationship abuse. And so one of the things I did on the tour was I went on stage every night with the black eye, but as the tour went on, the I faded from blue to purple to red to green to yellow kind of like symbolizing the stages of healing, which was really cool. And on that tour, we were doing all the same costumes, full costume changes every night. On this tour, I'm wearing something different on stage every night and so I'm doing a different makeup look and what actually is really interesting is I do my makeup before I pick out my outfit. So instead of matching my look to my clothes, I'm usually matching my clothes too. My look. So I think there's something kind of special about that where it's like my face and the expression and the makeup takes precedence. And this tour has been really laid back. I've been wearing like teens and a tank top on stage every night. I figure if the guys can do it like so can I, you know? Why do I have to be out there in full couture when I'm trying to like shred on the guitar and like sing my heart out, you know? It's like I'm wearing jeans and a T-shirt. That's what you're getting. You know? I was actually gonna say that because I was watching your performance running up that hill and you're in this cute little crop. I mean, you look fucking hot, sorry. You look incredible. Wait, I'm like, oh, are we allowed to curse? Is that a thing? Don't give me the go ahead. This is gonna get really bad really quick. I apologize in advance if you're not into, you know, excuse my French, but you looked incredible. And I don't wanna like par it down just to looks, obviously, right? Because it's so much more than the look. But I did notice this felt like a departure from what other typical pop stars are wearing. It.

Halsey Manny MUA Hailey Bieber Ellen von unwerth Baldwin Haiti New York YouTube gates Europe UK United States
"halsey" Discussed on Gloss Angeles

Gloss Angeles

05:46 min | 7 months ago

"halsey" Discussed on Gloss Angeles

"Hallelujah, because this means more people are going to experience the goodness that Sarah and I have been singing the praises of. Since this brand launched. Yes. Everything about this brand, they have done right. Everything about it. I was just texting Lexi white, our dear baby angel friend. And I told her that. She's an editor at refinery. I don't know Lexie. I do not know Lexie. Well, your social media friends with her. Calling her a baby angel because of her necklace that says 2000 or whatever she was born. Anyways, I was like, Halsey is coming on the pot because about face is at Ulta Beauty. And she screamed and was like, finally, I'm so excited. I can finally go into the stores and buy it. Because direct to consumer is great, right? Like there are so many reasons to do DTC, that model does work. But once you get kind of this sign off from a retailer, especially Ulta, it just makes accessibility so much more of a priority for the brand. Because there's going to be people that go into an Ulta Beauty now and see this cool packaging and wonder, oh, what is this brand? Oh, about face. And they may not even realize Halsey, the global pop star is the one that's behind it. Totally. And also too, I think like a lot of her younger fan base, like they might not be able to like, they don't have credit cards, they catch up online. Yeah, they can go to the store with your brand, yes, or they go with their friends after school. And swatch and play, and then buy the products with their own cash. It's like so exciting. It's very exciting for the brand because we've been following it since it launched. You all know, like we talked about it. Their lip liners are some of the best out there. The color range, the way they feel on the lips. I was wearing the lip liner a couple days ago on Instagram stories and I was just literally wearing it by itself with the rode lip glaze. And people were like, what lipstick are you wearing? And I'm like, no, literally, it's this lip liner. It's called thick slip pencil, and it's in the shade paper romance, and it's so good. And I also am a huge fan of happy endings. Oh, I holding raw kiss. I also love. There's just these really pretty shades of nude. Like they're pinky nudes. There's also brighter colors. They have the reds and stuff like that. I'm also a huge fan of the brand's liquid lipsticks. They're called the painted lip colors. Oh, so good. We've talked about the packaging before, but I literally think I said this verbatim. This is the perfect size lipstick in my humble opinion. You can fit it in the palm of your hand. You can easily travel with it. It doesn't roll everywhere because it's not a cylinder shape, it's a block. So it has a flat side, the foot is so cute. The packaging is so cute. It's great. And my favorite shade is babies arms. Babies. I also like a shade called little little. Which is really cute. The font is very small. The font, okay, thank you, 'cause I was like, am I, do I need to get my ice cream? And I know I'm blind. I'm wearing through the fields. Yeah, so and they have a ton of different products. They have these incredible eye paints. The eye paints. There's so much fun. You feel like an artist totally blendable, bright colors, neutral shades. They have these highlighters that come this amazing mirrored kind of holographic packaging. Yeah. They've got liquid. They've got powder. Yep. And I know there's so much more coming from the brand soon. Like I think even this week, they're launching a whole new thing, which is super exciting. I don't want to say what it is in case it hasn't launched yet by the time this goes live. But we have been reaching out to help face since we tried the brand. We're like, please, anytime Halsey is available, please let us know. And y'all, their team told us that she listened to a few episodes to decide if they wanted to come on the podcast. So I'm like, oh my God, what episodes? What unhinged shit where we say? Correct. And sometimes we forget that like, oh, this is not just a conversation between the two of us. People literally listening. Literally, when people come up and they're like quoting us or being like, oh, how is that thing that you were talking about? What? I'm like, oh so Halsey was listening to us and my God. My God. But she is just she was just so much fun. It was like just hanging out with friends talking about our love for makeup. Yes, they were so thoughtful and they're responses. So kind and gracious, very kind. I mean, they were literally, they're on the road on tour and they were just chilling. No makeup, hair kind of a mess. Yeah, exactly. Looked like maybe what I wear on a regular basis, which is like an oversized T-shirt and pajama pants. I'm like, you are my people. You are my people. And we just had a really good fun conversation. You're gonna hear it right now. We hope that this would encourage you to try this brand because this really is one of the brands that's just doing it right. Things so, so right to us. So enjoy.

Halsey Lexie Lexi white Ulta Beauty Ulta Sarah reds
"halsey" Discussed on Gloss Angeles

Gloss Angeles

01:44 min | 7 months ago

"halsey" Discussed on Gloss Angeles

"Find myself looking at pictures on Instagram being like, oh my gosh, do I need a thread lift? I know for one thing like a huge insecurity of mine has been I have hooded eyes, you know what I mean? So like I find that there's like a pipeline in Hollywood where people kind of start out with hooded eyes and then they get a corrective surgery for it. It was especially tough when we started launching about face because I was like, I'm selling makeup that I love and that I adore and I want to show off these looks and I just don't feel like I have the right face for it and then again it was like correct that thought this makeup isn't for the right face this makeup was for every face and you need to like live and die by that and show people so it's made me way more creative with my looks. Hi Kirby, hi Sarah welcome to Los Angeles. Welcome glam Jelena. We hope you stay a while. You ask you. It's.

