19 Burst results for "HSP"

"hsp" Discussed on Not Another Anxiety Show

Not Another Anxiety Show

04:53 min | 6 months ago

"hsp" Discussed on Not Another Anxiety Show

"Yeah. There's somebody pieces, but that's one of them is just taking more quiet time more. Yeah. I really love how you have some really practical ways to support ourselves right like somebody's. Kid does not have to be publication is just really basic clients come into my office and they're super anxious or depressed, and it's Feel strange. But sometimes, it's a little things. I'm like you need to get really basic here. Now Asleep getting how much quiet getting you know how much are you saying you don't want to know there's just little things that making those changes actually creates a big difference it's incredible to watch. And you know you mentioned just since you know this is a show about anxiety. You kind of already mentioned that The connection between being an H. S., p., and experiencing anxiety has to do with like the over-stimulation. Is Yeah. Is there anything you can expand on there? Anything you want to add to like what sort of this connection between because I think we often see them together Yay Lotta times we'll see some anxiety and being highly sensitive person and yeah. Why why is that or what can you expand on their? Yeah absolutely I mean, there's so many reasons why we get anxious know it could be brain chemistry, which is know they're still trying to figure out the specifics of that lifestyle factors to excess stress. But often do see like you're saying the over-stimulation being the source of the anxiety which makes sense only we think about it they feel very similar. You know it's just think of weddings. Eighty feels like lots of worry and mind is racing. We're having trouble sleeping or justice system is off. Right. There's so many ways anxiety can show up and and for us as HSP's that over-stimulation comes when we're in like a really noisy environment. We're having too many social engagements back to back we're in large crowd. Were inundated by a busy schedule or or too many people are multitasking for a long period of time..

HSP
Being a Highly Sensitive Person with April Snow

Not Another Anxiety Show

04:35 min | 6 months ago

Being a Highly Sensitive Person with April Snow

"Hey guys. Welcome to not another anxiety show. I'm your host Kelly Walker and joining me today is guest April snow hey bro. Kelly thanks for having me. Yes. Thank you so much for taking time to hop on the show I'm really excited about our conversation, same? Yeah. I'm excited to be here. Before we get started, do you mind if I share a little bit more about you with our audience? Please do thank you. Awesome. April Snow Alam ft is a licensed psychotherapist in California who specializes in working with highly sensitive introverts, introverts, perfectionists, and high achievers. April strongly believes that being a highly sensitive person doesn't have to stop you from living a fully engaged life and is a mission to help HSP's create a life on their own terms. So they can manage the overwhelm and start to thrive. FIND OUT MORE AT WWW dot expansive heart dot com. So April my first question is Can you tell us? What it means and what it looks like to be highly sensitive person. Sure. Absolutely I know some folks listening may have not heard of this term before or. May Have heard of the word sensitive call too sensitive cell just expanded out just to give some more context. So. Being highly sensitive person is someone born with a unique temperament trait. It's also called sensory processing sensitivity in the research. But in plain terms, you're going to hear it called high sensitivity or HP for short. but the title, it really doesn't capture the complexity of being an ATS because there's a lot of misconceptions about it. Especially, if you're someone who is sensitive, it may have been used as a negative, right all your to sensitive too fragile. You know you're too slow whatever it is. There's a lot of labels we get hurt around sensitivity So this trait was originally put on the map by Dr Lene Aaron About Twenty five years ago, and since there's been a ton of research is come out, which is really comforting as an age sap didn't like hey, it's real not making this up. You know I am feeling everything so deeply. And noticing so much. So this this temperament traits found in about twenty percent of the population and in over one hundred other species. So that tells you that it's real it's not. As or being too. Too, sensitive whatever we hear it's real and it allows her nervous system and are willing to pick up subtleties and details that most people miss. So if you're an HSP probably a good at reading body language noticing when someone's upset or there have you know a little bit of a face change or they can haircut or you're picking up all those little details, which is actually pretty useful. It is right and social really is. One of the the advantages of being highly sensitive. So. All. Cal just break down a little bit of facts and also the core characteristics with people will get a sense of what it actually looks like. It'd be great. Thank you. Yeah. Asked I know there is a lot of. Misunderstanding about the trait and some even know it is a trait. So you might just be hearing this for the first time. So a lot of times it's mixed up with introversion, but actually thirty percent of each extroverts. So if you're out there and you're like I don't know if hse because actually I really like to socialize or. To do thrill seeking things, you could still be HSP that's just one that's me and I. You know I didn't realize how complex yea. Highly sensitive person could be because I really love the adventure piece I get more wiped out from it then my adventures bags. Yeah. Yeah. It's so true. You can be a hyacinth secret, an introvert anime chest you and then it gets really confusing like what's happening inside of me. Of. Fit. Exactly and they might be fighting each other different parts need different things at different times or you might experience it differently all the people out there than maybe a non sensation-seeking extroverted. HSP there's just so many liar that's it's so fascinating to kind of put all the pieces together. To, let's talk about the core sex 'cause the trade can be summed up in four trait for components, which is used as the Akron does so that step of processing over-stimulation, emotional responsiveness, empathy, and sensitive to subtleties or sensory information. so that's the hub of it.

