17 Burst results for "Haas Institute"

"haas institute" Discussed on WCPT 820

WCPT 820

13:09 min | 1 year ago

"haas institute" Discussed on WCPT 820

"Is your house Richard R. J. S. gao my next guest has written a book on a subject that I have long pondered and long thought about he has done far more than that he's researched it he has written a book that I think I would like to know more about although I have the book you can't see it but it's in this electronic device so without any further ado let me introduce him Ian Haney Lopez is a professor R. he is the death of law he is a director of the racial politics project at the I'm going to try to get this radiant the Haas institute for a fair and inclusive society and and he's also Chief Justice Earl Warren professor of public law at Berkeley could I get that right I I don't know whether with all those titles that that's that sounds like just you know buffering or something but well I just don't I you know that's what I want to make sure we had a half hour right and the S. important the person and the it's just hard you have a car that's like an accordion as something he has a new book he wrote the book dog whistle politics which I recommend his new book is entitled merge left with good title fusing race and class winning elections and saving America and without any further ado and Haney Lopez welcome to the program thank you I'm so glad to join you so but rather than not me do it why don't you just briefly state what are the theme of the book as also there's two there's there's the analytics team that is that say Hey this is still dog whistle politics when you look at Donald trump's numbers I in terms of which demographics you want whereas the percentage of support he garnered they are very very similar to Mitt Romney's number so one is yeah I'm a late claim this is still dog whistle politics trump is building on a fifty year tradition it precedes him it will not go away when he goes away we've got to figure out how to beat so that's one part of it but the other part and in some ways the most important part is because I'd already published a book on dog whistle politics when trump was elected I realized it was really important to go beyond the analysis and figure out okay well how do you actually beat dog whistling out actually beat the strategic exploitation of coded racism in American politics so with communications specialist with labor union help with our corporate collaboration from DeMoss I think tank I co founded a two year research project it didn't swell used focus groups and national polling and message testing specifically around how you beat that message we ended up with is shockingly good results and merge left is about those results merge left is a way to understand where we are in terms of trump and the larger trajectory of the exploitation of racism in American politics and it's about how we can actually beat trump with what is now the most politically potent message available to the last way and it's more important even than the message on the right so I want to I want to explore both those avenues obviously the latter is of more as you say more importance because it involves the future we helped to create but I do want to explore the dog whistle the analytic side for a second because I was one of my concerns about the political discourse now among Democrats or the left and I think it's gotten a little better in the last few months but is a kind of trump exceptional isn't something that says that the the the dog was sleeping with the racial themes offend the Havering racial themes of the trump era of the trump administration particular this is somehow that something new and distinct and that if we could just expelled this man from our political life it would go away and that's why you know I mentioned the dog was politics your earlier book because it was long but my assertion home well that kind of thinking leaves out the welfare queen mythology of Ronald Reagan and it leaves out the Willie Horton ad and George H. W. bush it leaves out you know Richard Nixon's comments and so on and do you know personal observation I'm from a working class white neighborhood to me it also leaves out something like a Geraldine Ferraro as a Sir regard for Hillary Clinton in two thousand and eight saying of a black man Barack Obama it's not his turn to me in my white working class neighborhood it's not history had a very specific dog whistle me Menashe she denied it maybe I misunderstood her body I would say that a dog whistle blow dog whistles lane although Democrats have thankfully abandoned it as far as I can tell he was not something I'm familiar to members of both parties and is much older than trump right I absolutely agree and I think you we went through a lot of that history so all to a different version of it we know that the Republican Party in the summer of nineteen sixty three decided that they were going to shift from being a relatively moderate on race T. using race as a as a way to try and pool white voters out of the democratic coalition that included working class whites African Americans and white liberals we know that because it was reported at the time by a conservative journalist Robert Novak who said that many of the party's political leaders many of the Republican party's political leaders saw political gold to be mined in the racial crisis the civil rights movement by becoming in fact though not in name the white man's party we know the moment that decision was made it was made by a Barry Goldwater his reactionary faction of the Republican Party this is what they proceeded to do through Nixon and then through Ronald Reagan and then you see Bill Clinton are reacting to the success of it a good joke joke H. W. bush and Willie Horton ad by saying Democrats are going to imitate it and this pattern continues on up until two thousand eight and then again in two thousand and twelve if you look at the numbers essentially what's happening as Republican presidential candidates are winning about ninety percent of their support from white voters that is it's ninety percent of their support for Republican presidential candidate comes from white voters ninety eight percent of Republican elected officials are white three and five or sixty percent of whites are voting for Republican presidential candidates no democratic candidate for president has won a majority in the white vote since nineteen sixty four in other words that white man's party that Republicans talk about creating in nineteen sixty three they effectively created it those numbers I just gave you those are the numbers for Romney those are the numbers from a chain and those are the numbers for Donald Trump they did not much ship so it's very important understand that in one sense Donald Trump dress right represents the continuity of a fifteen year old trajectory but in another sense he is exceptional and dangerously so what made trump exceptional it wasn't that he was using race is that he felt completely unconstrained in the way we use race Donald Trump never thought he was gonna get elected and so he never thought that he needed to constrain his racial appeals in a way that would protect his ability to win a general election or to govern working electric moreover he had no loyalty to the Republican Party so as far as he was concerned what was important was to go as far as he needed to go to win the primaries and whatever damage was done to the party is an institution was a matter of utter indifference to him because he was on constrained in its ability to pander to racial fears and resentments in the Republican base he essentially ran the table on the more mainstream more cautious Republican candidates in twenty fifteen that's what allowed him to win the primary and then he went on and managed to squeak through with an electoral college victory not a popular the majority but he did manage this winter okay that's the difference about Donald Trump he feels himself unconstrained he's got no loyalty to the party frankly he's got no loyalty to much of anything besides himself and his reputation or as I should say his ego because I think for trial he's internalized the idea that all publicity is good publicity so is long as people are talking about him he's pretty happy that's what makes him especially dangerous he's exceptional in that sense but a beer Norma's mistake to think he's exceptional in being the first Republicans really exploiting race he's not he's doing something that's been fifty years in the making and that frankly now is the predominant modus operandi for almost every elected Republican official and it will continue to operate that way Intel Democrats figure out a way to defeat it and again we're talking with professor Ian Haney Lopez about his book merge left in this perhaps Ian gets us to the kind of event we can make between the analytical and and at the instrumentation or whatever you wanna call it the the implementation ideas and that's this are you have long watched in frustration as the laugh seems to splinter between those who are emphasized I wouldn't say it's absolutism on either side but those who emphasized economic issues which is one I've tended more to write about more but and work within more but the idea somehow are rising in the laugh is that there is I'm a decision to be made a breach between whether you support well what's come to be called identity politics what I would consider an extension of the civil rights social justice tradition in this country or whether you have a size economic issues and for reasons that perhaps we can go into there seems to have been in recent years a friction between those two embassies or tendencies where I didn't see you know historically that there was a fraction in the sixties or seventies but nowadays yeah you know he's like a Bernie Sanders or something he's that he talks about economic justice over there over here and they talk about perhaps some form of identity jazz does but they don't care about the working class so this this fact fiction it seems to me one of the goals of your book I don't want to speak for you the one of your the goals of your book is to address and redress that but what what are your thoughts I I think you really frame the question clearly accurately it's important understand the origins of this split as I said we we know and and you can bet democratic strategist no since our publicans made the decision to use race to hold voters away from the Democratic Party now to be clear they were gonna do so in code to allow plausible deniability they'd say things like lawn owner or welfare queen and then denied it was about race at all what is clearly a racial strategy the Democrats knew his original strategy they've known this since at least nineteen sixty four how to respond became the issue and what quickly became apparent to Democrats is to.