"halsey" Discussed on This Week In Google

This Week In Google

02:13 min | 8 months ago

"halsey" Discussed on This Week In Google

"Did we do this story? No, I guess we did it on Sunday. You know Halsey, do you like Halsey? I like Halsey. I like her work. Do we do this story last week? Sure. No idea. So she has a new record. Jeff know who Halsey is? Do you know who Halsey is? You would like her music. Kind of. I'll play a little. Here's a little bit of her music. So this is a TikTok that she posted. I'm not gonna play the whole thing because I don't want to Halsey to get mad at me. But she posted TikTok. Now maybe this was a publicity stint. I don't know. So she's playing the song. And then you know how they on TikTok text over it. Basically, she wrote, I have a song I love. I want to release ASAP, but my record label won't let me. I've been in this industry for 8 years. I've sold over a 165 million records. And my record company is saying I can't release it until they can fake a viral moment on TikTok. Everything is marketing and they're doing this to basically every artist these days I just want to release music, man. And I deserve better TBH. I'm tired. In fact, after this, a lot of others artists said, yeah, that's right. Our labels say go viral on TikTok. That's not a single. Shared a parody version of his 2003 hit singing, I don't want to be on TikTok, but my label told me I have to. English songwriter, fka twigs, said her label was not only making her create and post TikTok videos, but they wanted her to post videos multiple times a day. So what the heck is lizzo doing on TikTok? A, because she's got the song you can't escape. But B, lizzo's always on TikTok. Well, she responds to everything that she likes. She just okay. She likes it. And she's even got a TikTok dance. So this article in T and W says, lizzo regularly shares memes, vlogs, and recipe videos on TikTok. And heavily promoted her most recent release. It's about damn time. She was please don't do your head. I.

Halsey Jeff fka twigs lizzo
Feds Investigate the Horrors of Marilyn Manson

AJ Benza: Fame is a Bitch

01:35 min | 1 year ago

Feds Investigate the Horrors of Marilyn Manson

"Somebody said, AJ, you were right, you know, the maron Manson, the crazy rock and roller, the crazy guy. Devil worshiping, you know, the crazy an idiot, but cops, feds, whatever the hell descended on his house to search for stuff to search for evidence that would shed light on some of the horrible things, many women said he did to them. And I'm not sure if it was the house he just sold or that's empty or the house he lives in now. Either way, they took away a lot of boxes of stuff and I'm sure they're getting ready to really go at him hard. And it made me really go in depth and read about Marilyn Manson in publications and such that I never never read before. And we talk about all these guys on this show that have done awful things from hobby Weinstein down to you name it there's been so many that Matt Lauer, so many guys have done awful things since the me too era broke. But the stuff this guy is alleged to have done is beyond the pale. And for Kanye West to take him in and bring him to his church service and sing with him and Justin Bieber to be friends with him and the singer Halsey to have his name tattooed on her on her side of her body, it's so tone deaf in idiotic. The guy's bed. Is fear a woman, especially Halsey, you don't need his image likeness or name on your

Maron Manson AJ Marilyn Manson Matt Lauer Weinstein Kanye West Halsey Justin Bieber
"halsey" Discussed on Popcast

