31 Burst results for "Haifa"

A highlight from The long march from telecom to technology, CSG Podcast

Telecom Reseller

17:46 min | Last week

A highlight from The long march from telecom to technology, CSG Podcast

"This is Doug Greenan, I'm the publisher of Telecom Reseller, and I'm very pleased to have with us today Haifa Alshkar of CSG. Haifa, thank you for joining me today. Thank you, Doug. It's great to be here. Well, I'm very excited about this topic because it sort of leads on from some of the other podcasts we've been talking about, really a topic for the whole year since MSP Expo at the beginning of the year, telecom companies moving beyond connectivity and into the role of being really a technology company. So we're going to be exploring that idea in just a minute, but Haifa, can you tell us a little bit about CSG? Well, CSG is a company that provides solutions to, really we have three business units. We have our revenue management and monetization business unit, which is wholly focused on the telecom industry. We have a customer experience business unit that focuses on multiple industries, including telecom, and we have a payments business unit. The one that's most relevant today is our telecom focus, our revenue management. We provide solutions and customer experience capabilities to telecom operators around the world. We work with some of the biggest operators, some of the most innovative operators. We probably work with most operators in one form or another, given all of our capabilities. Well, Haifa, let's dive into our topic today, which is this transformation of the telecom company from basically telecom stuff to being really a technology company, a company that comes in and provides technology or technology advice. Give me the big picture on that. Every day, we're always reporting on new technologies. Of course, we have the ongoing story of the AI revolution and also a whole bunch of other things going on, not to mention mobility too. So put that together. What does that mean in terms of, okay, I'm a telecom company, and I'm talking to my customers? So essentially, I think to put all this into context, and it's always dangerous to generalize, but most of the operators are witnessing what we call flat revenues. So revenues are hovering around one to two percent. They need to unlock new top line revenue. And to be honest, to unlock that top line revenue, they're going to have to go beyond connectivity. And while the last decade was focused on connecting consumers through social media platforms, this next decade on the back of 5G is all about connecting the ecosystems of businesses. So bringing businesses together more efficiently, more effectively. The operators are in a unique position where they have a relationship with many businesses out there. Now, part of the reason we talk about operators going beyond connectivity is to unlock new revenue. And they honestly, this whole discussion around telco to techco is mostly about becoming a platform business. And there are three lenses on that. So the first lens is one of their biggest assets is their network opening up their network to third parties, to developers to come in and leverage that network and build and innovate new capabilities. So that's one lens. The second lens is in this kind of digital dynamic era, operators need to be able to pivot fast. If you've heard some of the operators talk about their techco transition and journey, a lot of it is about being able to react, knowing that they won't know what the killer use case is going to be. They need to be able to react fast. But the third and the most important lens is about bringing technology together as turnkey solutions back to their business customers. Now, business customers today spend a lot of money. I think they spend about four and a half trillion dollars globally around the world on IT and communications. Only a third of that spend is spent on communication services. And actually the biggest growth is going to come from enterprise services and IT services and solutions. So it makes sense for operators to unlock new revenue is to look at how they can bring technology, not just internally and make themselves dynamic, but also bring it to their customers who might not have the same big R &D spend, the same big opportunity to play around with technology and are looking for solutions that will deliver business outcome. So the operators have a unique opportunity here to really drive top line revenue, but also bring together these ecosystems of third parties into solutions to offer their own customers. So I wanted to sort of pull out something you said in what you're discussing there. It struck me that you talked about how social media has become now the method of connectivity. That's how people are connected with each other and how businesses are increasingly connected with their consumers. I'll go even further. I think it's true to say, especially in some countries, social media has become actually the marketplace. It absolutely is the primary way businesses are engaging with their audiences, with their customers, with their users, and particularly given the new generation are so tech savvy, you can understand how that makes a lot of sense. I think the distinction I would draw is that essentially social media, the last decade was spent moving into YouTube and Facebook platforms and Instagrams, and we call it the SMAC, Social Mobile Analytical Cloud era, for that reason. It was around bringing all that technology and what we saw in the consumer industry was over the top players, new players, new innovations come in, and to some degree that caused disruption for the telecom operators. In this next era, when now revenues and consumer are reasonably flat, essentially if you want to grow revenue and consumer, you're taking business from someone else. There's no real white space. A lot of the focus has shifted to B2B and working in the business space for that reason. If we think about the last era as B2C and connecting consumers through social media, I like to talk about this decade, the 2020 to 2030, as the era of connecting businesses through ecosystems, collaboration, co -creating, bringing together beyond connectivity solutions. Let's talk about how that actually looks like. Let me sort of maybe draw on a couple of theoretical things that sort of look like a lot of our readers, I think. Let's say I'm a represented company in rural America. We have maybe 30, 40, 50 ,000 subscribers still buying basically landlines and maybe possibly some mobility services. But to your point, social media is now actually the marketplace. It's increasingly how businesses are talking to each other, people are talking to each other, and so on. So what do I do? How can I connect what you're calling ecosystems, business ecosystems, to what I'm selling as far as services go? Essentially, you think about those rural operators and businesses. Their customers are still consumers. In order for them to engage their customers, they need to think about how their customers are engaging through digital channels, these omni -channel experiences that we constantly talk about, shopping cart experiences. In order to provide this kind of digital engagement with their consumers, they need to digitise their businesses. So the enterprises who are dealing with these consumers, the manufacturing companies, the retailers, the farmers who are engaging, need to be able to digitise their business models. And so the opportunity now is for operators to bring digital solutions, because as an operator, if you think you're going to go and acquire every single technology out there to put together a solution, those days are long gone. And this is why today we talk about ecosystems and collaboration and co -creation, being able to attract the right sort of partners who can bring together that rich tapestry of solutions and who can create a platform back to these businesses, whether it's through contact centres and chatbots, whether it's using AI to provide next best decisioning, whether it's using AR to help with the way they provide remote support to their customers. So bringing technology, communication and turning it into a solution is really the opportunity here to help the businesses engage with their end customers. Now, all year long, we've been talking about AI. So for generative AI, where is the potential for telecom companies? Look, the potential for telecom companies in Gen AI really sits in multiple places. And I like to talk about this because I think any company who's looking at Gen AI is thinking about it from the same lens. The first lens is always how can I use Gen AI to make my internal operations more efficient, more productive and be able to do the less mundane stuff more quickly so that I can use my power to focus on innovation. And so that's typically where a lot of companies are starting. And for operators, using a Gen AI network is probably top of mind. This is where their big cap expense is. They've spent a lot of money turning a lot of that copper into more software -defined networks with fibre. And so using Gen AI to do intent -based networking, to do self -healing is of the obvious place. But the next obvious place is using it in their contact centre, using it in the way they engage with customers. And so that's really the two big areas where Gen AI helps operators. Because if you think about that contact centre, using Gen AI to help guide, to help highlight, showcase during an interaction, that's the power of Gen AI. And this may have really exploded this year, but I can tell you, many telecom operators have been leveraging and using AI and forms of generative AI for the last few years already. So Haifa, you know, with this transformation underway and also with a lot of very interesting opportunities to move out of that flatline growth you were mentioning earlier, how are you guys walking your clients through this? So at CSG, we understand right now, as I said earlier, to unlock new revenue, you're really talking about creating ecosystems with businesses, collaborating, co -creating. And we talk a lot about B2B2X. Now, B2B2X basically essentially has multiple lenses, because at the end of the day, the operator can be any B in that B2B2X. When they are essentially the first B, they are literally basically bringing together solutions from third parties, offering them to their business customers who are offering them to their own customers. That's one version of the B2B2X. The second version of the B2B2X is where the operator is the second B. The operator is engaging with third parties to service their own customers directly. So IoT solutions would be a classic example where they would bring together an IoT solution with their connectivity and offer it to their customer base. Now, the third lens is basically opening up their own network to businesses to be able to take connectivity and sell it to their customers. A classic example would be a car company, so General Motors coming to one of the big carriers, using connectivity, putting it in their cars, but owning the end relationship with the customer. So there are multiple lenses on how ecosystems and relationships and co -creations will happen. We at CSG are anchored in this B2B space. Now, you'll hear a lot of vendors talk about B2B and B2B2X. What essentially makes us unique is that we recognize this space is complex. It's rich. We're talking multi -party relationships. We're talking multi -component solutions. We're talking distributed 5G architectures. So anyone who comes in and says to you, I can make B2B simple for you, means that they've lost all that richness that it requires to be able to service it correctly. When we talk about B2B, we talk about making complex easy. So keeping the richness, but making it all look, feel, and engage easy and seamlessly and creating that dynamic orchestration, creating that dynamic experience from the minute you engage with your customer to the minute you fulfill to the minute you monetize all the way through that transaction, making it easy. The way I like to talk about complex made easy, not simple, is I usually use a really interesting analogy, which is a sporting one. Most people probably know who Magic Johnson is. He played 13 NBA's. He's regarded as one of the greatest point guards of all time. They talk about his ability to be an assist machine. So essentially, he can, without even looking, make a pass that creates the next goal or the next set of points. What's interesting about it is he makes it all look so easy. But we all know it's not about peripheral vision. We know it's about, essentially, his core awareness. We know that it's the presence of mind. We know it's that deep knowledge of the players and where they're likely to be that allows him to do that. So what makes us unique in this whole space and the way we're able to make complex easy is that we understand B2B extremely well. Our solutions were born in this space. The pedigree we have, the proof points we have is what gives us that richness and then bring it together with the new technologies, the platforms that we've built that are standardized, that are open, is what allows all that dynamic interaction. So we see B2B2X as very, very important. We understand the three lenses, and it's really about orchestrating, and that is what we help them do, but we help them do it in a very easy manner. Well, Haifa, I really want to thank you for joining us today and giving us a really fresh take on, as you said, it is a discussion that's been going on for a while, but it's now more than ever. Revenues are flatlining, and I think people are looking for new opportunities and new visions as we close out this year and enter a new year. Maybe for the new decades. So this has been a really interesting experience. I hope we get to do this again. I think we will. But for now, where can we learn more about CSG? Look, essentially, like anywhere, you can go to our website and you can engage with us that way. We do attend most of the industry forums, so we're more than happy to meet up at an industry forum. Or essentially, if you do go through our website, just reach out and make contact, and we'll make sure the right people in the right location connect back because we are a global company. Well, Haifa, as I said, I'm very sure we'll do this again soon. I would like to see an update on these ideas, but for now, thank you very much for joining us today. Thank you, Doug.

Doug Doug Greenan General Motors 30 2020 Today Second Version 2030 Magic Johnson 40 Haifa Alshkar Msp Expo ONE Three Lenses Third 50 ,000 Subscribers One Lens Second Lens This Year About Four And A Half Trillion
A highlight from The problems of evil

The Maverick Paradox Podcast

04:02 min | 3 weeks ago

A highlight from The problems of evil

"In today's episode I'll be speaking to Raphael Cohen -Algamal about the problems of evil. How can you reconcile individualism and collectivism? Has multiculturalism failed? And what happens when the rights of the state are in conflict with the rights of culture? Raphael discusses his book and provides an academic viewpoint on these tricky dilemmas. I create clear thinking and decisive leaders who can amplify their influence. Contact me to find out how I can help you or your organisation. And today our guest is Raphael Cohen -Almagor. How are you doing? Good, how are you Judith? I am doing great, thank you. Tell me what sort of things make you giggle or laugh out loud? What makes me giggle? Good, cynical, sharp, statement jokes. Things that make me think and then see the irony behind them. And yeah, make me giggle. Tell us a little bit about you. I'm an academic, I've been in academia all my life. I did my bachelor degree at Tel Aviv University in political science, sociology and anthropology and then continued to do my masters in political science at Tel Aviv University. I pursued a doctorate at Oxford University at St. Catherine's College. I'm very patriotic about my Oxford College and then started to research and teach at the Hebrew University, went to the and Institute then I moved to University of Haifa. I spent a year at UCLA, I spent a year at Charles Hopkins University. I spent some time at the Woodrow Wilson Centre for International Studies, then moved to the UK, been to of course Oxford and then University of Hull and then University College London and presently I'm the Olof Palme Visiting Professor at Lund University in Sweden. Besides academia, I am sort of a public person. I established some organization in my life. So back in 1983 I established a second -generation Holocaust Remembrance Organization in Israel and later I established a Centre for Democratic Studies and then I established the Palme Jews Institute and I established the Middle Eastern Studies Centre at the University of Hull. So I like to do practical things. I'm not the usual academic because I have many many interests. You told me that today we're going to speak about the contrast between group rights and individual rights which is subject of my two last books. One of them is Just Visible Multiculturalism, maybe you can see that, published in 2021 and I consider this as one of my major works. Took me 10 years to write this book and then the other one is my most recent book which is called the Republic Security and Secularism which is on the fight of France against how women dress, especially Muslim women dress. In France I was fascinated by the fact that in France people are so preoccupied by the fact that women dress. I mean why should you be? There are people that can think that the government should be preoccupied by rather than how a woman dresses. She does it every day. So I went to France to study that and that's a subject of my most recent book but other than that I'm interested in problems of evil.