Richard R. J. S. gao
"haas institute" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

14:27 min | 1 year ago

"haas institute" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Emphasizing design and communications is changed the kitchen has changed the way religion is perceived and integrated into daily life thanks for joining us rabbi Kushner and doctor John Powell he's an internationally recognized expert in civil rights and civil liberties and a range of issues including ray structural racism ethnicity housing poverty and democracy he is the executive director of the Haas institute for a fair and inclusive society and professor of law and professor of African American studies and ethnic studies at UC Berkeley he is the author of several books including racing to justice transforming our concepts of self and other to build an inclusive society thanks for being here John Powell this is John how all start with you I want to know how you would describe this current moment this chaos that that were feeling and experiencing it's a hard moment and I would say it's more than a moment because I think what's going on we'll be going on for sometime in the United States we associate a lot of what's going on with trump I started before trump and hopefully when he's retired as president soon it will continue because there are things that are happening this feeding the change the speed of change in critical areas and I just spent a month in Europe so these these these issues are happening in Europe where you look at India these this is happening in India and so one of the things is that is happening is that as we sort of experiences change in critical areas like globalization climate change technology that demographic change for stress on us and we get anxious and we need a story to help with with anxiety and what demagogues do is tell us the story about us and them and so you see this happening all around the world and there is this sense of if I could only get rid of them somehow life would go back to another time so if you think about the demigods across the country across the world all of them have this notion of going back and really what they're saying is the future is too scary we can't deal with the future so can we go back to some imaginary time in most of this in the United States is like when white men moved and Christians was the order of the day and in the years when Hindus rule I was just in England seventy percent of the population of seven colonial station was a good thing and so they think of bricks finance colonialism two point no so we have these challenges and we're not facing them we're really trying to turn the clock back in the real thing is can we actually imagine a future we all belong and what we've along to the earth that's the challenge can we imagine a world where there's we or us without other I should just say we change the name of Art Institute from the house and so to work there and society to the offering a belong institute UC Berkeley well John thanks for saying that one of the things that I'm struck by a specially just as you were initially describing this place that we find ourselves in his you mentioned the speed of change do you think that there's something unique or instrumental about the speed with which we're experiencing this change that is also effecting master making it feel okay that's very important I mean if you just think of technology where things used to be reproduced or radical change every ten to fifteen years is now down to every eighteen months and the changes happening faster than we can relate that to it and one of the things that help to set up to it remaining making animals we are animals but we're meaning making animals and we make meaning through our institutions through our practices through a religion and those are not serving us now many of those things that came into being two hundred or a thousand years ago they're not helping us now in some ways they're part of the problem but we can't simply sweep them under the law rock we need new stories we knew the new practices also we have this combination of rapid change and we can institutions and very few leaders and leaders play a critical role in sort of giving us a story we can live by so the speed this is happening at our greatest pace and the resources are not there the other thing Robert Sapolsky that I'm struck by the John Paul said was this us and them dynamic and I know you really have looked a lot of intergroup dynamics I mean what are the tensions that that arise in groups and the circumstances that create those kinds of tensions well it's basically a story that's both really bad news and maybe a smidgen of good news on the bad news is we're social primate were social mammal our brains are wired up for doing incredibly fast distinctions between offices in VAM's and what do you know not being all that thrilled about to them so your brain processes are slim categorizations in parts of the brain relevant to fear anxiety aggression in a tenth of a second it's incredibly hard wired that's the bad news the slight bit of good news in there is that unlike any other primate out there it's incredibly easy for us to be manipulated as to who counts as of them and who counts isn't us and we carry multiple us them categories in our head and which one is at the forefront can shift on a moment's sort of contextual change and now is a little bit of good news lurking in there because you're saying that while we are very the whole that we can't be manipulated in positive what he well yes I I would probably put a better spent on it from that but you know basically as John was saying if you're a demagogue all you need to do is pseudo specie eight vans into being the vermin and wraps and leaking in season nothing much more than that and if you could get your followers having parts of the brain related to discussed and anxiety activating a tenth of a second when you mentioned those VAM's like you can check half year things off your genocide to do list right at that point would you say this dichotomy of us and them that that we are in it right now and that it is different from previous times in history when we had a very strong sense of us and them well I think you know as an academic I have to say both yes and no with the same time yes it is very much the same the differences are is you have the opportunity to hate people like her great grandparents never even heard of like you have the opportunity to decide that civilization as we know what is going to hell because of somebody's novel practices that again just because of globalization and the like you could be exposed to people you can dislike now they're like you're like forebears couldn't even dream of being mean to and at the same time you can of course see the commonalities with people we never used to be exposed to it cuts both ways robin okay sure what have you observed from people coming to the kitchen or you know just from your religious practice that you feel like really describes what we're going through also the perspective of the Jewish tradition is that we've always had immense challenges you know so for better for worse the Jews are saying this is just a new version of chaos and we've always been faced with grand possibilities possibility of leaving slavery or making meaning in life and so even the framing it's interesting it belies the way in which we eat today often without awareness consider ourselves more important than anyone who came before us now that might be true I don't know it might also be true that since maternity many generations saw things this way they saw themselves as ultimate but when I consider the challenges that face us and I think there are significant challenges complex challenges serious challenges what I see is the more power we seem to grant ourselves ironically the more we as a society tend to move towards escapism grandiosity and nihilism so I want to advance that rather than see ourselves as the singular source of a great determinative creative power instead we additionally consider ourselves as part of many things and they have to be hybrids as are other scholars were saying part of communities part of several communities part of the city part of the country part of a people are too part of a tradition connect ourselves to time mystic time narrative generations going backwards and forwards and and I would say that by two actualizing by contextualizing ourselves in these ways as limited in the scheme of things smaller than maybe we seem to think of ourselves by reaching toward humility counter intuitively we may be more likely to risk for what is just and move out of perilous nation and the many versions of a skate and we might be able to work together toward decency to follow marching orders not just create them not change the world or fix that but just do our part I feel like the word you're saying are words that you have said before and I mean that in a good way in the sense of is that what people are coming to you seeking you know what's interesting is that I'm in San Francisco if I said words like obligation and commitments maybe god before the election people would literally throw things at me after the election there was a sense of like small civic organizations maybe not terrible organized religion may be a possibility right tradition okay let's look at it why would people pre twenty sixteen throw things at you if that's what you suggested what was our cultural mindset at that time and since it's still let's let's be honest I like to say religions not chocolate and see if it's it's it's hard to connect with people around religion it's not where we start but but the reason is for the for the reasons are scholars suggested because religion is a tool and like technology or money or politics it can be used to harm and to hurt and has been and has been using his continued to be used to harm her many many people so many people use it with a broad brush and say no it's all bad without taking the idea that perhaps it new narratives can be formed annually alliances can be formed and in it and use the power for the good well John Powell I'm struck by a what no question same because it has echoes of what you've been talking about as well in terms of a way to try to address some of this chaos that were fueling this this deep sense of uncertainty and also to to whether to some extent you know just the the volatility of the change that we're seeing and that is through a sense of belonging and creating a sense of belonging but can you describe what you specifically mean by that well you don't belong is so foundational how we think about massless Harkey and this is as food safety belonging and some people would now say actually he hasn't won repairs because you don't get food or safety unless you belong on not just in humans but other primates we need to belong we do belong we're radically connected to each other but we don't have a practice of that we don't have and and part of our belonging is predicated on somebody else not long just for insect that would even by radically connected to each other well you think about this be more than an hour but you think about sales we're we have a lot of sales of a first party mode first billion years are largely single cell organisms roaming the earth and sales come together because they are interconnected they communicate with each other there they only exist because a radically connected and so are you know we drove over from East Bay with on a bridge that we didn't build a car that we didn't deal with a use energy that we can make it was sitting in the studio and I you know we're we're radically connected at every level spiritually physically and so one of the things about globalization with both the speakers spoke to to some extent is that we're sometimes uncomfortable with this connection and one of the things is different is that we can disconnect anymore it so a thousand years ago you had people all over the planet but they largely was separated by rivers and mountains and they didn't see each other that's not true that means you have how to break in China and you can build a wall you can put down planes but it shows up in San Francisco we are radically connected and so what we do how do we deal with the connection was James Baldwin says this well I'm driving this bar from the seed of them man impregnated by men see the woman he says again we are radically connected he goes on to say some of my countrymen find that I'm very troubling and even unfair he says it's time so why but none of us can do anything about it we are connected with the next to each other were connected to the earth and what is different is one no on the planet of the billion people.