HSP Kelly Walker April Snow Alam HP Dr Lene Aaron Akron California CAL
"hsp" Discussed on Creative Therapy Umbrella

Creative Therapy Umbrella

06:50 min | 10 months ago

"hsp" Discussed on Creative Therapy Umbrella

"It's really funny. My brother I think I'm not sure if he knows it, but I think he's an hse. but He is like does graphic design work, but now has ended up as a creating video games like he and it's so creative where it's like wow like that seeing that creativity in something that I think it's another thing with creativity. It's not just We tend to Pigeonhole it in only these certain ways, but creativity comes out so many different things Yeah, I think it's curious how I think there's. Those elements of you said with the does acronym where the sensory piece of say music for example of the nuances of the sounds that you're taking in, but then it's also the emotional experience of it to you know it's not just one of those things that makes it. You know that makes you more I. Guess maybe creative, but it's like the blend of those things. Yeah, there's we're experiencing on a few different layers. I love seeing mouth La. There is that I hadn't thought about that, but yeah, you're right. There is an emotional experience, and there's at sensory experience, and there's just so many parts of our lighting up CASS rubble. I think about that with even doing you know things like lyric analysis a lot of times with like you know. I do this with some teenagers where we'll really that depth work to or what does this you know they're talking about an ocean, but the really talking about something else. What does that mean and you know really diving and deep to some of those things, and it's cool how you how all of those things interplay in the arts as well. When yeah, there's so much overlap. Let's say yeah, it's exciting to think about taking something that others might just kinda glance over, and then uncovering all the layers of it, yeah. And also hoping using that as a tool to ourselves and our own experiences, yes, yes, and then it directly I. Think all of that directly impacts her clients, you know we become more solid grounded in who we are, and then we have more in our toolkit to help understand others and find other. HSP's you need that support. It's it's so true that we can bring in all these different. Options and therapy because we're. We think outside the box in were very creative, very intuitive. I know in my sessions I'll just pull something out from nowhere just because it came to the moment like Oh. What's try this art exercise or This experiential piece dissimilar we go with it and. That's usually where the magic happens. Just meeting the client in that moment, and not worrying about as it's been on before, or and what do I know that I can pull out. It's like great tool in the moment and. Designed specifically for this client in what they're holding right now. It's so powerful. Yeah I was just talking with another therapist about that of It's almost like we can get in our own way so many times when we're not used to lake relying on that tuition. And actually there was I read this book by Victor Wooten, who says Bass Player, and he even talked about that even with like things like music like you can sit there. There and like you know practice, practice and practice, but sometimes you just have to like get out of your own way, and it will come out like and I think it's the same thing in therapy. It's like we can you know our intuition is there as h s teas, and it's like if we get out of our own way, those really important things that you know where we're just being with each other can come out because we're so. And have that in there. We just let it flow through and not think about it too much. Yes, let it let whatever you're experiencing that moment. Let that guide you. Yes, trusting the process at A. Yeah! As we kind of slowly, wrap up! There's one other thing that I think is really important. I know I felt. That's a lot to for therapists who have moved to N Clients I think to. There's a lot of effect on clients but have moves to telehealth for because of covid. How have you seen that effect on highly sensitive people in general? Yeah. Sing, definitely affect across the board hse's and non therapist. HSP's now lot more fatigue Lama over-stimulation than. Were emotional, reacting feeling teary more time because of that over-stimulation. More headaches I'm not sure what the link is, but a just peace tend to get more headaches and Migraines from what I. Think just I. Don't know what it is if it's. If it's stimulation, issue or just the brain working so hard, I have no idea what it is. A, seeing more headaches and people and so more physical discomfort, more emotional reactivity more exhaustion. I know the first couple of weeks. I was having such a hard time I literally at the end the day. I would put on my noise cancelling headphones I. Ask my way to blanket Shut everything off. Yup just to kind of bring the stimulation down and since regulated and kind of incorporated more break season. Doing some you give, my is a break. But? Yeah, it's it's been hard trust and also another piece, just a not the physical component, but just the process of at all a quick change and we weren't prepared for it. We didn't get our time to process and think about how he wanted to do it. We just got thrown into which in itself is really difficult for us. We need time to make transitions any time to process. We didn't get that, so that alone can be varied this regulating for us as HSP's. Tease. Caring for a lot of other people as you go through that, not just yourself. Yes absolutely, it was really fast. It was just. This is happening. This is happening world. Actually. Pause slash. Let's figure right. And some ways you know a lot of HP's around. The lake. Come home I was going to ask. The benefits would have been the positives that have come to yeah. Yeah, it's it's permission to slow down, I, mean, of course we don't want to slow down because of A. Or pandemic. But if we if we isolate that personal experience, there is a relief in kind of a guilty relief. People are like whispering like. Feel? Okay and I'm happy to be home.