Raphael Israel ONE Judith 2021 1983 10 Years Palme Jews Institute Sweden Two Last Books UK Today Raphael Cohen -Almagor Oxford College Centre For Democratic Studies Middle Eastern Studies Centre Woodrow Wilson Centre For Inte University College London Hebrew University Charles Hopkins University
A highlight from Tomer Weller Interview - Stellar Adding Smart Contract Functionality Soroban, MoneyGram USDC, Allbridge, Jed McCaleb, WorldCoin, DeFi

Thinking Crypto News & Interviews

07:15 min | Last month

A highlight from Tomer Weller Interview - Stellar Adding Smart Contract Functionality Soroban, MoneyGram USDC, Allbridge, Jed McCaleb, WorldCoin, DeFi

"This content is brought to you by Link2 which makes private equity investment easy. Link2 allows you to get access to companies before they go public, before they do an IPO. Within their portfolio includes fintech companies, artificial intelligence companies, as well as crypto companies. Some of the big crypto companies in their portfolio include Circle, Ripple, Polysign, Chainalysis, Dapper Labs, Ledger, and many more. So it's a great way to diversify your portfolio to get access to equity. So you may invest in crypto, stocks, ETFs, but now you can get access to equity in these companies before they go public. And obviously that can be very beneficial from an ROI standpoint. So if you'd like to learn more about Link2 and diversifying your portfolio, please visit the link in the description. Welcome back to the Thinking Crypto podcast, your home for cryptocurrency news and interviews. With me today is Tomer Weller, who's the VP of Product at the Stellar Development Foundation. Tomer, great to have you on the podcast. It's a pleasure to be here. Thank you for inviting me. Tomer, you guys are doing some exciting things on the Stellar side, smart contracts coming to the Stellar blockchain, and much more. But I want to get to know you a bit better. Tell us about yourself, where you're from, and where'd you go up? Sure. So I spent most of my life in Israel, born and raised in Haifa. Did my undergrad studies in Jerusalem, in the Hebrew University. And I also spent a few good years in the Tel Aviv startup taxiing before eventually moving to the US, initially to Boston. And what was your professional background before working at Stellar? Sure. So I've kind of been all over the place. My ever first business was actually a food truck in German Sci -Trans festivals in 2006, 2007. But yeah, more recently before joining Stellar, I was at the Media Lab at MIT. And I was working on a bunch of different research projects ranging from decentralized systems, obviously, to things like media aggregators. I also, the last project I worked at MIT on was a 3D glass printer, an actual physical 3D glass printer. And I'm definitely, I think that if I wasn't in crypto, I would probably still be in the world of digital fabrication. I think it's just super magical to be able to design something on a computer and then see it shape up in real life. It's pretty epic. I mean, you mentioned that that is also a huge emerging market. And in parallel with crypto and AI, just the future of how the world is going to work with. I've been seeing 3D printed houses and different products and so forth. That fascinates me as well, the ability to do that and that becoming more prominent in different industries. Yeah, I think there was definitely a big boom a few years back. Everyone was talking about 3D printers and this idea of local fabrication. I think there was a bit of a step back from that. I happened to, as part of my studies, I went to Shenzhen in China, where a lot of these things, a lot of the supply chains actually originate. And I can tell you that fabrication is hard. And you can see so many, like anything that you have at home, there are so many human hands touching and testing everything and replicating that economy of scale across the world is just very difficult. So I'm excited about the idea of local fabrication. I think we still have a ways to go there. Yeah, maybe AI will help with a lot of that, right? Actually, yeah, for sure. The human touch to a certain degree. For sure. So what was your first encounter with Bitcoin or crypto and what was your aha moment? So these are definitely two very distinct moments. So I think my first encounter was in 2011. This is like very early on. I was still in Jerusalem finishing up my undergrad. And my roommate told me about this crazy Bitcoin thing. He actually started mining on his laptop and he was making Bitcoin on his laptop. Just pretty nuts thinking about it these days. But I kind of like I shrug. I said, this is just like nuts. Nothing's going to come out of this. Clearly, I was wrong and I should have listened more carefully. And throughout my time in MIT, we actually had the Media Lab started this digital currency initiative and it was sponsoring Bitcoin Core development. But I never actually paid that much attention to it. I wasn't really sure where this industry is going. And in 2017, when I was finally wrapping up my work at the Media Lab, I was in San Francisco talking with some companies on potential jobs. And I had offers from Google and Lyft and nothing really felt right. And I reached out to a friend of mine from MIT, Jeremy Rubin, who also happens to be a Bitcoin Core developer and very prominent in that ecosystem. And he was doing some work for Stellar at the time, advising Jed on some protocol changes. And so I asked Jeremy, he said, you should talk to Jed. And you know what? I told him I actually don't do crypto. Like, I don't see a reason for me to talk to Jed. And Jeremy, who, by the way, like more than 10 years younger than me, said that saying you're not doing crypto in 2017 is like saying you're not doing web in the 90s and that I sound stupid when I say that. And so I should really meet with Jed. And so the following day I met with Jed in the San Francisco office. I also met David Mazares, who's the Stanford professor who came with the consensus protocol, some of the other crew. And there was just something very I think I was both sold on kind of like blockchain as a tool for creating equitable access, but also like Stellar at the time. And to be honest, even today, like it felt just like really scrappy and focused and like great atmosphere. And even though it was the office back then was just like a shitty little apartment in the mission in San Francisco. But I just I just fell in love and, you know, packed my stuff up and moved from Boston to San Francisco the following week and been with Stellar ever since. Wow. So in a way, you are a crypto OG, you back in 2011, you know, you know, you knew a Bitcoin even though you didn't touch it or whatever, maybe. And then 2017, I mean, working with Stellar, that's pretty amazing.

Jeremy Jeremy Rubin David Mazares 2011 Haifa Israel Tomer Weller Tomer San Francisco Dapper Labs Jerusalem 2017 Google United States Polysign Boston Tel Aviv China Stellar Development Foundation 2006
"haifa" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

01:44 min | 11 months ago

"haifa" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Milan has reached the knockout round of the Champions League after a four nil win over Salzburg while Benfica surprisingly wins their group on gold differential over Paris Saint-Germain with a 6 one win at McAfee Haifa. Pie she knocks off Juventus two to one to advance as well as his RB lights you with a four zero win of her shock charge on nets. Elsa brush a Norman plays Copenhagen to a one all draw, but does move on to the round of 16, Chelsea slips past the nama Zagreb two to one, Real Madrid dominates Celtic 5 to one. A Manchester City gets past Sevilla three to one. Tottenham star son hyung min could miss the upcoming World Cup as a Ford will undergo surgery to repair a fracture around his left eye. The South Korea captain sustained the injury in Tuesday's Champions League win over Marseille. World Series game four is tonight as affiliates are hosting the Astros in Philadelphia leading the series to games to one. Christian Xavier is on the mound for Houston, but the Phillies countering with Aaron nola. More trouble for the Washington commanders, as reports say the U.S. attorney's office in the eastern district of Virginia has opened a criminal investigation into allegations of financial improprieties. The commanders have denied any wrongdoing in a statement released by the team's attorney. Meanwhile, team owners Dan and Tanya Snyder say they have hired Bank of America securities and explore a possible sale of the team that Forbes magazine valuing the franchise at $5.6 billion, 7 times with Snyder pay for the team back in 1999. I'm Dan schwarzman that your Bloomberg world sports op day. Markets, headlines, and breaking news 24 hours a day. At Bloomberg dot com, the Bloomberg business out and at Bloomberg quick tape. This is a Bloomberg business flash. All about the Federal Reserve of the moment with Jay Powell and suggesting he's going to be seeing a higher

Elsa brush Champions League hyung min Benfica Christian Xavier Salzburg Haifa Aaron nola Milan Sevilla Manchester City Copenhagen Tottenham Saint Paris Chelsea Madrid Marseille Tanya Snyder South Korea
"haifa" Discussed on Watch Football Streaming On TV with Anzfootball.com

Watch Football Streaming On TV with Anzfootball.com

04:04 min | 11 months ago

"haifa" Discussed on Watch Football Streaming On TV with Anzfootball.com

"One is Mbappé Messi is really the perfect person who creates the most rhythm of playing with. Their good cold nation was from the previous season and its even better now. Of course, buffet not only benefited from Messi's assist, but also from other teammates such as hakimi. In the 64th minute the Moroccan fullback had an accurate suspension. But had enough time to control the ball, his shots were again too good obviously has very charming feet with loose cuts the ball goes strong and quickly into the corner of the goal, causing the opponent's goalkeeper to have a wasted falling down since starting his career in the Champions League in 2017, but has also been keeping going ahead with the number of goals and assists reaching 61, and those numbers still increase very steadily every season. The last shining moment of the M and M trio in this match still returned to Messi. It was a phase where the Argentine player dribbled the ball down the left wing, but then stopped the ball and decided to return to the second line. A situation where one could sense his cavalier Messi's drop created a perfect rhythm for Carlos solar to rush to fix the score. Messi's record of two goals and two assists at the age of 35 and 123 days with PSG is also another record in this tournament. He is the oldest player who can produce such an impressive performance in the Champions League. Obviously this season, there is no sign of his decline. Not only scoring goals, but Messi is also good at creating assists for his teammates. Last night was the 50th match for Lionel Messi in the PSG Jersey, marking a significant milestone of his dedication to the Paris team. What goes on is absolutely wonderful Messi's 2022 is still on track when he has already joined 40 matches all with 50 goals and assists. Messi is the biggest factor dominating this match football fans have a chance to enjoy a trio in motion like never before, especially when looking around Europe and seeing how other trios have been separated apart. These three players at PSG are simply in positions where they can not be left out. They were already terrible with their abilities and if they shine together, it is really a threat to the opposing defenses. The truth is they are doing it better. This season has passed more than two months the attacking trio of the Paris team has scored three times together. The first goal was in the match against Lyon and two other goals were in Champions League matches against makabi Haifa. Understandably, when looking at the scoreboard after the game, PSG's attacker still make a big difference compared to the rest of the team. Simply because they are always the spotlight of the team. And this team also depends on them. The Champions League's official Twitter was also unable to resist the attraction of following the trio and tweeted. Messi, but Neymar we are lucky to see this trio it must be said that PSG are really lucky. The previous year they had completed the trilogy in nominal terms. But this year they just had the trio that I really dreamed of. This is still a sublime season for all three. Look at the stats to understand. Messi has 23 goals and assists in 16 games. BAPE has 20 out of 16 games and Neymar is 22 for 17 appearances they are still at their best a broader view, PSG itself also owns three players with the most terrifying performance of football in the past year. We don't talk far about the rest of this season, but we can definitely say that PSG is lucky to have a perfect trio of Messi Neymar and they are the sharpest claws of the Tiger PSG, making their perfect and terrifying balance there

Messi Mbappé Messi PSG Champions League hakimi PSG Jersey Lionel Messi Neymar Paris Carlos football Haifa Lyon Europe BAPE Twitter Messi Neymar
"haifa" Discussed on Watch Football Streaming On TV with Anzfootball.com

Watch Football Streaming On TV with Anzfootball.com

03:36 min | 11 months ago

"haifa" Discussed on Watch Football Streaming On TV with Anzfootball.com

"Welcome to ans football's news podcast. Champions League returns this week with the top games from the top European football team. And the match of PSG versus makabi Haifa gave us a very satisfying relaxing time thanks to the great coordination of Messi, and Neymar. You are going to listen to the perfect trio of Paris sun Germany in the last match. When the Champions League returns this week, you certainly have some choices for watching football live streaming. Some are boring like commenting on the match between Benfica versus Juventus and then watching your team continue to be defeated. Some are obviously better, like following the performance of Paris Saint-Germain in a pleasant match against macabi Haifa who beat Juventus two to zero before. We are going to talk about the perfect trio of PSG this week Messi, Neymar Paris Saint-Germain actually had a jubilant party when competing against macabre Haifa. Their 7 to two victory was marked by the trio when all goals were scored with the participation of Messi, and Neymar, except for the own goal of defender Sean Goldberg on the opposing side. It was truly 90 minutes to entertain and inspire all football fans when we had a chance to watch the players constantly come together and create goals. The show started with Messi's kick in the goal area after a mess. He finally pushed the ball to bupe. Although at that time the defender batchi bisika rushed over and blocked the direction of the shot, he also accidentally created a war, blocking the view of goalkeeper Cohen. Messi in that moment chose to end with a sidekick, sending the ball straight into the right direction. And the team's goalkeeper did not have time to return. A ball that seemed to happen normally but turned into a very beautiful goal Paris Saint-Germain attackers easily roamed the opponent's penalty area. And then at a similar angle, boppe had a kick raising the score to two to zero very early. It was a smash between bapa and Neymar in the 27th minute when Abdullah sec had a kick on BAPE. Neymar rushed to the opponent. The moment provoked a lot of things Neymar's anger at that time shows that he just wanted his juniors and was ready to lose. After that, bapa was the one who ran diagonally to drag Haifa's defender with him, helping to have space to make it three to zero thanks to Messi's assist. Paris Saint-Germain were very confident as they kept aiming for Haifa's midfield with messy smashing with. Then he turned the ball to the side and launched it with his left foot to sink the ball and then shoot it into the net. Messi once again showed his sublime and superb finishing ability. This goal also brought PSG's Messi to another record in the Champions League since his debut in this tournament in 2004 to 2005, Lionel Messi has scored more goals from outside of the penalty area than any other player. Messi bombarded the goalkeepers goal from outside 23 times in total, exactly one goal more than Cristiano Ronaldo, in which Messi has 5 free kicks and the rest are shots from live ball situations. Moped thus got his second assist, even if it wasn't the type of assist that put the ball at his feet and just shot only two players have ever provided two assists for Messi in the first half of a Champions League game the first time was in 2016 and the main author is Neymar while playing for Barcelona.