rabbi Kushner John Powell executive director Haas institute professor of law professor of African
"haas institute" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

05:08 min | 2 years ago

"haas institute" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Aw mean for the future of the court and will consider the significance of having a chief Justice John Roberts, who's also considered the most likely swing vote. He will be the first chief Justice in eighty plus years who is in the middle such as it is of the court. It will truly be his court and Kentucky reviews, Kurt vile, seventh album bottle it in that's coming up on fresh air. First news. Live from NPR news in Washington, I'm Lakshmi Singh. A federal grand jury has indicted the man accused of killing eleven people at a Pittsburgh synagogue as NPR's Ryan, Lucas tells us the forty four count indictment against Robert Bowers includes hate crimes charges the charges ended up by a federal grand jury in the western district. Pennsylvania include eleven counts of obstructing the free exercise of religion, resulting in death court papers say the Bowers walked into the tree of life synagogue in Pittsburgh on Saturday. Armed with a semiautomatic rifle and handguns and killed eleven people. While inside the synagogue Bauer spoke about his desire to quote, kill Jews. According to the indictment. Attorney general Jeff Sessions called the alleged crimes, quote, incomprehensibly evil and says hatred and violence on the basis of religion have no place in the United States. Federal prosecutors say they intend to seek the death penalty. In the case Ryan, Lucas NPR news, Washington, grieving members of Pittsburgh's Jewish community have been enduring a second day of funerals today. Mourners gathered for services held for. Melvin wax Irving younger and Joyce Feinberg at her funeral fireworks. Brother reportedly clutched his chest as he described his loss. He described her as pure goodness whose murder he told the congregants cannot be fixed. Four weeks after Jamal kashogi was killed inside the Saudi consulate in his tumble atop prosecutor in Turkey is publicly stating the journalists was suffocated as soon as he entered the building. According to the statement kashogi a critic of the Saudi government was killed his body dismembered. And then disposed of the location of his remains are still unknown though. Saudi Arabia claims it has arrested eighteen suspects in kashogi Steph. The crown prince Mohammad bin Salman is still widely suspected of ordering a hit on kashogi the suspect behind the recent series of pipebombs sent a prominent critics of President Trump apparently started plotting the attacks in July in a letter Justice department. Prosecutors a Miami federal judge that Caesar CEO search for his targets addresses online and had photos of many of them on his cellphone. Authorities say no one was hurt. But the pipebombs were real General Motors has announced that it is offering buyouts to about eighteen thousand white collar workers in North America NPR's, John ydstie reports. The automaker says the buyouts are an effort to reduce costs GM announced the buyouts on the same day. The company reported better than expected two point five billion dollar profit for the third quarter. In a statement GM said the buyouts are part of the company's effort to reduce costs while the economy remained, strong, GM and other US based car companies are adapting to higher costs for aluminum and steel inputs following tariffs imposed by the Trump administration. GM also phases slowing sales in the US and China the buyouts are available to GM salaried workers with at least twelve years of service. The automaker has about fifty thousand salaried employees in North America. John ydstie NPR news, Washington. This is NPR news. I'm tara. Siler political maps show the bay area as a blue bubble with progressive values. But when it comes to racial diversity and new study found most of us continue to live in largely segregated neighborhoods cake UD's, Monica Samoa reports researchers at UC Berkeley Haas institute are looking closely at residential segregation in the bay area. Overall, the bays diverse, but that diversity masks, plenty of racial isolation. Take oakland. It's one of the most diverse yet also one of the most segregated cities and that plays out in lack of opportunity for many Oakland public school students, according to hostile men Indian, and we know from decades of social science research children's who had racially segregated schools, especially predominantly non white segregated schools perform worse on almost every metric Oakland's public school enrollment prioritizes enrolling kids in their local neighborhood school. The study calls out to bay area cities integrate, well, new work, and San Leandro, I'm Monica semi. Kiki? Dee news the fine arts museums of San Francisco, that's the young and the legion of honor have appointed a new director and CEO cake. UD's khloe Veldman reports Thomas Campbell comes to San Francisco from the Metropolitan Museum of art in New York where he recently ended an eight year tenure as director and CEO in his new role Campbell oversee programming both the young and the legion to of northern California's largest publicly funded cultural institutions, Kabul takes over from max, Elaine in what kind of amounts to a job. Swap Halloween, the finance museums. Former director recently moved to New York.

