35 Burst results for "Haiti"

Beirut Explosion Linked to Russian Ship Storing Ammonium Nitrate

Larry Elder

01:44 min | 1 d ago

Beirut Explosion Linked to Russian Ship Storing Ammonium Nitrate

"Beirut explosion linked to Russian ship storing ammonium nitrate left in port called floating bomb. Investigators were probing it. 135 people were killed, 5000 injured. And they're pointing to a Russian ship docked in the city's port for nearly seven years without appropriate security precautions that officials warn was a quote floating bomb into quote. So it does not appear at least based primarily to be an act of terrorism. Now, every August I ask you to help out Food for the poor. Feeds. Hungry Children and families. In third world countries like Haiti and Guatemala. Haiti is the poorest country. In the Western Hemisphere. Even before the Corona virus pandemic hit, the average Haitian lived on less than a dollar a day. Consider this report from NPR about About Haiti. But over the past few weeks, Haiti has seen a rise of more than 600% of covert. 19 cases were Now this was June. Things are worse now, a lot of patients living the Dominican Republic to return home. And this is Dr Jean Pop, who was the leading expert About 30,000 of them and as you may know, the Dominican Republic have the worst epidemic in the entire region. They have passed the bar off 20,000 kisses such Anuj epidemic, So we believe that Those

Haiti Dominican Republic Beirut Dr Jean Pop Western Hemisphere NPR Guatemala
Debating the Ahmaud Arbery case

Court TV Podcast

10:48 min | 2 weeks ago

Debating the Ahmaud Arbery case

"Equa mercy. Join his acklin great to see you. Did He. How dare you? How dare you? This is my house and you're wearing yenkey stuff. Scion unapologetically hello. All right well I just hope that during our debate I do better than the mets do against the Yankees that's. Hoping all right, let. This is what we're GONNA to talk about is the video. The video and the Aubrey case is an amazing piece of evidence. For the prosecution against the McMichael's because you see everything they do. Those are the two guys with the guns in the pickup, one of whom shoots and kills armory. But I think unfortunately. It's a great piece of evidence for the man who is recording that video. Roddy Brian Acklin you do not agree with me. Do not you are wrong. You're wrong. All right I'M GONNA go first, and it starts here and I say unfortunately and I want to preface that folks I'm not making an argument for Roddy. Brian what I'm telling you is what's going to happen and unfortunately this is a great piece of evidence for Roddy, Brian, this video and it comes down to the arguments that Kevin Goth is attorney. Make look at the facts surrounding the video, the only person on the face of the earth who knows this video is being made and being recorded at the time. It's being made in recorded. Is Roddy Brian Okay. He's the only one that knows. That this video exists. He's the only person on earth okay. So, if in fact, prosecutors are going to argue that these three men are working as a lynch mob. Are they going to argue that Roddy Brian's job as part of this lynch mob is to Corral And make sure that you record the lynching, so we can memorialize all of this. And don't forget how everyone finds out about the recording. Roddy Brian at the scene. Invites police into his truck to view the video, so police show up there. Just investing you try to figure out what happens and Ronnie Brian. Tells Police. Listen I got I've got it on video. I, recorded it. Please take a look at it. Shows it to them right then and there. So. Again. Unfortunately, the argument that Kevin Goth can make is lazy. Let's go inside the body Brian. What's his intent? Here was his intent to lynch. Ahmad Aubrey. If so, why would he record a crime? And then why? When police show up the first thing he would do is hand over to police the evidence of the crime that he committed. This goes one hundred percent into the mindset of Roddy Brian and this is a strong argument that Kevin Goth can make to a jury. that. Why on earth would someone record their own crime and then the first thing they do when police show up? Is hand the piece of evidence over to them. ACKLIN. Arguing was very compelling in sense. It's you can tell that you're not racist. By the argument that you provided because we did not include the racist element. Ronnie, Brian in the Michael's were racist, and they were on age racist Tirade. That is why they went around. That is why they have video. As you can see back in the day when they did lynchings in wasn't prided, they had videos. They need pictures of it because they were excited about what they did. We are in a world in which we have Presidential rallies in which races tirades are invited so to to be to say that Haiti's men weren't in building would be wrong. They were in bolted with regards to the back surrounding the video. Let's talk about it the fact surrounding videos. Let's talk about the video. When he was I invited. It was no audio I. Don't know I have that function in my recording in the sense in which I can record a thin ideo in not on your. You know who had the. Mr Brian. We didn't hear the shock in the basement of something that somebody about to die. Why because that million participating in now? He missed a whole big piece of evidence in that pieces of Ahmad. Berry was found on missed the giants car. Pieces that means that evidence of Mr Bridge that means that he hit. The armory with his car to prevent him for movie. To say that he was unarmed is wrong. Mr Robin Mister Bryant had the biggest weapon it at the time. Which is the whole vehicle? Truck with a whole trump down at he did his way, even had that man was cool hand Luke because he was watching a murder, and nobody asked for the audio initially because he was a murder. You know who that the cops you had racist cops come to a racist situation. Leave. The racism states okay hit him with the high side and let him live for three months. Months without any interruption to say that Mister. Bryant wasn't guilty is a farce. He was very much guilty at an end for three months. They watched a video and immig miles. What because they were able to stop? Being friends after Arboretum was shot and killed, they were still friends. They still had the video. They watched it so much, so daddy opened the door to sexual crimes. The this, this case should shock the conscience because the levels of racism in this case is unreasonable, we act three different prosecutors. This prosecutor who saw this in didn't think that this was a murder. We had officers at the scene saw this. In, dot, this which justify so the the Glenn Races. When the most important that evidence of our very being on righties car was still on his car. Three months acted incident and nearly care to wash off so. That that is that the video helps Brian. Totally doesn't work acting that. You didn't plinking most so. The prosecutors are going to argue. That Roddy Brian. Was Racist which they can. Was In cahoots and knew the police would not charge him, which is why he shared the video with police, and knew the process and shared it with the prosecutor because he knew the prosecutor would never charge them, is that do you think that is? An argument that is going to fly with the again. This I'm saying. These are all unfortunate facts for prosecutors in this case, and the prosecutors are going to have to prosecute. Roddy Brian. The McMichael's the local Glenn County Police and the prosecutor's office all in the same trial in order for that theory of yours to to not help. Roddy Brian? Welcome welcome to the practicing law. The South the levels of racism is so appeared like many I. I have to think of Armagh. Arbitrary. That I may get I get that I. Get that, but here's my point. My point is this makes that video the fact that he shoots video and there's more obstacles now. Prosecutors unfortunately again that and to me the obstacle is not only do I have to prosecute these three men. I've got to prosecute the local police and I've got to prosecute the local prosecutor and guess what I'm probably going to have to do it in Glynn County. Georgia. That makes the case more difficult. It's like it's like A. It's like a harper. Literally, but this is what in is in the south? We Wanna say that we come. We've come so far, but that's what it is, and that's how that's how big it is. That's how big it is I think we're agreeing here Hear me out here me out on my theory and why we're agreeing okay, because we're. We're making to arguments that are. not necessarily in conflict everything you're saying. I'm I'm agreeing with. Right. I, just have to get you to agree with the fact that the case is a little bit harder against Roddy Brian with him shooting that video and handing it to police, because now prosecutors have to take on the police and the prosecutors right so. Can we agree on that yes? Yes, all right all right I think we solved it. I think we did. This is a big moment, but I will not ever. Ever cheer for the Yankees. Especially when they play my mets, that will never happen, but I think we can agree here. To a certain extent that the there's going to be some obstacles here, but I think what you have shown me. And made me realize how you look at the case. You know I look at the case a certain way, but I have to get a different mentality onto to to get to that next level. So? Wow Acklin, always great having you on the show for having go Yankees got. That will be her last time on the show by the way. Either that or we can edit that out next time. We'll just bleep it out. Right Acklin mercy, incredible criminal defense attorney. In Georgia knows Georgia law. Insider knows Georgia juries, which is the most important part of of trying to case when we come back. I WANNA, talk about hate crimes, because at the time of the Amman archery shooting there was no hate crime. Law in Georgia and people were. Besides themselves coast to coast. When you come back I'm going to explain to you why it's really not a big deal. Especially in this case, number one and number two. Hate crimes. Are Way too over height by the media.

Roddy Brian Roddy Brian Acklin Prosecutor Ronnie Brian Kevin Goth Ahmad Aubrey Roddy Yankees Georgia Mets Lynch Mcmichael Scion Murder Attorney Mr Robin Mister Bryant Haiti Glenn County Police Mr Bridge Giants
13 nuns at Michigan convent die of COVID-19

TIME's Top Stories

02:14 min | 2 weeks ago

13 nuns at Michigan convent die of COVID-19

"Thirteen religious sisters at a Michigan Convent have died from the Corona virus with twelve sisters passing in the span of a month, the women aged sixty nine to ninety nine were all members of a Felicien, sisters. Convent in Livonia Michigan on Good Friday. The virus took the life of sister. Mary Louisa was ninety nine by the end of the month eleven. Other sisters had passed seventeen more. More were infected, but recovered according to sister, Noel Murray Gabriel. The director of clinical health services for our lady of Hope Province, a thirteenth sister, despite an initial recovery passed away in June the sisters in presentation of the Blessed Virgin Mother Convent in Livonia as well as all of us in the province are still very much dealing with the loss of so many sisters says Suzanne Wilcox. Wilcox English Executive Director of mission advancement for the Felicien Sisters of North America the sisters. All of whom were longtime members of the convent, lived prayed and worked together prior to their retirements. The women had worked as school teachers college professors and principles. Librarians nurses and organised sister. Mary Louisa was Indiana had served as the sunshine person for the local minister, sending Peace Day and birthday cards. Cards to the sisters in the infirmary and obituary reads sister Victoria Marine dykes sixty nine lead nursing students regular trips to the Felicien sisters mission in Haiti sister Rosemary Wallach Eighty six spent eight years working as a secretary in the Vatican Secretary of State Sister Thomas Murray Would Hausky seventy three once led a second grade class to win a national prize and a Campbell's soup commercial competition. The death of the thirteen nuns could be the most serious loss of life experienced by a group of religious women in the United States since the nineteen eighteen influenza pandemic, according to Global Sisters report a nonprofit Catholic News outlet globally at least sixty one felicien sisters have died, but other religious orders have also been struck by the virus with six sisters, dying of covid nineteen at the Our Lady of Convent in Wisconsin in April. The convent closed its doors to visitors in. In March and placed strict restrictions on group activities, but the virus still reached the convent and spread quickly for many sisters who normally pray alongside those who are dying, having to socially distance during a time of grief was difficult. Normally we will share stories about the sister. We have lost during the vigil the night before the funeral says English, but we have been unable to do so. Their collective impact on the community has been and continues to be very deep, says English.

Blessed Virgin Mother Convent Global Sisters Our Lady Of Convent Mary Louisa Suzanne Wilcox Noel Murray Gabriel Michigan Executive Director Of Mission Hope Province English North America Livonia Director Rosemary Wallach Indiana Felicien Haiti Thomas Murray Secretary
Resistance And Loss In The Age Of COVID-19 With Edwidge Danticat

Latino USA

06:04 min | Last month

Resistance And Loss In The Age Of COVID-19 With Edwidge Danticat

"So tweets you talked about how all of these protests that you're seeing. Have really brought up a lot of memories because you grew up in Brooklyn after you arrive there when you were twelve and. People forget that in the eighties and nineties, and I covered these stories New York. City was a very divided place. So you brought up the murder in one thousand, nine, hundred nine of Yusef Hawkins. He was a young black teenager who was killed by a mob of white teenagers in Benson Hers Brooklyn. He was literally just at the wrong place at the wrong time in the wrong neighborhood because he was black. There was also the nineteen eighty-four murder of eleanor bumpers a she was an elderly, disabled black woman who was shot and killed by police when they tried to victor from her own apartment. In the Bronx, there was also this terrible case in nineteen ninety-seven. This was the brutal assault of Abner Louima Haitian, American from Brooklyn. Who is sodomized by a police officer in a precinct in Brooklyn and I`Ma Diablo from Guinea shot at Nineteen Times in a hail of forty-one bullets in Nineteen, ninety nine. You were in Brooklyn. You were in New York City. We have lived through this before and. We thought we had made progress. Yes, actually. Week I've been thinking about it a lot and I have spoken about it to my three brothers I was twenty years old when Yusef Hawkins was murdered Yusef Hawkins. Was For me the first time that I started following very closely and part because he was the same age as one of my brothers and. Immigrant parents, not all but many. My grandparents harbor this illusion that if they're black. US borne or foreign born child is polite. Works hard in school does all the right thing that they might be able to. Escape. The brunt of American racism. But for my parents that case. Did something. My parents and myself for the first twelve years of my life I had grown up under booth dictatorship to develop dictatorship in Haiti so there's a kind of caution about authority, then about Filante is about mobs, and so you come with that with that fear already, but I remember after USA faulk inside I decided my brothers and I were going to the protests. There was a big marks. I think September one thousand, nine, hundred nine in downtown, Brooklyn, where they were attempting to cross the bridge to march to city hall, and I remember looking over at them during the march and thinking, would I be marching for them one big? So, of course that whole notion of the good, immigrant, being exempt from police violence, war-shattered by the police shooting of people like I'm a Dr Low. And then there was the atrocious abuse of Abner Louima so all of that. You know we marched lot. Even my parents, who were not very political people at all went to one of the protests at that time, so it was a very volatile and really urgent seeming time, so there are echoes of the protests then here but now. To see the whole range of different people in young people at this current protests is very encouraging. Was this. Really beautiful image that I saw the other day ever protest in New York of young Haitian and Dominican people marching side-by-side in the protests, and that was so heartening to see like all the coalitions that are built in think of this Maria. We've all been inside our homes for the most part right unless sir. Essential workers. We've been inside and the pandemic that we've been hearing about. That can kill us at his kill so many people I know, but if that couldn't keep people in, when cannot emphasize the urgency of Fatty. NUFF, that everybody who steps out on the street is saying that this is so important that I'm potentially risking my health to stand out on the street and protest. You brought up those recent images of the Haitian flag right next to the Dominican. And these protesters linking arms in a message that is saying you know black lives matter so, what are you thinking in terms of Latinas? Data Latina ex people and the conversation about anti blackness that runs deep in Latin America, and the Caribbean well. Thankfully, the young people are already having that conversation right, but I I would say to folks. My folks might people is that we are seeing and we have seen what entire blackness does from this very concrete moment? Of this man being suffocated on the ground to people being shot in their cars when they're pulled over people being shot in the back and the stories that we don't see, but here about if the. Sandra Bland woman who was found dead in a Texas jail sale three days after being arrested during a traffic stop, we saw at the beginning of the end of her life. It's Halo Louisville Police shot and killed twenty six year old Briana Taylor in her apartment. The women we hear less about we've seen what entire blackness does by