HSP headaches Victor Wooten HP Migraines
"hsp" Discussed on Creative Therapy Umbrella

Creative Therapy Umbrella

08:02 min | 10 months ago

"hsp" Discussed on Creative Therapy Umbrella

"Just, really being thoughtful about textures in the room, and the I've lot of clan and things that make me feel comforted ensued so when I go in office. Too High for like I'm at. It's like my second home essentially very so when I'm feeling. Settled and comforted I know that I'm going to be showing up better as therapists ramming more clear, not thinking like us chairs uncomfortable this latest. You bright her. Oh this you know this, my next door neighbor's to louder new. There's really thinking about our are where we're putting offices and also Howard. Setting the office up inside is going to be really important. Yes, yes. I had an office for the longest time without windows and it was like soul-crushing. Just something so simple of just having like it's so calming. See trees outside, and have that natural light instead of overhead lighting, or you know all those different things going to plan to each other but yeah, it's funny. How much that can affect you? Arabist how draining. It's just added drain. Just amount even be realizing that it's in the background taking up a mental energy. You're aware so just thinking about you know our sensory. Sensitivity awareness almost hesitate to call it since it more awareness like. Classic HSP. ability is tags close. Classic. Think about yourself, you know this happened to me. Were I got to work? And I maybe had a new shirt on their authors big tag on Sometimes I. Get tricks that they're on the side were and then they're just I can feel it on my torso. I'd just can't focus one hundred percent yoga. The same thing could be happening with something in your environments in your office face. And it's like it's. It's like poking at you, but you. And then I like to I would think if you're not aware that you are a highly sensitive person. You might not even know that that's something is poking at you. You know it's like bothering me or I have this underlying irritability, and I don't even know where to look to fight what it is right yep if you weren't. You probably wouldn't even notice. There is even a tag. X I always find it with hairs like hairs that start to tickle all. They get your shirt or something. Yeah, uh-huh, that's always yes, for sure. So as for each tease you know kind of gone over these things that can help us be more present and be better. have have things better suited for us so that we can ultimately help our clients. What about working with clients who are highly sensitive? What is that playing? Yeah, this is such a good question. Whether you know it or not. You're working with highly sensitive people as up to fifty percent of clients are highly sensitive. So, no matter what your specialty is or wherever you are, you're working with someone. That's highly sensitive person most likely. partly, because HSP's like going to therapy. They've Dahlia doing that work. They're noticing more. And then also, there are more interested in of going deeper right where we're deep processors, deep thinkers feeler so were very well-suited the therapy and then also another layer is if a if an agency has had a traumatic event or Some change in their life. They're going to be experiencing that much more intensely than non or doctor doesn't like just a non HSP, but someone who doesn't have the trade, okay? Yeah Right. Because we'RE GONNA BE WE'RE GONNA be experiencing so much more from disturbances in our lives whether they be from childhood or present day, so you're. Just for that reason alone the fact that each value therapy. They're experiencing more. They're more impacted. You're GONNA see