GM NPR Pittsburgh Justice John Roberts United States Lucas NPR CEO North America oakland UD Ryan Kurt vile prosecutor Washington Saudi government Saudi Arabia Lakshmi Singh director
"haas institute" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

04:32 min | 2 years ago

"haas institute" Discussed on KQED Radio

"I'm Robin young. I'm Jeremy Hobson it's here. And now. Coming up the final stretch before the midterms is President Trump's shifting his focus to just holding under control of the Senate. Also, one of the races will be looking at is the unusual competition for governor of Alaska where the incumbent suddenly dropped out. There isn't a lot of precedence for having an incumbent governor name on the ballot and then not campaigning and voters around the country will be casting their ballots on married of policy questions everything from gerrymandering to nursing staff levels. But is that such a good idea? Should there be some protections involved? And should there be some more criteria that prevent any sort of manipulating of the voters coming up here? And now. The news is I. Live from NPR news in Washington, I'm Lakshmi Singh. Federal prosecutors are upping the number of charges filed against the alleged gunman behind Saturday's mass shooting at a synagogue in. Pittsburgh a grand jury has decided to indict the suspect on forty four counts up from twenty nine according to a filing in federal court in Pittsburgh eleven people were killed over the weekend. Today. The city is holding a second day of funerals a day after visiting Pittsburgh President Donald Trump hits back to the campaign trail ahead of next week's midterms NPR's Windsor. Johnston says Trump will be in Florida later today. Trump is scheduled to hold a leading campaign events in the days leading up to the midterms today. Ho rally supporters in heavily Republican Lee county, along Florida's Gulf Coast. There. He's expected to make a last minute push for Republican gubernatorial candidate Rhonda Santa's and US Senate candidate. Rick Scott, Trump will also make campaign stops this week in Montana. Indiana and Missouri NPR's Windsor Johnston reporting in Georgia. A federal court is reaffirming a previous order aimed at preventing Shum absentee ballots from being rejected Georgia public broadcasting. Stephen Fowler has the latest update on the ongoing legal wrangling leading up to next week's midterms last week. A judge said absentee mail in ballots with signatures that don't match what's on file shouldn't be rejected. Instead, the ballot becomes provisional and voters have until the Friday after election day to fix it. The secretary of state's office had asked for a stay while the court order is appealed. But now the federal judge has said no ruling that the public interest is served by having these ballots cast and counted there are currently several lawsuits challenging aspects of Georgia's election systems. Polls are showing a tight gubernatorial race with Georgia Democrats looking to elect the country's first ever black female governor for NPR news. I'm Stephen Fowler. And Atlanta Russia's space agency says a faulty sensor is why rocket failed during launch causing the two crew members aboard to make an emergency landing. NPR's? Lucian Kim reports from Moscow Russian officials hope the next piloted launch will take place in December after NASA. Retired the space shuttle in twenty eleven Russian Soyuz rockets have been the only way to get people to the international space station on October eleventh us rocket failed two minutes after liftoff forcing the American astronauts and Russian cosmonauts aboard to abort mission and dropped safely to earth from three. Thirty miles into the atmosphere. Sergei creek eleo for Russia's space agency told reporters an investigation determined a defective sensor at caused the accident. Curricula said the next piloted mission may take place on December third followed by the return of the crew currently at the international space station before Christmas Hussein Kim NPR news Moscow. The NASDAQ is up more than two and a half percent at seventy three forty two. The Dow's up one and a half percent. The p's up one point seven percent. This is NPR news from K Q news. I'm Tiffany can high politically the bay area is a blue bubble with progressive values. But when it comes to racial diversity, a new study found most of us continue to live and largely segregated neighborhoods k- Kiwi, dis Monica Somalia reports, researchers at UC Berkeley Haas institute are looking closely at residential segregation in the bay area. Overall, the bays diverse, but that diversity masks, plenty of racial isolation. Take oakland. It's one of the most diverse yet. Also, one of the most segregated cities and that plays out in lack of opportunity for many Oakland public school students, according to Haas, Steven Mnuchin, and we know from decades of social science research the children who had racially segregated schools,.

President Trump NPR Georgia Stephen Fowler Senate Pittsburgh Windsor Johnston Hussein Kim NPR Russia Robin young Florida Jeremy Hobson Alaska Moscow oakland Lakshmi Singh UC Berkeley Haas institute
"haas institute" Discussed on KSRO