Yusef Hawkins Brooklyn New York United States Benson Hers Brooklyn Louisville Police Abner Louima Haitian Abner Louima Murder Nineteen Times City Hall Haiti Sandra Bland Texas Officer Assault Eleanor Briana Taylor Latin America Guinea
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The Indy Mogul Podcast

00:32 sec | 2 months ago

Expand - burst 01

"Haiti filmmakers. And welcome to the anymore podcast episode fifty one now today we have cinematographer Watkinson, who is behind the absolutely stunning frames of the handmaid's tale now for those guys who already seen it. You know that you can basically pause the show at any time, and it looks like an absolute painting, but before convicts able to craft, those beautiful shots also had to start as a runner film. Special Effects House back in one. One thousand, nine, hundred, seventy Larry, what Sharpton Mac tools by making short films and most control studio after hours, so we are going to be talking about all of that leading up to the sheeting of the handmaid's

Special Effects House Watkinson Haiti Larry Sharpton
Queer Eye's Philadelphia season is live on Netflix

KYW 24 Hour News

01:00 min | 2 months ago

Queer Eye's Philadelphia season is live on Netflix

"We're we're I was was I filled filled was was filled filled this this season season this this season season here here here here the the film film the the film film their their fifth fifth their their fifth fifth season season season season I I should should I I should should say say say say right right right right here here in in here here Philadelphia Philadelphia in in Philadelphia Philadelphia the the season season the the season season was was released released was was released released this this weekend weekend this this weekend weekend the the first first the the first first weekend weekend weekend weekend of of pride pride of of pride pride month month month month and and K. K. and and what what K. K. abuse abuse what what abuse abuse might might might might already already already already spoke spoke spoke spoke with with the the salon salon with with the the salon salon owner owner owner owner featured featured featured featured on the show on the show it it was was a surreal a surreal experience experience for for Heidi Heidi Wallace Wallace to see to see all the all lights the lights cameras cameras and and action action inside inside of her of little her little six six chair chair salon salon in south in south Philly Philly we're we're there there for the for whole the whole thing thing and and it was it nice was nice to see to all see the all the little little and and then after then after the filming the filming and and what what how much how work much work is put is put into into it it she's she's a big a big fan fan of the show of the show and says and says it was it so was so cool cool to be to involved be involved too bad too bad you can't you can't take take advantage advantage of a of once a once in a lifetime in a lifetime marketing marketing opportunity opportunity because because the salon the salon is closed is closed I I know know right right now now it's it's just just unfortunate unfortunate that that you know you know we're not we're not able able to be to be in the in pond the pond behind behind the chair the chair but but I think I think you know you the know other the other wonderful wonderful upside upside to this to this is is such a such positive a positive show show and and there's there's so much so much happiness happiness in the show in the show that I that feel I feel like like this is this a good is a time good time for it for to it air to air you can you see can Haiti's see Haiti's mocking mocking bird bird salon salon in episode in episode eight eight of queer of queer eye eye on on

Philadelphia K. K. Heidi Heidi Wallace Wallace Philly Haiti
Queer Eye's Philadelphia season is live on Netflix

KYW 24 Hour News

01:00 min | 2 months ago

Queer Eye's Philadelphia season is live on Netflix

"We're we're I was was I filled filled was was filled filled this this season season this this season season here here here here the the film film the the film film their their fifth fifth their their fifth fifth season season season season I I should should I I should should say say say say right right right right here here in in here here Philadelphia Philadelphia in in Philadelphia Philadelphia the the season season the the season season was was released released was was released released this this weekend weekend this this weekend weekend the the first first the the first first weekend weekend weekend weekend of of pride pride of of pride pride month month month month and and K. K. and and what what K. K. abuse abuse what what abuse abuse might might might might already already already already spoke spoke spoke spoke with with the the salon salon with with the the salon salon owner owner owner owner featured featured featured featured on the show on the show it it was was a surreal a surreal experience experience for for Heidi Heidi Wallace Wallace to see to see all the all lights the lights cameras cameras and and action action inside inside of her of little her little six six chair chair salon salon in south in south Philly Philly we're we're there there for the for whole the whole thing thing and and it was it nice was nice to see to all see the all the little little and and then after then after the filming the filming and and what what how much how work much work is put is put into into it it she's she's a big a big fan fan of the show of the show and says and says it was it so was so cool cool to be to involved be involved too bad too bad you can't you can't take take advantage advantage of a of once a once in a lifetime in a lifetime marketing marketing opportunity opportunity because because the salon the salon is closed is closed I I know know right right now now it's it's just just unfortunate unfortunate that that you know you know we're not we're not able able to be to be in the in pond the pond behind behind the chair the chair but but I think I think you know you the know other the other wonderful wonderful upside upside to this to this is is such a such positive a positive show show and and there's there's so much so much happiness happiness in the show in the show that I that feel I feel like like this is this a good is a time good time for it for to it air to air you can you see can Haiti's see Haiti's mocking mocking bird bird salon salon in episode in episode eight eight of queer of queer eye eye on on

Philadelphia K. K. Heidi Heidi Wallace Wallace Philly Haiti
Queer Eye's Philadelphia season is live on Netflix

KYW 24 Hour News

01:00 min | 2 months ago

Queer Eye's Philadelphia season is live on Netflix

"We're I was was filled filled this this season season here here the the film film their their fifth fifth season season I I should should say say right right here here in in Philadelphia Philadelphia the the season season was was released released this this weekend weekend the the first first weekend weekend of of pride pride month month and and K. K. what what abuse abuse might might already already spoke spoke with with the the salon salon owner owner featured featured on the show it was a surreal experience for Heidi Wallace to see all the lights cameras and action inside of her little six chair salon in south Philly we're there for the whole thing and it was nice to see all the little and then after the filming and what how much work is put into it she's a big fan of the show and says it was so cool to be involved too bad you can't take advantage of a once in a lifetime marketing opportunity because the salon is closed I know right now it's just unfortunate that you know we're not able to be in the pond behind the chair but I think you know the other wonderful upside to this is such a positive show and there's so much happiness in the show that I feel like this is a good time for it to air you can see Haiti's mocking bird salon in episode eight of queer eye on

Philadelphia K. K. Heidi Wallace Philly Haiti
WHO: coronavirus cases increasing in Central and South America

AP News Radio

00:40 sec | 2 months ago

WHO: coronavirus cases increasing in Central and South America

"The emergence is chief of the World Health Organization says central and South America witnessing the most intense transmission of the corona virus but it's difficult to predict when the pandemic might pique their Michael Ryan says five of the ten countries recording the most new cases are in the Americas the US Brazil Peru Chile and Mexico he says hospitals are starting to strain under the pressure Ryan says in the WHL he's particularly concerned about places like Haiti because of the inherent weaknesses in their health systems he's clarified the outbreaks in South Asia and Africa well the difficult I'm not a stable Charles the last month London

World Health Organization South America Michael Ryan United States Chile Haiti South Asia Africa Charles London Brazil Mexico
WHO: coronavirus cases increasing in Central and South America

AP News Radio

00:28 sec | 2 months ago

WHO: coronavirus cases increasing in Central and South America

"Michael Ryan says five of the ten countries recording the most new cases are in the Americas the US Brazil Peru Chile and Mexico he says hospitals are starting to strain under the pressure Ryan says in the WHL he's particularly concerned about places like Haiti because of the inherent weaknesses in their health systems he's clarified the outbreaks in South Asia and Africa well the difficult I'm not a stable Charles the last month London

Michael Ryan United States Chile Haiti South Asia Africa Charles London Brazil Mexico
Colin Finlay

The Candid Frame

05:58 min | 2 months ago

Colin Finlay

"I'm excited I sit down and talk with here you man. I'm disappointed you can't see me dressed in my finest and freshly shaved respect for you. Yeah and doing looking at work and seeing some of the presentations you've done and just getting a a really good understanding of what your career has look like. I was really inspired. Not just by the work which I think is exceptional but I thought that you were one of the few photographers who focuses on the things that you that you do in terms of the environment cultural impact of socio economic issues around the world and one of the things that you really adept at is providing a sense of connectedness between all these what normally would be disparate things in the minds of many of our of Westerners tend to have such a topic and self absorbed obsession with the world revolving around us that we tend to sort of exclude things that we don't feel have a direct impact on us even though it does and I don't think that at least for for for Western people that that something that awareness that you have it comes naturally. I think it's something that at least for me has been sort of a learned. I've had to unlearn that kind of way of thinking and open myself up and I'm wondering for you. How did that sense of that connectedness? You know that I see in your work. How did you come to have that yourself? It's kind of interesting here just to kind of explore this topic right out of the out of the out of the gate here but it's just an overall feeling that we are all one connected human being we are all one connected earth country. There's no difference between myself. And someone number Wanda a first nations person in Canada. A polar bear were all part of this great mother nature all part of this earth and I see it. All is our earth our collective future art collective history that belongs to each and every one of us and all of us have a vital role to play in this world so for me. It's I see that connection point. I've seen the difference between a billionaire and someone who's on the streets having a tough time in their life were all these powerful magnetic souls that are all on our journey in this world. I respect an extraordinary operation for really each and every one of us who are on this path. Was that something you always had or? Did you have a moment of epiphany when you were younger? That sort of allowed you to see the world in that particular way is definitely something that was important to me from the streets of Belfast from my times experiences in Sarajevo some of those really powerful experiences in Haiti in the early nineties. When you're just experiencing something that is so powerful and so beyond anything that you could even imagine you'd be confronting in your life and the humility that is absorbed through every cell and fiber in my body as I photograph and spend time with extraordinarily powerful people. That frankly have the power have strengthened. Have courage that I do not possess. I am simply an observer a witness in that sense and I am a part of this journey that they are on in the experience of their life than you know. Ultimate humility to me comes from there in the eyes of the people that I've photographs from really understanding the depths. What their day to day realities like and then how I come back to this first world. It's it's a difficult thing. It was brutal that coming back in landing at LAX. In coming back into this world leading. When I just left behind That Internet itself is extraordinarily difficult to the least. I remember crying literally walking down the aisles of a grocery store and looking at their Sushi in all these meets and everything it's like my God and I'm in Saudi bullets. They're dependent on what food they can scrounge. They're taking their lives in their hands. Trying to get water for their family and Sarajevo not being shot and killed and he does understand life and such a different matter that it really comes down to a pitcher of water feeding your family for that day or providing one meal and then coming back here to realize you know what we have at our at our fingertips some so it starts to really bend and the beginning years of breaking May to a completely different understanding of other majority are. Have you know a lot of other people around the world on? That's an interesting term. You said breaking you in as if you had Basically Foundation that you basically emptied sort of destroy in order to build a a a new one with being way of describing. Yeah I also think that for me I had an extraordinary powerful desire within me to witness first hand the history as it unfolds being an apartheid South Africa before Nelson Mandela. Send it to presidency a lot of the different war-zones in and out of the genocide in Rwanda Darfur wars in the Middle East. A lot of fees experiences really changed me immensely and really broke down the nature of what I thought reality was for me and for my family and what that word means to me and how it's manifested within me and how it is indeed. You know change the way that I view the world. How did how did you see your work or hope for your work to be used during those those early years of your career and how change what was really interesting. Is that one of the first major magazines that I work with was magazine that you might have depending on where you're at school was called scholastic so that was the magazine. Went out to students I received when I was a student so lineup really establishing a great relationship where the editor they're Lee buyer and I really started to take on a lot of these projects around the world on children.