them. Shopping in your office and I think I mentioned this to you where knowing about the trade. Is that missing puzzle fees? Let's say you have a client come in. Super burned out at work You know they're. They're not able to sleep They're just having a high level of stress. You're going to do all the right things right, but then you don't realize that. Them! Riding the train to work or spending too much time with family members are not taking a day off for week is having a huge impact little thing like that, but if you know their niche spn okay, they need some time everyday decompress. You know that they are going to be more overwhelmed easily that they made me to set tighter boundaries and that train ride is really ever stimulating to them. Or that CO worker who asked too many. Too, many you know, ask for support too much is really draining them, so there's just all these little things that may seem inconsequential. Actually difference, HSP's knowing about the trae as a clinician, even at a basic level had really helpful, and it's GonNa make a huge impact. Your client's life knowing this part of them. And you can help them because other. All the time, the last two or three clients that have come to me said they were already seeing a therapist for long-term. Something's not working. It's Thurgood therapists were making part of it like I'm not getting. Something is missing again. That's probably because you're not working with the trait you're not. Thinking about yourself as a deeply thinking feeling, feeling impacted empathetic person in the world and How little things make a big impact? Has. And like as a client, and that was actually my my experience was I was in therapy. Therapists was like. Have you heard of HSP's? And it was like Oh my God like a completely. It completely changed. Everything and everything fit so well after that like it was so easy to. Dive. Deep work with her because she was aware of it and I think, too is if the help that we can give as therapists of shining that light on like you know will potentially. This is what this is for you. When clients don't even know, it is so powerful like that experiences so so powerful. It's life. It's life changing. Yes. I. We say like it's like a switch went on in my life, and I think about my clinical work and I've seen clients coming that seemed on the surface seem depressed rightly. They might have been living in towards. Major depressive disorder and really want you look in a little bit closer. We realize Oh. This clan is working on a job that is unfulfilling over stimulating and we take that away. It's like. Night and day client re energizes feeling invigorated. Again are feeling excited. Hopeful again they're more engaged. Or. Let's let me think of another example, or perhaps a client who? Every night before they go to bed there the reading, right? What seems like a very great way to go to bed and. But the content of what the reading is stimulating, getting their mind going, and then they can't shut it off right. That's subtle but it. I've seen it happen with clients, and we make that change like okay. Instead of reading this con- why you try reading something a little bit lighter. Don't you? Try Meditating before bed and it's like A. Big Switch so there's all these. Amazing, things can happen when you recognize there's this is a highly sensitive person. They might need a little bit different, and it's tricky when. Expressions of the trader things that were experiencing as H. P. Starts Showbiz, clinical or mental health issues. When really there's like different source, so we can be helpful to take inspiration. Yes, absolutely I think that's such. A big point is that the source of anxiety depression all these different things that could show up as.