Popcast

15:55 min | 1 year ago

"halsey" Discussed on Popcast

"Be interested to see a version of Drake testing in those spaces. And I agree. It's not that these versions of this don't exist anymore, but I do think that it is starting to feel like a tiny bit like we're in a rut over the last couple of years. And so the question is, how do you get out of the rut without asking the person to completely reorient and reinvent a style? I mean, look, what I love to hear just like a Drake like underground Memphis tape where he's just like all he's doing is like Memphis flows. Sure. You know, do I want to see Drake like rapping with like Shawnee bin Laden? Like sure. Absolutely. This is a question of packaging, I think. And the obvious answer is like four 44. Ten Drake songs over alchemist beats. You know what I mean? Or whichever whichever guy he chooses. And all about one thing. Like obviously he's gonna do that like Jay is the blueprint. You know, like, I think that will happen, but yeah, I think that the rut is more, it's like it's like numbness. It's not about the quality of the music. It's about the frequency and sound of it. I don't think the 20 best Drake songs from the last four years are worse than the 20 best strike zones from the prior four years. Okay, I don't know that I actually agree with that, but I mean, I understand where you're coming from. I will say the 20 best songs over the last four years and this is actually would be an interesting exercise if we did this. The 20 Drake songs in the last four years would be more scattershot than the 20 best Drake songs of the previous time period. I don't know if that's true. No, but to me the previous time period is coalescing around a sound nailing it inflating it to huge pop heights. The last four years have been a kind of leaning into that sound on some level and also like kind of a lot of strays in other directions that I think are some of his better songs. Are the strays. And so I wonder if the last four year Drake exercise would be tonally consistent. Maybe we'll make some playlists. Okay. Yeah. This actually, okay, I'm into, okay, let's do that. And let's revisit it on a later episode. Yeah, we should we should refine the time period four years was sort of arbitrary, but yeah, we'll refine the time period. Okay. So we are going to do this and then I will put out a call on the Facebook group in the Discord and like ya can get involved as well. So I feel like on every mailbag question we have one question where I'm just like, do you just want to come and take the job? Do you just want to the question is so thorough and we're just like, okay, cool. That's an article. Just do that. So this reminded me this question of the demotic vocal question. Oh, that was a good one. Iconic. And iconic questions and previous mailbag episode. This is from and it's sort of similar. It's side by side with that question. This is from Campbell Tupac. I've been thinking a lot this year about female pop star stylized vocal trends. In the past 5, ten years, we've had more female pop stars that I see using really specific stylized vocals. The biggest stars do this in a way that feels recognizable, but put office natural, lord Billy, you also have people like Halsey who got decently made fun of for their vocal style early on. Now I feel like we're at a place where aspiring pop stars are imitating these trends and the result runs the gamut from awkward imitation to pure cringe. Olivia's deja vu is good, but the versus sound like she's doing lord drag. Rather than singing in her own voice. Wow. I really started thinking about this when I heard what up and coming pop singer tape mccray was doing. What are your thoughts? What function of these vocal trends serve in the arc of pop history? When do you think they're effective and when do they detract, has every era had trends that felt like this, thinking of early 2000 sprint voice or something specific to this moment? Great question. Yeah, really good question. Good do a whole podcast about it. Here's my thought. And the reason I said this is kind of side by side with the demotic vocal question is I do think the way that pop stars get built today, which is to say Internet upwards rather than industry downwards and big generalization, but generally speaking, I think that's fair, is I think you learn a lot about what people's tolerances are, what their ears can tolerate. I think that there was a sense, certainly in the 90s and 2000s of that the ear could tolerate only like a very specific kind of vocal approach, even Brittany's thing, which is like a little bit croaky. It doesn't have a lot of range. You know, it's not overwhelming. Obviously, Christina Aguilera sort of a very, very powerful talent in that same time with much bigger range. I think what you learn is that if things function from the bottom up, there are a lot of people who have a wide oral tolerance for these kinds of idiosyncratic vocal styles and maybe there's a lot of like sad girls and boys and others on the Internet who gravitate towards that. So I think there's more room for it now than there was 20 years ago. That's my gut. I do think it's a little bit timeless, though. And the question asker nodded towards that. But, you know, like people learn by singing other people's songs. You can literally see Olivia Rodrigo covering cruel summer on YouTube. You know, so like you know you get to see where she learned to sing from and where she learned to write from. And I think it's like fun to spot that stuff, take it back again to a Drake thing. You can see Drake's influences. And you can hear them over time. And you can tell what he's listening to based on the time period. I think that goes beyond pop girl stuff. But I think you're right and the lord long tail is quite long. I think we're still hearing a lot of lords, but I'm hearing a lot of billies in my box, you know, a lot of I agree. You know, I think of someone like crazy Abrams, you know, who, you know, every time I check in with her new singles, I'm like, okay, maybe you're working towards your own voice. And I mean that in all senses of the word, but you're not quite there yet. You still sound like a pastiche. I think that's normal and fine. And a function of this moment in pop histories that we get to see a lot of that development that may have previously happened in the background. Okay, we're going to do two more questions, but quick shout outs just before we do those last two questions. One Lawrence per your email day and I talked about tramps on a previous episode, the old New York club. He sent in a scan of an ultramagnetic MC's ticket from a tramp show in 97. Thank you, Lawrence for being old. So I appreciate that. Also, Tom Brian emailed in he wants to know and maybe I'll have a good answer for this. I certainly don't. And it makes me want to do an episode about it with Tom. What is our favorite hardcore record of the past few years? I feel like I don't have a good answer to that. And I want to have a good answer. So if y'all don't have a good answer, me and Tom will do an episode at the beginning of the year. Have you gotten answer style episode? I haven't, but I feel like that's the cheap answer. Yeah. I don't listen to enough modern hardcore to have an answer. I listen to some, but I feel like not in a comprehensive way. And so that's good homework for me. Do you like that armed album either of you guys? I've dabbled and I think it's good. I think it's good. I have not dabbled, but I do like the term style record. Okay, Tom send me an email. We'll do an episode. Okay, so the last two questions. First one's from David Cohen. This has been lightly touched upon in podcast but never fully broken down. You've spoken about how many current pop stars have been pulling their sounds away from heavier, more hip hop EDM leaning influences and going with generally lighter area software sounding production on their latest albums, Billy Laura Taylor come to mind. What do you make of this move being influenced by great tragedy? In this case, the pandemic. I feel like this sort of mirrors the post 9 11 soft pop rock explosion of the early aughts with artists like Jason morass, Gavin degraw, Jack Johnson and Norah Jones, gaining huge amounts of popularity culminating with Norah Jones as many Grammy wins in 2003. Are these things connected? Does pop music generally respond to great international tragedy by becoming less abrasive and confrontational? Great question. Good music criticism. Very, very good question. What do you all think? First of all, do you see something pandemic Y either production wise or singing wise in the last 12 to 18 months? I mean, I don't know if it's so much the pandemic is like the Jack antic of music. You know, you just sort of look at who the in demand producers are and what their general modes are. And I think a lot of the music that the questioner mentioned was in the Jack mode. I think the thing missing from the question and sort of a pivot, but as he mentioned, we talked about our podcast for the thing missing is race, right? These are these are white artists who dabbled in black sounds when it was maybe more possible to do so without anybody calling you on it. I think you seen a cultural shift. And I think, you know, the industry also is a pendulum, right? And every time things are more maybe black, you know, than you see this response of whiteness. And that's has to do with what it's played on the radio. That has to do with what corporations are backing. There's a musician, Jamie Brooks, who is great on Twitter, great music critic on Twitter. And Jamie talks about this a lot. And it's like, you can sort of see, for instance, the EDM boom was perhaps a reaction to a corporate reaction to wrap getting so popular. So I think with the sort of boom times of especially street rap now, regional stuff, so that never would have been reaching the audiences that it is at the moment. You get a little knee jerk response to that, even if it's not explicitly running away from that stuff, I think culturally that happens. I will say that I do think the thing that people seek out in popular music is not always the same. And I think there is always going to be a quest for safety and pop is a safe harbor for a lot of people. You know, just even seeing these names, Jason mirage, Jack Johnson, you know, artists that I have this kind of like deep seated revulsion for the Jack Johnson show at the garden when I serve you concerts primarily when that was my job. Genuinely was one of the least happy nights of the 2000s for me. It was like it was unbearable. And people were loving it. It was such a spectacular room to be in and be the absolute only person on the verge of tears. Not good to you. Like it was awful. It was risible. It was terrible, but I do think that people crave the softness and I think coming after 9 11 that's interesting. I don't know that I've thought about it in those terms. So I think that could be very real. I don't think that the pandemic is functioned exactly the same because with the speed that media moves right now, people don't linger on a feeling very long. There is no national mood. There are multiple national moods. And so I don't know if it would function in the same way, either in or post pandemic. But that's interesting and someone should write about that early 2000 stuff through that framework. I'd be really curious to hear that. Last question, and guys, you have to forgive me. This is a question specifically for me. That you I believe can not have an opinion on because it is about me. We are going to that's what you think. So this is just get into it because this is something that came up on the Facebook group. It wasn't in the thread about the listener rail bag. But it did come up in the same time frame. So I feel like I have to address this. This is from Andrew Robert, who says, yo, John. Whatever happened when you came to write about the pickathon festival and ended up dot dot dot incapacitated question mark. Wow. I actually I could answer this because may have been for the best because you know we were coming for that long ago promised hug for print subscribers. But honestly, was looking forward to that New York Times take on an Oregon festival, and it was right there. And then dot dot dot question mark. Also, in one of the other comments in that thread, you said that you were a local music writer and you were coming for me. So I don't know if when you say you're coming for me, you're coming for me and an affectionate way. Or in a kind of aggressive way. I don't know the answer. But and Andrew pointed out in my year end concerts list, which is the thing we used to do, I did include the war on drugs at pickathon as one of those shows. Just surprising statement. You're trying to see Priscilla awake. So here is the here is the question. I, from time to time, get vertigo. Why is that funny? I just didn't know that we were gonna end here with your medical history. My confessions, these are my confessions. From time to time, I get vertigo. I certainly get it when I am under some kind of dress or stress, bodily stress. And I literally can't believe I am bearing my soul. Can we please only to be laughed at some of the stress comes from deadlines? No, no. That's not what this one. I want to see John land this plane. Go ahead. Okay. Okay, so when I was traveling a lot in the early 2010s and into the mid 2010s, I would, you know, I travel and go straight to a concert. I'd fly across country, not have any water and then be outside in 100° weather. This is what happened to pick a thought. I was not prepared for how intensely hot. It would be. I basically spent that entire first day at the festival, no water, whatsoever. I remember being very hard to get water, like you had to have. You had to come in with a bottle. You know, some crunchy ippy type thing. And of course, I didn't like bring an empty flask or anything. So I did an entire day no water. I get back to the hotel that night, I lay down, I like sort of pass out and about an hour later I wake up and I actually am suffering from such intense vertigo that I can't get out of bed, had to go to the emergency room and I spend the entire next day at the hospital. And that's when one more day at the hotel before I flew back. Did you call an ambulance? Yes, they came to my room and stretched me out. This is before. This is before this is 2014 years before you. So yeah, I literally was stretching out of my Holiday Inn to a local emergency room. And I got what's the thing where they Bill you 'cause the doctor you see is not like covered by your insurance. American healthcare. I got surprised. I got surprise build. I got after all that I also got surprise bill for like $800. Welcome to America. So that is why I did not do a thorough review of pickathon. Thank you for making me take up and unearth that traumatic time in my life. Let's go out with the war on drugs. Karen and Joe, what a true joy to revisit my personal medical history with y'all. And I hope that was a satisfactory answer.