Neymar Messi Haifa Germain football PSG Champions League bapa Paris Neymar Paris Saint Sean Goldberg batchi bisika Saint boppe Paris Saint Germany Cohen Abdullah sec Lionel Messi
"haifa" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

01:40 min | 1 year ago

"haifa" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"The Senate and walkers past regarding abortion is very much getting in the way. Now, senator Tom cotton is trying to, well, he's trying to dance the line. Listen, Raphael Warnock and the Democrats want to make this about Herschel walkers. Songs that he partial walker wants to make this about Georgia's tomorrow. What about his right now right now, Georgians are hurting. So he says, don't focus on the candidate, focus on the GOP. Early voting in Georgia begins November 8th. In San Francisco, I'm at Baxter, this is Bloomberg. Thank you, Ed. Let's get to global sports. Dan Schwartzman joins us now. We can talk about the Yankees guardians momentarily and I'm sure you're just laughing to yourself. So you want to talk about that? No, I don't want to talk about that, really. Talk to me about Juventus struggling in the Champions League. Now we're talking guardians. I will get to that, though, Doug. Juventus really struggles yet again. You have to wonder now if Massimiliano Allegri is going to be let go sometime soon, they lose two nil in the Champions League group stage match to maccabee Haifa. The Syria giants and real danger of not advancing now to the knockout stage. I also Manchester City and Copenhagen play those scoreless draw PSG and Benfica end in a one I'll draw around Madrid needs a goal 5 minutes in the stoppage time to play shock darkness till one I'll draw that match was in Poland. Meanwhile, Chelsea shots at A.C. Milan two zero brush and Dortmund and Sevilla ended a one all draw Celtic plank by RB Leipzig two nil Salzburg and dinamo sagre Plato won all draw. Multiple sources report that PSG start killing Mbappé is looking to leave the league in one giant string the January transfer window as relationship the club has deteriorated to the point where he wants out now and Baba is set to want to join Real Madrid despite spurning the reigning

senator Tom cotton Raphael Warnock Dan Schwartzman Georgia Herschel Massimiliano Allegri Champions League Syria giants Senate Baxter walker Bloomberg GOP Yankees PSG San Francisco Ed Haifa Doug Manchester City
"haifa" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

06:33 min | 1 year ago

"haifa" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"And at Bloomberg quick take This is a Bloomberg business lash Palms Bloomberg world Hank waters I'm Charlie Paul 28 minutes to go ahead of the closing bell stocks have paired their games still positive thin trading S&P the Dow both the records but key takeaway here little change for the S&P up by two points The Dow in fact just turning negative retreating from the record the Dow right now down by one point S&P up by one point as stack up 47 R by three tenths of 1% Ten up 1130 seconds with a ten year yield right now 1.51% spot gold up 7 tenths of 1% 1816 the ounce West Texas intermediate crude platform 76 56 a barrel I'm Charlie collar That is a Bloomberg business flash This is Bloomberg market special coverage this week simulcast across Bloomberg TV radio and YouTube Romain boss Tim steinem a pretty good day here Of course looking ahead to 2022 also taking a look back at 2021 We're going to spend the next few minutes talking about hedge funds and bringing him a Parma or a hedge fund reporter here at Bloomberg and you go back a year ago The conversation about hedge funds and their performance was way different than the conversation we're about to have right now A lot of funds got caught by surprise back in 2020 2021 was a much better year for at least most of these funds Yes So if we look at one strategy that really struggled last year which was the quant strategy they had a very difficult go There are models not able to adapt to what we were seeing in 2020 but they've really bounced back so far this year And it looks like they've adapted they've been able to navigate the volatile markets a lot better and perhaps the models have since been refined or have been able to adapt You and I have been in the trenches together in terms of covering those 13 F filings that come every quarter For a couple of years now one of the things that really stuck out to me in 2021 was that there was no clear consensus from a group that's supposed to be essentially the smart money if I'm allowed to use that phrase when it comes to hedge funds What is you take on essentially this perhaps different diverging calls on really where to put your money whether it's tech whether it's travel it seems like hedge funds broadly didn't have that consensus trade Well funds there are certain funds that outperformed in terms of where they were putting their money and other ones that really struggled And the ones that really struggled were funds that were playing in the treasury market and really were quite a long way faster on some of the tumult that we saw in the treasury fund So those macro sort of funds really weren't able to navigate that very well But some such a better multi strategy fund they are generally pretty diversified So they invest a lot of strategies to have pods of teams and they perform pretty strongly this year And investors are really giving a lot of money to this type of strategy They put $28 billion in total trust funds this year alone Which is a lot because investors are increasingly viewing multi strategy funds as a way to get diversification in their portfolios because they aren't correlated to equity markets And so you're seeing the money flow to mirror that opinion Hey how important was private equity in terms of helping these hedge funds outperform outperform this year versus last year Pretty important for some of the world's largest hedge funds private equity ended up really supporting their returns And in some cases for funds they would have struggled if they didn't have that exposure These funds have been able to get an early and pretty cheaply and some startup companies and then that ends up being worth a lot more once they go public and in the year like we saw this year with a record number of IPOs that really did help a number of these hybrid funds that do both public and private investing The big thank you to Bloomberg hedge fund reporter Emma Palmer Now speaking of the record year for IPOs Goldman Sachs once again claiming the top deal making spot in this record year as the number one adviser on M and a this for a 5th year in a row For more let's bring in Mike Haifa editor for Bloomberg's U.S. deals coverage Hey Mike so according to Bloomberg data Goldman Sachs advised on more than $1 trillion worth of deals that gave it a market share more than 24% of the more than $5 trillion we saw in global M and a this year So a lot of superlatives a lot of records right there Goldman doing this for the 5th year in a row I mean how are they doing it I think we quoted dandies ahead of investment banking Goldman And in some ways the simple answer is the easiest is the best one in this case They focus a lot on each aspect of the business What I think is remarkable is not only do they keep and really break away in terms of their lead on M and a But for example on IPOs and advising they really took the lead going from third place all the way to first and that's a pretty remarkable fee There was a surge in everything in the past year as you know And Goldman Sachs was prepped to ride that surge right up They certainly did and they took advantage of that and you saw a lot of the money a lot of the clients have flow to them here A big part of that IPO or I should say of bringing companies public in this year dealt with spacs of course most of those didn't go through the traditional IPO process but there was still a lot of money to be made off of that or for some of these advisers Oh absolutely And you know the thing about stacks is they offer different benefits for investors but for the banks a listing as a listing And an underwriting And so they make their money in a sense regardless of what type of IPO necessarily though of course there are differences in different portions and such And one thing looking ahead of course is that those facts that astronomical records by comparison to what they've done in years past beginning with the surge in 2020 they look like they're tapering off quite a bit They'll certainly still be a popular vehicle for investors and for taking private companies public but it looks like they're just won't be so many of them Also there's just a large backlog going into 2022 Mike that's kind of what I want to hit though that large backlog because 2021 started off with a bang essentially in that there was.

Bloomberg Palms Bloomberg Charlie Paul Charlie collar Tim steinem Goldman Sachs treasury Emma Palmer IPOs Goldman Sachs Mike Haifa YouTube Texas S IPO
"haifa" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

06:45 min | 1 year ago

"haifa" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Here special markets coverage of global simulcast here on Bloomberg TV radio And YouTube as well We just got the closing bells here The 70th record high for the S&P 500 this year's second most on record obviously the most of going back to your favorite era of the 1990s The Dow Jones Industrial Average also closing higher here on the day at a record high the Philadelphia semiconductor index getting a nice little bid the NASDAQ composite down slightly here on the day And I want to talk about this divergence here So flip up the board here because when we talk about what's been leading this market the importance of these big cap tech companies here You look at a line one line is a NASDAQ 100 the percentage of members of the NASDAQ 100 that are above there 200 day moving average about 70% of those names Of course the smallest company in that index has about an $11 billion market cap You go to the NASDAQ composite where something like 2500 members of market caps below 1 billion the percentage of companies in that index that are above their 200 day moving average Well only about 37% here So there's a big divergence here between the small caps and the large caps about what's been bought here and this has been the trend that we've seen now for the last few months and definitely something to keep an eye on As we move into 2022 flip up the board real quickly here just in other asset classes You look at a little bit of weakness on the day for the dollar a little bit of weakness on the day in crypto oil getting a modest bit here on the day and the vix still camped out right around 7 teen And one of the one of the big movers of the day It's got to be Biogen Yeah but I didn't share his closing higher by just about 10% after the Korea economic daily says that Biogen is in talks to sell itself to the Samsung Group Let's bring in Bloomberg's Mike Haifa who covers the company's and he joins us We should know Biogen says it doesn't comment on rumors or speculation And Mike with the caveat that this is right now being reported by one source What do we know about a potential deal like this In context it would be a very large deal currently it would top the second largest deal of the year which interesting enough is medline another healthcare company That will put it past it's got a market cap of 30 38 billion now after today's share rise So that could even clear it is the largest deal by comparison with what's happened in 2021 which is the discovery Warner deal from earlier in the year Mike there's something very clearly happening in the healthcare space I wonder how much of this has to do with the pandemic but not too long ago We haven't heard about Oracle making this huge bet discern are essentially a healthcare infrastructure software company talk to us a little bit about what this might mean for Samsung Group or for Biogen on that front if this deal were to be true Okay Without going beyond my expertise into the overlap between tech and healthcare I think what you're seeing in both of those transactions is that like everything else healthcare is becoming more tech and vice versa There's a lot of overlap there certainly the type of IT power that's needed to run and develop pharmaceuticals as a company and as research is becoming more coming more into play as well So I think that might be something that's involved in this case All right Mike great to catch up with you here Of course keep an eye on Biogen Those years I have a phenomenal day though of course we should point out Biogen prior to today It was something like the 5th or 6th biggest laggard in the S&P 500 over the past 6 months A lot else going on here in the bond space Believe it or not we had a 7 year treasury auction on this day What better time now Let's turn the page and talk to Alex Harris of course who covers everything for us here treasuries at Bloomberg Alex we don't just talk to you on down day This is momentous This is the last Bond auction of the year We got of course everyone's looking at 2022 They want to know what the treasury is going to put out there More importantly I guess what the appetite is going to be by investors How do they deal with this auction today You know so the auction came in a little bit higher than where it had been trading pre auction But on a day like this it's really normal we're in the end of the year volume tends to be very thin I think levels today we were about 50% of our normal trading volume So but it wasn't too worrisome I think people were expecting a concession The market was sort of anticipating a result like this The question now is going to be going forward The fed is stepping back Those asset purchases are getting scaled back and they're getting scaled back very quickly So now you have to wonder what these auctions still so large What is going to happen with this demand And that's going to that's the big question Mark I think as we head into 2022 and we're going to have to see how things shape up in terms of investor appetite for this Okay so Alex what are you going to be looking at when to try to understand and investor appetite here And what are you looking at for 2022 to understand what today told us Yeah I think you got to look at the auction metrics You got to look at the positioning data so all these things primary dealer data These are the things that are going to be important as we head into the year From my perspective also looking at the very short end and the funding space we're going to be looking at repo levels and how some of these individual securities trade in the repo market and what the demand is like there Because there's some dynamics that can come into play So there's a few things we're going to be watching but I think the auctions that we get the threes tens and 30s will be really the first big slate will get in the new year And so those will be watched with some interest especially with the fed Coming back in also to resume asset purchases albeit smaller asset purchases starting January 3rd Right Alex I saw PTSD from that 7 year auction in February and then the one involved in March How much of what we can see in 7 years auction today can actually feed through the ten year we got about 30 seconds here You know I wouldn't make too much of it you know again it's the end of the year last trading trading week Of the year And things just get a little liquid And it's totally normal I don't think it's room to panic You know I guess it's an interesting metric but I wouldn't worry too much and I think you could see probably some of this reversal when we come back at the beginning of the year and we kind of see where things lie and where we are geopolitically Any other ending libor this week Well you know the three the 6 month and the 12 month dollar libor still have until June 20 20 23 so we got a little bit of time but yeah the most of them are going away We're going to have to leave it there coming up that we are talking travel Thank you for Alex Harris This is Bloomberg You're.