Sarajevo Middle East Nelson Mandela Wanda Haiti Editor Canada LAX South Africa Belfast
Millions of U.S. homeowners are behind on mortgage payments

Orlando's Morning News

00:23 sec | 3 months ago

Millions of U.S. homeowners are behind on mortgage payments

"Term homeowners like Haiti Fernandes stop up then her husband who's a catering company in Las Vegas or worried about their mortgage party is the mortgage to keep that up to keep the lights on by one count three point eight million American homeowners skip mortgage payments last month reporter Victor Candice's many lenders right now are offering forbearance which is basically if temporary grace period that lets borrowers pause your

Haiti Fernandes Las Vegas Victor Candice Reporter
How I Built Resilience

How I Built This

06:34 min | 3 months ago

How I Built Resilience

"Okay onto today's bonus episode. So as some of you know we've started this new series of online video conversations. Where every week? I talked to a founder or an entrepreneur or just a wise person about how they are building resilience into their businesses. Right now and in case you missed these conversations. When they happen live. We are posting an excerpt. Right here every Thursday in your podcast feed and you can see all of them on our facebook page facebook dot com slash. I built this. Just click on videos anyway. Last week I spoke with six chefs about the impact of cove in nineteen on the food industry. And today we're bringing you conversation with. Jose Andress the founder of world's central kitchen. Jose as many of you know is a Michelin starred chef known for as many restaurants around the country including minibar in Washington. Dc AND BAZAAR IN L. A. Jose is no stranger to giving back in two thousand ten after the earthquake in Haiti he founded ruled Central Kitchen which is a nonprofit that provides meals during times of crisis specifically natural disasters and in the wake of the Corona Virus. Pandemic ruled central. Kitchen has been on the ground serving hundreds of thousands of meals daily to people all over the world. I spoke with Jose at his home in Maryland. Where he's cooking with his family delivering meals and feeding the masses by borrowing some bigger kitchen's like the kitchens at the stadium where the Washington nationals play baseball in Washington DC. I've seen some videos. You outside the stadium then literally delivering food How are you doing are you? How are you staying safe? When when when you're doing that work well listen People as being from the beginning why we do what we do. I mean frankly was Chan is doing close to two hundred thousand meals a day so they will reach three million meals way. The today on this is reality. But we don't do it the long way our organization that we've proven over and over that we can go from is more organization to sometimes the main organization in a in an emergency in Bama's we were the first one on the ground Fed for the NYLAND's eighty thousand today. We were the first one Sundays before anybody else show up here. Obviously America's own is what we belong on to be able to put the know. How of wasn't Kitchen the surveys of federal Americans is the best Moment in that in the way of we wish we were out of business and we had to do it but we Feeding save thousands many of them American people In the British cruise ship we help the government than we went cutting four to help the Governor. Newsom to look the same in Oakland. We knew that this was about to happen. We call it from the beginning. This is going to become a health prices. Obviously everybody's GonNa talk about the economic crisis but above all these may become a big humanitarian crisis not only America but the run the world humanitarian crisis because Latvia foot. So how we do it. We are trying to build restaurants to join. We have more than five hundred restaurants across America. We are adding new restaurants almost everyday. Well why we do it. Because who better than defeat Americans than the same chefs do it in the good times is not like restaurants that are gonna be retiring from what we are able to contribute by. The restaurants are barbed distribution. Their leaders shops. The owners of the restaurants are in their communities. They know their communities better than anybody with partner with local organizations that know the neighborhoods very well so we may be feeding into bronze in Harlem only housing fellows that need our breasts because nobody else is there or all of the southern many angios receiving funding May NGOs. Don't have any more the same luxury of volunteers on the systems that we took for granted are shutting down with forget the NGOs are the third biggest employer in America on. When does India are not up and running this system breaks? We should be super thankful for them. Because they do an amazing opening surveys. So what we're doing is covering the blind spots. We are in more than hundred cities as we speak in multiple estates. I'm always do it. Will we partner ownerships achieves something very simple at three hundred sixty degree response What we see here is how together we can show Congress and the White House what legislation what bills. They have to pass to make sure that we're no wasted fought by farmers no being able to sell it and throwing in the fills or the production. When this time we have many cities across America? Where families are hungry. We're trying to rein smart solutions.

America Jose Andress Washington Dc Founder Partner Facebook DC Michelin L. A. Jose Maryland Haiti Chan Bama Oakland Newsom Harlem Washington
Coronavirus crisis could double number of people suffering acute hunger - UN

UN News

01:28 min | 3 months ago

Coronavirus crisis could double number of people suffering acute hunger - UN

"More than a quarter of a billion people could suffer from acute by the end of twenty twenty because of the impact of the new corona virus. Pandemic that's according to the World Food Programme. Wfp and other UN agencies. Which on Tuesday warned that caveat nineteen could almost double the number of people who are already critically hungry now in fifty five countries according to the global report on food crises produced by WFP and fifteen other humanitarian and development partners. Seventy five million children were stunted and seventy million suffered from wasting in two thousand. Nineteen the forecast. It's spike in the number of people at particular risk of curve in nineteen relates to one hundred and eighty three million people who were found to be on the cusp of acute hunger last year faced with the new corona virus. They're unlikely to withstand the shock to their food insecurity. The report suggests regionally more than half of the one hundred thirty five million people covered by the report are in Africa. Forty three million live in the Middle East and Asia eighteen and a half million from Latin America and the Caribbean. The key reasons for food insecurity are conflict where the extremes and economic turbulence in order of severity the ten worst food crises last year Yemen the Democratic Republic of the Congo Afghanistan Venezuela Ethiopia South Sudan Syria Sudan northern and Haiti together they constituted eighty eight million acutely food insecure people and accounted for sixty five percent of all people in acute need

World Food Programme Pandemic Middle East UN Yemen Haiti Democratic Republic Caribbean Africa Asia Afghanistan Latin America Ethiopia Venezuela
The stigma around COVID can be as dangerous as the virus

Second Opinion

03:20 min | 3 months ago

The stigma around COVID can be as dangerous as the virus

"Every country in the world is grappling with the covert epidemic. Some much better than others. In many of those countries stigma around the disease plays a very important role in India. Stigma is directed at Muslims in Haiti at orphanages in Spain at Italians and in the US at asian-americans stigma related to disease his not new and in the US. It goes back hundreds of years. Those who are infected are considered to be part of an outside group and they have been blamed ostracized and often brutally attacked for simply getting sick. Geneva is in North Africa compared to other North African or African countries. We have one of the oldest population with a population of twelve million. To Nisha has one of the best healthcare systems in Africa with well trained health providers but few hospital beds and very few intensive care units so public health and testing need to play a large role in controlling the spread of Kovic. My name is Gibert BELKA KOREA. Young Damien continues. Yeah working For the Institute Jaber is concerned that the public response to co VID has turned into a blame game. We have fighting a virus year. We non fighting people what we seeing right now. The message about Kobe is more about foreign train. People that have the disease as bad people highlighting gators and saying hey the virus or the diseases coming from these neighborhoods. When people are scared it is human nature to want to blame others and create a narrative of outside bad people causing the problem. It is their fault. My family or my community would never have caused this problem by being portrayed as bad people are scared. That basically makes him hide. And we've seen that with other diseases that has to beg colossus or or HIV. Basically people don't WanNa get tested or portrayed as cubby positives in in their communities or in the neighborhoods but when people don't get tested it's hard to control the disease and we can't know about hot spots and we can't do contact racing and individual suffer as well. Jaber told me about one example. He found particularly upsetting burying. Gubbay positives agents or Ned evil. Some communities refuse to have burials in noticing. Theories scored It's it's it's human rights. I mean if it's done properly. It knows no risk. Stigma itself is like a virus. The fear that drives it is contagious. It's absolutely gear driven by giving the correct information. We can remove that fear. Remove that stigma and no the movie This virus from the comed- once we find a way to manage Kovic nineteen and we will. It would be too bad if we eliminate the virus but are left with the plague of stigma.

Institute Jaber Kobe United States Kovic North Africa Korea India Haiti Comed North African Damien Spain HIV Geneva NED
In a test of faith, Christians mark Good Friday in isolation

AP News Radio

00:50 sec | 4 months ago

In a test of faith, Christians mark Good Friday in isolation

"As the world remains in uptown from the current virus pandemic on Good Friday Christians commemorate Jesus's crucifixion without the Saddam touch sepsis or emotional possessions of pastillas in Jerusalem a small group of clerics also hold a close to service in the church of the holy sepulchre a stark contrast to the tens of thousands of pilgrims from around the world who would normally retraced Jesus steps in the Holy Week leading up to Easter it ran the torch lit way of the cross procession at the Colosseum at the highlights of Haiti week drawing large crowds of pilgrims tourists and locals it's been canceled this year along with all other public gatherings in Italy which is backing one of the worst outbreaks local resident Franco put out a fine to change up setting it is very disturbing besides the sacredness of this period we have missing everything that surrounds it starting with the religious celebrations I'm Karen Thomas

Jerusalem Colosseum Italy Franco Karen Thomas Haiti
In a test of faith, Christians mark Good Friday in isolation

AP News Radio

00:50 sec | 4 months ago

In a test of faith, Christians mark Good Friday in isolation

"As the world remains in uptown from the current virus pandemic on Good Friday Christians commemorate Jesus's crucifixion without the Saddam touch sepsis or emotional possessions of pastillas in Jerusalem a small group of clerics also hold a close to service in the church of the holy sepulchre a stark contrast to the tens of thousands of pilgrims from around the world who would normally retraced Jesus steps in the Holy Week leading up to Easter it ran the torch lit way of the cross procession at the Colosseum at the highlights of Haiti week drawing large crowds of pilgrims tourists and locals it's been canceled this year along with all other public gatherings in Italy which is backing one of the worst outbreaks local resident Franco put out a fine to change up setting it is very disturbing besides the sacredness of this period we have missing everything that surrounds it starting with the religious celebrations I'm Karen Thomas

Jerusalem Colosseum Italy Franco Karen Thomas Haiti
In a test of faith, Christians mark Good Friday in isolation

AP News Radio

00:50 sec | 4 months ago

In a test of faith, Christians mark Good Friday in isolation

"As the world remains in uptown from the current virus pandemic on Good Friday Christians commemorate Jesus's crucifixion without the Saddam touch sepsis or emotional possessions of pastillas in Jerusalem a small group of clerics also hold a close to service in the church of the holy sepulchre a stark contrast to the tens of thousands of pilgrims from around the world who would normally retraced Jesus steps in the Holy Week leading up to Easter it ran the torch lit way of the cross procession at the Colosseum at the highlights of Haiti week drawing large crowds of pilgrims tourists and locals it's been canceled this year along with all other public gatherings in Italy which is backing one of the worst outbreaks local resident Franco put out a fine to change up setting it is very disturbing besides the sacredness of this period we have missing everything that surrounds it starting with the religious celebrations I'm Karen Thomas

Jerusalem Colosseum Italy Franco Karen Thomas Haiti
"haiti" Discussed on The Current