KSRO

09:59 min | 2 years ago

"haas institute" Discussed on KSRO

"Ninety, four five. K. SRO Nine thirty five ks SRO good morning I'm, Pat Kerrigan glad you're here too on the live line with us this morning is John Powell he is a professor of law African American and ethnic studies at UC Berkeley, he also leads the. UC Berkeley Haas institute for a fair and inclusive society, good morning John running Pat happy to have you here and back with. Us this morning and I'm I'm hoping you can help educate me on whether the Taytay between Amoroso and President Trump has merit when, it comes to a discussion about race Well I think you know in terms. Of there's a larger pitcher because obviously President Trump has made a number of statements publicly about. Mexican about Muslim that, we don't have to sort of refer to the last contest back and back, and forth, she, worked in the. White House. And she had. A chance to have. Access to Trump in a special. Way so I think there's. Something there but I think it goes back to years when Trump was managing. His father's real estate choosing to rent to blacks although that case was never. He never, admitted that they paid in federal so Trump has had a long history that we don't, have to look at the latest example and deeper question is will it matter because Trump is said and done things when he's on election circuit Oh man about other, people In terms of, the makeup of? His administration will it matter Well I, don't think so I mean. He's very few people of color especially blacks and his administration Ben Carson being probably the most prominent one and, said very much We saw the. Thing what happened in Charlottesville which we are now looking at the One. Year anniversary that even upset some of these more core supporters I don't think it's going to. Change who's in his cabinet and I don't think so changes policies and? What do you make about what happened in Charlottesville over the weekend what happened in front of the White House in DC when a couple of dozen white supremacists showed up and were outnumbered An incredible magnitude of protesters for that rally yesterday Still. Reeling over issues poop long opposed really an, American does that, characters calculation extend beyond white Christians. Which clearly does but some people's cut. The nation I think it was a good thing if we're gonna have, demonstrated for counter-demonstrators could actually step forward and. Say we actually have a different vision of America that's why haven't, we have enough contacts. About what America should be what America will be America was one business. In America's Marsh for white. With a dominant role Christians dominant role another good no America is actually a country where everyone who acts here to some core values belong regardless, to whether problem what gender is our. Sex warranty who's a very different visions of, America and unfortunately it from my perspective right, now much of the administration in the White House Sides with very narrow vision of who, can belong to, America and you know I remember. During the Obama administration it me along. With so many millions have fathers and and such great hope for this, country and its divisions and I remember feeling. Particularly sad when there were so many issues of race that came, up during his administration. Well that that divide has been multiplied by a thousand it seems at. Least vocally speaking in terms. Of of black and white relations in the United States where do we go from here professor well two things I mean it's even a misnomer, to just talk about political divide because. I I sometimes say we're still fighting the, civil war and not clear who will win So if you think about the. Civil war if you think about? The? Founding, of this. Country was, concept of equality but it wasn't extended to the majority. Of Americans, wasn't extended to women yeah it wasn't a tomato Americans who wasn't extended to slave And so civil war, in part when Lincoln talk about her better angels Newport the freedom he. Talked, about a new birth of freedom all that was corrected And some people are saying no, we, don't want, America but black women are part of America. Muslim part of America And, so it's really in some, ways, I would think those, who actually embrace Lincoln's vision are the real from my perspective Not the people are not paying based on for positive, vision of America America that really is your nine and You know Do you think about the declaration of independence was self? Evident truths all men should be all people are created equal for people reject that notion, who believe, one race one gender is superior to. The other to, some extent they don't and embrace the bones, of America and that hasn't always, been that but the Bama, talked about we've been moving toward a more perfect union. Right now we've had, a cop but it's not just a divide between the left and right. Or conservative we see a lot of people who call themselves conservatives basically embrace that thing vision of. America, inclusiveness yeah but pumping what fundamental the net and we don't get. It right Not only is American trouble that I think whole world is in. Trouble, because we're seeing expresses of this for the Torah -tarian strongman exclusive Belong happening in India happening happening in Australia So it's not just an American phenomenon to. Some extent the changing demographics change in economy the globalization is creating exhausting. Zaidi, all around the world who people are yeah But. That's not going away I mean we're not going to go back in that regard you, know what some people might call simpler days that's just not going to happen so we're gonna, have to figure out collectively away to not just live with that. Fact but but, embrace. It to, the point where you know there, is overall success in this country, and we got a long way, to go from here to there you're exactly exactly right I mean the two predominant responses to anxiety the a global anxiety and I I started writing, about this, frankly when Obama was running for president even, before he was elected because there was already undercurrent alongside particularly coming from conservative, white Christians with emphasis on male nothing Arkansas not. All white innings wasn't exclusive to them but being Zaidi in in England about what is. Going to be England yourself unconsciously being Kristen country and Muslims are moving. In What does it mean, to be Indian when one of, the largest Muslim populations in the, world is an India so you're right the diversity the complexity the migration of the world would just happened since people were people it's part of human, nature to, move their tubers about one is that the, people who look different talk a little different you look for worship political that, they're not us that there are threat to us Yeah somehow not fully humor and we saw that most. Extreme expression in Germany with Jews the other the other story that we're a mixture of each other that we grow and. We benefit will be recognized complementary nature to other they were not just one thing Families if. You look at America right now Multi racial multi ethnic families exploding no and the. Thing that actually makes America great, is diversity when we turned back on that not only do we hurt those, people that. We call other hurt America economically politically them so I think they have to tell a story. About a diversity where we are both Pied in different at the same time and the teachers are not my future, your future. So those are the two dominant story one stories one kid would retreat to the path When things were simple. When one group dominated it never was simple never was that clean. Or can we embrace the future where we all belong well. I'm gonna go with what you. Said earlier. Professor at this point in time is merely a hiccup in American history I'm gonna let. That sit with me for a while. Today thank, you for for being here appreciate it Thanks for having me that is John Powell professor of law. African American and ethnic, studies at UC Berkeley it's nine forty four at k. SRO have you checked. Out the heroes of October on the website you have the opportunity there to nominate your, own communities heroes from last October we wanna see those nominations because we want to acknowledge the people who. Haven't been acknowledged jet who have done.

America President Trump White House professor of law John Powell Trump Obama president professor Berkeley Haas institute UC Berkeley Pat Kerrigan Ben Carson India Charlottesville SRO United States Zaidi
"haas institute" Discussed on WCPT 820

WCPT 820

01:32 min | 3 years ago

"haas institute" Discussed on WCPT 820

"On this is vince version consultant with his dot com nickelback family meeting so i figured a little big daddy thing but the word debbie you man yeah that'd be like that is heavy divorce where every man good dance just a great man some of the grace of don things welcome back the number seven seven three seven six three nine two seven eight so we've got a guest on the line let me bring him in here if i can transition correctly ritchie there yes i am hey richard this is richard rothstein fellow hey richard fellow for the economic policy institute senior fellow emeritus at the thurgood marshall institute of the legal defense fund and the haas institute at the university of cal berkeley and he's here because he's the author of the book well it was published about a year ago a little bit more than a year ago thank you i watched richard participate in an interview with my man tiny he's the coach and he talked about really kind of the story of the book how america segregated government segregated america.

consultant thurgood marshall institute haas institute america vince ritchie richard rothstein economic policy institute senior fellow university of cal berkeley
"haas institute" Discussed on On Being with Krista Tippett

On Being with Krista Tippett

02:10 min | 3 years ago

"haas institute" Discussed on On Being with Krista Tippett

"John pal is director of the haas institute for fair and inclusive society and professor of law african american and ethnic studies at the university of california berkeley he previously directed the cure one institute for the study of race and ethnicity at ohio state university and the institute on race and poverty at the university of minnesota he is the author of racing to justice transforming our concepts of self and other to build an inclusive society on being is chris cagle billy percy mariah hocus maya tarot marie sambo aaron farrell laurindo tony liu bethany iverson aaron call asako kristen lynn profited oh and jeffrey besoins lovely theme music is provided and composed by zoe keating and the last voice you hear singing our final credits in each show is hip hop artist liz oh on being was created at american public media funding partners include the george family foundation in support of the civil conversations project the fetzer institute helping to build the spiritual foundation for a loving world find them at fetzer dot org calia paige foundation working to create a future where universal spiritual values form the foundation of how we care for our common home humanity united advancing human dignity at home and around the world find out.

george family foundation fetzer dot bethany iverson billy percy chris cagle university of minnesota university of california professor of law fetzer institute John pal zoe keating jeffrey besoins kristen lynn ohio state university berkeley haas institute director
"haas institute" Discussed on On Being with Krista Tippett