Biogen Samsung Group Korea economic daily Mike Haifa Mike Alex Harris Philadelphia YouTube Bloomberg S Warner Oracle fed treasury Alex
"haifa" Discussed on Mentors for Military Podcast

Mentors for Military Podcast

03:39 min | 2 years ago

"haifa" Discussed on Mentors for Military Podcast

"Yes. It was wild stretch man. Nine months appeal five months as an echo. And then i'm taking command as a young. I lieutenant i. I love the morale stuff that you guys did with the win. I think it was the mud. Everything's so maybe maybe talk about that a little bit I thought there was a really call. You could really feel through the book of of just you brought the team together or team came together with the great. Nco's that you had the came from The original unit that transferred in and stuff as well. That kind of helped you build that that foundation with all these new guys coming in. Yeah it really was and been asked before like what made us different It wasn't it definitely wasn't me. It was just a culmination of the right. Collective group of men put together the right time and circumstance went through all these experiences together that built just this unbreakable bond and entrust if everything i mean. It's just day in and day out. I mean you only hear about three grenades on the news. Becker but the three major shown at you. It's pretty damn big deal you learn and all the stuff that happened haifa. We lost some guys while there none directly under my command but it just built this Incredibly tight cohesive group and so when we came back in we reflagged a lot of people got out of the army. A lot of people went to different bases but sort of the same core. Call it fifty sixty percent. That was there Was the leadership. My first sergeant. I started off as acting commander. He started off as an acting. First sergeant he had been to platoon sergeant for third platoon. Just the men worship this guy still do to this day awesome awesome dude and you know the fives the sixes and the fires and east. Six's that left you know bite and miss him as we. We're going to keep the ones that we wanted to keep it. So yes when you guys came in. And i think this familiarity Entrust with the leadership that it was something special and so you know the old cheesy motto work hard play hard. I mean we trained our ass off but you know we did that. You're referring to the lead squad competition and it was a chance for some of our younger e five. We put them in east six positions and like go do this competitions and basic skills. Pt test. you know different things and it was it drug on probably six hours longer than it should have more than likely from horrible planning on my part but the culmination of the night was going to be all right. We're gonna have the ultimate winner is going to be determined in but we didn't tell them this is going to be. The surprise is going to be this basic huge mud wrestling match and document four or five squads or six. I can't remember exactly but we knew as soon as we say go. They're not going to jump each other. They're gonna jump us and they're gonna beat the hell out of us so we've taken all the guys around profile and cinema out with a bunch of five gallon water jugs you just got. This was like point break style from the bill. Put the headlights. I'll drive it up and it's like made this mudge porn water in it and as soon as they set go i mean they just one squad jumped on me and i was gonna say we'll back up because there was one of the officers who i guess who just got a nice new car and So of course he had told the men that Don't give me dirty because i'm gonna Up to drive that car home my wife will be upset or something to that nature so he stripped butt naked so make sure couple of funny things before. so.

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"haifa" Discussed on Tribe Talk Connection

Tribe Talk Connection

03:59 min | 2 years ago

"haifa" Discussed on Tribe Talk Connection

"They don't understand how it's possible that a country can consider you a citizen but not consider you important enough to give basic health coverage to now of course today. Israel is a capitalist country. It's a startup nation. A lot of that was done by the way by bb netanyahu who whether people love him today. Don't love him. Today is widely acknowledged as an extraordinary extraordinarily successful minister of the treasury and he privatize is a lot of those organizations and really moves israel forward to a free market economy long before he's prime minister but still certain socialist organ elements of israel do exist. There is a national trade union which is very very powerful. There is still medicare for all. There is a decent social net. Although it's not good enough for everybody but israel has very deep socialist routes some of which are gone some of which remain so. That's the kind of economic background of israel. What happens with the arabs. Were in israel and here. We have to understand something in light of what we said about the seven hundred thousand arabs of who leave palestine israel. Kuala whatever you want. And i understand that leave is a very loaded term. Some of them were forced out. Some of them were frightened out. Some of them followed their leadership out. I'm not trying to minimize the complexity of that. But let's say for the time being they leave palestine they leave israel and they become refugees. The jews who remain in. What's now sorry the arabs who remained in. What's now israel become israeli citizens. And it's very important to understand how complicated this is for israel's arabs because who becomes a palestinian refugee and who becomes an israeli citizen who can vote who has health care who has university education access and all of that. It's entirely an accident. Imagine that there's two families who are related to each other cousins or whatever in haifa in the middle of nineteen forty eight.

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"haifa" Discussed on Talentos para o Sucesso

Talentos para o Sucesso

04:11 min | 2 years ago

"haifa" Discussed on Talentos para o Sucesso

"It will go osu Gotta keep reading. Cheats on does alter the presence of april kevin that she was jealous. We're sound two trevor. Broke passenger area. Didn't percent strasse. Jadu haifa the percents steals yes neck. He doesn't H yeah who may be ancient so cialis over nasa may. Mba sought percents that speed schools. As far as you preserve. I seldom inch saas space. Were sound to no four thousand square feet the majority or you sat down this as percents. carol that keith. Josh bell is into the central. You w male life of man to america china vinci squads to e king saint jimbo view during ten percent failure. Gene guys i just smith is this was i was seeing pre accusers on the has yong-chol montale stems akin being bash edges zuta peculiar in the poco panch. Quite the thing is not medically example. Essays percent says no out also actually means using gas absorbed absurd produce qatar much. A pistol isn't a key thing. Kinsey a personal. Can i going to keep things seem quake. Don't tell by them. katembo medium. Ice zeki has done to solve a subagio quadruplet car when guys. I'm answering prayers. The same sample came into we're tossing percents. What quadruple cowan. Gosh sogeti his dot audit protests asynchronous. Messaging you told us a schemes. This content is. That's i. I got choya peru to know. Brazil intimate autumn bouquet. And he's not convention percent- mice. I in the scene as top ashley. Panel mark that twenty percent venezuela though is percent scots uvira could easy sarah form komo casual shop in equal. Got us don't drink deutsche santa santa's face for sound stop. You've ancient authors sample. She don't went too far. Nobody has you look. Use this bait for the but as youth america seemed to same. You don't get a jimbo of either non-medical actually signal. Waddington sounded specialist. Sam thank miserable may jump on them. Mayor damage dodge. She didn't should overview granja pershing vo mu. Wrap up a mom. Officials alone won't fish. I do a squeeze as important. Premier commission should get through to his daughters. As for us. You see that sue inbox. Bellevue budget come kissing packing zodiac. The chamber shaimaa kicked out chairman. And they'll go has shown inch demolish no sperm snazzy bashing national may squawk ain't pretty middle guy saying god starting pitching issues up Al gore saying upset about the main star sewing famous kamal. Komo guys are made based quizzes key on tractor. I want to keep up toward as organism science. I sorta gone nine. Jeff levine. there's stuff laundry komo's forward. Yes besides qatar by the saints started by the dallas. No major monday me go on. Chip geometric civil engineering telecity. Show bardo asks shock. You link by lee. Too nice was situated. So it's a blend was leading this because someone was shown what it sounds. Yummy one dance. Arlene allowed to stop mal. Komo komo joan. The main prayer niche squeamish amita tell up american style malcolm new dodge she..

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"haifa" Discussed on Naval

Naval

05:28 min | 2 years ago

"haifa" Discussed on Naval

"Pace of pipe. Think in three dimensions rep. The pace of piper ran a basketball as you have one now. Consider the ways in which you could draw rye straight lines through those two points you could punch a hole through one of those dots with your pen and push it out through the other side through the other hole and now you have different straight line you have the straight line that is drawn with your pen and you have a straight line. That is literally your pain that has been pushed through these two dots. So your initial feeling of absolute certainty. That only unique lawn could be drawn through. These two dots is false and you might be thinking that's unfair. That's cheating you thinking in two dimensions but you within two dimensions. I wasn't i was thinking more dimensions. Cow papa. has this wonderful saying it is impossible to speak in such a way that you cannot be misunderstood. This is always the case even in mathematics where we try and be as precise as possible. It's possible for people to make errors to think false premises about what the argument is that they're trying to make. And by the way this particular example of clearly geometry because geometry was traditionally always done in two dimensions on a piece of haifa was resolved by various people and led to geometry in curved space which led to arnstein coming out with general theory of so it is questioning these deepest assumptions. That we have where we think. There's no possible way. We could be mistaken that leads to true progress to genuine fundamental change in the sciences. And everywhere else you said that we went from adams in the time of democratise down two nuclei and from there to protons and neutrons and then to quarks it's particles all the way down to paraphrase feinman. We can keep going forever. But it's not quite forever. At some point. You run into the plank length the plank time this the plank length this even the plank mass which is actually quite a large mass. These things don't have any physical significance. It's not like the plank. Time is the shortest possible time and it's not like a plank. Length is too short as possible. Link the reason for that is because these plank things Pot of quantum theory but length is not described by quantum theory. it's described by the general theory of relativity and in that theory spices infinitely divisible. There is no smallest possible. Length ole time this illuminates an ancient tension between the discrete and the continuous because quantum theory seems to suggest that things are discrete for example. There's a smallest possible particle of gold. The gold atom is a smallest possible particle of electricity the electron as a smallest possible particle of light. The photon in quantum theory. We have this idea of discrete. Nece that there is a smallest possible thing from which everything else is built but in general relativity the is the opposite it says things can continuously vary and mathematics requires that things bay continuously variable so that can be differentiated and so on the. Id there is that you can keep on dividing up spice cape on dividing up time fist. This understand that there is this contradiction at the deepest level of our most foundational explanations in physics. And it's one of the reasons why there are these attempts to try and unify quantum theory general relativity because what is the fundamental nature of reality. Is that things can be infinitely divisible or is it that we must stop somewhere or other because he puts infinitely divisible than quantum theory might have to be subservient to general activity. But we just not. There goes my solution for xenos paradox. Which is before. He can get all the way somewhere. You have to get halfway. They didn't before you can get halfway there..

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"haifa" Discussed on Israel Daily News Podcast

Israel Daily News Podcast

08:31 min | 2 years ago

"haifa" Discussed on Israel Daily News Podcast

"Eastern standard time today. And if you can't catch you can always watch the video. It'll be posted there tomorrow. We are going to be speaking with an arab israeli who lives in haifa. He is a journalist a translator. And we're going to talk to him about how his family arrived in. Israel and why arab israelis are under stress and disappointed in their current government. Now let's get to the news. Israel is receiving rockets from lebanon in the north of the country instead of coming from usual suspects and terrorist group hezbollah. It is believed. The rockets are coming from palestinian groups. Living in lebanon is roles. Defense forces are striking back and hitting lebanese targets in the country. The rocket fire can be felt as far down as haifa. Where one of our sources said he heard a loud boom while we were talking with him he says most homes and his arab neighborhood do not come equipped with bomb shelters or safe rooms. The idea says four rockets were sent one intercepted by the iron dome defense system. One landed in an open field and two in the mediterranean sea. So far the only injuries are from two people who fell and got hurt during their run for. Cover this past week. Rockets have come toward israel from lebanon and one time from syria humanitarian aid for gaza. Nhs is being held up. This is because terrorists in the strip fired mortar shells at the kerem shalom crossing and the erez crossing yesterday. When israelis were trying to transfer aid that was donated to them from jordan. Three shells were fired at the camp shalom crossing which is near egypt. A shelling also took place at the erez crossing near to stir wrote this caused one soldier assisting in the effort to get the humanitarian aid through the border to get injured. The humanitarian aid includes medical equipment for a hospital come us and fatah called to or yesterday. Day of rage and encouraged arabs from all sectors of the palestinian territories and within israel to strike and rally in an effort to end the violence in gaza jerusalem and to stop street violence in arab villages. The officials said they wanted israel's you feel their absence. Two israeli soldiers were hurt near the west bank. As thousands of palestinians rioted near ramallah and throughout the west bank soldiers and israeli officers used force to fight them back. Three palestinian protesters were shot and killed. But it is not clear. By whom as both arabs and israeli soldiers and officers showed up to the protests with guns to multi workers in their thirties and israel are dead after hamas sent a rocket barrage toward israel south. The two were working in a packing house which was directly hit. Eight others are injured. Israelis are boycotting the telecom company cellcom after they hosted an hour of silence and stopped work yesterday. Cellcom says they wanted to support jewish arab coexistence but right wing groups saw it as a show of solidarity with palestinians and arabs who united for the day of rage against the jews the company reportedly lost millions of shekels as people called in to cancel their phone service. If you are getting caught up on your israel daily news and you consider yourself and israel daily news. Podcast her support our show. We are now trying to complete our second round of fundraising and gain new paid subscribers. So that this show can continue to run daily send over a monthly contribution at anchor dot. Fm backslash israel daily news backslash support. Thanks to our latest paid subscribers. We got some new paid subscribers as this violence unfolded in israel and in gaza people really want to get caught up and they wanna know what is going on. Thank you to everyone who has been so interested. We have one central link in the show notes which you can click on. It will take you to the page where you can make a contribution and feel good knowing that you're supporting independent journalism. You can also support us by leaving us. A review on apple podcasts number. Two you can share the show with a friend and number three. You can follow us on social media at israel daily dot news as well as full. That's s. h. a. n. a. f. u. l. d. president biden spoke with prime minister netanyahu and says he hopes to see a ceasefire. Come about on wednesday. So that's today. Meanwhile a fresh new barrage of rockets hit southern israel and ashkelon dodi and bear shiva. Some rockets fell into open fields. Starting fires thirteen rockets went toward bear. Chevra eight were intercepted by the iron dome and the rest fell into open fields. Thankfully the fire comes in the afternoon after some quiet in the morning but a heavy night with rockets from kamaz sent toward israel's southern air force base the idea of has reportedly tried to kill hamas military commander two times since war broke out which is being called operation guardian of the walls in english. The name of this chief mohammed dif and he has one i one arm and no legs because the idea has tried unsuccessfully to take him out completely in the past and finally i am trying my best to leave you off on a high note eh in a lean the ethiopian israeli queen got a lot of attention last night as she represented israel in the annual eurovision song contest a advanced last night to the final round in rotterdam in the netherlands a leans performance of set me free was well received and voters applauded her for reportedly hitting the highest note ever achieved during a eurovision performance. A lena's israel's first representative of ethiopian descent. To go to this competition. She was supposed to join in two thousand twenty but the pandemic put the contest on hold and she was disappointed for the year. A sing while also dancing. And she's getting attention for the black and white costume created by famous israeli designer alone. Livni aline was seen on video fidgeting with joy in front of cameras and she was saying she was so happy for her country because it has been through so much she wrapped herself up in an israeli flag and recited the shama prayer while she waited for the results. Some audience members did waved palestinian flags which has happened many times in the past others tweeted that her song set me. Free should actually be about palestine. Protests took form outside the auditorium and people called for lean not to be allowed to perform the eurovision final will take place on may twenty second in two thousand nineteen it took place in israel after israeli electronic music. Star neta bars. Eli one competition the year before. That's how it works. If you win the competition your country takes the responsibility of putting on the show this year. To israelis wrote the lyrics for russia's contestant who is also moving forward to the final round. All right well. That's it for today's show. Today is wednesday may nineteenth twenty twenty one. Tel aviv has a low of twenty degrees celsius and a high of twenty seven. That's sixty eight degrees fahrenheit for the low going up to eighty degrees for the high. Subscribe to the israel daily news podcast on spotify or apple podcasts. Or wherever you're hearing it from. I am everywhere. Don't forget to sign up to our weekly news rapids a newsletter with the top. Five stories. Coming out of israel from throughout the week. You also get the cliff notes version of our original stories investigations and interviews. You can sign up by using the link in the show notes. I am going to send you off today. With israel's eurovision.