The Current

11:44 min | 7 months ago

"haiti" Discussed on The Current

"Quebec politician Dominique gloves parents. George UNGLOVED in Mealy Neptune. I'm glad we're among those killed in the earthquake. She also lost her uncle and her cousin last month as the tenth anniversary approached. She spoke in Quebec's National Assembly and told the story of her sister calling her twenty four hours after the quake Zepa Mama. That's my Malacca School because you've been the dominique ungloved is saying and I said Dad and mum and it was at that moment that I understood that in one blow. I had lost my father my mother. My uncle and my cousin Domenico glove is the liberal member in the National Assembly for the Montreal writing sent Santan. Good Morning Good Morning told me about that moment in the National Assembly this incredibly powerful Oh was It was very emotional national and I you know a today's beforehand. I didn't know whether I was going to do it. Or not I didn't know whether I was capable of speaking about this The National National Assembly. But then I I also have the responsibility to do that. My parents were due to Friskin Indians to be identified the aftermath of the earthquake and I think This story is not only my story but it's the story of hundreds of thousands of people have been acted by this earthquake. So I thought I I had to do it and I didn't know exactly what I was going to say. How was going to come out but I just shared the story like it happened And how I felt and remembering my sister calling me and my sister not being able to tell me dad and mom had passed away she was only able to tell me Who was my aunt? She's alive and Nick is alive and then I was saying and dad and she was an me is alive and sitting repeating all those lanes the people that were alive. He was incapable of telling me who was who had passed away. And that's how I understood what was going on you make that speech And then what happens. Politics can be a pretty divisive Participation to be in we know that people have different sides that they're involved in what happened happened in in that moment after when you go in regardless of what party you're from You go in because you think you can change the oil change things and I think we all human the the end so I had people from different parties coming to me and hugging me and and I could see people being emotional across all parties. Although it was a very sad moment it was also a very moving moment because as people were were all touched touched by the story and you know we have significant is for our patient as ranked Quebec. It's very hard to be quebecer and not to know one percents. That originally comes from Haiti eighty took me back a decade ago. When you first heard that their head burn earthquake in Haiti what did you think what went through your mind you know? I was restaurant and I was having dinner and somebody call into earthquake in Haiti. I'm like okay my parents out there because you're on vacation but All later it was it was nothing for me because earthquake is not something that is necessary. Terrible so I but almost like five minutes later somebody called I said. Did you see the earthquake. Oh did you hear about it and then I started realizing okay. It's more serious than I thought. And we started making phone calls all didn't have used but it was not surprising. The lines were caught and I had to wait until the next day to have news. We thought we had good connections. Some people giving us information and it was all all it was all wrong. In in from members of my family yet had died so Twenty four hours of not knowing of certainty the of stress fear and And then the news. I was going to say what were those twenty four hours like. I can't imagine seeing images hearing about it but not not knowing the state of your family. What was it was terrible? It was it was terrible. But you know we have very We're very resilient family. So he's trying to stay very active calling people finding solutions reaching out so it was also very a busy so you did have time to think too much about all this. You're trying to I was emotive trying to find solutions. But you can only imagine what a what it's like and then to us But then few hours later spoke with my aunt who had lost her her son Mike. My cousin who was twenty four years old passed away as spoke to to his mom. My aunt my aunt and she said you know dominate the dead. And there's nothing we can do about that. There's so many more things that you need to did you for the people that are alive so she was so strong that I told myself I'm here here. I am in Montreal and able to a half a positive influence despite everything that we're going to try to find solutions for the other people that are in need will deal with all this afterwards but if if we can actually get some food get people over there to help out and get back on the get back on their feet that this will will be contributing so it's a a personal tragedy within national or international catastrophe. Told me about your parents. They sounded like remarkable people So both my parents were from Haiti. the move to Quebec nineteen. sixty-nine was born in seventy four. And the reason why I was born and raised in Quebec is because my father was a was as a political prisoner under underdeveloped and He he had to leave the country and he came to Quebec in. co-founded the University of Montreal mom became a teacher and they were very involved in their communities. And when I say community for back he shouldn't communities in in Montreal. We all My mom was very involved with them. Female female groups and And my dad always invited some some kind of politics because he ended up being a minister Mr in the end in in Haiti And I think it's their engagement values that have That I've really they were able to transfer that aura to conveyed those values to us. We are with following we we walking in the footsteps. Your mom wrote a thesis. What what was the thesis? The thesis was the work of women. or how men become rich so basically defunct communism in infringing Basically illustrating that a lot of the men in he Had some money. But because of the work of the women supporting them she she was a feminist and The the book was all about the impact award jump women in the in the country. How did the work you talked about the impact that they had on Quebec Society? How did their work shape who you are now because you were involved in engineering before their death right? That's probably the reason why I mean politics today because they've always encouraged me to think about what difference I can make in the world and Politics is one way of doing that. So that's the certainly the reason why I'm doing what I'm doing today. And that that advice that motivation that your aunt gave you about The the work that you can do to help the living. What did that mean to you in terms of where you are now? It's something that I carry with me all the time. And even the National Assembly I share the fact that he had After exile after being sent to jail and finally he was a he was sent to tinker Acre back but He wrote a letter to my mom. And he said you know we're going to go and build I'm just going to translate it as a As I can right now but we're going to build tomorrow's at that look like our dreams so I thought disin- exactly what they've been able. STU gives us as values despite what's going on you always have to stand up and and fight for what you think is right we he also With the with the singer rocket fire outage in session Stein founded a foundation called copy which which means stand up inquiry all and to support people in Haiti. So I think these are values that are very very alive and that I'm trying to convert my own children that that cushion that you mentioned from your father. I mean that was that was in a letter that you found that he that he rotate your mother. Yes I mean told me about that letter. So the ladder The letter was written the year of I was born and it's also the year where he was sent to jail in that sent back to Quebec and After after they had passed away I was looking at all the papers and documents and I found that card For Chris it's on December. Twenty four th. He's writing this letter. My mom is pregnant. He goes to a nearby. My mom too tim unique and to you who doesn't have a name and he writes this card and at the end he said despite everything the wheel bill bill tomorrow was that looked like our dreams. it's very moving. It's it shows the strength that he had in the in the courage and I think we need to be inspired by this every day. When you look at the situation now in Haiti a decade after the earthquake What do you see? Of course. Haiti is going through difficult situation right now. Too Complex country a because of the dictatorship Because of everything that went wrong afterwards. A Haiti is in is in this current situation. That is very hard. The there are some initiatives that are clearly working being at the local level and copies a good example of that when you see communities are Becoming financially independent creative a standing up for themselves working agriculture working in education But at the end of the day like in any place in the world you need a stable government to make things happen and so if you think of those words that were in the letter that your father wrote to your mother that idea of building days that resemble our dreams or building days as that resembled our futures. What are your dreams for Haiti? They finally get A government that is table in they can actually focused focused on building. This new generation of leader kept population is under twenty years old It's a wealth unbelievable believable wealth. And and I really hope that there is a leader or group of people That will be able to Create opportunities for this new generation. It's a real pleasure to talk to you about this if I wanted to say. Thank you in Creole holiday. Say That you would say Miss Yuppie. Dominique Messina appeal. Thank you so much. Domini ungloved is the liberal M._N._A.. For the Montreal writing a centenary Santan for more C._B._C.. PODCASTS Goto C._B._C.. Dot C._A. Slash podcasts..

Haiti earthquake Montreal Quebec National Assembly National National Assembly dominique ungloved George UNGLOVED Dominique gloves Malacca School Domenico Quebec Society University of Montreal Dominique Messina Domini ungloved Creole holiday Nick Mike
"haiti" Discussed on The Current

The Current

11:44 min | 7 months ago

"haiti" Discussed on The Current

"Quebec politician Dominique gloves parents. George UNGLOVED in Mealy Neptune. I'm glad we're among those killed in the earthquake. She also lost her uncle and her cousin last month as the tenth anniversary approached. She spoke in Quebec's National Assembly and told the story of her sister calling her twenty four hours after the quake Zepa Mama. That's my Malacca School because you've been the dominique ungloved is saying and I said Dad and mum and it was at that moment that I understood that in one blow. I had lost my father my mother. My uncle and my cousin Domenico glove is the liberal member in the National Assembly for the Montreal writing sent Santan. Good Morning Good Morning told me about that moment in the National Assembly this incredibly powerful Oh was It was very emotional national and I you know a today's beforehand. I didn't know whether I was going to do it. Or not I didn't know whether I was capable of speaking about this The National National Assembly. But then I I also have the responsibility to do that. My parents were due to Friskin Indians to be identified the aftermath of the earthquake and I think This story is not only my story but it's the story of hundreds of thousands of people have been acted by this earthquake. So I thought I I had to do it and I didn't know exactly what I was going to say. How was going to come out but I just shared the story like it happened And how I felt and remembering my sister calling me and my sister not being able to tell me dad and mom had passed away she was only able to tell me Who was my aunt? She's alive and Nick is alive and then I was saying and dad and she was an me is alive and sitting repeating all those lanes the people that were alive. He was incapable of telling me who was who had passed away. And that's how I understood what was going on you make that speech And then what happens. Politics can be a pretty divisive Participation to be in we know that people have different sides that they're involved in what happened happened in in that moment after when you go in regardless of what party you're from You go in because you think you can change the oil change things and I think we all human the the end so I had people from different parties coming to me and hugging me and and I could see people being emotional across all parties. Although it was a very sad moment it was also a very moving moment because as people were were all touched touched by the story and you know we have significant is for our patient as ranked Quebec. It's very hard to be quebecer and not to know one percents. That originally comes from Haiti eighty took me back a decade ago. When you first heard that their head burn earthquake in Haiti what did you think what went through your mind you know? I was restaurant and I was having dinner and somebody call into earthquake in Haiti. I'm like okay my parents out there because you're on vacation but All later it was it was nothing for me because earthquake is not something that is necessary. Terrible so I but almost like five minutes later somebody called I said. Did you see the earthquake. Oh did you hear about it and then I started realizing okay. It's more serious than I thought. And we started making phone calls all didn't have used but it was not surprising. The lines were caught and I had to wait until the next day to have news. We thought we had good connections. Some people giving us information and it was all all it was all wrong. In in from members of my family yet had died so Twenty four hours of not knowing of certainty the of stress fear and And then the news. I was going to say what were those twenty four hours like. I can't imagine seeing images hearing about it but not not knowing the state of your family. What was it was terrible? It was it was terrible. But you know we have very We're very resilient family. So he's trying to stay very active calling people finding solutions reaching out so it was also very a busy so you did have time to think too much about all this. You're trying to I was emotive trying to find solutions. But you can only imagine what a what it's like and then to us But then few hours later spoke with my aunt who had lost her her son Mike. My cousin who was twenty four years old passed away as spoke to to his mom. My aunt my aunt and she said you know dominate the dead. And there's nothing we can do about that. There's so many more things that you need to did you for the people that are alive so she was so strong that I told myself I'm here here. I am in Montreal and able to a half a positive influence despite everything that we're going to try to find solutions for the other people that are in need will deal with all this afterwards but if if we can actually get some food get people over there to help out and get back on the get back on their feet that this will will be contributing so it's a a personal tragedy within national or international catastrophe. Told me about your parents. They sounded like remarkable people So both my parents were from Haiti. the move to Quebec nineteen. sixty-nine was born in seventy four. And the reason why I was born and raised in Quebec is because my father was a was as a political prisoner under underdeveloped and He he had to leave the country and he came to Quebec in. co-founded the University of Montreal mom became a teacher and they were very involved in their communities. And when I say community for back he shouldn't communities in in Montreal. We all My mom was very involved with them. Female female groups and And my dad always invited some some kind of politics because he ended up being a minister Mr in the end in in Haiti And I think it's their engagement values that have That I've really they were able to transfer that aura to conveyed those values to us. We are with following we we walking in the footsteps. Your mom wrote a thesis. What what was the thesis? The thesis was the work of women. or how men become rich so basically defunct communism in infringing Basically illustrating that a lot of the men in he Had some money. But because of the work of the women supporting them she she was a feminist and The the book was all about the impact award jump women in the in the country. How did the work you talked about the impact that they had on Quebec Society? How did their work shape who you are now because you were involved in engineering before their death right? That's probably the reason why I mean politics today because they've always encouraged me to think about what difference I can make in the world and Politics is one way of doing that. So that's the certainly the reason why I'm doing what I'm doing today. And that that advice that motivation that your aunt gave you about The the work that you can do to help the living. What did that mean to you in terms of where you are now? It's something that I carry with me all the time. And even the National Assembly I share the fact that he had After exile after being sent to jail and finally he was a he was sent to tinker Acre back but He wrote a letter to my mom. And he said you know we're going to go and build I'm just going to translate it as a As I can right now but we're going to build tomorrow's at that look like our dreams so I thought disin- exactly what they've been able. STU gives us as values despite what's going on you always have to stand up and and fight for what you think is right we he also With the with the singer rocket fire outage in session Stein founded a foundation called copy which which means stand up inquiry all and to support people in Haiti. So I think these are values that are very very alive and that I'm trying to convert my own children that that cushion that you mentioned from your father. I mean that was that was in a letter that you found that he that he rotate your mother. Yes I mean told me about that letter. So the ladder The letter was written the year of I was born and it's also the year where he was sent to jail in that sent back to Quebec and After after they had passed away I was looking at all the papers and documents and I found that card For Chris it's on December. Twenty four th. He's writing this letter. My mom is pregnant. He goes to a nearby. My mom too tim unique and to you who doesn't have a name and he writes this card and at the end he said despite everything the wheel bill bill tomorrow was that looked like our dreams. it's very moving. It's it shows the strength that he had in the in the courage and I think we need to be inspired by this every day. When you look at the situation now in Haiti a decade after the earthquake What do you see? Of course. Haiti is going through difficult situation right now. Too Complex country a because of the dictatorship Because of everything that went wrong afterwards. A Haiti is in is in this current situation. That is very hard. The there are some initiatives that are clearly working being at the local level and copies a good example of that when you see communities are Becoming financially independent creative a standing up for themselves working agriculture working in education But at the end of the day like in any place in the world you need a stable government to make things happen and so if you think of those words that were in the letter that your father wrote to your mother that idea of building days that resemble our dreams or building days as that resembled our futures. What are your dreams for Haiti? They finally get A government that is table in they can actually focused focused on building. This new generation of leader kept population is under twenty years old It's a wealth unbelievable believable wealth. And and I really hope that there is a leader or group of people That will be able to Create opportunities for this new generation. It's a real pleasure to talk to you about this if I wanted to say. Thank you in Creole holiday. Say That you would say Miss Yuppie. Dominique Messina appeal. Thank you so much. Domini ungloved is the liberal M._N._A.. For the Montreal writing a centenary Santan for more C._B._C.. PODCASTS Goto C._B._C.. Dot C._A. Slash podcasts..