Drake Shawnee bin Laden Campbell Tupac Memphis lord Billy Olivia Rodrigo Jack Johnson Tom Brian Norah Jones Tom Billy Laura Taylor Jason morass Lawrence mccray Halsey New York club Christina Aguilera Jay Olivia Brittany
"halsey" Discussed on Popcast

Popcast

04:33 min | 1 year ago

"halsey" Discussed on Popcast

"About this theory. Okay, moving on from Taylor Swift, but with a question that mentions Taylor Swift. And this is actually I actually did think about this one quite a bit. But I didn't come up with answer. This is from Ben barzel eye. Ben says you've talked about your ideal career trajectory for Taylor Swift. The Joni Mitchell album, et cetera, Drake's certified lover boy felt uninspired to me. And I think he needs the care Monica tree. Where would you like to see Drake go from here, artistically? Is a time he finally makes his case as R&B's reigning prints. Man, I don't have a clean answer to this. I agree with you about CLB. I said as much in my piece. That said anytime I've listened to songs from CLB kind of in passing over the last couple months, they just sound like pretty good Drake songs like a lot of other earlier Drake songs sound like pretty good Drake songs. I do feel like the bloat era is true, though. The last say four years of Drake. My answer is maybe a little different than the R&B thing. Because I don't think Drake would be fruitful as a straight ahead R&B singer. And certainly not in the era of Brent Faye as, you know, Bryce and tiller ever pulled it all back together, Bryson tiller. You know, I don't want Drake doing whatever that is. But Drake as a someone who becomes a go to globalized collaborator, like who is making more efforts to work with African artists who is making more efforts to work, maybe in East Asia, working within KPop, certainly Latin America, Spanish language artists. I'd be really interested in a version of Drake that's less preoccupied with hey we made all these structural changes to what we think of as the center of hip hop. And I got to stick with that. That's where I live now. I would much rather him build on the thing that is already happening, which I've written about and we've talked about a bunch, which is the Drake application of popular music globally, why not very simply just go out and live in those spaces, much more than holding down the same turf. But I'd love to hear if either y'all have an interesting take on this. All right, here's my thing. Drake has done so much so well for so long that any version of Drake that you want. Basically from any period of time, you want to put those parameters on. You can make that. You can build your own Drake. The global Drake album exists, you know, throw 12 of the best Drake songs. The R&B Drake album exists the pop Drake album exists. The drill, you know, you want to hear him wrapping over drill beats. I think people need to free their mind from the tyranny of the album. I'm exasperating because I'm just like, I don't know, I just don't know what else people possibly want from him. If you like Drake, there are so many good and different Drake zones. I just don't know that he needs to make a pivot. Obviously, he's going to have to grow up at some point. I'd like to ask the question. But to me, that's more the question. It's not that I think Drake needs to have a different style. He's not Halsey. You know, he doesn't need to have a different style, but the idea that Drake should be doing hell, let him do full length collaboration albums with Bad Bunny or L alpha or Raleigh honjo or, you know, who knows, you know? Like that to me is potentially way more interesting to see him sharpen steal against people who have learned and studied implicitly at his feet for the last ten years that would be fascinating to me, like.

Drake Taylor Swift Ben barzel Brent Faye Bryson tiller Joni Mitchell tiller Ben Bryce East Asia Latin America Halsey
"halsey" Discussed on Popcast

Popcast

08:03 min | 1 year ago

"halsey" Discussed on Popcast

"Actually. This Halsey record is very good. I will say this, it does not feel to me of a piece with earlier Halsey records and maybe Halsey's like chameleonic approach. Album to album is the most fascinating part of their career. I was very, very struck with the production on this record. I hadn't really thought about the sequencing in those literal terms Karen. But I think that's probably right. Like it does feel very, very cohesive in a flow sense. I mean, we should probably mention who produced it. Dancing around an important it's Trent reznor and Atticus Ross, correct? Yes. Trent reznor, as you may know from 9 a.m. sales, Atticus Ross, from movie soundtracks. And also. So what they have brought Halsey if I have any hesitation about the record, there is the context of the record feels a little weightier than Halsey feels on the record. I think Halsey's well suited to it, but it does feel a little more deterministic than maybe the vocals stand up. I don't agree. I mean Joe, I'll let you talk, but I think that Halsey stands up to it. There's obviously an easy narrative that Halsey needed to make a great album was like some old guys from the 90s. And maybe, but I do think Halsey has been leading up to this. I think they were able to potentially realize this vision that Halsey has had from the beginning of their career. And I think every album is a story every album is really thematically heavy. There's always these interludes. There's always these characters. This has been this has been the selling point. It just you stack up Trent reznor versus lido or whoever that guy was that Halsey was dating and collaborating with earlier in their career. And it's just, you know, it's not a fair fight. That said, I'm a manic. I think manic is the best Halsey album. It's the best policy music I think since the original room 93 EP, which I was very into wrote a story about the beginning of Halsey's career. But I think yeah, I think this is just perfect time perfect plays, you know, Halsey was pregnant, Halsey had a child. It just all lined up, I think, here, even though this isn't really the music I want to hear from my pop singers. Can I quote John perella briefly who reviewed the album? Of course. Disappointed that he didn't make it a critics pick, but we didn't talk about that at the time, because I didn't, to be honest, I didn't have time. I didn't have the time to spend with it when it came out. So I didn't even realize how great it was. But both Halsey and ninja nails have made their mission to pack the bleaker impulses of human nature into pop song structures, noisy desolate, sometimes assault of tracks that still resolve into courses and hooks. Yes, just so extraordinarily well said by JP. I mean, I think that these elements have been in Halsey's music the entire time and that this is just a very neat crystallization. And I don't even get necessarily parenthood vibes from the album. I just get this sort of like overwhelming bleakness, but there's also exhilaration like honey appears to be a sort of lesbian celebration. I'm just saying, and there are some very upbeat rocking songs that aren't quite as bleak, but I'll be curious to see what the next album's content is about. But this album was being made and thought about during a time of extreme personal change in terms of parenthood. It's not reading that way directly. And that's appealing to me. Let me ask this, though. Is this the sonic palate that makes sense for Halsey moving forward? Because I do think more so than any pop star and I do want to put that in maybe light quotations because I don't think that the breakthrough has been total still. But do you think of any pop star of the last ten or 15 years, I can't think of one who has shifted more era to era moment to moment, does this feel like a landing place or does this feel like a statement of purpose than then you carry with you into whatever the next thing is? I would want to hear an identical replica of this record come next. I would want to hear elements of this into something else. But I think you're right. I mean, when you think about pop stars shifting their sounds from Alma album, I think we've been more successful than Gaga. You know, I'm trying to start a war, but sure. Yeah. I'm just saying if you're going to swing, you know, from aesthetic to aesthetic. I think that Halsey's swings have served their music much better. I haven't watched the film. Have you guys? No, not yet. I have not. It looks high budget, but I don't know about all these music companion films in general. That's actually a great segue to another question we had. This is coming from Sarah white. What is the future for music videos? Will they be short films like lemonade and star crossed or will they just fade into oblivion like MTV's, hey day? Joe, do you want to build on that? The kind of ambitious potentially overambitious, long form companions. I mean, look, I'm pretty sure I've answered this question on a previous podcast. I just like south of the Beyoncé self titled videos and lemonade. I just don't have that much use for these visual albums. It's not how I consume music. It often just seems like blowing a budget in the way of like late 90s videos, but less good and less economical timing wise. Look, like, the best music videos are a regional rap videos on YouTube. There's just no and those are made for no money. It just can't help but feel like feeding the streaming content ma and I just like, I'm just not interested. And I'm open for stuff to change my mind, but like, you know, Casey, my screws. I don't know. Let me speak on the musgraves one. I think the legacy, unfortunately, of Beyoncé, self titled and lemonade is that for younger artists who come up after that, there's this perception that to be taken seriously to feel like you've reached the a level, whatever that might mean that you're entitled to some kind of big vanity film project like this, or that your album cycle is not complete without some kind of complimentary overwrought film. And I think star crossed was unfortunately an example of that, the aesthetic. I thought it was interesting, very vivid, very beautifully shot. I think a lot of money was spent on it. I don't think a lot of time was spent on it. Certainly not from a narrative or writing perspective. I think there is this perception that you have your fans attention and you want to hold it and the way you hold it is by giving your fans all this extra stuff. But to me the star crossed film does the opposite of it. It doesn't deepen the narrative of the album. Quite the opposite. I think it fragments the narrative of the album and makes it more confusing. And so I think, in general, these big films don't do the thing that I think artists hope that they will do. That said, but I do have an answer to this question. That's not this. You know, look, what is a music video, right? Is it the lyric video? Is it the visualizer? Is it a narrative? Is it live? Is it a full song? Is it full songs with narrative pieces? Is it a 15 second snippet that goes on TikTok? There are so many different ways to approach a video content, especially in a mobile TikTok era, that I think this kind of central idea that a song has a music video. That's going to go away. I think there might be ten music videos. For every song, but I don't think the music video is going to be as essential,.