ramallah haifa lebanon today Three yesterday tomorrow Tel aviv two people Two thirties thirteen rockets hezbollah wednesday Today twenty degrees celsius netanyahu Five stories two Livni aline
"haifa" Discussed on Democracy Now! Audio

Democracy Now! Audio

08:19 min | 2 years ago

"haifa" Discussed on Democracy Now! Audio

"They're not allowed to speak Romany. I wanted to ask you about the what we talked about Iraq, the general strike that it's by, and in terms of the, this unprecedented situation of of Palestinians within Israel. As well as the, the West Bank and in Gaza, the entire Palestinian people are coming together in a general strike of this, kind of talk about the how unprecedented that is and off and will you see this as a pivotal moment in the struggle? Of course, of course, thank you for asking that question. You know, last December, I was sitting with a friend here in Haifa and we were, we were very depressed, very much depressed. Did was another covered locked down, and it was right after the, the normalization Accords. You know, my friend and I basically were morning. We said, okay, that's it. We lost down in the wage vehicle that the the Palestinian cause is done for, maybe we should just, you know, throw in the towel. What's happening these days, what's happening right now, what happened last week, which was allegedly had downsizing and all over Palestine, including the decision to strike from The River To The Sea to go on strike from the river. To the sea is not only, it is, president that it happened in 1956, but it happened in nineteen thirty-six, you know, it happened a very long time ago. So the fact this is happening. Now the fact that the uprising, it's started with the young people. But under the age of twenty, I mean, you'd go to this day demonstrations. You I wouldn't recognize most of the people there. They were killed, you know, they were young people, teenagers, a lot of them? Uh, so in a way down, what happened right now is another rise of the Palestinian, cause the Palestinian cause is not dead. And the last two weeks, I think pretty much proved And in terms of the response throughout the rest of the Middle East. Dr. Mustafa barghouti was talking about the difference between where the Arab leaders are and where the street or black people are, what's your sense of the impact of the last few days on the, the rest of the Middle East? Yeah, yeah. That's a difficult one month, we expect more, we expect more, we have been seeing masses taken to the street and, and, and Lebanon, and then in Jordan, and that's fantastic. But obviously, we don't expect much from Arab Leader of the Band mean, they, they have been disappointing us for decades and why should they act differently? Now, what what what I have been noticing is a shift in the states. I'm talking to journalists like all day long. That's what I do. They keep calling me. I keep doing these interviews. I feel that American Media Outlets are interested in hearing us out and this is a first this is The first, this is a new thing. Also, for us, we're dealing to deal with it now. What do you do when you go on CNN and the actually allow you to speak. So so so I really feel that, you know, life if we're talking on on how what's happening in Palestine is affecting other places, I'd like to to focus on on the states because what's happening in the United States and not many friends in America, I lived in Boston, for a, I just came back, actually, from Boston, a few months ago cuz of covered. But, but what we're seeing the states is unprecedented. I think, and this should be capitalized. I mean, we, we have to keep talking to, to Americans because we have to let Americans know what the taxpayers money is is, is is is, is is going for not only bomb children in God, but not only help Israelis settle in the West Bank, in demolish, Palestinian houses, but also targeting in and the person persecuting Panthers Indian citizens of Israel. You know, that they actually started by the way. And I forgot to mention that before, you know that they actually started marking, Palestinian houses in - live, you know, Israel right-wing rioters come during the day. You know, they just they're searching for Arabella houses and hyphen and and Lids. So off the mark and come later later on that night and attack. People need to hear all of those people need to know that this is what the American Administration is supporting them. I wanted to ask you about what happened in the Israeli city of backyard and Israeli mob, shown on live TV attacking a driver who they thought was Palestinian. The man was dragged from his car. Attacked left bleeding on the ground. After what the Israeli media described as an attempted lynching in other parts, John large groups of Israelis were seen vandalizing arab-owned businesses and on live TV. You saw some of these mobs chanting death to Arabs. I mean, this song is reminiscent of kristallnacht back in World War Two, the attacks on Jews during the Holocaust. Well yeah. And what's what's I mean just, you know, as another prove to what I said before that date real establishment, then the Israeli legal system and the Israeli police are working hand-in-hand, against the Palestinian population is what what happened? Yesterday, 116 indictments were brought to to Israeli court, all of them or against Palestinian people who took to the street, you know, Amy, how many environments were brought to, to court against Israelis zero? I mean, let me let me correct myself to indictments were booked for today against against Israelis but that's just a drop in the ocean. Now regarding that that Lynch attempt that you were describing in bottom. That was a live TV. That was a Life TV. Package was a TV reporter there and the TV reporter interviewed the the the people who were committing the Lynch, one of them did the interview shirtless he had blood on his hand off. Was screaming at the microphone. I want to kill Arabs, I want to murder them. What happened to that guy wasn't? Why isn't he in jail? Why isn't police doing anything about her? That, that was a live TV. Last question, there is a debate going on unusual in the US Congress Democratic party divided. You have people like, well, the first palestinian-american congresswoman and Rashida to leave taking to the floor of the house, giving an impassioned speech and this 735 million dollar expedited weapons sale to Israel. Now being questioned, Congressman Meeks in New York, who has long supported Israel talking about a delay of those weapons and clearly putting pressure on a Biden though. He did not demand a cease-fire apparently. Talked with Benjamin Netanyahu about wanting one, took the subtleties of this division being conveyed in the Israeli media. No, no, no, not at all. No one is being conveyed. In the Israeli media. Is that the Americans are the Americans are dead. Lightning this, and although Biden is not the biggest fan of Benjamin Netanyahu right now, there are still okay with what's happening, maybe in a couple of places or considered professional and more. I don't want to say, I hate using the word but, but I'm going to say it anyway Progressive like hearts. Yeah, they are they are they are saying that. They are saying that they are pointing out these little subtleties, but again, that's not enough. The American Administration has to put all of its weight on the Israeli government and to stop this, Amy off. Almost seventy children. Died in Gaza. What what, what,.

United States Benjamin Netanyahu Haifa Boston America Gaza Mustafa barghouti Lebanon New York Rashida Jordan Amy World War Two last December Middle East 1956 Holocaust 116 indictments Biden last week
"haifa" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

08:21 min | 2 years ago

"haifa" Discussed on Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

"This very thank you for you know. I'm a big fan of your show. G g great. Great debate great and i'm scottish. I'm very passionate about what's happening there. You know hide a great mom. She was scottish. Mary mcleod she taught me well. She taught me well. At everything. Including dolph scotland. And i love the scottish. Food is great food. I sent to milan haggas looking at what's more than more scottish than that me. I am that address. She said what thin skinned and full of crap sputnik has been launched to give you a closer look at everything happening in the world radio spook telling the untold. The mother of all talk shows join our faculty of legends contributors. Everyone is welcome. Gideon levy as the finest stall is really journalists and authors and commentators extensively followed and read in israel and indeed around the world. He's the most famous israeli journalist of them all and the best one. And it's an honor as always to remake his acquaintance gideon. Thank you for joining us on this dreadful occasion. God knows who's dying as we speak. I wonder if you would describe to the audience. What the atmosphere is like israel in israel in honor vis connick jr festival. Over as on for me being you show. I must be very few courageous shows. Who says the fighting jews which fight for justice. Now this unbelievable gift between what's going on in israel and what's going on right now when we talk in gaza. I must remind you joe jr that if i will go freely with my car for my whole into the two girls are easy to take me like our fifteen. That's the oldest says and here into the life is almost no more. I don't want to say because we are so many sirens in the last days but finally it's almost normal while what an hour they sense from. Here it is a. I get so many videos from gaza which i never saw. We'd never saw before then of children really massacres idiots. Unbelievable we know nothing about it by the way if you ask most of these babies exposed to those images they know nothing. They're don't want to know gideon. Was i write in ascribing this latest frenzy in part to the travails of the prime minister. Netanyahu a george yes and no because both of us are old enough to remember that those things happened before and unfortunately we had been up the neo. The neo carries responsibility about but they will put it own yells at policies. Because this is israel it's than the l. This is dance brewed policy of israel. You go backwards. You see those all day. Prime ministers so bullied oriented. How is in a way to make life easier because once will get rid of how better known not become. What's the aim of this. It cannot be. This is not an era in which the complete destruction of every palestinian in gaza can be achieved if that was the goal of those who are carrying out this crime. So what is the aim is the end game. Nobody knows what is the endgame. And because there is no gang as you remember henry kissinger who say that israel does not for morrissey everything is domestic policy. You can say the same about the fence policy visit by the end of the day. It is about showing these rallies that here we have beaten. Louis have humiliated them. We are the heroes. This is the end game in a way. Yes there is a hamas israel faces at programs of adult. Ignore it but israel never dry in a way but living on the sold by using its paulo. Who is a real way really without any boulders and there is out you can see the students of tens of children fans of children dead right now. How did this of of people looking not surface the binding. They live maybe second souped. I mean that. I for the place to hide totally. It's breaking we are also also sadly both old enough to remember. The period in which mass did not exist and the lives of the people in gaza and under occupation and in the camps in the country's alongside israel were not very much better so was myself. Because i'm not a supporter of islamism. I'm not a supporter of hamas. But the it's another by to some extent. Isn't it that some people reach for to allocate guilt in this picture to hamas games is expects and therefore how is doing anything possible to strengthen thomas and the weekend the palestinian authority and the because that be a stronger nathan. the other israelis be challenged. Why don't you go for agreement. Why don't you negotiate. But that's exactly what he does not get into the best because nobody experience come us to be a problem for diallo. Even though by the way gioja said you. I believe that even hamas are reasonable people. And i believe that we could talk to them. We shoot them and we could have gotten into a leave. An interim agreement with them but in any case you are right hamas gift for his another of the new characteristics of this particular episode. Relatively new Is the ugliness we have seen inside israel itself in places like haifa and aca on jaffa. We have seen violence against the arab citizens of israel in the wake of these horrific events..