On Being with Krista Tippett

02:22 min | 3 years ago

"haas institute" Discussed on On Being with Krista Tippett

"Well just just reiterate trans welcome i see some familiar faces it's so exciting to every time we opened the space up like this we've tried to create a physical space that carries the virtues of our media space of hospitality and beauty and when when we have you here it just adds this dimension for us to the work we do so thanks for coming out we didn't know who'd be available at ten o'clock on tuesday morning but apparently more people than we realized and i'm just could not be more thrilled to have don powell with us i'll give you his his official credentials i on john powell is one of our this is me one of our most esteemed thinkers and actors on race and civil liberties he's the director of the haas institute for a fair and inclusive society at the university of california at berkeley also a professor of law there as well as african american studies and studies he previously directed the cure one institute for the study of race and ethnicity at ohio state university and was founder and director of the institute on race and poverty at the university of minnesota his work has taken him also to miami and seattle and africa and law schools from harvard to columbia and i could go on and on when one speaks the word race in america right now many images come to mind and and a great deal of anguish and we are going to have some opportunity as we go through the next hour and a half to to bring some of what you've brought on your hearts and minds today into conversation with john powell what i'd like to do i with him up here is pullback a wide and generous lens on all of this because that's what i so value in john paul's personal wisdom as well as his scholarship he examines the questions around race in the largest possible human context the questions of who we are who we want to become and how we get there from here he uses language that i love when he talks about what the goals are of are grappling with.

don powell america africa seattle miami university of minnesota professor of law university of california official john powell john paul harvard founder and director ohio state university berkeley haas institute director
"haas institute" Discussed on Life of the Law

Life of the Law

04:16 min | 3 years ago

"haas institute" Discussed on Life of the Law

"Not. Technologies are being used to create people who have been the product of extremes interventions that can fundamentally shape the way that society exists. The effort needed to have a global conversation on these technologies needs match previous efforts in things such as for example, nuclear disarmament and other types of areas where we've had to engage international treaties or have broad global conversations about the future of humanity. Because these are topics and technologies deck in transformed, fundamentally who we are. For life in long. I'm Andrea Hendrickson. This episode was produced by Andrew Hendrickson along with myself, Tony, gaining. Anthem lean is our executive producer or social media editor is Rachel. He pulled audio from the film Gatica testing. The limits of fair use. All other music was by Andrew Hendrickson guys. This episode took a little longer to produce the normal. Thank you for your patients. We are in the middle of spring campaign to raise ten thousand dollars to fund existing and future productions. Thanks to some amazing listeners. We have raised eighty two hundred dollars, which means we only need to raise eighteen hundred dollars more to meet Arkell. We hope you'll join others who have made one hundred dollar donation to sport episodes, like the one you just heard. The campaign is one hundred by one hundred and we hope you'll support life of the law with a one hundred dollars donation. Each time we publish a new episode. We send everyone who subscribed to our newsletter behind the scenes. Look at life of the law includes notes from our reporters and news about upcoming episodes. You can subscribe on our website life of the law. ORG. We are nonprofit project of the tide center, and we're part of the panoply network of podcasts from slate. You can also find life of the law on PR X public radio exchange. We wanna thank Renate Kramer Dr.. Eric, Pearson, Kelly Kat Kat, Heather Thomson Lila, hood Dion woods, Bill Abilene. Kate Robertson had been in Hilary billings, Kate Germond, Anne bunting Shankar Rahman Malcolm Appleby soggy. Oh boss, again, Catherine catcher. Ben Edwards, Steve Lind, Robert, Anthony grace. Nielsen Britney, Baltimore and York University special. Thanks to the Haas institute for a fair and inclusive society and the center for genetics and society. Again, go to our website. The support button is on our homepage, just one hundred dollars to help cover the production costs web, so's like the one you just heard join us next time when we present in-studio episode on bioethics. I'm Tony Gannon. Thank you for listening. Is glassy with tears. Jerome walks slowly toward the other astronauts after a few steps. He looks back at Dr. Lamar who gives him an encouraging nod place in his hands behind his back thrown, continues into a rounded corridor. He walks alone taking a path. So many valid. Have already traveled. To gotta technicians, close the metal door behind him. At the condo. The incinerator door opens gene himself inside. Eugene removes his silver medal from his breast pocket and places it around his neck. Eugene holds up metal taking one last look before pressing a button inside the incinerator. The vets stirs ignite filling the screen with bright orange planes. Jerome serenely opened his eyes to watch yet another launch at Gatica this time from the inside. Closing credits in each name, the letters G A T and see are colored green. In contrast with white letters presented on a black background.

Andrew Hendrickson Tony Gannon Andrea Hendrickson Dr. Lamar Jerome Eugene Renate Kramer Dr executive producer Catherine catcher Arkell Gatica Ben Edwards Nielsen Britney Haas institute Kate Robertson Shankar Rahman Malcolm Appleby Kelly Kat Kat Rachel York University
"haas institute" Discussed on Life of the Law

Life of the Law

06:11 min | 3 years ago

"haas institute" Discussed on Life of the Law

"And justice. Tonight lays the cord. Opinion. Next turns the problem of what did you initial rose should be. It's all statistical measurement and statistics never really mean anything. The only thing that actually ever means anything in a human life is what actually happens. Fade to black. An epigraph emerges. Consider God's handiwork who can straighten what he hath made crooked. Ecclesiastes TS seven, thirteen. This is life of the law. You are listening to episode one, thirty, four. A second epigraph. I not only think that we will tamper with mother nature. I think mother wants us to Willard, Galen. You're listening to Katy Murphy who is an audio. Describe her that someone who describes films for people who are blind or visually impaired fade to a blue background. The opening credits roll with each G A T and see bolted every name and title in the background fingernail clippings in strands of hair fall with a dull thud flakes of dead skin, drift down, like snowflakes as the title of peers. Gatica. Whenever I to someone who is unfamiliar by what they want to talk about talking for a few minutes. The first thing that someone says Gatica, though soggy obesity is a professor of bioethics at UC Berkeley and a regular contributor to our in-studio conversations. He's also on the board of life of the law Assange organized to screenings of the film Gatica followed by panel discussions. I'm Tony Gannon life of the laws, senior producer indium, associate producer, Andrea Hendrickson. He invited us to attend and we brought our recording equipment. These screenings were put on by the center for genetics and society, as well as the Haas institute for fair and inclusive society at UC Berkeley organizations that Assange works with per their website. The center for genetics and society works to encourage responsible uses effective governance of human genetic and assisted reproductive technologies. Gatica a sci-fi film set in the not so distant future was released. Just a little over twenty years ago in nineteen ninety seven although. Although it was a mainstream movie with a big budget, well known actors and was produced by a major studio that has been used as a teaching tool and the science and bioethics communities since it was released. Let's go back to win. This movie was first released in nineteen ninety seven. I was a senior in high school. I distinctly remember writing papers by hand since my school was just a little behind in terms of the PC revolution that was emerging four dollars and fifty. Nine cents would have got new a movie ticket, and I have a memory of my biology teacher telling students that developments in bio engineering would wore the digital revolution. We were beginning to experience mind you. This was before laptops were the norm before I phones and pads of course, and here's this movie Gatica that was seen past all of that into the future. Bioengineering. Biomedicine and genetic. Research as a whole. The main character Vincent played by Ethan Hawke was born without the intervention of geneticist in the film's universe. He was the product of a dying trend of children who were conceived naturally. Never understand what possessed my mother to put her faith in God's hands rather than those of her local geneticist Meany everything was left to chance as the Seidel influence pushed parents to conceive with the aid of genetic technologies using what we now commonly referred to as a cystic reproductive technology. He and others like him referred to in the film as invalid 's while the newly altered majority came to be known as valid and thanks to the future of genetic research that the movie predicted everything known about us biology. Now only seconds exact time cause of my death was already known. Logical conditions, sixty percent probability, manic depression, forty-two percent probability, attention deficit disorder eighty nine percent probability heart disorder. Ninety nine percent probability, early fatal, potential life expectancy, thirty point two years. Vincent's life is predetermined. For my brave talk. I knew it was just that no matter how much I trained him, which I studied the best test score in the world wasn't gonna matter had the blood test to go in. So that changes position life. He has to assume someone's identity and most significantly another person's DNA that of Jerome gene, moral. Guys practically can live forever got an IQ off the register better than twenty twenty and both is the heart of hawks. One throat wall. If you could still run since Vincent is perceived as having what some people would consider genetic anomaly at birth, making him an invalid. This predetermined says position society from schools, he attends to the type of employment. He's able to get.