Halsey Trent reznor Atticus Ross John perella Joe Karen Sarah white Beyoncé Gaga MTV Casey YouTube
"halsey" Discussed on Popcast

Popcast

06:32 min | 1 year ago

"halsey" Discussed on Popcast

"All actually have answers. So yeah, go for it. I generally don't want physical things to enter my life anymore. You know, I live in Manhattan. It's not a palace. You know, just casual flex. You live in Manhattan. In New York City, I could be more vague. There isn't a ton of storage. I'm reorging as you can tell by the chair. So I don't usually buy physical music at the end of every year when I make my top ten list. I then go and I pay for all that music in case I have not over the course of the year. So I do buy music every year to support the albums I love. But in I think it was, it was not July. It was June. It was over the summer. I was in Vermont and I went to two LP shops there shout out Ben cesario and the vinyl revolution story. I bought a stack of singles, mostly Madonna singles, things of that nature. Old pop stuff. Nothing new. Nothing from the century, but I spent like a 130 bucks at both stores. Wow. Yeah. They were happy to see me. I bet. Good answer. Okay, here's my answer. I don't actually know if this was early 2021 or late 2020. There is a very hole in the wall used record and CD store near me. I'm not super near me, but like a long walk from my house. And it's very dusty. I don't know if it's open anymore. It's very dusty. It's the lighting cerebral piles and piles and piles of completely disaggregated stuff of all genres all styles and all formats. But every now and again, when I would go in there, you could tell that they had just bought out. You know whether it's like a record store or some DJ's collection because there'd be a cluster of a particular kind of thing. So many years ago, I bought a bunch of very arbitrary rap promo CD singles from the mid 90s, one of which I later sold on discogs for like $90. Are you allowed to are you allowed to say this stuff? I absolutely was not sent to me. Blame the first blame the person who dropped it off at that store. Probably like someone that we work with or no. I definitely I definitely was like scouring those labels to be like, where's the name on them? Because I definitely know this person. But in the most recent trip, they had very clearly either bought out or gotten a dump of Spanish language CDs. Mexican Colombian, et cetera, et cetera. And the covers, they're mostly mixes. They don't look super official. The covers are incredible. So I've got a stack of 8 CDs from them. They were probably about two to $3 each. I'm looking at madrassas, Sony darrows, 2001, looking at es quadron M 19 Columbia, to save, is the name of the albums, a very vibey cover, big vest energy on this uncover. Alcala de la cumbia, dwen they mix two, and this is music of Peru, Argentina and Mexico, la Banda mix from DJ Aztec. Some of these I have listened to some of these I've yet to listen to. It is largely mayhem ish dance adjacent or club adjacent. Cool. Great bye. Truly, I would have bought the entire crate. There were probably two to 300 CDs. And I just, you know, at a certain point, I was just picking based off covers because I didn't recognize any of the names. I look forward to you spending a little bit of your booklet of making a SoundCloud mix out of this. The best of this stuff. Yes. That's every time I take a break from sitting at my desk. I'm gonna walk back to that store and just slowly leach them one or two CDs at a time. And then make us a blend. Yes, absolutely. Sean, there's your answer. I hope that was satisfactory. I hope we pass the vibe check. Moving on, Halsey. Yeah. So Halsey put out a record this year. We have not talked about it on podcast. We have two questions. About the Halsey record, shivani gold and Amanda prevent beam, both essentially asking what we think and Amanda said, I feel like on one episode last year, the consensus was Halsey's close to making a great album, was this it? Also, Halsey is using they them pronouns. If people are not aware, I have an opinion about this, but I'm fairly certain the only opinion that's allowed to be broadcast on podcast is Karen Gans. Karen Gans, Halsey's album, if I can't have love, I want power. That's dark. That's very dark. That's a dark algun title. What's the vibe? It's the album of the year, John. What? It's my number one. It is really. You put a guess that. If we just break it down into its component parts. Okay, yeah, so justify each of those four versions for me. I mean, I'm not going to ask you for your list now because it's too early, and I know you haven't started doing it yet. EST G plus 9. I was gonna say yes CG and Halsey fighting for hardest album of the year. Real fit. Okay, Karen, bring it down, bring it down, 'cause I do, I actually do have lots of walls, rock, and I listen to it, knowing that I was going to have to face this question. Okay, well, I have a couple of points but I'm going to make them briefly and then we can all chat as group, but if we just purely very gracious fancy listen, I'm just trying to conduct this orchestra guys. If we are to break this down to its component parts, what could be more Gans core? Then the sound of this register voice we're calling back to the female fronted pop punk that I enjoyed of the actually Simpson Avril Lavigne variety from the earlier part of this century. Oh, yeah. Glenn did with a darker, often guitar centric, sometimes sense centric, brooding, thudding, fascinating, sonic component. And on top of that, this is a spectacularly sequenced album. You know, that's something that I'm very focused on. I couldn't believe how what was sequenced the first time through. And I've tried to sort of pick up in the middle. I have a couple of favorite songs, and it really, it doesn't even work. I have to go back to the beginning every single time. I honestly think this might.