Netanyahu israel gioja Mary mcleod jaffa two girls haifa fifteen diallo both joe jr aca thomas israeli second arab prime minister Louis scottish milan
"haifa" Discussed on WGN Radio

WGN Radio

01:38 min | 2 years ago

"haifa" Discussed on WGN Radio

"And this protest in Los Angeles. Protesters demanded an end to the Israeli air strikes over the Gaza Strip and denounced U. S support for Israel. Rally and March for Palestinian rights will be held in downtown Chicago later today. The latest round of Israeli airstrikes has killed 33 people. Another 50 have been wounded. Royal Caribbean canceled plans for its newest ship to sail out of Israel because of this unrest. The odyssey of the Seas was scheduled to depart from Haifa, Israel, starting June 2nd and run through October. Instead, the ship will spend its inaugural season sailing out of Florida. Starbucks will be one of the businesses vaccinated people can go into without wearing a mask. The store's new policy for customers starts tomorrow. It only applies to areas were local laws do not require them. And the tiger that was seen wandering through a Houston neighborhood last week, prompting chaos and confusion has been found and appears to be unharmed. The former owner's wife, JIA Cuevas, turned the nine month old Bengal tiger named India over to authorities. It'll go to a sanctuary. Authorities say Cuevas is not facing any charges, but her husband was arrested earlier this week for evading police find news nation on your cable or satellite provider and stay up to date around the clock at news nation now dot com and on the news nation now F I'm danged one. It's warmer, drier and with more sunshine. If we close out the weekend.

Los Angeles Royal Caribbean Florida October Gaza Strip June 2nd Houston Starbucks JIA Cuevas 33 people Cuevas last week earlier this week Israeli tomorrow nine month old Palestinian India Haifa, Israel Seas
"haifa" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

07:44 min | 2 years ago

"haifa" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Kauffman dot or g'kar. And from the listeners of KQED Public Radio. This is weekend edition from NPR News. I'm Lulu Garcia Navarro. We return now to the Middle East, where there are now fears of a civil conflict within Israel. Fighting has spread into many Israeli neighborhoods across that country. Context about 1/5 of Israeli citizens are Palestinian. They're also known as Israeli Arabs, and they've lived side by side within the country's Jewish majority for decades. In a few minutes we'll hear from an Israeli columnist. But first we're going to go to the town of luck or lid as Palestinians call it. A state of emergency has been declared there and the Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu visited on Thursday, pleading for calm. But roaming Israeli and Palestinian bands have been stoning and beating up people from the other side and Vandalizing property and there have been hundreds of arrests with us now is Rami Eunice. He is a Palestinian activist who is from Lord or lid. He is joining us, though today from another city, Haifa, which is also experiencing unrest. I mean, you just thank you so much for being with us. Thank you for having me little can you first tell me what you're hearing from the people in Lord. I mean, it seems like the situation is extremely tense. Right now. People are extremely afraid. It's all very new to us this level of hatred and violence in the streets. But they started marking Palestinian houses in Haifa and lit so they can come and attack later on that night. When you say that they've been marking houses explain to me what that what that means and what people have been Experiencing there. Look at maps. They see where Arab houses are, and then they send younger kids. You go and like mark them with the marker. They make a sign. The whole idea is to so that they can come and attack it at night. And it zapping that this is being done by Jewish people and you know of all people. But this is truly terrifying. People are are staking and in terms of ethnic cleansing, I mean this the city of lead, you know it was occupied in 1948. It did go through. Horrifying massacre and explosions, you know s Oh, it has a bleeding history. That place is very much traumatized. And it's been like that for the past 73 years because the Palestinian side of the city you know the Palestinian history of it. Hasn't been recognized. So after that the fact that settlers tried It started moving into the city around 15 years ago, and they're declare its purpose was to Judea is the space. Um Andreas created a lot of tension between us, Palestinians and them. I mean, when you're talking about that old history, Of course you're talking about the 1948 Arab Israeli war and lead or laud was taken over by Israeli forces and many Palestinians were forced to leave. A small community, of course remained and the descendants Live there now, and they are Israeli citizens like yourself What is happening elsewhere in the country in terms of how you view why Palestinians inside Israel are taking to the streets? Well, first of all, let me say thank you for for demonstrating your knowledge of the history of lead. I mean, this is quite impressive, usually because it's a small city people, Tonto. Forget about it in other places. It's quite different in high father, for example. People from the Jewish side who are clashing with the Arabs are not exactly what you would call settlers with racist ideology. These are more right wing activists, people who are incited. You know, there are a lot of figures in Israel right now inciting to violence. It's just very, very tense right now. Roominess. Let me let me ask you this, though. Obviously, some of the violence is coming from the Palestinian side. We have seen synagogues burned. We have seen Jews being attacked, beaten. This is not just happening on one side. How do you think about that? Of course, uh, but before we talk about that we need to provide the context so that people understand why there's rage on the Palestinian side. Mind you these demonstrations they started as ah, Demonstrations. You know, people were supporting the Palestinian community and checks. The rocket is Jerusalem, uh, away these families that were about to be expelled from the neighborhood. By settlers. They took to the street also because they wanted to support a Luxan mosque and object. What days was you were doing there? But these were the triggers. These reasons weren't the fuel The fuel was the pent up anger that people had the frustration because of the you know, institutionalized oppression. You said at the beginning of our conversation that you have been surprised. And shocked by the degree of hatred. What is different about this time in the conflict is what is happening on the streets. Inside Israel. I'm wondering If you think that there's any coming back from what's going on. Very tough question. It's a very tough question. We also need to understand that it's not a civil wars. It's not anything close to that. It's two groups who are attacking one group. So right now it's one group minority who's on the defense. While part of the other side's society is trying to eradicate it, sometimes being escorted by the police. So how what do I do as a Palestinian I know that it's set has come to my neighborhood and they tried to shoot me and try to break and enter to my home and they've been doing that. They've been doing that in Haifa. So what? What? What would you do as a Palestinian knowing that you can't even go to the police? What I hear you say is that you think that there's a narrative that says that the two sides are equal when They aren't there aren't there aren't I mean, how could they be equal? Whether people who are on the occupation? Uh, yes, I'm I am Citizen a visual, but I'm not an equal citizen of Israel. So So. So how can we be equal? TomTom? They have the power in Israel. This is normal. The group that attacking you are the landlords. On the other group who's supposed to protect you, which is the police are either protecting them or just allowing them to do what they do. Palestinians are not only the people who live Within the 67 borders Gaza and the West Bank or Palestinian refugees, and they'd ask for Palestinians also live in Israel, and and they are oppressed. They are a second class citizen. I don't really have an answer instead off, other than putting more pressure on the Israeli government and to start asking about what's happening to the local community within Israel. That's Rami. Eunice, a Palestinian activists from Lid or Lud living in Haifa. Thank you very much. Thank you for having me appreciate this. And now we move to a different Israeli perspective on the conflict. Nadav Eyal is a columnist and analyst for Israel's Yediot are not newspaper. And he joins us now from Televisa. Welcome. I don't know It's my cousin joining you. I'd like to begin with what is happening inside Israel because you wrote, We're.

Nadav Eyal Lulu Garcia Navarro Haifa Thursday 1948 Rami Eunice Televisa Eunice Jerusalem Middle East West Bank KQED Public Radio two sides NPR News two groups Israel today Andreas 1948 Arab Israeli war Jewish
Rocket Barrages Hit Israel From Gaza, Sirens Sound in Jerusalem

Monocle 24: The Briefing

01:18 min | 2 years ago

Rocket Barrages Hit Israel From Gaza, Sirens Sound in Jerusalem

"Later today. Israel's capture of east jerusalem in the six day war of nine hundred sixty seven will be commemorated as usual by the annual jerusalem day flag march on the basis of the last few days. It is difficult to imagine it. Going altogether smoothly. Hundreds of palestinian demonstrators and dozens of israeli police have been injured in several days of disturbances around palestinian protests against threatened evictions. The violence has spread to haifa romolo. I'm the always hypersensitive site of the alexa mosque. In the temple. Mount compound in jerusalem's old city. Joining me with more on this from tel aviv is alison kaplan saw a journalist at haaretz alison first of all to the disturbances. We've seen over the last few days. How significant do they seem. I guess local standards. They seem very significant. We haven't had anything this violent and this large in several years really time will tell if this is going to be a long term problem but right now you know. We're focused on this. The celebration of ramadan coinciding with jerusalem date which is also always very provocative time of year. But i would say that we haven't seen anything on the scale. In in many years. In scott israel very concerned

Jerusalem Alexa Mosque East Jerusalem Alison Kaplan Haaretz Alison Haifa Israel Tel Aviv
"haifa" Discussed on The Last American Vagabond

The Last American Vagabond

05:13 min | 2 years ago

"haifa" Discussed on The Last American Vagabond

"Is that an illegal act that they committed what the justification for what happened in nineteen eighty in one thousand. Nine hundred eighty. That's a decision. They made to do a detour. Annexation last year for instance Netanyahu promised in his election campaign that if he became prime minister he would. He would annex or what he would As he termed it. A establishes raliess sovereignty over the jordan valley inside of the west bank. That's time which is a crime which is a crime and no one disagrees with that. The united nations and these are openly stated. I'm going to commit these crimes. Because i just don't think they're illegal like this is this is almost juvenile. You know what i mean. It's incredible and this again just to make the same points because our governments allow it period and it's under insanity if you look what they're doing now at the the most pertinent issue. I think the one that some of the most important at the moment is the case of shadow. So you people of shakes genre. Israel orders and It's sorry it's says that these people in shadow Did not don't have proof That they've been living Like in these properties right that the paperwork wasn't done under jordanian rule and that these homes or the area used to be owned by jews And so according to israel's nineteen fifty absentees property law and they use this by the way it's well documented in the human rights watch reported the anyone wants to go through the two hundred twenty plus page report there on included It's well documented. How this absentees property law was used to annex palestinian territory Going back to the laws inception but now they use this in east jerusalem along with A decision made in the knesset in nineteen seventy seven in order to say this land used to belong to jewish people can be returned to jewish people But there's no such thing for palestinians on the other sides have palestinians car claim. Land the people of schick are though these people specifically in the cases so incredibly ridiculous even by the israeli a legal system standards and we have to understand. This is not just sat. there is coming in by themselves as the whole israeli legal system which backs them in this rights of course and so this situation here the residents of shake genera refugees in nineteen forty seven nine hundred forty eight from places like haifa. And y'all which were ethnically cleansed by Israel leads zionist gangs. At the very least this is the second time they've been illegally displaced exactly. And then what happened with that is when they were ethnically cleansed the jordanian authorities essentially in return for them. You know giving up their refugee status They would be re homed in east jerusalem in shifts data and most of the properties. There were built by the jordanians right now. The argument is by in. The israeli courts is all while. There's no proof. The documentation wasn't completed right by jordanians..

Netanyahu last year jewish haifa jordan valley east jerusalem one thousand second time two hundred twenty plus page Nine hundred eighty nineteen fifty absentees jordanian prime minister eighty palestinian nineteen seventy seven shake genera west bank jews eight
"haifa" Discussed on Israel Daily News Podcast

Israel Daily News Podcast

03:05 min | 2 years ago

"haifa" Discussed on Israel Daily News Podcast

"And lighting tires on fire and finally for a nice story to close out the day are it's has a great piece about one of the earliest. All of pickling factories that was found off of the coast of israel. It is sixty five hundred years old and was found. When archaeologist uncovered stone circles with thousands of olive pits in it research shows. Israel was the epicenter of olive tree. Cultivation and that at first people didn't know that they could eat olives they were simply squeezing the oil out of them and using that without actually eating the fruit. What a shame. I love olives from israel. This specific site mentioned in the recent article. That's the nature. Scientific report journal says it's located south of haifa in a place called his shirley carmel and was first exposed in twenty eleven after a storm washed away layers of sand that had covered that factory up. Investigations showed the stone circles with a paved inside had thousands of olive pits in their covered by a thin layer of clay and stone. Archaeologists from the university of haifa. Say since there weren't any signs of permanent habitation nearby. They believe this site was industrial. Only and that people came just to make products and then went home so this site is actually off the coast. So you can see pictures if you go onto the haaretz article. You can see pictures of marine biologists underneath the water with all of the pits. all right. well that's it for today's news. Today is tuesday february. Second twenty twenty one. It is groundhog day in the united states. Which means that a groundhog came out. An everyone around the country was waiting to see if he would see his shadow. Well punxsutawney phil did indeed see his shadow on this cold snowy day and that means that we can predict another six weeks of winter. Tel aviv on the other hand has a low of thirteen degrees celsius and a high of twenty six degrees. That's fifty six degrees fahrenheit for the low going up to seventy nine degrees for the high nice and sunny and warm there subscribe to the israel. Daily news podcast on spotify or apple podcasts. Or wherever you're hearing it from. I am everywhere. Don't forget to sign up to our israel weekly news rap it's a newsletter with the top five stories coming out of israel from throughout the week. You'll also get the cliff notes version of our original stories investigations and interviews. Plus i've been keeping everyone in the loop about what's happening with my return flight to israel so if you want to know when i am going to get back in you can sign up for the newsletter. I've been keeping everyone up to date there. You can sign up by using the link in the show notes. i also have. Don't forget those phone numbers for the support hotline for immigrants who are new to israel and dealing with covid nineteen. Thank you to benny four sad for your contributions to the research and writing.