Vincent Gatica Katy Murphy UC Berkeley Andrea Hendrickson Assange Ecclesiastes Haas institute us Tony Gannon Willard Jerome gene Meany Ethan Hawke producer professor Seidel Galen Ninety nine percent
"haas institute" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

WCBM 680 AM

02:14 min | 3 years ago

"haas institute" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

"The weekend i'll get your all of your headlines we're talking komi we're talking mccabe we're talking a possible trap for president trump in the muller investigation who knows or has it all backfired on the republicans on the republican listen to me on the democrats we're also talking about immigration and small cities in california fighting against the big machine can they survive in their fight against the sanctuary city laws here's a shock poll for you fifty nine percent of california want increased deportation of illegals can you imagine that and that is not some conservative think tank this poll comes from the uc berkeley haas institute for a fair and inclusive society there left wing organization so interesting there and sadly donald trump lost an appeal the us appeals court says the trump administration cannot i repeat cannot block funds from sanctuary cities unbelievable that these activists judges can undermine the presidency and the safety of you and your family in your community regardless of where you are we're also talking about the sad story of the two police officers in florida gilchrist county outside of gainesville that were murdered assassinated while eating chinese food having their lunch and i asked the question is there a war on police in this country we we see anti please send sentiment growing these men were killed in the line of duty but there was no altercation with anyone they weren't giving a ticket it wasn't a domestic violence issue they weren't rating a drug den they weren't chasing down some perpetrators who robbed a store or a bank we're talking about two guys eating lunch and a guy saw them in the window fifty nine year old male and just shot them and then we see the boldness of not brave ness of ms thirteen a member there in long island directing members to quote take out a cop and as we talked with one call as we know it lends to your street credibility with these gangs if you're going to do that but the.

mccabe california uc berkeley haas institute donald trump florida gilchrist county gainesville president muller us fifty nine percent fifty nine year
"haas institute" Discussed on KARN 102.9

KARN 102.9

02:18 min | 3 years ago

"haas institute" Discussed on KARN 102.9

"The weekend or get your all of your headlines we're talking komi we're talking mccabe we're talking a possible trap for president trump in the muller investigation who knows or has it all backfired on the republicans on the republican listen to me on the democrats we're also talking about immigration and small cities in california fighting against the big machine can they survive in their fight against the sanctuary city laws here's a shock poll for you fifty nine percent of californians want increased deportation of illegals can you imagine that and that is not some conservative think tank this poll comes from the uc berkeley haas institute for a fair and inclusive society they're left wing organization so interesting there and sadly donald trump lost an appeal the us appeals court says the trump administration cannot i repeat cannot block funds from sanctuary cities unbelievable that these activist judges can undermine the presidency and the safety of you and your family in your community regardless of where you are we're also talking about the sad story of the two police officers in florida gilchrist county outside of gainesville that were murdered assassinated while eating chinese food having their lunch and i asked the question is there a war on police in this country we we see anti police sentiment growing these men were killed in the line of duty but there was no altercation with anyone they weren't giving a ticket it wasn't a domestic violence issue they weren't rating a drug den they weren't chasing down some perpetrators who robbed a store or a bank we're talking about two guys eating lunch and a guy saw them in the window fifty nine year old male and just shot them and then we see the boldness of not brave ness of ms thirteen a member there in long island directing members to quote take out a cop and as we talked with one on the call as we know it lends to your street credibility with these gangs if you're going to do that but the heat that would be brought down upon them they know that it's bad for business so it.

mccabe uc berkeley haas institute donald trump florida gilchrist county gainesville president muller california us fifty nine percent fifty nine year
"haas institute" Discussed on WZFG The Flag 1100AM

WZFG The Flag 1100AM

02:18 min | 3 years ago

"haas institute" Discussed on WZFG The Flag 1100AM

"The weekend i'll get your all of your headlines we're talking komi we're talking mccabe we're talking possible trap for president trump in the muller investigation who knows or has it all backfired on the republicans on the republicans listen to me on the democrats we're also talking about immigration and small cities in california fighting against the big machine can they survive in their fight against the sanctuary city laws here's a shock poll for you fifty nine percent of californians want increased deportation of illegals can you imagine that and that is not some conservative think tank this poll comes from the uc berkeley's haas institute for a fair and inclusive society there are left wing organization so interesting there and sadly donald trump lost an appeal the us appeals court says the trump administration cannot i repeat cannot block funds from sanctuary cities unbelievable that these activist judges can undermine the presidency and the safety of you and your family in your community regardless of where you are we're also talking about these sad story of the two police officers in florida gilchrist county outside of gainesville that were murdered assassinated while eating chinese food having their lunch and i asked the question is there a war on police in this country we we see anti police sentiment growing these men were killed in the line of duty but there was no altercation with anyone they weren't giving a ticket it wasn't a domestic violence issue they weren't rating a drug den they weren't chasing down some perpetrators who robbed a store or a bank we're talking about two guys eating lunch and a guy saw them in the window fifty nine year old male and just shot them and then we see the boldness of but not brave ness of ms thirteen a member there in long island directing members to quote take out a cop and as we talked with one on the call as we know it lends to your street credibility with these gangs if you're going to do that but the heat that would be brought down upon them they know that it's bad for business so it.