Halsey Ben cesario Manhattan Karen Gans Alcala de la la Banda Madonna shivani gold Vermont New York City Amanda Peru Argentina leach Sony Columbia Mexico Sean
"halsey" Discussed on 1202 - The Human Factors Podcast

1202 - The Human Factors Podcast

05:22 min | 1 year ago

"halsey" Discussed on 1202 - The Human Factors Podcast

"Amazing transformation transformation was so acute. He actually change jobs because it wasn't just a physical summation it was an identity shift. Right guy said to any off boarding and look. I was I would. I would wait in the. Coal is put it in spanish where we did it in spanish. She says i was moaning myself and all of a sudden revs down to may know more. I wasn't going to put with anymore. This rubbish i was gonna turn by job changed my life literally halfway throughout our calls a week. Six hundred acre enough looking for another job. He'd been each off about four five years. You'd never think a man in his mid fifty in spain in this scenario will your date. He didn't ask for he changed jobs. Why guys is the ten key point. Here really is not just a physical. Transformation is identity shift is a powerful. You see yourself as a victim. You see yourself as someone who's going to take the bull by the honed move onto the next to the next planet were see. That's really interesting because you've got you've got a basic program worked out and and if people want to know more about your basic program i suggest you get into wave hacking jose around around what that is and and they'll be able to tell me more about it but you also pushing You've got yo what's up group in the you. You do your monthly webinars and things like that and you push your Different things that you've been reading and things like that. So i get the feeling that over the past two years the calls when you first started it is different from the calls that maybe that i've just gone through and it will be different again Maybe for the people go through in in the future. So how'd you keep the program fresh. Well what is this thing that you're looking for new. How much do you change what you do by By finding out new things. I said that's a good point. So am halsey alluded to before of our six pillars of health. So i conclude you when i did my research to put this together. Six things that other shifter's okay different ratios. Some people are more affected by something other so six pillars briefly habits and routines sleep hydration nutrition exercise activity mindset and obviously people imagine sixty from parts some people are going to have some put fuller than others and some affected by things more than others but essentially those are the six things are going to shift so it was your question..

spain halsey
Amy Schumer Is Now an Endometriosis Martyr

AJ Benza: Fame is a Bitch

01:35 min | 1 year ago

Amy Schumer Is Now an Endometriosis Martyr

"Welcome this morning, Amy Schumer, I mean, I think you guys know she's suffering from endometriosis very horrible, painful. Make sure periods hell, affect your fertility. We know this. We know she also had a very rough pukey pregnancy with a two year old son, gene the towels, I mean, Amy was very upfront and honest about how bad a pregnancy was and she tried having a second kid via IVF. Super tough. She didn't think she could ever be pregnant again while things didn't get any better and now Amy, who's 40, took to Instagram, and you can find any thing on Instagram. And she showed up, hey, I'm recovering in the hospital from my endometriosis surgery. They removed her uterus and her appendix. I don't know why, but so she had a hysterectomy and an appendectomy. And then once she said that all the other bold busters on parade joined in Lena Dunham who had a full hysterectomy because of endometriosis complication joined it. Even Chrissy Teigen Halsey pasma Lakshmi joined in. Thank you so much for sharing your endos story. Over 200 million women worldwide suffer from this hope you feel better. Christ.

Amy Schumer AMY Gene Instagram Lena Dunham Endometriosis Complication Chrissy Teigen Halsey Pasma La
Halsey Says They Were Treated 'Like a Teen Mom' Over Pregnancy

News O'Clock

00:46 sec | 1 year ago

Halsey Says They Were Treated 'Like a Teen Mom' Over Pregnancy

"Shared their feelings about being pregnant in the public eye. And the criticisms that came with it. They told apple music in an interview that despite being twenty-six financially independent and pretty far along in their career they got quote treated like a teen mom. A lot of the time halsey added quote. People were like. Oh my god you're so young and you have so much to do in your career and you're not married. It triggered old these feelings of shame. For when i was younger. They also opened up about facing backlash for not taking an easy during their pregnancy after experiencing multiple miscarriages saying quote. I think everyone who has heard me yearn for motherhood and yearn for this for so long would have expected me to write the album that was full of gratitude and instead i was like no. This shit is so scary. And so horrifying. I

Halsey Apple
Halsey Does Duet With Trent Reznor on Their New Album

Radio From Hell

00:36 sec | 1 year ago

Halsey Does Duet With Trent Reznor on Their New Album

"Not familiar with the music of Of Halsey. Mhm. Um, my brother in law loves her. I like her. I don't. I'm not pretty good. Now she's got a new record coming out. If I can't have love, I want power. And, uh, It's there is nine inch nails echoes all over it unmistakable echo of nine inch nails heard from 1994, which is the year she was born. The new song. The Tradition opens across generational album length collaboration with Trent Reznor. Um,

Halsey Trent Reznor
"halsey" Discussed on My true Self – Podcast für Deine emotionale Freiheit

My true Self – Podcast für Deine emotionale Freiheit

03:38 min | 1 year ago

"halsey" Discussed on My true Self – Podcast für Deine emotionale Freiheit

"On email if he binders on. Yeah cal- action on harm. That long had a mood Vikings on Accused ativan considered Much dollars. He tied a hung in this town. Is that any sleep on the street on zonta zonta even he jets someone Rotted in sureness must would by halsey All higher and delegating hit. This was bangs cottages the You mentioned i mean even from Odd nabbed hallam does the yankees room. Alzheimer's these should mention ennstal de tacitly in our tom Now soon as it is the buying Lows so wrong zoologists horrid founds recruit sign on mice dimension. I e. everybody annoy join shop home.

zonta zonta Vikings halsey hallam yankees Alzheimer
The Link Between COVID in Nursing Homes and Mail in Ballots With John Zmirak

The Eric Metaxas Show

01:58 min | 1 year ago

The Link Between COVID in Nursing Homes and Mail in Ballots With John Zmirak

"John. You're you're alleging in the previous segment that these blue state governors cuomo of course a number one but then murphy in new jersey and whitmer in michigan and Whoever is in connecticut and use that day and newsome in california that they they were aware somehow that's by sending corona virus patients into nursing homes. It would enable them to do these other things to take control. most coordinated. Yes on them. And how would that have happened in other words. That's hard you're out. Joe biden's chief. Corona virus advisor was. Dr ezekiel emanuel. The brother of rama manual. He was joe. Biden's number one guy on making corona virus halsey. He has said publicly. That people over seventy should not receive life saving medication because they had already lived long enough but life after seventy has no real value. Meaning he favors passive euthanasia for elderly people. He said he has no desire to lymph s. Eight seventy doesn't see why anyone else should them yesterday. Well yeah the point is way. Joe biden's chief. Medical adviser is saying the lives of people over seventy have no value that they're like sick sick pets at a kill shelter. Why should we be surprised when the democrats in a coordinated fashion dump corona myers patients in nursing homes. There's our math massive spike in death statistics. Then they use that. Massive spike to invoke emergency powers suspend their state constitutions and create mail-in ballots all worked together as part of an effort to use the coleman crisis as a pretext to render the constitution nolan

Dr Ezekiel Emanuel Whitmer Joe Biden Newsome Cuomo Murphy Connecticut New Jersey Halsey Michigan Biden John California JOE Coleman Nolan
'Without Me' Singer Halsey Announces Birth of First Child

WBZ Morning News

00:24 sec | 1 year ago

'Without Me' Singer Halsey Announces Birth of First Child

"A new mom in the pop music world for singer Halsey gives birth to her first child. The 26 year old shares The news on Instagram. Including a couple of shots of the new baby names and ER, Ridley finally find any congratulations to haul Z the birth of her first baby.