twenty six degrees Today israel tuesday february thirteen degrees celsius Israel six weeks spotify today Tel aviv fifty six degrees fahrenheit united states twenty twenty one university of haifa apple haifa five stories first thousands of olive pits benny four sad
Iran newspaper: Strike Haifa if Israel killed scientist

Optimal Health with Dr Calapai

00:22 sec | 3 years ago

Iran newspaper: Strike Haifa if Israel killed scientist

"Nuclear scientists is killed in an alleged assassination. The funeral for scientists Most enter his body got underway today His body will pass through multiple cities before being buried in Tehran on Monday. Top Iranian officials say Israel is behind the ambush as one of the country's largest newspapers today called on Iranian leadership to bomb the Israeli port city of Haifa. Fox's trey, you angst President

Tehran Israel Haifa Trey FOX
Iran newspaper: Strike Haifa if Israel killed scientist

Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

00:34 sec | 3 years ago

Iran newspaper: Strike Haifa if Israel killed scientist

"Their reports israel has put its embassies on high alert following the assassination of iran's top nuclear scientist the middle east remains on edge today after the assassination of a man largely seen as the godfather of the iranian nuclear program. The funeral today. For scientists most in our body got underway. Iran's supreme leader the ayatollah khomeini and the running and president. Assad rouhani are vowing to respond to the top. Orion officials say israel is behind ambush as one of the country's largest newspaper. I called on iranian leadership to bomb. The israeli port city of haifa

Iran Israel Assad Rouhani Middle East Ayatollah Khomeini Orion Haifa
Iranian op-ed urges attack on Israeli port city over scientist killing

This Weekend with Gordon Deal

00:41 sec | 3 years ago

Iranian op-ed urges attack on Israeli port city over scientist killing

"Punishment for the assassination of a nuclear scientist. Ah hard line Iranian newspaper is suggesting the regime attacked the Israeli port city of Haifa and cause heavy human casualties. Iran blames Israel for Friday's ambush. Iranian state media says the scientist convoy was traveling down the road when the bomb went off and stop when they stopped. The Iranian media says at least five gunman popped up and opened fire on the scientists SUV. Now. Israel has long been suspected of employing exactly these kinds of assassinations in Iran, including one of another scientist. Almost exactly one decade ago, Fox is Ryan Chilcote. More than six months after they

Haifa Iran Israel Ryan Chilcote FOX
Danni Reches: Building Your Path In the Social Sciences

Papa Phd Podcast

05:39 min | 3 years ago

Danni Reches: Building Your Path In the Social Sciences

"We're going to be talking about how you got to where you are today in academic terms. So we've talked about So you're in Haifa Center for German and European Studies. You're doing a PhD on policy and perceptions of immigrants from the Middle East in. Europe. how did you get before talking about exactly what you working on? How did you get to the PHD? How was the whole academic journey for you? It all comes down to a big coincidence adds to the honest I. Didn't really know what I was getting into. When I signed up for BBC or or applied for position actually see what happened is data. I moved to from the Netherlands when from. partially to be able to go from the humanities. Faculty which I had had my Ian Levin's. To Straits ahead, go into political science, which is in social sciences. Different faculty in unknowns wasn't able to do that. Unless. Would have done a year in between to get some more courses than every year the University of Haiphong. Because I have taken some classes earlier recent conflicts, which also political science they allowed me to state go into get him. So that's one of the reasons that I moved here that I started doing that M. A. N. as I loved to science. I love the small programs with just a few students so that I could really choose my own self aches that have tonight. So when I wrote my master's thesis. Supervisor said I'm not only in political science departments also a part of the sense of Germany abuse. Studies. And we are you, we opened up two positions for his suits with a scholarship. maybe you WANNA consider applying for us because my master's thesis was about the refugee crisis in Europe. So you're being center that was something interesting. So. I was like, well, you know I like what I'm doing I like the writing of first ongoing on the gap here in Salia and from there alright the application. Which I did from the Wifi at McDonald's. In, Australia was as a backpacker. I applied for the Specie position. After having spoken to. Supervisor Miami was over with. With that. Center. and. Then eventually I got the news was still in Australia that I've gotten that I got the position and that when I was be back in this is something I was starts. Would Abuse De was How much effort at time and? A lifestyle is just a position was not clear to me and I had to learn a lot along the way. I am very happy to be hosting bolts costs what to do with Dad's. Because I get to listen to others. To hear a how they've been dealing with things and I'm also happy like you said before I confess that on people who are just starting now you mentioned something that I found really interesting and I didn't do that. I didn't think it was something possible. I didn't. It didn't arise in my mind you talked about taking a gap year. I'd like to talk about that and. Yet to talk about how you took that decision, how easy was it to take it and how you organize to be able to go backpacking in Australia that how Atlantis? Well. It's always been something on my mind right Australia as child's. To seeking room for real. To See all these amazing places where there's desert big cities. At. But also the tropics and everything in between. was. Something that was always on my mind and I learn about this program way to go on a working holiday visa. which that people with my nationality? Is Fairly, easily apply just go online you a little bit of money and then within twenty four hours I got the email zero mine visa. To go to. For one year allowing you to work so that you could also finance your said there. and I knew that this was only possible until the age of certain. Now, not necessarily tell you how old I am now but I'm eating it. At some point you know before thirty, this is my goal in life is to make it to the and. This was the right time in my life because I just finished Ma I. Wasn't sure yet. What was GONNA do exactly with bats whether I was GONNA look for a job. He is railway move to or if I was GONNA find a job in Europe Netherlands or any other. Country which is an option. Or. Continue studying because I. got this idea for my. Evasive advisor, Ovadia about the Beastie. So this was a good time for me to go about and think about it in a different setting and my everything together for quite a while already. Also got really lucky as an Israeli to death that same visa that he at applies for from. Yeah it was really a dick out of the lottery. And then. You know. To go within so many months otherwise you will be valid anymore. So like Yoga we're doing.

Australia I. Supervisor Ian Levin Middle East Haifa Center Europe European Studies University Of Haiphong BBC Europe. Netherlands Germany Salia Mcdonald DAD M. A. N. Advisor Ovadia Europe Netherlands
America's prepper culture kicks in

Correspondents Report

05:47 min | 3 years ago

America's prepper culture kicks in

"Americans know how to prep all saying it. In the movies there was even a US reality TV series called Doomsday prepares. The term prepa is often used to mock people who prepare often intensely for all kinds of calamities. These basic survival skills have come in handy. Recently as millions of Americans have stocked up to bunk down as the virus takes hold North America correspondent Catherine discs reflects on how she isn't a PREPA and in this case she really should have been so just come to do my and I'm not a precursor and it's a bit of a problem. Not many cans of food left the show so excited I might just be getting some of the basics milk. Get someone ask seems to even on is still for sale. There's no meat left. Looks like you know they get one. Y'All WanNa be Dr Americans certainly how to stock up now. Let's see is in the vet favorite commodity selects that sterling's long slow March. Is there any toilet Haifa? There is this is the Feast supermarket. I've aintree with as being no toilet paper and signs which say Judah High Demand. We're now limiting the quantity of units per person. So it looks like it's paper towel for now so that was my experience. Just one of the supermarkets. I visited over the weekend. You'd think that I would have been more prepared. I've been talking about panic. Buying on a Fidesz these food bank at the heart of New York's outbreak now making home deliveries to the elderly here. In the nation's capital businesses will shut from tonight. America has just upriver. I never have been. I think there was something about my upbringing with the mother who always had five of everything that put me off stockpiling. I genuinely height hoarding. My husband. Who is back in Australia for work? Stock to all the shelves before leaving two months ago knowing full. Will I'd only shop for food two days in advance. He said when he left. You've enough in the Fraser to last you about six weeks. I brushed off his concern when he suggested on three separate occasions last week. It's best to do a big shop. Hey shore shore turns out. He was right but I am making loss of a very serious situation at a costco in Georgia. A man was stabbed with a bottle over a packet over in New York. A food bank started home deliveries to society's most vulnerable they can't get out like some of us can like and I so for them. They are affected because they cannot eat and gun shops across the country have almost sold out. Show your bed is empty. Logan's empty guns handguns. Let's see what hanging is we have none and none none. You Guys WanNa see what amyloid have. Let's look at this almost none. No ammo this is happening everywhere. Right across the country. It's even prompted the Corona Virus Task Force to tell people to stop stockpiling one of the biggest problems. Here is a shortage of general medical supplies. He's an emergency department. Dr ON CNN. Through five months now. Six months worth of supplies in less than a week and we are scrambling we're scrambling and even to the point. Where these are in ninety five masks We've got three days of supply of and ninety five mass on hand in order to preserve these and get them the last longer. We have began. We've got a team. People sewing mass together. This is surgical sheeting and this is our prototype. We've got about three thousand of these made. We believe we can make two hundred thousand of them. It will take a few weeks but this is. This is the kind of what we're having to do because we don't know when that next shipment is coming. It's prompted the US president. Donald trump to enact a wartime power the defense production act giving him the control to order companies to make more supplies deemed necessary to national security and gives him the ability to take hold of the civilian economy to redirect those critical materials which are in such short supply towards protecting the nation. Tonight we don't know of any circumstance where these power has been used to combat a public health. Emergency we'll be invoking the defense production act just in case we need. It can do a lot of good things if we need it and we will We will have it all completed signing it and just a little while right after. I'm finished with this conference I'll be signing. It's prepared to go. In the first instance the act is most likely to be used to try and source face masks and ventilators which have so far been in short supply. As the nation has grappled with ways to contain. The outbreak

America United States Fraser Logan Donald Trump New York Catherine Discs North America Judah High Demand Feast Supermarket Haifa Costco Fidesz CNN Australia DR Georgia President Trump
Yasmin Khan: Stories of Recipe in a Cookbook