HSP Howard Thurgood H. P.
"hsp" Discussed on Creative Therapy Umbrella

Creative Therapy Umbrella

07:26 min | 10 months ago

"hsp" Discussed on Creative Therapy Umbrella

"Table taking and so much more on that. Just think all that coming at you hot. It's overwhelming, so you know that's our Achilles heel. We notice everything. We feel everything. Get overwhelmed. Yes yes, what does that look like when you're working on taking an all of that sensory information? What is the danger of that at the end of the day, and then the positive at the end of the day now that's corruption means dangerous, definitely getting towards like a burn out place especially. If you're therapist your caregiver, your parents here is HFC's tents any we. Have more empathy. Those mirror neurons are firing more, so we have more empathy or feeling and. Emotions of others milestone, so it's easy to extend over. Extend ourselves. Take into much. We also have a perfectionism side because we can see how well things can be done, and it hurts us when it's not done right now. Hello. This absolute tend to stretch ourselves much more than and maybe we have the capacity for. So were. We're very know I. see a lot of clients and I may psychotherapy practice that are that are burned out from putting. Engineers were from carrying people or not setting boundaries, or you know pushing themselves through something perfectly when it probably seventy percent would be just as good by. Most of the time. The other people don't notice that the extra thirty percent there like seventy percent. That's great. I'll look how while you do this, and then we, but we can see that there's more yes, push ourselves men. The others others a big costs when. Were not slowing. We're not taking kind of slow down to get down time to get quiet time to just essentially any time to process all that information that we took in the day. Go at your other question was the flipside. Yes. Yes. Could you repeat that for him? Oh sure yes, so the positives, the things that at the end of the day what would be the positives from taking all that information even with the coffee shop? Thing her. that. Somebody else who's anonymous P might not have taken away from that. Day. I, think were able because we feel so deeply, we noticed those little details. Make Experienced A. Little joys in such a big way like it can almost be euphoric. Get something. It's like a natural high in some ways because we. took part of. The characteristics of our trade is having this emotional responsiveness right? We feel they have a much wider range of emotional experience. So? Let's say something as simple as. Seeing flower on your walk or Running into a doll and getting the immediate, new dog, issues love animals and nature and music art, and all that you know we're feeling that it's such a deep level were someone who doesn't have. The trade made great a dog. Right? That's that's Nice but we're like all the dog. We feel it. We can act with it. You know or that. Flower, Ullah colors and textures in the Roman. We're taking so much more. And that's a bad guy. If it 'cause, we get to be get to enjoy life so much when we're in a good place more feeling balance. And just think about like my spiritual parks for instance, or when I'm in nature, or when I see a piece of art or music. I moved so much nicer so grateful to be able to take that all in. Just from. Day to day just like this little things that I run into, it's amazing. Yes, I love it so much because it's One hundred percent fits with being HSP and I have like a huge excitability like the. Childlike excitability would work with kids, but explains so much about of like Gosh. That's so exciting. Tens kneeling. Wouldn't have that. If I wasn't picking up on so many things throughout the process of whatever led to that moment. That's right exactly. Yeah, we are we to have that kind of childlike wonderment, a lot of their time to carry it into adulthood with us when we're taking good care of ourselves right when we're getting at time and and holding our boundaries, and making sure that we're prioritizing our needs. Yeah, and I think that's one of the biggest things once. I found out about HSP, which was I think about ten something years. Years ago, it was like a light bulb moment I was like. Oh, my gosh, this explained so many things get definitely led me on the path to knowing what I needed to put in place more to keep that balance. and I think you've mentioned boundaries. You know time to process. What would you say are the big things that HSP's and I'm sure different for everybody, but those big things to keep in mind to balance out the you know from heading towards burnout and those kinds of things. I used to say that getting quiet time was number one. I think even before that. If we back up even further, it's no yourself by knowing. That self awareness, and knowing about the trade and knowing why you need what you need. And making sure that you realize that that's valid, because we're so often told because we have different needs. We or experiencing the world differently than eighty percent of the population, so we're often told that what we need doesn't make sense. It's too much, or we're not moving fast enough, or we're being too sensitive, right? All those labels get put on a so we tend to shut our needs down and try to assimilate into what everyone else. Nancy, hitting first of all just starting to slow down and offering look inward and. Learning about yourself as nature's Pin, what year are unique needs are? And then also grieving, not getting those needs met most of the time. ooh! Now. That's at the core before we can even start to set boundaries or take time for ourselves or And maybe look for work. That's more meaningful or you know. Whatever it is whatever shifts we need to make. Or say you know what this really lights me up. This is why I really love doing this I'm going to make time for this. Whatever it is, it could be. Hiking knitting playing music. You know I think it's really. Important at HSP's. Spend time doing things we really loved that really phyllis out. His meaning and connection is so important for us. We're not going to be able to do work that we hate. That's not align with our values it I've seen I've done that myself. I've seen other just. Really does take the life out of us, it's. Really! It's like I think it's probably you know a life suck for many people, but I just I waitress for probably like ten or twelve years before you know through college going into music, therapy and so many people are like you know of course music therapy. Really you know I was like no am super passionate about it I love it I spent so long waitress saying and there were so many great things about I loved. You know I learned so much, but it was just so draining on characteristically draining won't when probably very over simulating as well totally? Yeah, I worked retail for a long.