Halsey Instagram Ridley
Pregnant Singer Halsey Unveils New Topless Album Cover

KTLA Morning News

00:50 sec | 1 year ago

Pregnant Singer Halsey Unveils New Topless Album Cover

St Mark's Basilica Wins Qatar Prix Du Jockey Club

The Final Furlong Podcast

01:17 min | 1 year ago

St Mark's Basilica Wins Qatar Prix Du Jockey Club

"Sean t looked glorious over. The weekend is The ground was officially saw But mendizabal yet again Pulls it off a superb ride in the french. Two thousand guineas Onboard saint mark's basilica and for the second year in a row on foreign reiter last year of This year of course saint mark's basilica he wins the tower predigested club I thought this was an exceptional right but break the race down for his. How goods was Mendez about how good is saint mark's basilica and the race overall. I think he gave him the perfect friday. You was close to the base on. The ray opened up to the front probably a bit earlier than he won't but still did not ask him to go right to wear the new halsey you. What sort of hacienda. And the rim of a a very good dried the good positions of the stock in a tricky feed nineteen runners. Yet the goodrow you make the most of destroy but but also with to shoot that he probably at the best in the race even though we saw some some nice finish from there and there but i think had the best stay in the race just the

Saint Mark Sean T Mendizabal Reiter Mendez Goodrow
"halsey" Discussed on The Troy Farkas Show

The Troy Farkas Show

03:12 min | 1 year ago

"halsey" Discussed on The Troy Farkas Show

"So i had known that there was a guy at the hall of fame. The what was great about this. Internship program at the hall of fame was that it was super structured. It had been going on for a decade plus and there were people from all around the country that were a part of this prestigious program who worked in all different departments. So the the the steel internship program and so it was kind of the alumni kind of help each other out. And so i ask for this master list of every single intern that that there once was at the hall of fame and it said. Hey here's contact info. Here's where they are. Now here's working. Here's whether living. So i kinda went down the list of people who were app places that i thought maybe would be cool to work at and i stumbled upon this guy jeffrey. Iran sent never met him. But i just kinda cold emailed him said. Hey i'm a. I'm troy steel intern. You work at espn in la. That's pretty cool I'd love to work there one day. But let's hop on the phone. One day just chat looking for nothing. There was nothing to be had at that time. But just to get my name in people's minds and then as i'm applying just as i'm about to graduate you all my junior year. Applying applying to places around the country small outlets big outlets and espn is one that actually gets back to me and this is made. Probably you know the one that's casting the the whitest net and getting the most applicants and it was. Because i think my theory is that i had said to jeff. Hey jeff i just applied for this job of espn. Is there any way that you can get my name. My resume in front of an actual pair of is no not a robot nine algorithm and he said shirt. We have this program where i can give you an employee referral. And we all do that. And let me know how it works out for you. And then not soon after i heard from. Espn go back and forth a couple interviews and boom. I wanna see that's incredibly rare but the more on this podcast the cold calling the going out and just being a little bit of aggressive towards has worked out for a lot of people but that is unique in itself. You never met the guy in person. You've never talked to him on the phone. It's not like you have a friend of a friend. Justed internship list cold call cold email. Gets you in front of somebody and sure enough. Boom you're hired in bristol. Yes it's the way to go. I mean people. People are a lot nicer than we think we have people in strangers and you know the way the world is now. We give people a bad rap. Truly people are truly good at heart and we don't give them enough credit for that and people want to help you out and especially people like jeff in that situation. Remember when they were like you right. They remember when they were the kid who didn't know what they were doing was just freaking out to figure out what to do with their lives especially in the early stages and they remember that kid and there's a party that thinks that they all just kind of go back to that time in their lives and in some sort of empathy for me in that situation and so people are a lot nicer than he thinks. That'd be my advice jenny. Any young person out there is just like just take a shot. Get out of your comfort zone cold email. Find any connection that you can whether it's an alumni.

jeff jenny nine algorithm One day jeffrey one day every single intern Iran forth couple interviews each a decade plus bristol Espn
Biden Set to Unveil $2 Trillion Infrastructure Plan

WBZ Midday News

00:42 sec | 2 years ago

Biden Set to Unveil $2 Trillion Infrastructure Plan

"Biden is rolling out the first part of a massive infrastructure plan. Today. It appears that House Speaker Nancy Pelosi wants to pass the legislation fast. A service confirms to ABC News House Speaker Nancy Pelosi said she hopes to pass President Biden's massive infrastructure plan by July 4th. That's an accelerated timeline for a bill that could end up totaling more than $3. Trillion in spending. Democrats have already sick No, they might try to pass the measure using the reconciliation process, which wouldn't require any Republican votes. But they'd have to get all members of their own party on board in the Senate, which could be its own challenge. Elizabeth Halsey. ABC NEWS Washington

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi President Biden Biden Abc News Elizabeth Halsey Senate ABC Washington
Fox News hit with $1.6 billion lawsuit over election fraud claims

WBZ Midday News

00:37 sec | 2 years ago

Fox News hit with $1.6 billion lawsuit over election fraud claims

"This afternoon against Fox News. The suit claims the outlets claims of election fraud against the company were fake and the media company damaged their brand, You know, $1.6 billion DEFAMATION LAWSUIT. Dominion Voting Systems claims Fox News sold a false story of election fraud in order to service its own commercial purposes. The Denver based firm claims Fox News pushed baseless conspiracy theories about its voting machines. Fueling former President Trump's effort to overturn the results of the election. In a statement, Fox News said in part, it's proud of its 2020 election coverage and will vigorously defend against this baseless lawsuit in court. Elizabeth Halsey ABC

Fox News Dominion Voting Systems Denver Donald Trump Elizabeth Halsey ABC
Lost in the Forests of Tennessee