Haiti earthquake Montreal Quebec National Assembly National National Assembly dominique ungloved George UNGLOVED Dominique gloves Malacca School Domenico Quebec Society University of Montreal Dominique Messina Domini ungloved Creole holiday Nick Mike
"haiti" Discussed on The Current

The Current

11:44 min | 7 months ago

"haiti" Discussed on The Current

"Quebec politician Dominique gloves parents. George UNGLOVED in Mealy Neptune. I'm glad we're among those killed in the earthquake. She also lost her uncle and her cousin last month as the tenth anniversary approached. She spoke in Quebec's National Assembly and told the story of her sister calling her twenty four hours after the quake Zepa Mama. That's my Malacca School because you've been the dominique ungloved is saying and I said Dad and mum and it was at that moment that I understood that in one blow. I had lost my father my mother. My uncle and my cousin Domenico glove is the liberal member in the National Assembly for the Montreal writing sent Santan. Good Morning Good Morning told me about that moment in the National Assembly this incredibly powerful Oh was It was very emotional national and I you know a today's beforehand. I didn't know whether I was going to do it. Or not I didn't know whether I was capable of speaking about this The National National Assembly. But then I I also have the responsibility to do that. My parents were due to Friskin Indians to be identified the aftermath of the earthquake and I think This story is not only my story but it's the story of hundreds of thousands of people have been acted by this earthquake. So I thought I I had to do it and I didn't know exactly what I was going to say. How was going to come out but I just shared the story like it happened And how I felt and remembering my sister calling me and my sister not being able to tell me dad and mom had passed away she was only able to tell me Who was my aunt? She's alive and Nick is alive and then I was saying and dad and she was an me is alive and sitting repeating all those lanes the people that were alive. He was incapable of telling me who was who had passed away. And that's how I understood what was going on you make that speech And then what happens. Politics can be a pretty divisive Participation to be in we know that people have different sides that they're involved in what happened happened in in that moment after when you go in regardless of what party you're from You go in because you think you can change the oil change things and I think we all human the the end so I had people from different parties coming to me and hugging me and and I could see people being emotional across all parties. Although it was a very sad moment it was also a very moving moment because as people were were all touched touched by the story and you know we have significant is for our patient as ranked Quebec. It's very hard to be quebecer and not to know one percents. That originally comes from Haiti eighty took me back a decade ago. When you first heard that their head burn earthquake in Haiti what did you think what went through your mind you know? I was restaurant and I was having dinner and somebody call into earthquake in Haiti. I'm like okay my parents out there because you're on vacation but All later it was it was nothing for me because earthquake is not something that is necessary. Terrible so I but almost like five minutes later somebody called I said. Did you see the earthquake. Oh did you hear about it and then I started realizing okay. It's more serious than I thought. And we started making phone calls all didn't have used but it was not surprising. The lines were caught and I had to wait until the next day to have news. We thought we had good connections. Some people giving us information and it was all all it was all wrong. In in from members of my family yet had died so Twenty four hours of not knowing of certainty the of stress fear and And then the news. I was going to say what were those twenty four hours like. I can't imagine seeing images hearing about it but not not knowing the state of your family. What was it was terrible? It was it was terrible. But you know we have very We're very resilient family. So he's trying to stay very active calling people finding solutions reaching out so it was also very a busy so you did have time to think too much about all this. You're trying to I was emotive trying to find solutions. But you can only imagine what a what it's like and then to us But then few hours later spoke with my aunt who had lost her her son Mike. My cousin who was twenty four years old passed away as spoke to to his mom. My aunt my aunt and she said you know dominate the dead. And there's nothing we can do about that. There's so many more things that you need to did you for the people that are alive so she was so strong that I told myself I'm here here. I am in Montreal and able to a half a positive influence despite everything that we're going to try to find solutions for the other people that are in need will deal with all this afterwards but if if we can actually get some food get people over there to help out and get back on the get back on their feet that this will will be contributing so it's a a personal tragedy within national or international catastrophe. Told me about your parents. They sounded like remarkable people So both my parents were from Haiti. the move to Quebec nineteen. sixty-nine was born in seventy four. And the reason why I was born and raised in Quebec is because my father was a was as a political prisoner under underdeveloped and He he had to leave the country and he came to Quebec in. co-founded the University of Montreal mom became a teacher and they were very involved in their communities. And when I say community for back he shouldn't communities in in Montreal. We all My mom was very involved with them. Female female groups and And my dad always invited some some kind of politics because he ended up being a minister Mr in the end in in Haiti And I think it's their engagement values that have That I've really they were able to transfer that aura to conveyed those values to us. We are with following we we walking in the footsteps. Your mom wrote a thesis. What what was the thesis? The thesis was the work of women. or how men become rich so basically defunct communism in infringing Basically illustrating that a lot of the men in he Had some money. But because of the work of the women supporting them she she was a feminist and The the book was all about the impact award jump women in the in the country. How did the work you talked about the impact that they had on Quebec Society? How did their work shape who you are now because you were involved in engineering before their death right? That's probably the reason why I mean politics today because they've always encouraged me to think about what difference I can make in the world and Politics is one way of doing that. So that's the certainly the reason why I'm doing what I'm doing today. And that that advice that motivation that your aunt gave you about The the work that you can do to help the living. What did that mean to you in terms of where you are now? It's something that I carry with me all the time. And even the National Assembly I share the fact that he had After exile after being sent to jail and finally he was a he was sent to tinker Acre back but He wrote a letter to my mom. And he said you know we're going to go and build I'm just going to translate it as a As I can right now but we're going to build tomorrow's at that look like our dreams so I thought disin- exactly what they've been able. STU gives us as values despite what's going on you always have to stand up and and fight for what you think is right we he also With the with the singer rocket fire outage in session Stein founded a foundation called copy which which means stand up inquiry all and to support people in Haiti. So I think these are values that are very very alive and that I'm trying to convert my own children that that cushion that you mentioned from your father. I mean that was that was in a letter that you found that he that he rotate your mother. Yes I mean told me about that letter. So the ladder The letter was written the year of I was born and it's also the year where he was sent to jail in that sent back to Quebec and After after they had passed away I was looking at all the papers and documents and I found that card For Chris it's on December. Twenty four th. He's writing this letter. My mom is pregnant. He goes to a nearby. My mom too tim unique and to you who doesn't have a name and he writes this card and at the end he said despite everything the wheel bill bill tomorrow was that looked like our dreams. it's very moving. It's it shows the strength that he had in the in the courage and I think we need to be inspired by this every day. When you look at the situation now in Haiti a decade after the earthquake What do you see? Of course. Haiti is going through difficult situation right now. Too Complex country a because of the dictatorship Because of everything that went wrong afterwards. A Haiti is in is in this current situation. That is very hard. The there are some initiatives that are clearly working being at the local level and copies a good example of that when you see communities are Becoming financially independent creative a standing up for themselves working agriculture working in education But at the end of the day like in any place in the world you need a stable government to make things happen and so if you think of those words that were in the letter that your father wrote to your mother that idea of building days that resemble our dreams or building days as that resembled our futures. What are your dreams for Haiti? They finally get A government that is table in they can actually focused focused on building. This new generation of leader kept population is under twenty years old It's a wealth unbelievable believable wealth. And and I really hope that there is a leader or group of people That will be able to Create opportunities for this new generation. It's a real pleasure to talk to you about this if I wanted to say. Thank you in Creole holiday. Say That you would say Miss Yuppie. Dominique Messina appeal. Thank you so much. Domini ungloved is the liberal M._N._A.. For the Montreal writing a centenary Santan for more C._B._C.. PODCASTS Goto C._B._C.. Dot C._A. Slash podcasts..

Haiti earthquake Montreal Quebec National Assembly National National Assembly dominique ungloved George UNGLOVED Dominique gloves Malacca School Domenico Quebec Society University of Montreal Dominique Messina Domini ungloved Creole holiday Nick Mike
"haiti" Discussed on The Current

The Current

11:23 min | 7 months ago

"haiti" Discussed on The Current

"Haiti has been trying to rebuild for ten years. After seven point. Zero magnitude earthquake left leftist capital in ruins close to a quarter of a million people died in that tragedy. Many more were injured and in the days that followed doctors from around. The world rushed to Haiti to help. Alexandra Dolphin was among them. He's an anesthesiologist who works at Saint Joseph's healthcare in Hamilton Ontario. Dr Good Morning. Good morning when when you first arrived in Haiti in two thousand ten a couple of days after the earthquake. Describe to me what you saw well first of all in getting there. It's a aw wasn't possible to imagine what would see except picking through the window of the of the plane all the landmarks. I knew going out there. We're gone and there was a kind of a dust in the yeah. The Cathedral National Palace. The government buildings all those. Thanks for a gun so when we get there then you discover the city you knew no longer existed and it will just rubbles you know pals or concrete everywhere. How did you process that knowing that city as well as you did and as you said not seeing the landmarks that anybody would expect practic- as they fly into the city? The first approach is that you haven't sense of being overwhelmed but at the same time the call of duty is there that you. That's the reason for coming. I'm from Haiti originally so it's very close to home. And they are my brothers my sisters and right now. That's really hard but we had to do what we had to do. And accept the reality of what we had. What do you mean call of duty? What what was it that drew there in the first place? Well the first question. What can I do? How am I going to help this? And how to approach this as an anaesthetist. We are good at critical appraisal and Setting priorities tapis and trying to process and priorities but the limitation also. It's what do you have to work with. Everything has been gone. So it's tough to imagine onsite insight how to solve this. Describe the scene that you encountered when when you got to. The hospital was no longer hospital. It was a building parts absolutely badly damaged and people in the field where they're attentive aware seep people everywhere but one scene I can never forget is on. There was a young lady there and as I'm passing by. She called me. She clear both arms were broken and she had chest tube and covered with. Flies is and she tells me. Please try to call for me because I'm not dead yet. I don't want to fly to EMU life. That's the kind of first thing you get and see how we're going to deal with this when you when you see something like that. I mean what goes through your mind. The first thing is immediate care and her do. What can you do to have the people immediately? We're here and we're trying to do some triage whom you can help for him with what and tried to set up things and also being part of the whole team that would dad ed. There's another difficult things. Because the Haitians themselves they were physicians nurses and so on the only been affected by this and somehow being overwhelmed they were not necessarily drawn into being part of this. Likes the world sticking get all of them. Push to decide so I had to say. Hey wait a minute here. I belong to this thing here. And how can I just bring this together and please give the sense of purpose by setting up some place for them to work which we did to that point. Where did you find space to work in a building that has been destroyed by the earthquake and where there is such chaos kind of all around you? How where? Where did you set up your your base of operations operations? So what would you was at the university hospital. They're attentive From builder nations but there was none Haitian so what I did was to find a building one of the building that was to standing and to set up uprising rooms for the Haitians and by the end of the first day we got there which is about three or four days there we managed to have at least a comprehensive approach Haitian approach to it which interestingly enough that that room lasted for Over six months afternoon of Greek for fighting the same. You're also there at a time when there is great loss and so there are people that you can help at. There are a lot of people who have been affected because loved ones friends. Family have been killed By the earthquake or the effects of the earthquake what was the mood like but also also just the sense around the hospital at that time well it was very hard because people even on a first name basis and remember one of my colleagues there who lost his wife is sure John Lewis his wife lost children and the hospital where he works collapsed. He's home he's gone. He's Gone Day a student in the hospital with nothing left in to look at him and see how stoic was in pushing dot and on. You can't do just be there but one thing with Haitians the resilience. They have to do so with the natural environment of Haiti. Not having much to start with but also belief system very spiritual religious people. But all you have to do is just can do more than being there within and NBA support. You were there for two weeks initially. Yes did you did you sleep at all. I mean I could imagine given the scale of things that that and the fact that you're there and you can offer valuable resource insistence that you would be wanted to four seven. Well the first thing when I couldn't sleep inside the homes because there was that panic with the after show so we we sleep outside but after a week Going to two weeks I started decided not to feel well. I started to cry and a lot and in being very emotionally connected with the people by that time I was fortunate enough to recognize this. And that's what would be called pitches deal things like this so I just left eighty. I took the plane came back into Hamilton and slept for two or three days or so. And then can you tell me about when it hits you when the reality of what what you were seeing hit you and as you mentioned Would start to cry well. I think it's it's a process that build up with the exertion of working all day and entering the cruel reality of sometimes. You can't do anything for the person would could help. If we're another place it builds up up to to a point where really crack after leaving and as you said sleeping for a little while returning back to Hamilton you decided to return to Haiti. Why would did you do that? Well first of all I've been going to deceased nineteen ninety so the the earthquake was just a bump along are scheduled. DOC ID program and after the earthquake I personally continued to go and I'm still going now right to now with times a year and I spent three months there. I'm on at a time and the reason I go is because the job is not finished and I'm not sure that anything was done to help help. Should something like this happen again. And we know it's possible because of the location of eighty four quake. Tell me about the work that you've been doing in the time that you've been returning well immediately. Eighty left another quake What we did was we stayed in cuddle prints and for two years we? We built a hospital where we will invo with McMaster muster. Ns Andrews System with the Minister of Health. We're going to create a hospital that would be a model for University Teaching Hospital in Haiti after the earthquake we continue with this program and with the help the Fund headphone Hamilton area. We rebuild the hospital that was forty percent destroyed destroyed and brought it to a good standard and create other programs. What are the difficulties being faced in trying to make the I mean that sounds like real progress but in trying to make make further progress in in your visits there well? Presently we no longer in Puerto Prints and this has to do with the political instability of Haiti with change of political Michael regime. So we're no longer welcome to that hospital so that you know just to be longer welcome at the hospital. We were no longer welcome to that hospital. Despite by despite the fact that you helped rebuild the hospital yes yes and that's okay. That's fine we we move on and and what what have done. I've I've mostly the northwest part of Haiti presently in the area where I was born in the same hospital where I was born. We were building up to become a hospital that would be good regional hospital catchment area of eight hundred thousand and there's not really much care there so we building that up and what I liked with that hospital is whoa religious affiliated hospital. It has a Canadian flavor to it. We provide care to everyone coming whether they can pay or not. And and that's the only hospital there with the twenty four hour emergency care so we were thankful for that as a very good thing and we're hoping to develop their and and continue with that what we couldn't finishing buttocks you talked earlier about how this is personal for you yes. It's a calling as a physician to go in and I and save people and ensure that suffering is alleviated but but as a Haitian that this is personal for you and I'm just wondering how you see the country now personally personally not as a doctor but personally a decade after the earthquake. Well IT'S A. It's a country. Still struggling to define itself politically socially economically comically. And Somehow. I'm saddened by the fact that we all rate mind that have come from Haiti. That are in Haiti. That hasn't been a sense sense of where people can sit down and reflect and for the whole to embrace that a comprehensive approach to help this country thank on the the most of the head that counted country has been disappointing in that because they've never delivered truly a good out something that will be helpful to the people and the people themselves are still in the similar. They've been forever when you heading back willing First Week of March I wish you the best of luck. It's a great pleasure to talk to you doing important work. Well thank you very much for. We'll give me the opportunity to thank you for what you do and Continue the good work itself as well. Dr Alexander define is an anesthesiologist with Saint Joseph's healthcare in Hamilton Ontario. How do you take down criminal network hidden in the shadows? I tell them that. I know that they're the ones who are running the largest child abuse website on the dark nets the journalists working to expose the darkest corners of the Internet. That's your playroom for that's your baby's clothes. That's my house. The police who hunt down online predators dewick right involved Ormoc. They're using no we didn't we didn't make it. They made hunting moorhead. Subscribe wherever you get your podcasts.