HSP HFC phyllis Nancy
"hsp" Discussed on Not So Standard Deviations

Not So Standard Deviations

15:26 min | 1 year ago

"hsp" Discussed on Not So Standard Deviations

"Did you know index too hard on people at your institution than it's like. You can't leave. You can leave but it's hard and and whereas if you've got people all over then it doesn't matter where you are and what the strategy is but I don't either even just talking to surreal. I think rather than giving people like the Hal y you know what I mean like. Don't tell people to write code in their free time. That's like a very specific path for having job security outside of your institution whereas like telling people like you know if you WanNa make sure they are insulated from like a bad work environment. I mean and this happens. People get this advice in other fields where it's like. Oh you're not going while time to brush up your resume so it's like it's not like different than that necessarily true. It's just that you have more means to do it. It's like Oh give conference socks and I think that's the biggest thing as I've gotten more into this career it's like I. I just get conference stocks. I didn't even know why like I just like them and I was used to doing them so I just figured you were supposed to keep doing them. But now I have much more like purpose for for it like I have an agenda. It's not just job security. It's like I'm motivated to change the community in certain ways you know it's like but like I'm also very intentional about it now we're in lake. Let's my goal is this like is this aligned with my values because yeah I'm not just doing it because I'm like aboard. which was what I was doing before? I actually just found a book face on my hi Anderson Recommendations. It was funny we're actually with a co-worker we are going through trashing the Amazon homepage like over lunch. We're GONNA like look pick this up here. It's like bought something from the words on this book I recommend in the past called designing signing your life. That's all about like a it's like using design mindset to set these values intentions and like view everything you're doing through the lens of like is this line with my values. Is this like a choice. That's consistent with what my stated intentions are for. How my life? How how I think my life should be like imperiously? Observe your life and be like it. Looks like I like this the not bad at. How can I cultivate more of this being realistic with yourself and like they spend a lot of time talking about like? Don't think you have to get a job and what you majored in maybe empirically. You're learning that you don't like that much and resonated with me of course but like I just thought they had a book called Designing Your Life at work and I was like Click so report back but I got along the same things of like okay like having ten. Think about what you wanted to be accomplishing and again like I've in some ways. My heart was warmed more to like the original intentions of open source. Because for a while I was just like Richard Stolman horrible like they were crazy easy and so now I'm like okay like I'm starting to feel the warm fuzzies of like you know we're trying to empower each other to be independent and like live healthier. Lives doing the things we want like. You know what I mean like. I was able to like pull myself off from the Ledge based on these conversations and so I think Ah Yeah like I think that taking even further and applying it today conference dogs and like. Are you doing coding. In your free time and you know I just like I think it's a good thing like feeling empowered to leave. Makes it better wherever you are. Yeah and so. That's that's good. Yeah do you want to switch topics sure we have a little bit of follow up from friend of the show GNOME. Ross He He wa. He commented our discussion about like you know. Do you analyze data or do you like right assist or do you like organize it into a system and you and I seem to be in agreement about like we just we just like code page and make sure report make sure it's reproducible. And he was. He said that he struggled uh-huh he struggled with the idea of writing functions for data analysis. But he says now your rights functions that may never be used for anything but they're just like kind of one step that they do and it turns out that the defining step of analysis as a function is a natural way to declare inputs and outputs and having that step as its own on our object. Let's one inspect manipulated. I Yeah I Nelson benches that he's using he's using drake which is will end out. It's kind of like make system project organization system and that. I've never use but I know of