Horror Fictional and True Stories

05:28 min | 2 years ago

Lost in the Forests of Tennessee

"You go out in the woods today you are show off or a big surprise. I'm always one for spending time out in nature and enjoying the wilderness. But you always have to be a little bit careful of where you go when you get up to. And that's the theme of tonight's fantastic story. Nowhere near as gruesome as the one. I told you on monday just the same now. My dear friends. I think you know what time it is. It's hump day so please sit back and relax with your favorite drink is. It's time to listen to down here. In the south riding horses is still a fairly popular amongst many. There are many different types of writing. But i've always been keen to trail ride myself. Shell writing is just what it says. It is riding your horse through trails in the woods. Mountains hills and hollows as anyone from around here. Tennessee would tell you it gets hotter than the devils not sack especially during the summer months that is to say when summertime trail riding takes place at night often we wait until full to begin writing because the weather makes it easier but during the summer we ride these rights are always time and a half as usually just a small group of us get together we all gather at the edge of the woods find the trail head from that we set out together for a long night of trout writing through some of the south's last uncivilized land. This particular story and ride took place in august three years. My father and i met up with our friends. Jr and h apm at a place known to the locals as galley hill. It has this name because the trail head is behind the galley hill. Church of christ and cemetry. Yeah i know it sounds bad already but this has been the only trail to this ride for as long as i can remember and it's never cost any sort of problems so like i said we set off for a long night of horseriding and for everyone but me a long night of drinking. I never drank when we rode. Because i wasn't of age and i was our designated driver. I'm aware this all may sound very dangerous. So even strange. But i assure you it's not at least not to us gilly hale is full of well-traveled trails during the winter but during the summer people don't write as much. The trials grow up making it easy to get lost or at least turned around halsey smarter than most folk given credit follow. They have a tremendous sense of direction and can see well at night. The only problem with horses being able to see at night is that in all for them to maintain their vision. It needs to remain. This leaves you without anything to improve your own vision while you ride a thousand pound animal and the duck who the middle of a wooded. No the only exception to this one may use a dim light with a red bulb and redlands for whatever reason which. I'm sure someone hit and explain. These lights won't make your night blind weakland aside from that and the only light we have come from the glow sticks. Everyone ties to the front and back of their saddles. So we can keep up each other easily anyway back to that. All night house came and went with nothing out of the ordinary happening as we wrote and covered a lot of ground constantly putting more distance between us and the whole trailers. I guess. It was around midnight when i made the comment that i was hungry and brought food to cook implying. I wanted to stop for more than just a few minutes to build a fire and eat unsurprisingly. I was not the only hungary one because we immediately stopped him. Within a few minutes had fire roaring and hotdogs roasting when we stop period of time we would always tie horses to trees in a circle and gathering the middle to do our thing. This was done especially at night for more than one reason. I because everyone to relax a little as we could all keep an eye on the horses together and made sure they didn't run all this had happened before and it's nearly impossible to catch a wild in the woods at night. The second reason is because host is a very large animals have superb hearing by having them form circle around us. It served as a natural to any unwanted visitors. Viewing are not after all. We were in the middle of nowhere in the woods at night. The horses formed a circle and inside the circle. We all sat by our fire eating drinking. When carrying i suddenly had the urge to piss so i stood up and walked. Had a few yards to the other side of my horse to go.

Mountains Hills Gilly Hale Devils Weakland Church Of Christ Tennessee Halsey Redlands Hungary
Barrett writes first majority Supreme Court opinion in FOIA dispute

WBZ Midday News

00:42 sec | 2 years ago

Barrett writes first majority Supreme Court opinion in FOIA dispute

"And Supreme Court Justice Amy Amy Cockney Baron has delivered her first majority opinion for the nation's highest court. This is a case involving the Federal Freedom of Information Act, a PC's Elizabeth Scholesy with more from Washington, in her first opinion as a U. S Supreme Court Justice Amy Cockney Barrett rights on behalf of a 72 majority, saying federal government agencies can refuse to disclose documents related to internal deliberations. As part of an exemption in the Freedom of Information Act. The case involved the environmental group Sierra Club trying to obtain documents from the U. S. Fish and Wildlife Service. Justices Sonia Sotomayor and Steven Brier were the two dissents. Elizabeth Halsey. ABC NEWS

Amy Amy Cockney Baron Federal Freedom Of Information Elizabeth Scholesy Supreme Court Justice Amy Cockney Barrett Environmental Group Sierra Clu Washington Federal Government U. S. Fish And Wildlife Servic Steven Brier Sonia Sotomayor Elizabeth Halsey Abc News
Why This Physicist is in the "Hope Business"

Here's Something Good

04:49 min | 2 years ago

Why This Physicist is in the "Hope Business"

"Dr shirley jackson is used to being a first and only she's a physicist and the president of the renown rensselaer polytechnic institute the first woman and first african american in that job and she's a leader pointing the way to a better future. Dr jackson believes that for our country to move forward to be competitive and prosperous. We absolutely must have women and people of color involved in tech and science. Her own life shows. How much change can happen in just a few decades when she was a girl growing up in washington. Dc public schools were still segregated. The nineteen fifty. Four supreme court decision known as brown versus the board of education allowed her to attend schools with better resources and broaden her horizons. She went on to become the first african american woman to get a phd from mit later. She served as an academic researcher and as chair of the us nuclear regulatory commission. We asked dr jackson about the challenges facing women of color in stem. How to meet those challenges and why she sees this as a moment of opportunity. Here's what she had to say. I think they're complexities. That african american women women of color face then that are rooted in the challenges that women face on the one hand and minorities race on the other now. We know that women get dissuaded. Many of them by the time they're in middle school from really thinking of themselves in these field and there are some fields that have been very a male dominated and that then will obviously breakdown to heaven affect on african american or minority women generally but then it's further exacerbated by sort of a kind of lack of confidence or belief in the talents of african americans in this country and and other minorities in terms of people seeing them seeing us in these fields and the net can become self inculcated so that the given individual dozen see ourselves as either being able to do these Do work in these fields or even if they believe they could do it and are excited The work they may feel the mountains of too high to climb and so people move into other things. All of us in higher education are by definition in the whole business because we educate the next generation of innovators and discovery discoverers and those who will be halsey makers etc but from the perspective of the kind of institution either lead. You know we really focus on those who will innovate will invent who will discover and join with those who come from other fields of endeavor to create what needs to be created to keep us moving forward and so i believe it is truly the most important work in the world and certainly here at rensselaer we. Educating many dynamic women leaders in science and technology we have women professors in computer science who have had great success in drawing young women into the field by proving to them that one does not have to grow up a gaming or programming as many of the young men in the class do in order to succeed in fact our young women do quite well here. They graduated very high rates and they go on to do amazing things. We have more challenge with a attracting and retaining minority students. But again those who come here they onion they do well and they go on to do important things. I'm one who believes times of upheaval can open up opportunities previously. Shut out of them. And i'm one who believes that one has to step through one window in time when it opened and to take advantage of whatever those opportunities there are offered and so we've now arrived at another moment when there is at least a more discussion about inequality of opportunity being recognized as something that in our democracy at least in most quarters is not something that we should have the finest tol

Dr Shirley Jackson Renown Rensselaer Polytechnic Dr Jackson Us Nuclear Regulatory Commissi Board Of Education MIT Supreme Court Washington Brown Rensselaer
Trump legal team argues impeachment trial is unconstitutional

Phil Valentine

00:36 sec | 2 years ago

Trump legal team argues impeachment trial is unconstitutional

"Team has submitted its response to the single article of impeachment ahead of Trump's trial in the Senate next week. Former President Trump's legal team argues in a written answer to the Senate that the impeachment trial is unconstitutional because Trump is no longer in office. The former president faces a single charge of inciting the insurrection at the Capitol January 6th, but his lawyers say his comments ahead of the capital riot are protected by the First Amendment. The lawyers also say there's insufficient evidence that Trump's statements about widespread fraud in the 2020 election were false, despite the claims, getting rejected by dozens of courts nationwide. Elizabeth Halsey.

Donald Trump Senate Elizabeth Halsey
Congress overrides Trump's veto for first time

News, Traffic and Weather

00:39 sec | 2 years ago

Congress overrides Trump's veto for first time

"Override President Trump's veto over Must Pass Defense policy bill marking the first veto override of the Trump presidency agencies. Elizabeth shows he has details from Washington. Less than three weeks before President Trump leaves office. Congress has delivered the first veto override in the Trump presidency. The Senate voted 81 to 13 to override the president's veto of the must pass defense policy bill after the House voted to do so earlier this week. $740 billion bill, which authorizes pay raises for troops will now become long President. Trump had vetoed the bill because it didn't include a repeal of a separate law that protects social media platforms. Elizabeth Halsey ABC NEWS Washington The turn of the

President Trump Donald Trump Elizabeth Washington Congress Senate House Elizabeth Halsey Abc News