Haiti Hamilton Ontario University Teaching Hospital university hospital Dr Good Alexandra Dolphin Saint Joseph Ormoc John Lewis NBA Cathedral National Palace practic Minister of Health EMU Dr Alexander McMaster Puerto Prints Michael regime
"haiti" Discussed on The Current

The Current

11:23 min | 7 months ago

"haiti" Discussed on The Current

"Haiti has been trying to rebuild for ten years. After seven point. Zero magnitude earthquake left leftist capital in ruins close to a quarter of a million people died in that tragedy. Many more were injured and in the days that followed doctors from around. The world rushed to Haiti to help. Alexandra Dolphin was among them. He's an anesthesiologist who works at Saint Joseph's healthcare in Hamilton Ontario. Dr Good Morning. Good morning when when you first arrived in Haiti in two thousand ten a couple of days after the earthquake. Describe to me what you saw well first of all in getting there. It's a aw wasn't possible to imagine what would see except picking through the window of the of the plane all the landmarks. I knew going out there. We're gone and there was a kind of a dust in the yeah. The Cathedral National Palace. The government buildings all those. Thanks for a gun so when we get there then you discover the city you knew no longer existed and it will just rubbles you know pals or concrete everywhere. How did you process that knowing that city as well as you did and as you said not seeing the landmarks that anybody would expect practic- as they fly into the city? The first approach is that you haven't sense of being overwhelmed but at the same time the call of duty is there that you. That's the reason for coming. I'm from Haiti originally so it's very close to home. And they are my brothers my sisters and right now. That's really hard but we had to do what we had to do. And accept the reality of what we had. What do you mean call of duty? What what was it that drew there in the first place? Well the first question. What can I do? How am I going to help this? And how to approach this as an anaesthetist. We are good at critical appraisal and Setting priorities tapis and trying to process and priorities but the limitation also. It's what do you have to work with. Everything has been gone. So it's tough to imagine onsite insight how to solve this. Describe the scene that you encountered when when you got to. The hospital was no longer hospital. It was a building parts absolutely badly damaged and people in the field where they're attentive aware seep people everywhere but one scene I can never forget is on. There was a young lady there and as I'm passing by. She called me. She clear both arms were broken and she had chest tube and covered with. Flies is and she tells me. Please try to call for me because I'm not dead yet. I don't want to fly to EMU life. That's the kind of first thing you get and see how we're going to deal with this when you when you see something like that. I mean what goes through your mind. The first thing is immediate care and her do. What can you do to have the people immediately? We're here and we're trying to do some triage whom you can help for him with what and tried to set up things and also being part of the whole team that would dad ed. There's another difficult things. Because the Haitians themselves they were physicians nurses and so on the only been affected by this and somehow being overwhelmed they were not necessarily drawn into being part of this. Likes the world sticking get all of them. Push to decide so I had to say. Hey wait a minute here. I belong to this thing here. And how can I just bring this together and please give the sense of purpose by setting up some place for them to work which we did to that point. Where did you find space to work in a building that has been destroyed by the earthquake and where there is such chaos kind of all around you? How where? Where did you set up your your base of operations operations? So what would you was at the university hospital. They're attentive From builder nations but there was none Haitian so what I did was to find a building one of the building that was to standing and to set up uprising rooms for the Haitians and by the end of the first day we got there which is about three or four days there we managed to have at least a comprehensive approach Haitian approach to it which interestingly enough that that room lasted for Over six months afternoon of Greek for fighting the same. You're also there at a time when there is great loss and so there are people that you can help at. There are a lot of people who have been affected because loved ones friends. Family have been killed By the earthquake or the effects of the earthquake what was the mood like but also also just the sense around the hospital at that time well it was very hard because people even on a first name basis and remember one of my colleagues there who lost his wife is sure John Lewis his wife lost children and the hospital where he works collapsed. He's home he's gone. He's Gone Day a student in the hospital with nothing left in to look at him and see how stoic was in pushing dot and on. You can't do just be there but one thing with Haitians the resilience. They have to do so with the natural environment of Haiti. Not having much to start with but also belief system very spiritual religious people. But all you have to do is just can do more than being there within and NBA support. You were there for two weeks initially. Yes did you did you sleep at all. I mean I could imagine given the scale of things that that and the fact that you're there and you can offer valuable resource insistence that you would be wanted to four seven. Well the first thing when I couldn't sleep inside the homes because there was that panic with the after show so we we sleep outside but after a week Going to two weeks I started decided not to feel well. I started to cry and a lot and in being very emotionally connected with the people by that time I was fortunate enough to recognize this. And that's what would be called pitches deal things like this so I just left eighty. I took the plane came back into Hamilton and slept for two or three days or so. And then can you tell me about when it hits you when the reality of what what you were seeing hit you and as you mentioned Would start to cry well. I think it's it's a process that build up with the exertion of working all day and entering the cruel reality of sometimes. You can't do anything for the person would could help. If we're another place it builds up up to to a point where really crack after leaving and as you said sleeping for a little while returning back to Hamilton you decided to return to Haiti. Why would did you do that? Well first of all I've been going to deceased nineteen ninety so the the earthquake was just a bump along are scheduled. DOC ID program and after the earthquake I personally continued to go and I'm still going now right to now with times a year and I spent three months there. I'm on at a time and the reason I go is because the job is not finished and I'm not sure that anything was done to help help. Should something like this happen again. And we know it's possible because of the location of eighty four quake. Tell me about the work that you've been doing in the time that you've been returning well immediately. Eighty left another quake What we did was we stayed in cuddle prints and for two years we? We built a hospital where we will invo with McMaster muster. Ns Andrews System with the Minister of Health. We're going to create a hospital that would be a model for University Teaching Hospital in Haiti after the earthquake we continue with this program and with the help the Fund headphone Hamilton area. We rebuild the hospital that was forty percent destroyed destroyed and brought it to a good standard and create other programs. What are the difficulties being faced in trying to make the I mean that sounds like real progress but in trying to make make further progress in in your visits there well? Presently we no longer in Puerto Prints and this has to do with the political instability of Haiti with change of political Michael regime. So we're no longer welcome to that hospital so that you know just to be longer welcome at the hospital. We were no longer welcome to that hospital. Despite by despite the fact that you helped rebuild the hospital yes yes and that's okay. That's fine we we move on and and what what have done. I've I've mostly the northwest part of Haiti presently in the area where I was born in the same hospital where I was born. We were building up to become a hospital that would be good regional hospital catchment area of eight hundred thousand and there's not really much care there so we building that up and what I liked with that hospital is whoa religious affiliated hospital. It has a Canadian flavor to it. We provide care to everyone coming whether they can pay or not. And and that's the only hospital there with the twenty four hour emergency care so we were thankful for that as a very good thing and we're hoping to develop their and and continue with that what we couldn't finishing buttocks you talked earlier about how this is personal for you yes. It's a calling as a physician to go in and I and save people and ensure that suffering is alleviated but but as a Haitian that this is personal for you and I'm just wondering how you see the country now personally personally not as a doctor but personally a decade after the earthquake. Well IT'S A. It's a country. Still struggling to define itself politically socially economically comically. And Somehow. I'm saddened by the fact that we all rate mind that have come from Haiti. That are in Haiti. That hasn't been a sense sense of where people can sit down and reflect and for the whole to embrace that a comprehensive approach to help this country thank on the the most of the head that counted country has been disappointing in that because they've never delivered truly a good out something that will be helpful to the people and the people themselves are still in the similar. They've been forever when you heading back willing First Week of March I wish you the best of luck. It's a great pleasure to talk to you doing important work. Well thank you very much for. We'll give me the opportunity to thank you for what you do and Continue the good work itself as well. Dr Alexander define is an anesthesiologist with Saint Joseph's healthcare in Hamilton Ontario. How do you take down criminal network hidden in the shadows? I tell them that. I know that they're the ones who are running the largest child abuse website on the dark nets the journalists working to expose the darkest corners of the Internet. That's your playroom for that's your baby's clothes. That's my house. The police who hunt down online predators dewick right involved Ormoc. They're using no we didn't we didn't make it. They made hunting moorhead. Subscribe wherever you get your podcasts.

Haiti Hamilton Ontario University Teaching Hospital university hospital Dr Good Alexandra Dolphin Saint Joseph Ormoc John Lewis NBA Cathedral National Palace practic Minister of Health EMU Dr Alexander McMaster Puerto Prints Michael regime
"haiti" Discussed on The Current

The Current

11:23 min | 7 months ago

"haiti" Discussed on The Current

"Haiti has been trying to rebuild for ten years. After seven point. Zero magnitude earthquake left leftist capital in ruins close to a quarter of a million people died in that tragedy. Many more were injured and in the days that followed doctors from around. The world rushed to Haiti to help. Alexandra Dolphin was among them. He's an anesthesiologist who works at Saint Joseph's healthcare in Hamilton Ontario. Dr Good Morning. Good morning when when you first arrived in Haiti in two thousand ten a couple of days after the earthquake. Describe to me what you saw well first of all in getting there. It's a aw wasn't possible to imagine what would see except picking through the window of the of the plane all the landmarks. I knew going out there. We're gone and there was a kind of a dust in the yeah. The Cathedral National Palace. The government buildings all those. Thanks for a gun so when we get there then you discover the city you knew no longer existed and it will just rubbles you know pals or concrete everywhere. How did you process that knowing that city as well as you did and as you said not seeing the landmarks that anybody would expect practic- as they fly into the city? The first approach is that you haven't sense of being overwhelmed but at the same time the call of duty is there that you. That's the reason for coming. I'm from Haiti originally so it's very close to home. And they are my brothers my sisters and right now. That's really hard but we had to do what we had to do. And accept the reality of what we had. What do you mean call of duty? What what was it that drew there in the first place? Well the first question. What can I do? How am I going to help this? And how to approach this as an anaesthetist. We are good at critical appraisal and Setting priorities tapis and trying to process and priorities but the limitation also. It's what do you have to work with. Everything has been gone. So it's tough to imagine onsite insight how to solve this. Describe the scene that you encountered when when you got to. The hospital was no longer hospital. It was a building parts absolutely badly damaged and people in the field where they're attentive aware seep people everywhere but one scene I can never forget is on. There was a young lady there and as I'm passing by. She called me. She clear both arms were broken and she had chest tube and covered with. Flies is and she tells me. Please try to call for me because I'm not dead yet. I don't want to fly to EMU life. That's the kind of first thing you get and see how we're going to deal with this when you when you see something like that. I mean what goes through your mind. The first thing is immediate care and her do. What can you do to have the people immediately? We're here and we're trying to do some triage whom you can help for him with what and tried to set up things and also being part of the whole team that would dad ed. There's another difficult things. Because the Haitians themselves they were physicians nurses and so on the only been affected by this and somehow being overwhelmed they were not necessarily drawn into being part of this. Likes the world sticking get all of them. Push to decide so I had to say. Hey wait a minute here. I belong to this thing here. And how can I just bring this together and please give the sense of purpose by setting up some place for them to work which we did to that point. Where did you find space to work in a building that has been destroyed by the earthquake and where there is such chaos kind of all around you? How where? Where did you set up your your base of operations operations? So what would you was at the university hospital. They're attentive From builder nations but there was none Haitian so what I did was to find a building one of the building that was to standing and to set up uprising rooms for the Haitians and by the end of the first day we got there which is about three or four days there we managed to have at least a comprehensive approach Haitian approach to it which interestingly enough that that room lasted for Over six months afternoon of Greek for fighting the same. You're also there at a time when there is great loss and so there are people that you can help at. There are a lot of people who have been affected because loved ones friends. Family have been killed By the earthquake or the effects of the earthquake what was the mood like but also also just the sense around the hospital at that time well it was very hard because people even on a first name basis and remember one of my colleagues there who lost his wife is sure John Lewis his wife lost children and the hospital where he works collapsed. He's home he's gone. He's Gone Day a student in the hospital with nothing left in to look at him and see how stoic was in pushing dot and on. You can't do just be there but one thing with Haitians the resilience. They have to do so with the natural environment of Haiti. Not having much to start with but also belief system very spiritual religious people. But all you have to do is just can do more than being there within and NBA support. You were there for two weeks initially. Yes did you did you sleep at all. I mean I could imagine given the scale of things that that and the fact that you're there and you can offer valuable resource insistence that you would be wanted to four seven. Well the first thing when I couldn't sleep inside the homes because there was that panic with the after show so we we sleep outside but after a week Going to two weeks I started decided not to feel well. I started to cry and a lot and in being very emotionally connected with the people by that time I was fortunate enough to recognize this. And that's what would be called pitches deal things like this so I just left eighty. I took the plane came back into Hamilton and slept for two or three days or so. And then can you tell me about when it hits you when the reality of what what you were seeing hit you and as you mentioned Would start to cry well. I think it's it's a process that build up with the exertion of working all day and entering the cruel reality of sometimes. You can't do anything for the person would could help. If we're another place it builds up up to to a point where really crack after leaving and as you said sleeping for a little while returning back to Hamilton you decided to return to Haiti. Why would did you do that? Well first of all I've been going to deceased nineteen ninety so the the earthquake was just a bump along are scheduled. DOC ID program and after the earthquake I personally continued to go and I'm still going now right to now with times a year and I spent three months there. I'm on at a time and the reason I go is because the job is not finished and I'm not sure that anything was done to help help. Should something like this happen again. And we know it's possible because of the location of eighty four quake. Tell me about the work that you've been doing in the time that you've been returning well immediately. Eighty left another quake What we did was we stayed in cuddle prints and for two years we? We built a hospital where we will invo with McMaster muster. Ns Andrews System with the Minister of Health. We're going to create a hospital that would be a model for University Teaching Hospital in Haiti after the earthquake we continue with this program and with the help the Fund headphone Hamilton area. We rebuild the hospital that was forty percent destroyed destroyed and brought it to a good standard and create other programs. What are the difficulties being faced in trying to make the I mean that sounds like real progress but in trying to make make further progress in in your visits there well? Presently we no longer in Puerto Prints and this has to do with the political instability of Haiti with change of political Michael regime. So we're no longer welcome to that hospital so that you know just to be longer welcome at the hospital. We were no longer welcome to that hospital. Despite by despite the fact that you helped rebuild the hospital yes yes and that's okay. That's fine we we move on and and what what have done. I've I've mostly the northwest part of Haiti presently in the area where I was born in the same hospital where I was born. We were building up to become a hospital that would be good regional hospital catchment area of eight hundred thousand and there's not really much care there so we building that up and what I liked with that hospital is whoa religious affiliated hospital. It has a Canadian flavor to it. We provide care to everyone coming whether they can pay or not. And and that's the only hospital there with the twenty four hour emergency care so we were thankful for that as a very good thing and we're hoping to develop their and and continue with that what we couldn't finishing buttocks you talked earlier about how this is personal for you yes. It's a calling as a physician to go in and I and save people and ensure that suffering is alleviated but but as a Haitian that this is personal for you and I'm just wondering how you see the country now personally personally not as a doctor but personally a decade after the earthquake. Well IT'S A. It's a country. Still struggling to define itself politically socially economically comically. And Somehow. I'm saddened by the fact that we all rate mind that have come from Haiti. That are in Haiti. That hasn't been a sense sense of where people can sit down and reflect and for the whole to embrace that a comprehensive approach to help this country thank on the the most of the head that counted country has been disappointing in that because they've never delivered truly a good out something that will be helpful to the people and the people themselves are still in the similar. They've been forever when you heading back willing First Week of March I wish you the best of luck. It's a great pleasure to talk to you doing important work. Well thank you very much for. We'll give me the opportunity to thank you for what you do and Continue the good work itself as well. Dr Alexander define is an anesthesiologist with Saint Joseph's healthcare in Hamilton Ontario. How do you take down criminal network hidden in the shadows? I tell them that. I know that they're the ones who are running the largest child abuse website on the dark nets the journalists working to expose the darkest corners of the Internet. That's your playroom for that's your baby's clothes. That's my house. The police who hunt down online predators dewick right involved Ormoc. They're using no we didn't we didn't make it. They made hunting moorhead. Subscribe wherever you get your podcasts.