and part of me is like I don't necessarily inconsistent with what we said because like I don't think we said that functions are bad or that they dislike the impact. It clearly had I think that yeah I mean I guess maybe it is in conflict with insists that like I think we have slightly different penal ization functions functions for and. Isn't that the same like this. Sounds like someone who cares about being right more than I do. There's no there's no doubt that. There's like a little bit of overhead for declaring it puts an outfits right well. Testing is like a why testing is a whole. Yeah testing and puts it out. But that's a whole different thing but even just like specifying what they are like. I've done this a lot when I like doing a date analysis and I'll say oh this it could be a function and often what I'll do is I'll write a function that has no arguments right and because obviously you can just pick a work and then and then I'd just just then all right like even know what the argument should be and then it's like now to think about what the arguments are so put the arguments in the function and then it'll be like well it. Just it'll change at another argument or did you just leave it. You know it's like yeah. I guess I feel like my situation. Tends to be just more fluid fluid. Oh no I agree. Actually the only time I was realizing I do actually write functions a lot and they're usually so sure that they're all online. I don't think the curly curly brackets and it is specifically so I can use the map function in a deep layer pipeline. So it's like I wanna like mutate this call and I can't figure out what to do with like normal functions. Let me right a quick function. That just does the thing I want. which is what he's saying? I want the input to be a column and I want the output to be a column like I agree with you that like anything beyond that it just like any. I'm thinking back to that paper like the opinionated analysis development stuff where it's like these things are are all true and like you scale your. Roi Like you you scale what you invest based on your anticipated our ally and I'm just so rarely in a situation where even the investment of the overhead he's talking about is like worth it. I feel like I up to maybe we're just not doing good work impossibility like jobs. We like clearly. We're both the type of people who have like a podcast in our free time. We like talking like you know Worthy ideas guys like. We're not doing the hard code. I don't actually think that's true it. Does I write code that. Probably most data scientists right like. I'm like spinning up. Random project like very proof of concept stuff. You know what I mean like like Gutten Getting some sort of analysis for a discussion where precision is a waste of time like it needs to to be like a very broad lake. Let's get our best guess at a narrative for the small things that we can move onto the next thing like. I don't disagree with any of this. I just I think think I think if I was given gnomes project and he was gonNA mind we would both like switch our paradigm you know so. That's more the issue. It's code sketching. Yeah I don't have time to like for the whole thing. Yeah I was just about like if you have you ever watch. HDTV SHE TV here. They're like like this. Like design on a dime right like me shows where they like. They're just taking plywood. Food like stapley fabric on it. There's a lot of hot glue gun. stateful involve like this is not furniture or decorating. That's going to last for for like even several months. This is literally so that you can have that one shot of the room. When you're like panning over read like like don't have the close up? This will look terrible. I like it's like yeah like yeah. Like what are the ends here that lends a little crummy because like the ads for them are getting that pan shot whereas they're you're telling people that this is a legitimate way to redecorate your house and like you're just going to end up with a bunch of like you know falling apart staples tables everywhere like hazard to children so anyway. Speaking of did analysis analysis. I thank you actually or something. This never happened. You'RE GONNA get to give you credit for this so I don't know if you remember this this but like I don't even know in what context this came up but I do this all the time. Now which is like you said like A. You made a comment comet on some. Don't twitter I can't remember that every using like kind of like if else or case when a lot in your life you uh of data wrangling. What you really should be doing is like a joining of two tables? Oh Yeah and That has like that has saved me and number of times actually. That's