Bon Appetit Foodcast

14:30 min | 4 years ago

Yasmin Khan: Stories of Recipe in a Cookbook

"Yasmin I'm so excited to be talking to you today thank you for being here thank you for having me I love your book Zitouni we had it as part of our book club a few months ago and I read what about it then and I wrote about that and I'm still raving about it I find it just to be Such a great mix of cookbook that also tells a lot of really incredible story okay so I wanted to talk to you first about your own story you have a little bit of a unconventional background for food writer and I'd love to he's here a little bit about how you found your way to food from was it a law degree that you have to begin with yeah I mean it's about as dry as you can get saying they're studying you know treaties and laws it's about as far away as you can get from like the creative intensity of of a kitchen but I think that in a way my you know connection to the food world just started from such a young age because my family grandparents were farmers and think anyone who's grown up around fresh produce it just installs in you from such a young age real reverend of I mean definitely vegetables and you know when we were you know my my family would grow rice but then also all kinds of plants they eh clients and peppers and tomatoes and cucumbers and so you know cooking a meal you know would would very much be about going off getting eggs and getting beans and getting vegetables I'm getting rice all from the land we had chickens and we had cows soya milk cow like when I was like four years old so I think that's what is my love food but it wasn't until I was older when I was around thirty that I decided to make the the the real shift I was working for a British charity in London I'd been working for nonprofits throughout my twenties for different kinds of human rights campaign groups and you know often happens for people working on this quite intense subjects I mean I was working on stuff light deaths following contact with the police or Israel Palestine or the you know the continuing occupation of Iraq and Afghanistan so I mean you know pretty heavy stuff I just ended up having like a classic burn out like I just yeah you're still pretty young at that time rate thirty yeah that's pretty young really young but enough time to start a new career yeah absolutely and go diagnosed with chronic fatigue which kind of basically leaves you with very little energy to do anything but I could cook and it was during that purser healing from the illness and recovering the I. Refound my love of food and as part of my time off for my job going to Iran to spend some time with my grandmother my grandfather recently passed away and and while I was there I set myself this task of asking different family member is what their favorite recipes were and if they would show them to me and while we were cooking together I just stick my iphone down and record what we were saying and and I did the opportunity when we were in the kitchen you know chopping onions or you know at an making dumplings I do not opportunity to ask them about their lives in the history and and probably the kind of conversations you'd be wanting to have even if there weren't a recorder exactly yeah when I came back to the UK after that time I suddenly realized I sitting on a treasure trove of recipes and stories that would really enable you know someone in the asked you know someone like my friends just to kind of get a glimpse of what life in Iran was like and Iran is a place with just like the most incredible Zine which I'm so thrilled in the last is you know he's been getting lots more attention but you know when the Saffron Tales came out you know which is only three years ago that you know it didn't you know it was part of that that trend I think the Saffron Tales your first book you wrote out of those stories and recipes from your time in Iran exactly and that was definitely like part memoir very much about your own lived experience and then you your second books they tune which which we're talking today is kind of much different in a way because it's not the experience that you grew up with but it's a little bit more of an anthropological look got a region So how is it different to be working on that book after your first one yeah it was it was both weedy different and really similar I mean in a thread that's run through all of my work over the last eighteen years has been a real love of storytelling and a real understanding that stories is how oh not only we better understand the world around us but we also better understand ourselves and when I was working for Human Rights Charity israel-palestine was my brief signed so I was really familiar with the place but also the food you know I was really lucky in London like I live incredibly close to the author Langi Cafe so like you know twelve hundred eighteen years ago I remember I e in kind of food and being like wow it's so similar to Persian food but then it's got so many differences and you know food from that region was already part of my culinary repertoire so when I was thinking about what book to write next you know what motivated me really clearly to write the saffron tales was deep desired to not only celebrate the incredible culture and Food Iran but also to challenge stereotypes of how people normally perceive Iran and I think the Palestinian kitchen another place where I felt I could use food to really share stories of a place I think too often when we see depictions of places is like Palestinian communities either through very narrow political prison or it's because something really bad happened and you know of course there are huge challenges is in that region but there's also a lot of beauty of joy and a lot of great food and so you had been going to that region for work previously so that was your first exposure to it and to the cuisine there yeah so I I went in two thousand nine which is about ten years ago and I really remember it clearly because it was July so it was really hot and we was dipping in our meetings with projects that we were going to whether it was visiting olive farming communities or kind of joint and Israeli Palestinian in community initiatives and it was quite heavy stuff because it's you know region which is just yeah fraught with human rights abuse But the reason I remember it was July hi it's because I really remember in times off kind of walking through the markets and just it being packed with all this color the color and abundance of of summer whether there's that was like giant watermelons sweet Jami figs incredible like berries as I mean it was you know the the produce fell so alive and as I often say like in a region that feels like it's dying that just felt so important and you Talk a little bit about how this book is laid out because I think it's really I think it's really interesting and I learned a lot just by reading about the different regions within this region I and n how vastly different styles of food are in a in a area the size of Delaware so small yeah so talk about how you decided to put the together and how you decided to highlight these different cuisines yeah so I really see this book as a travelogue I wanna take my read on real culinary adventure through listen in kitchens so I divided the book into different chapters kind of starting kind of in the north of Israel actor I and Haifa which of these incredible seaside towns the food like how how do you describe the food there yeah so the food that and actually the food of that region the North region which is the Galilee is perhaps the most traditional Levin teen type foods so you know the the things you might think of along it's on the coast they have lots of fresh seafood perhaps likes him seabream that smothered in a gorgeous like garlic Tahini saw a recipe for that in this book there is and then just so many stuffed vegetables like stuffed bell peppers stuff eggplants Zucchini stuffed with what kinds of thing yeah stuffed cows it's I mean just like I feel like if Palestinians can stop something like they will and what are they stuffing yeah well a real variety of stuff so it can be with Rice on minced Tom Flavored with maybe nutmeg cinema and kind of a warming sweet spices sometimes it can be you know plant based with kind of chick peas and rice and and sometimes it can just be kind of rice and herbs and I think one of the things that really struck me when I was doing the research for this book is just how plant based the food is from from the both it'd be really common just to have a whole Vegan meal but without any like purposefulness about it was just an abundance of vegetables and I love the the book do divide out a whole section on the Vegan and also dairy free and gluten free menus because it does seem like it this zine just naturally lend itself to diets are particularly kind of trendy here right now I know it's funny isn't it I wonder if you know that helped to some of the trend but I think all Middle Eastern diets of very I mean the Mediterranean diet is said to be one of the best for health in the world right and I really wanted to make the book very practical because I'm a home cook you know I want people to the is this isn't a recipe book which has got you know dishes in it I mean there are few like standout dishes but it's mainly stuff that I just want people to to get home from work and unlike quickly pulled together and part of that referencing was about that because so many people I know dairy free or plant based on you know perhaps just I wanna have that choice yeah so tell me about the other regions Gallery New Orleans the Galilee and then we've got the food of the West Bank which you know if the Galilee was really green you know the the West Bank is is not it is dry it's you know it's it's you know it's huge water supply issues in the region the food there reflect that so it's a lot more grilled meats a lot more bread based as opposed to rice so we're kind of thinking about dishes such as massakin which is this gorgeous kind of marinated chicken dish that's-that's made with with all spice and Su Mac and then roasted and and the big huge flat breads and the meat juices of pulled over into the bread and then you tear apart it with your hand so interactive eating yeah or Mansa which is this kind of really Halsey lamb stew made with Jimmy which is a bit of it's kind of a strange ingredient it's it's a kind of amended way Lexus is Kinda funky the milk product yeah but fermented or dried so it's a common ingredient throughout the Middle East so you know we're talking heartier dishes and Maumee Bay and then the food from Gaza is completely different as well so Gaza is a tiny strip of land and it's on the coast the Mediterranean Sea and there the focus is on lots of like see food but also lots of the flavor palate is different so the whole eternity of Gaza and cuisine is garlic and Green Chili and dill you or beef stew that you would add these flavorings into so again just really unusual so within such a small bit of like land there were three distinct culinary identities all right we're going to take a quick break to hear from our sponsor this week's episode of the bottom teeth food cast is brought to you by targets would gather when it comes to feeding families gooding gather believes that real life and eating well should go hand in hand that good food and good people are more important then when where and how we eat that's why they created good and gather favorite flavors in selected staples made for real life in many ways we gather made with high quality ingredients and carefully crafted recipes to create better tasting food that you can be confident is a good choice for you in your family that's good engaged her new and only at target so you spend a lot of time like just talking to people while you're there I mean it sounds like from reading the book you're constantly introducing the reader to new families to people who you cooked with and telling their stories so what was the is that might be through social media I'll call out for friends of friends does anyone know anyone in an area and luckily the way the world works now you can meet people that way other times you'd be at someone's House and then they'd be like Oh well you've got to try the bakery in this town like my aunt sisters cousin runs an incredible drier and she was like just this really likes spirited young Palestinian woman you know she had right head like pomegranate tattoos like a real kind of cool artists and she was such a big Foodie so we would just drive around in her car with the windows bled down listening to music and just like visiting friends there's all visiting people I've met through social media or people

Yasmin Zitouni Milk Twelve Hundred Eighteen Years Eighteen Years Three Years Four Years Ten Years
Science News from around the Planet

60-Second Science

02:23 min | 5 years ago

Science News from around the Planet

"Hi, I'm scientific American podcast editor Steve Mirsky. Here's a short piece from the December two thousand eighteen issue of the magazine in the section called advances dispatches from the frontiers of science technology and medicine the article is titled quick hits. And it's a rundown of some science and technology stories from around the globe compiled by editorial contributor Angkor Powell from Ecuador. Scientists have identified a new hummingbird species in the Ecuadorian Andes, but very few of the birds exist and the species is considered critically endangered. Its habitat is shrinking as nearby communities burned the native landscape to make way for cattle grazing from Germany, Germany has launched the world's first hydrogen powered trains in an effort to reduce its dependence on fossil fuels the trains, which can reach speeds of up to one hundred forty kilometers per hour. Have fuel cells that convert high. Hydrogen oxygen into electricity from Rwanda Rwanda is setting up its first research center for noncommunicable diseases, including diabetes cancer such illnesses currently account for forty six percent of the country's total deaths by all diseases a one hundred percent increase from the year two thousand from China. The Chinese government is requiring athletes who want to compete for the country in the twenty twenty two Beijing Olympic Games to have their genomes. Sequenced officials say this practice is to screen for medical conditions that could affect the competitor's performance. But some scientists have called a discriminatory from Pakistan. Researchers have detected the flesh eating amoeba Gloria fowleri in the domestic water supply of Karachi Pakistan's most populous city, the metropolis a fifteen million people has seen alarming uptick in cases of fatal type of encephalitis caused by the parasite. And from Israel. Scientists have discovered the world's oldest known brewery in a cave near Haifa. They found residue from thirteen thousand year-old Wheaton barley based beer that resembled Partridge. The previous earliest known brewery was thought to be five thousand years old that was quick hits by uncle Apollo.

Rwanda Pakistan Steve Mirsky Germany Ecuadorian Andes Angkor Powell Editor Haifa Gloria Fowleri Ecuador Partridge Chinese Government Beijing Israel China One Hundred Forty Kilometers P Thirteen Thousand Year Five Thousand Years One Hundred Percent
Science News From Around the Planet

60-Second Science

02:23 min | 5 years ago

Science News From Around the Planet

"Hi, I'm scientific American podcast editor Steve Mirsky. Here's a short piece from the December two thousand eighteen issue of the magazine in the section called advances dispatches from the frontiers of science technology and medicine the article is titled quick hits. And it's a rundown of some science and technology stories from around the globe compiled by editorial contributor Angkor Pol from Ecuador. Scientists have identified a new hummingbird species in the Ecuadorian Andes, but very few of the birds exist and the species is considered critically endangered. Its habitat is shrinking as nearby communities burned the native landscape to make way for cattle grazing from Germany, Germany has launched the world's first hydrogen powered trains in an effort to reduce its dependence on fossil fuels the trains, which can reach speeds of up to one hundred forty kilometers per hour. Have fuelled cells that convert high. Jn oxygen into electrically from Rwanda Rwanda is setting up its first research center for noncommunicable diseases, including diabetes and cancer such illnesses currently account for forty six percent of the country's total deaths by all diseases a one hundred percent increase from the year two thousand from China. The Chinese government is requiring athletes who want to compete for the country in the twenty twenty two Beijing Olympic Games to have their genomes. Sequenced officials say this practice is to screen for medical conditions that could affect the competitor's performance. But some scientists have called a discriminatory from Pakistan. Researchers have detected the flesh eating amoeba Gloria fowleri in the domestic water supply of Karachi Pakistan's most populous city, the metropolis of fifteen million people has seen in alarming uptick in cases of fatal type of encephalitis caused by the parasite. And from Israel. Scientists have discovered the world's oldest known brewery in a cave near Haifa. They found residue from thirteen thousand year old Wheaton barley based beer that resembled Partridge. The previous earliest known brewery was thought to be five thousand years old that was quick hits by encore Paulo.

Rwanda Pakistan Steve Mirsky Germany Ecuadorian Andes Ecuador Editor Haifa Gloria Fowleri Chinese Government Wheaton Beijing Israel Partridge China One Hundred Forty Kilometers P Thirteen Thousand Year Five Thousand Years One Hundred Percent
Little Aphids Ride Big Ones To Safety

60-Second Science

02:49 min | 5 years ago

Little Aphids Ride Big Ones To Safety

"This is scientific Americans sixty seconds science. I'm Jason Goldman imagine. You're an eighth amid a tiny insect that sucks. Plant sap for a living. You're munching away. When Akao comes along to munch on the same plant urine, you feel it's warm breath. So you drop to the ground to avoid being eaten and runaway. The ground is a scary place for eighth did. But it's better than a cow's mouth. But if you're an especially small young Fid also known as a nymph scampering over cracks stones twigs is really difficult. Luckily, young eighth solution. They climb aboard the back of a larger effort that's also making an escape and hitch a ride cowboy style there there's a pile of at the beginning that prime on the adult sometimes you eight or nine names at all climb on the adult university of Haifa into Tamala gist. Moshe Gish thanks to a series of experiments Gish learned of the nymphs actively seek out adults after dropping to the ground. It's not that. They just try to climb onto any old thing. They find nearby for the adults. The Knicks are bit of a nuisance. There is some disadvantage for the Holt slows down the grown-ups trying to toss off their writers like a mechanical bull at a college bar, and they'll toss off a relative just the same as they will and unrelated him, but somehow evolution has allowed this piggyback writing behavior to persist probably the course that the adult pays for that Demet is not high enough to balance the benefits that the colony gets from saving a few mint. In other words, the advantage to the younger bugs outweighs the cost imposed on the older ones. The entire colony benefits. The results are in the jerk. Journal frontiers in zoology, eighth deserve some of agriculture's most important pests, but to gifts they're also a part of a fascinating important ecosystem most people, they think of as if we think of they think of tiny dots on their plans that kilt their plans the whole world there will be interactions with the host plant, and there's a chemical warfare between aphids and their host plants. It's a co even Lucien and it's an arms race. There's a lot of action going on between the Dan plants and the eighth they're predators in the feds. And the element is whole world. Thanks for listening for scientific Americans. Sixty seconds science. I'm Jason Goldman.

Jason Goldman Moshe Gish Frontiers In Zoology Adult University Of Haifa Tamala Gist Knicks Demet Akao Lucien Sixty Seconds
Voters give House Democrats a check on Trump

WBT's Morning News w/ Bo Thompson

00:54 sec | 5 years ago

Voters give House Democrats a check on Trump

"Selected split government in Washington, you bunch of rascals, and that means there will be change in Washington. Democrats have captured the house of representatives where they will be able to put a major check on President Trump's powers while ushering in a younger, more female. More racially diverse political generation, but the GOP solidified their Senate majority Karen Haifa reports now on where things stand this hour. Democrats projected to take control of the house of representatives for the first time in eight years, and they did if I win and key suburban districts in states like Pennsylvania and Virginia changes coming to America and changes coming to Virginia ten and after focusing their final days less on President Trump and more on healthcare and the character of the country. Thanks to you. We owned the ground. Thanks tomorrow

Donald Trump President Trump Washington Virginia Karen Haifa GOP Senate America Pennsylvania Eight Years