Haiti Hamilton Ontario University Teaching Hospital university hospital Dr Good Alexandra Dolphin Saint Joseph Ormoc John Lewis NBA Cathedral National Palace practic Minister of Health EMU Dr Alexander McMaster Puerto Prints Michael regime
"haiti" Discussed on Travel with Rick Steves

Travel with Rick Steves

08:17 min | 7 months ago

"haiti" Discussed on Travel with Rick Steves

"With great Interest in lovely story We currently sponsor a little girl from Haiti. We have sponsor children in Haiti for a couple with decades. We have traveled a couple of times with a child sponsorship organization to African countries. And as someone. Who's done that? I see such a disparity between what's being portrayed in the news and the pockets of good that we saw in that in those developing African countries. I know that Haiti is in crisis right now but can you. You tell me Catherine is their progress and is there good going on in Haiti that the news cameras don't see oh a hundred percent and I profile some of this in my book doc. It's definitely better than after the earthquake. There's no rubble on the streets. For instance but there are some great organizations that are doing really good work. In Haiti one is partners in health health. which is run by a remarkable doctor named Dr Paul Farmer who works at a hospital in a Massachusetts and he not only runs in healthcare hospitals for free basically for free offering really advanced healthcare but also has schools attached to these hospitals Farming coming program so all the food that feeds a hospitals come from you know support local farmers and almost all of the staff most of the board almost everyone is is Haitian and which I really think is like the key like when you're looking at a program to support you gotTa make sure that it's the there's real grassroots Muslim ownership yeah local ownership chip in local you know not just ownership like that are steering the whole program And so there's many many of those programs that the thing that upsets me a behaviors that there I was just such a hope that this earthquake would be this terrible springboard into a new way of doing things. I don't know if you remember but Bill Clinton kept talking about build back better better and this idea that you know there would be this sort of new Haiti like a new Rwanda. After the genocide with things that were developing world world norms free education for kids better healthcare that was free for particularly for pregnant women and children. You know working airports more jobs all these type of things things that was systemically changed and that has not happened but that much said there are many great organizations and many wonderful people doing really great things on the ground. A lot of it is giving good governance as well. Isn't it and taking care of the environment. I mean my understanding is you can fly over that island. Half of its Dominican Republican. Half it is Haiti and you can just see the border order because one side is deforested and then when you get more violent weather with the global climate change and so on it just washes away the topsoil people say ninety percent the number one an expert for Haiti they say his top soil which is just devastated. The people yeah. That's a real real problem and all the woods there goes to charcoal. which is the number one way of cooking thing right? So really. There needs to be energy. And smartness on the part of government policies where people can have smart stoves for instance where you don't need to cut down on as many trees to or just running electricity. These were all sort of the plans after the earthquake of having regular electricity for instance. which even if you have money in in Haiti? You'RE NOT GONNA get electricity. Almost everyone who has money in a wealthy has a huge generator on. They're they're running that with with gas which is also environmentally terrible. It's these large systemic issues that have bedeviled the country since the had an incredible revolution and slaves overthrew Napoleon. And it's been sort of suffering I wrath since then and you know but to get back to Christie's point I was just in Guatemala and Ethiopia these things and there is a lot to be positive about in hopeful a four because we have a new way of developing which helps people become productive part of the global economy rather than traditional charity which just keeps people you know well meaning being but it keeps people impoverished. So I think there's exciting new reasons to be hopeful but some countries are doing better than others and I was coming back from Guatemala. The okay thinking about the three CS corruption conflict and climate change. These are big players in the game as we try to help. Countries like Haiti become self sufficient. Haiti doesn't traditionally have conflict. But there has been the politics of eight there you know so much of the economy comes from aid two thirds of the budget of the GDP of the country's countries from aid between the corruption of local government. But also you know there's no local person driving the ship so if you have a Canadian aid that's going in and you know Canada's that is really into maternal health so they'll say okay. We want to fund programs hospitals for pregnant women. Because that's what you know our aid programs about that might work but it has to be part of a larger program for Development and the problem in Haiti has so long been that if a weak government and loss of opinionated people giving money who wanted to to give money for what they want to do but it doesn't fit into an overall plan and Catherine my understanding is there's vast fields of that could be growing rice in Haiti but it's unplanted because so much food is dumped on them by the United States where local farmers are demoralized. Why should they try to compete with free? Food coming in from America when that aid aide in a more smart way would encourage local farmers to be productive and connect with the market. Did Not hundred percent yeah. I mean we saw rice on the right after after the earthquake. Oh bags of American rights being sold in the market that were sent for aid for sure. And there's the same story but there was a Haitian pig that was killed on mass because of an American policy policy of work concerned about swine flu at the time so now they import all these pigs from the United States. I mean like aid is political too right to to put down after the earthquake. It'd be really brilliant rather than bringing in food indefinitely to do what Paul farmer does already on the ground for his hospitals goals and buy from the local markets so you are employing locals. You're keeping the money in the country and in a lot of a leg even like some of the housing that was built. There's very little. Housing was both ears but a lot of it was manufactured in Canada and sent down at creates Canadian jobs it does not create. Haitian jobs and I think the new sensibility. He is to make aid engender development in the receiving country and that is so exciting. It's not to put down eight. It's just there's got to be smart aid aid that empowers locals to be developed Christie. Thanks so much for your part in that as entering a child in Haiti and that must be very gratifying. For you gotta ought to hear that. There's good things going on because exactly like you said. I don't want to be part of a handout. I want to be part of the hand up. I WanNa be part of something. Sustainable Win something that empowers people doesn't keep them poor. So thank you so much for this conversation. I'm looking forward to your program on on the causes of poverty because I think here in North America we have a very skewed idea of what causes already. And it's very different there. Stay tuned is going to be exciting to be able to learn about this insurance. Thanks for your call Christie Christie Catherine Porter the candidate bureau chief for the New York. Times is our guest right now on travel with Rick Steves. She joins us from the CBC Studios in Toronto. Catherine writes about her experiences with the people of Haiti after the island's devastating twenty ten earthquake in her book. A girl named lovely one child's miraculous survival travel and my journey to the heart of Haiti. Catherine's website is Puerto Rights Dot ca ends on the line from Lake Mountain Georgia. Hi thanks for your call. Hi Rick my husband and I did several mission trips to Haiti He's done three or four more than I've done but I've been there twice once before the earthquake and once after the earthquake and I really can identify With a lot of what your career folks have said already. You know. It's just it seems seems like a a bottomless pit. Because there's so much need there. We sponsor children Because we believe education is the key for them to come out but corruption is still there. I've never seen people with so little though to be so happy I find that immense in Katherine. That's an interesting point. What was your experience because that is fascinating to think that people in such tough an environment.

Haiti Christie Christie Catherine Po Dr Paul Farmer Rick Steves Canada United States Bill Clinton Massachusetts Katherine North America Guatemala Rwanda America CBC Studios Toronto Puerto Rights Dot Ethiopia bureau chief
"haiti" Discussed on Natural Disasters

Natural Disasters

11:59 min | 8 months ago

"haiti" Discussed on Natural Disasters

"Despite making it through the most recent hurricane season at the start of two thousand ten Haitians were in more danger now than ever each day was bringing them closer and closer to disaster to understand the danger. We have to take a look at the geography of Haiti. The island of Hispaniola like the rest of the islands in the Caribbean was formed over millions of years. As the Earth's crust moved the crust is the top most layer of the earth and is made up of numerous tectonic plates these plates rest on top of the Earth's molten mantle in most cases when islands are formed. It's the result of plates moving past one another forcing magma up from the mantle and through the crust Hispaniola. Daniela is only one of several islands that make up a larger chain known as the Antilles. The largest of these islands is Cuba which is only fifty miles. Els Northwest Hispaniola is the second largest. Haiti shares the island with Dominican Republic which has control over the eastern two thirds of Hispaniola. But while they share the same island the climate and geography of the two nations are vastly different. The Dominican side of the island gets more rain and has more forests Haiti's eighties third is dryer rockier and deforested Hispaniola. Very geography is due in part to the fact that it's located on a small tectonic nick plate known as the Gov micro plate a micro plate is just a smaller version of the larger tectonic plates. That make up. The Earth's crust micro plates are usually formed when they break off of the larger plates in the case of Gonaf. Mike replayed it broke off from the much larger Caribbean plate in the early Eocene period worried about fifty million years ago. The.

Els Northwest Hispaniola Haiti Dominican Republic Caribbean Cuba Daniela Gonaf Eocene Mike
"haiti" Discussed on No Jumper

No Jumper

03:56 min | 1 year ago

"haiti" Discussed on No Jumper

"It's just having fun. I like it. He'll he my words will come on positive because your energy, right? Brother would get bad vibes, but people don't know that. That's what goes down in the studio. Is that really being in the studio is about just, you know, put something out there, just blurting out, some sounds going melodies? And then that's how rappers figure out what they're gonna actually put on the track. And that's what I thought was interested about you. And that thing is that that's kind of what it felt like you were just experimented with different melodies and shit. Like the way you would be in the studio. I experiment, basically what I do is. I'm going to studio. In this house started be just I'm showing. Be around that noise. So the beat. Su SU SU SU. Sure. Sure, in paternal beats per minute. Ninety two ninety three say our had in my head, 'cause I practice so much. I worked so hard at this. So this is got understand, isn't that no longer free freestyle for me. This is me preparing. I'm just doing what I'm so used to doing consistently Curry's jump shot. You're not gonna go near and tell him how to shoot. How long you feel like you've been making music for? Ten months ago. I feel like that. Really? Yeah. Always had in your soul. You were a baby who was, like sorta bars. I can never sit down. And I'll always entertaining like my bars are, are like I consider my bars. Average. I consider my Leers average entertaining performances is by far. To seen Mobley Brown, Chris Brown. I'm bringing everything back to life. I'm making. Being humble cool again. Really? Yeah. You could see yourself humble. Yeah. KP humble in the jungle though can't be humble in jungle. No. You had to struggle. You making me wanna bus them. Bars out too. No. Okay. When I when I came into the podcast game I knew that I also had to take an oath to not rap. Explain my mom was just like you're not going to start wrapping right? And I was like, no way. But would you open your own company? I have a little label situation while low key label situation. I got some artists in the in the pipeline down. New business was doing man. Haiti baby features a rare feature right now to you got any big hit you up since the freecell Enviro ear. I can't talk about really too big. Yeah. The drag drag vs on the way. No. No. Not yet hopefully to hopefully. Everybody types in, because I do I produce on my record. So, right. If you can't get a feature you can get. I'm not. I want to break this down. I don't wanna work with everybody, you know saying. But if you ain't got a bag don't, don't tap into. AM value to bring to the table. I'm offering a lot and giving you hope package a whole show. And that's how I was think of it is, like, listen, if you go in pay for verse from somebody that if your if your confident in your music than you should believe that you're going to be able to make that money back from that piece of work so freely. I want somebody's best work on my work. Exactly if I'm on your work. I want it to be cert- sound a certain way, I would even boost those up like no you need to be louder is your song, this needs sound like this guy staying room when I mix all my stay in a room, like I don't like if you pay for Gucci mane verse, and people still don't care about your song. Then that's a pretty good. He's evidence that you're not that good example, that you need to do some out in the water. Say you need to get a little bit to see where you see where your Krause audience goes facts..