mccabe haas institute florida gilchrist county gainesville president muller california donald trump us fifty nine percent fifty nine year
"haas institute" Discussed on KSFO-AM

KSFO-AM

02:18 min | 3 years ago

"haas institute" Discussed on KSFO-AM

"The weekend or get your all of your headlines we're talking komi we're talking mccabe we're talking a possible a trap for president trump in the muller investigation who knows or has it all backfired on the republicans on the republican listen to me on the democrats we're also talking about immigration and small cities in california fighting against the big machine can they survive in their fight against the sanctuary city laws here's a shock poll for you v thirty nine percent of californians want increased deportation of illegals can you imagine that and that's not some conservative think tank this poll comes from the uc berkeley haas institute for a fair and inclusive society there left wing organization so interesting there and sadly donald trump lost an appeal the us appeals court says the trump administration cannot i repeat cannot block funds from sanctuary cities unbelievable that these activists judges can undermine the presidency and the safety of you and your family in your community regardless of where you are we're also talking about the sad story of the two police officers in florida gilchrist county outside of gainesville that were murdered sas innate while eating chinese food having their lunch and i asked the question is there a war on police in this country we we we see anti police sentiment growing these men were killed in the line of duty but there was no altercation with anyone they weren't giving ticket it wasn't a domestic violence issue they weren't rating a drug den they weren't chasing down some perpetrators who robbed a store or a bank we're talking about two guys eating lunch and a guy saw them in the window fifty nine year old male and just shot them and then we see the boldness of but not brave ness of ms thirteen a member there in long island directing members to quote take out a cop and as we talked with one on the call as we know it lends to your street credibility with these gangs if you're going to do that but the heat that would be brought down upon them they know that it's bad for business so it.

mccabe uc berkeley haas institute donald trump florida gilchrist county gainesville president muller california us thirty nine percent fifty nine year
"haas institute" Discussed on WDRC

WDRC

02:18 min | 3 years ago

"haas institute" Discussed on WDRC

"The weekend or get your all of your headlines we're talking komi we're talking mccabe we're talking a possible a trap for president trump in the muller investigation who knows or has it all backfired on the republicans on the republicans listen to me on the democrats we're also talking about immigration and small cities in california fighting against the big machine can they survive in their fight against the sanctuary city laws here's a shock poll for you fifty nine percent of californians want increased deportation of illegals can you imagine that does not some conservative think tank this poll comes from the uc berkeley haas institute for fair and inclusive society they're left wing organization so interesting there and sadly donald trump lost an appeal the us appeals court says the trump administration cannot i repeat cannot block funds from sanctuary cities unbelievable that these activist judges can undermine the presidency and the safety of you and your family in your community regardless of where you are we're also talking about the sad story of the two police officers in florida gilchrist county outside of gainesville that were murdered assassinated while eating chinese food having their lunch and i asked the question is there a war on police in in this country we we see anti police sentiment growing these men were killed in the line of duty but there was no altercation with anyone they weren't giving a ticket it wasn't a domestic violence issue they weren't rating a drug den they weren't chasing down some perpetrators who robbed a store or a bank we're talking about two guys eating lunch and the guy saw them in the window fifty nine year old male and just shot them and then we see the boldness of but not brave ness of ms thirteen a member there in long island directly members to quote take out a cop and as we talked with one on the call as we know it lends to your street credibility with these gangs if you're going to do that but the heat that would be brought down upon them they know that it's bad for business so it.

mccabe uc berkeley haas institute donald trump florida gilchrist county gainesville president muller california us fifty nine percent fifty nine year
"haas institute" Discussed on 1410 WDOV

1410 WDOV

01:37 min | 3 years ago

"haas institute" Discussed on 1410 WDOV

"Top and thirty past the hour and when it breaks all day news radio fourteen ten wd lovie expect fourteen ten w deal for quite a while we've got him back on the line here and we wanted to give a chance to talk to us about immigration bill newton mass round to go hello guys do we not have him on oh we got a phone as you that's for sure i'm in i'm in la here my team in new york is letting me know that as my bill we try man and we got other people call you know we wanted to give you first crack at it we thought we had addressed the issue of the phones and and here we are without phone connectivity all of you but that's a great time for me to tell you all you got thoughts on the show facebook dot com slash buck sexton i can look at it while i'm on air well in the brakes it'll be bad if i started reading as i was trying to talk to you but you have a way to reach out and say hi anytime you like and it is in fact me was responding i saw this pole made me interested because in part i'm here in california and it's from the daily democrat and it looks like this was from berkeley's haas institute for a fair and inclusive society a hostage i think is the bee's school business school at berkeley and this poll said that half of californians are okay with the travel ban and i thought the travel ban was the worst thing in the history of bad things ever.

lovie new york california berkeley haas institute facebook fourteen ten w
"haas institute" Discussed on WMAL 630AM

WMAL 630AM

02:29 min | 3 years ago

"haas institute" Discussed on WMAL 630AM

"He tweeted about what does developing in california we've talked about it here orange county california we had one of the state senators represents irvine and the environment there in orange county california as a guest a couple of weeks ago john warlock talking about the fact that no california is not all jerry brown country it's not all the bay area it's not all san francisco and it's certainly not all sacramento and there are a lot of americans who live in california who were pushing back on sacramento for their their policies their sanctuary state policies so we saw huntington beach we saw newport beach my old hometown we saw a irvine we saw orange county as a whole we saw san diego county now joining what a san diego county orange county having common there the closest to the mexican border if there's a whole lot of people crossing the border illegally and then integrating into the school systems and into the job market and into the social services it's happening in san diego and orange county more than anywhere else in that state and they're saying no we want to cooperate with the federal government we want immigration laws passed and now get this a new poll and this is not from some crazy right wing group it's the university of california berkeley the haas institute for a fair and inclusive society now if there's not a liberal sounding organization i've never heard one other the that doesn't sound like the institute for fair and inclusive society at university of california berkeley and their pulse shows that fifty percent fifty percent of californians support president trump's travel ban for a muslims that come from countries that are predominant not muslims people that come from countries that are predominantly muslim and have a history of terror i attacks against this country they also fifty percent are in favor of more deportations of illegal immigrants of californians so the president remarked on this today via twitter in his own inevitable inimitable way i shall read his tweet there is a revolution going on in california revolution inexplicably capitalized not sure why so many sanctuary areas there are four os and so so that's why i said it like that so many sanctuary areas want out of this ridiculous crime infested and.

haas institute university of california berke university of california san diego newport beach jerry brown twitter president trump california federal government san diego county orange county huntington beach sacramento san francisco