Mobley Brown Haiti Gucci Curry Ten months
"haiti" Discussed on No Jumper

No Jumper

02:20 min | 1 year ago

"haiti" Discussed on No Jumper

"How you feeling high shit after that last time we were pretty good ready to rock. Oh, yeah. Thank you for having a blessing. No. Yeah, man. I'm fucking hyped on your shit. Actually, to be honest. I gotta wear of you based on that fucking viral free style. But then ever since then I've been listening to your shit on YouTube, and I'm fucking hyped on super talented, as you appreciate that, man. Let's talk about it where you're from Stockton stocking. Rare ass place to be from the when we think stock that we think of it as the place. That's so grimy that at birth, Nick and Nate Diaz. That's why I think. Yeah. Yeah. It, it is what people perceive it to be. But not as as early as I think it is. It's more people trying to fit in 'cause you gotta think about stock like this middle everything. It's more people like what is the niche. That's why a lot of people out there, don't really know. 'cause this combination LA the bay Sacramento air by one city scrambled together. It's like identity crisis between. Coming from. So once people out there, finding niche, it's a lot of talent out there, not far from being only one, and I hope I'm not the only one I hope to others who are talented. I'm able to sign those artists and profit is there anyone who's blown up out of Stockton really. Or is it still kind of dry in that regard is most likely being people that I know the name of but wants? Long time ago. And she away before me to have not the first you feel like right now, there's nobody really popping off. Is that part of your motivation that you wanted to do a big for where you're come from? Yeah. I see nobody representing it. So I was like, man. I think this would be huge. I think it'd be huge disa- outcome. That's why my name Haiti baby to visit I my, my rap name. Yeah. Murder Mook murder commercial at all already freestyler battle hymn. Did you know that there was another murder Mook? Okay. I'm glad damn near because when I searched in I got the research his stuff I fell in love with about. I didn't know about it worth. I named myself more to move in research on original one after my name, and I was like let me research him now the research on battery. So, you know, that's when I started looking into meek meals, career, Cassidy's, sorry, put their name together. No, but you're right though. The a lot of people who are rap fans these days, don't know how ill the battle rap scene is, and don't know how much good content there is on YouTube..

YouTube Stockton Murder Nate Diaz Haiti Mook LA the bay Sacramento Nick Cassidy
"haiti" Discussed on PRI's The World

PRI's The World

02:27 min | 1 year ago

"haiti" Discussed on PRI's The World

"Lose their TPS status for the world. Amy Bracken LA Boule Haiti a quick update. Now to a story we first covered this past winter on the world. That is a captive whale. That will being held in a small pan near the Russian far east city of Nakodhka on the Pacific Ocean. One of almost one hundred orcas and beluga whales captured last summer apparently for illegal sale to marine parks in China. Several may have died since then others may be sick activists have been trying for months to get the Russian government to step in and rescue the whales from what they're calling a wail jail now for the update the authorities have since brought charges against four companies, and they're promising to release the whales back into the wild. If they can they've decided to see how we could eventually rehabilitate them, and hopefully, we stem that's marine activists Yami shell Cousteau. Yes of that Cousteau family. He's part of a group of activists and scientists who signed a deal with the Russian government to try to help the whales. Learn to live again in the wild Cousteau says the goal is to release all of them. But activists Charles Vinik. Who's also part of the effort thinks. That won't be quick or easy. Not only. Do we have to understand the health conditions of h wail? We also have to look at where it is appropriate to transport them. So that they can be having the best opportunity have food and guidance of older adults vinick helped lead the effort to free a captive. Orca named Keiko in two thousand and two, you know, Free Willy fame Keiko's released an Iceland was widely publicized. But what most people may not remember is that it ultimately failed. Scientists say Keiko never really learned to socialize with other orcas or find his own food, and he died after about eighteen months back in the wild. So the challenge of freeing, these Ninety-seven Wales in Russia is pretty big. And the activists say they don't yet have a plan for rehabilitating them. So no happy ending yet to the story of Russia's wail jail. But a Ray of hope you're listening to the world this podcast. Is brought to you by Goldman Sachs for insights from leading thinkers on the state of markets industries and the global economy listen to our podcast exchanges at Goldman Sachs. You'll hear discussions.

Yami shell Cousteau Keiko Russian government Goldman Sachs Amy Bracken LA Haiti Pacific Ocean Russia China Nakodhka Charles Vinik Ray Iceland Wales eighteen months
"haiti" Discussed on Watch What Crappens

Watch What Crappens

04:24 min | 2 years ago

"haiti" Discussed on Watch What Crappens

"So then her other kids so fi one of other kids comes in shannon what's what haiti just total normal everyday conversation with your kid what's up in haiti math me comes out tell you what haiti how about this guess what s strong does work be strong networks okay oh so stuff like i have a church trip to haiti so just have you told your tab i mean that's sort of a big deal so okay talk to your father about an eighth phone screen but not heidi tuck your father about haiti and i found grains gets so she's like a household full of loan so we will now call it heavy eighty get out of my house save hits a t shirt were there with bethany haiti is this me bethany for hashtag get out behind your selfie well i do have to say that didn't i communicate via text any male and they aren't pleasant let's just leave it at that his new cd is go fuck yourself shannon which i think is very rude that he says to every single person emails and fortunately for him there are such a thing as screen take shoddy pictures so you can hear all about those texts emails at the jeff lewis radio show on sirius xm any day of the week i'm not discussing it here i'm shocked that david can send so many emails and so many negative texts i would've thought my now has voted been cell full of sand from walking on the beach with those bitches and just for the real shot at jeff show all my god so shannon showed jeff all of these tax david smith senator and they're horrible and mean and terrible and so then jeff talked about it so david texas jeff all these evil mean tax and yelled at him so you know you message jeff lewis not wise said just right all of this on the air really stupid david do you ever think you're ever going to win jeff lewis especially has his own radio show it's not gonna work at your is back in your head david kay go go off and having a chip live your life yeah yeah eat some potato chips chips abusively he can eat some potato shit too the potato shits aren't you but we'll get to that we whole sorta league get so now we go to kelly dodds new townhouse which is larry's because we were we so kelly what saying that we've saying that she even says a two bedroom like the trying so hard to make it seem glamorous she's like yeah i live in a two bedroom or front becky's a live in that apartment so it's like it's funny because it's definitely that's kelly is the one who do the real downsizing i mean she she downs is until like a normal person's apartment you know yeah because the place was used to clean her other house it's enormous it's like four stories god somebody's everywhere you there's like another gigantic room you know that's hard to clean a roomba can't get up all those stairs the room has probably committed suicide ten million times down those stairs i mean do you remember the big the big episode last year at kelly's house and how many arguments took place in that staircase because it was like nothing but staircases the house of staircases yes every time you it's like shamma had to keep marching up and down the stairs and that sun hat hat throw a at kelly's that's her kids so lee jellies she's like have a school the kids like i haven't ap coach mommy like like is is he katie's kelly says daddy after divorce is easy it's like fishing with dynamite which you probably also does six out into the ocean lake what's wrong with this when i was like really a black but lee black does it to shore leslie black just doing kelly scenes i don't like everyone but i can date everyone.

haiti
"haiti" Discussed on PRI's The World

PRI's The World

02:02 min | 2 years ago

"haiti" Discussed on PRI's The World

"Talk about these things in haiti and may be you know create some conversation about sexual violence and they reached out to a few women including gail asks them if they would testify about what happened to them and what's interesting to note that in any country in the world it's really hard to speak on camera about something so horrific as rape and and gale was the first one who was brave enough to do it massage of i'm usually too against to me weeks after she gave video interview to the online website called loop it and she told me that she felt dirty and thought that people were gonna judge her for speaking about these things and she said she had kept this to herself because she was a shame and she even cried during the interview and as she was speaking on camera she realized that she was not able to name her rapists are though a rian viewed italian actress as you are gentle on the show not too long ago and she was one of the first celebrities to speak out against harvey weinstein she got a lot of support in the us but internet of italy she was vilified how did haitians react to be enemies going public with her story one thing that submit different in dennis cases that she's talking about something that happened tourists such a young age that it's hard for anyone to go against someone being the victim of a paedophile but at the same time she said that she got a lot of criticism as well but she also got a lot more support and a lot of women wrote to her and said we never thought that someone like you could be the victim of sexual violence as well and it's helping us cope with our own trauma the people more went into used loop in jim thome you so here says that she's feeling better because there are a lot of women who reached out to her on facebook say gail i want to talk about it it's.

haiti gail rape gale harvey weinstein us jim thome facebook italy dennis
"haiti" Discussed on PRI's The World

PRI's The World

01:54 min | 2 years ago

"haiti" Discussed on PRI's The World

"Me too in haiti today on the world i'm marta werman gail gm as a well known haitian playwright and comedian and she recently spoke out about sexual abuse a lot of women vote to her and said we never thought that someone like you could be the victim of sexual violence as well and it's helping us cope with our own trauma plus deforestation takes toll and post peace deal columbia the atmosphere is just filled with a thick yellow smoke and as you're going down the river you see these towers of smoke just billowing up into the sky and suggestions for the trump kim summit menu in singapore there's high non chicken rice there saute roasted skewered chicken or lamb of with sort of a spicy peanut sauce a former diplomat talks food and more today on the world i marco werman and you're with the world on a friday glad you could be here if you like may are feeling like it was ages ago that president trump pulled out of the iran deal that's okay it has been a long week but look on the bright side lots left a process today on the show like the choice of singapore as the location for the trump kim jong hoon summit next month we'll get to that a bit later but we begin with a big story not far from us that's not been getting a lot of attention massive protests in nicaragua and a government crackdown this left dozens of people dead the protests were sparked by changes to nicaragua's pension system but they're really about president daniel ortega and is sentenced to movement critics accuse overtake critics accuse ortega of acting like a brutal dictator which is really ironic given that ortega was a leader of the sandinista revolution that toppled the somoza dictatorship in nicaragua almost forty years ago eric flacco alegria is a writer he.

gail gm trump ortega writer haiti president iran kim jong nicaragua daniel ortega eric flacco forty years
"haiti" Discussed on On Being with Krista Tippett

On Being with Krista Tippett

02:00 min | 2 years ago

"haiti" Discussed on On Being with Krista Tippett

"Actor or they're just it doesn't of there there really are so now i've now spent the past year and a half almost two years really doing this research and there are maybe closer to twenty or so but there's definitely fewer been thirty so and that's digging deep and like going everywhere we can talk a little bit about the challenges of researching something he wrote a diary which within travel journal so so it's so there's the phenomenon of women singing all the time everywhere and then there's this very small number of women who are known to be artists or who've made music career rate okay so you know i it was interesting to me so i was like i wanna find out more about these women i wanna find out how they connect to me and i think that feeling stems from especially in the past couple of years feeling like such a strong sensation to connect to my own cultural identity to embrace that and to celebrate who i am certainly being haitian american i feel lucky in many ways because i have access to so many more years of my history than most african americans half and that's amazing haiti was the first free black republic and they really were the first obama slavery and the patient revolution was an epoch thing to happen you know at the time that it happened and so for me the fact that we have you know that much more time where we were able to hold onto our history hold onto keep record of who we are how we got our names where we came from.

haiti obama two years
"haiti" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:03 min | 3 years ago

"haiti" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Haiti's examined long by man voter hangs on a bean he would not endear release i in these animals the browns were seen van veen is loans go down adding that then in law the down pau dan the gang in the navient again a bone in lima everyone's dave away they have the we nine for own in my hand the she was gone and nine the man and on that day and then had been in my john he has varying standards gasic along the green now the man an cabin baggage the long mamadee tv will then we oh my god now green impose.

Haiti van veen lima
"haiti" Discussed on The Joe Budden Podcast

The Joe Budden Podcast

01:46 min | 3 years ago

"haiti" Discussed on The Joe Budden Podcast

"What come on our worry if that all your efforts to highlight chain smokers i was told is a really good lap performance i was a little underwhelmed by i saw they didn't really nationalism they're kind of boring sampha who i knew was really talented added no he played instruments like that he's a phenomenal performer he's makes sad music initiate was live and rain later saturday can we blame money for them from blaming ready for every for your sorry rate it was cool man i i don't know how people have the energy to do those so often people were like cereal goers they just travel around a festivals everyone's high out of their mind throw up everywhere people are laid out on the street there's rural new our allies cereal through narrow i don't want you're going to matrix what festivals obama clinton haiti blues that's work it's a festival thorpe us where you're not a festival either we got out of your way it's now moves more all be people read about this though a jas it's less viable bob festival javelin north performing can't perform that's a fucking frog young ema before bad same i'm hopeful i that's wouldn't take federal way the festival is definitely festival every week guys have call pitcher from in working i'm talking about going to festivals mi taken mali and throw went up have yeah that's exactly what you've been mean this year you clean your life up a little bit but there has never done that at any layup take emollient thrown up in a bathroom a never my life the never thrown a bathroom.

haiti