awesome that I do like it. There's a certain kind of elegance to it. I had the same journey as you were like once. I realized that I was like. Oh my God. This changes everything typically. It's like if you have a factor column you know and and you want to. I guess you want to assign I guess if you want to sign like different values to associate different values to different levels of the factor but the crude way is just do like a case when or if else through that column. Yeah but the better ways to have table that defines. What the mapping is and then joined you too bye? I'll be vulnerable here and say that I was just writing code with a bunch of case when like my. My words wholeness thinking that I ooh. Yeah because I remember editing it in two places and I'm like Oh my God like I forgot so I have a hot tip for you actually. What's that that if you create a separate table toyed together? Oh my God you're we've come full circle. Yes we've come full circle. That's so funny I I remember that revolution and I'm like I'm feeling the fact that I forgot it right now. What does that say about that? I stopped writing as much code at some point relation. Take our advice about wondering funches. That's not true but tight. Mature quick question from Chris MHM asks if our is your first language right we tell you. We had a whole discussion about rs first programming language. What should be your second language? I don't know you don't know you don't have a recommendation. Well I think it depends on what you're doing for that right now. Actually learning impact on is kind of like he learned Spanish. French like there's a lot of overlap. Yeah Yeah do you. Rather than like what language maybe kind of what category of languages is is it useful to art python are kind of in the same domain and would it be useful to learn a second language anguish. That was looking at a totally different domain again. I just think that it's like really depends on what you're doing okay. This is the type of advice that I I need. More context in Phila- guys give I. I don't want to mislead and act like there's generic answer that's fair. Yeah it seems. I think I have no good idea. That's why I still. I feel like I still primarily use ours so it's like oh none no gave Dave I. Yeah I think it would really depend if you want to be like a production data scientists than probably something. That's a little more like I mean. What do people graduate to? It's like if you wanted to be more performance at in the context. I'm in right now. You then then like us more spark type stuff which is could be price fire or I mean sparks sequel. Well like you know like I think I'm not sure restriction people go but usually there's a lot of performance improvement from just like writing good sequel like the right right types of window functions or whatever but that is like mind-numbing sometimes in terms of like it's not like fun you're going to like a less expressive language but and then and then after that I don't even know like like I think like Java you. We like things like that that you can write lake extremely performance systems on the but then. Yeah if you're doing like going deeper into analysis and I would suggest more are packages you know like yeah. Anyway I'd say academia. There was a time where I would would've said that it is useful to learn like a compiled language like C. Yeah and that would be useful. If you're writing like really performance are packages right. Yeah or at least some sort of like ours ours ep or something like that. I don't know if that's in terms of like being an academic I don't know if that's true anymore or I don't think so. Yeah I don't think it is. I mean have you you've never used like a compiled language like that for your worker. Absolutely not under no circumstances I right the one thing I would. If you wanna just amp up our I highly recommend getting familiar with late. Oh okay yeah and like learning python through that Lens Lake has been helpful for me so that I don't have to like give up..

lake Anderson Amazon Lens Lake Richard Stolman Ross Phila Chris MHM Dave
"hsp" Discussed on Not So Standard Deviations

Not So Standard Deviations

14:19 min | 1 year ago

"hsp" Discussed on Not So Standard Deviations

"Sometimes the you write a package it turns out that everyone loves it so now everyone starts using it and then the question is like like okay. Well what are you supposed to do about Y- you're the developer or you're one of the developers and and it was. Was It really your intention for this thing to take off. Meanwhile you've got another job you know. Is it your responsibility to quit your job and support this full-time or Or hire someone to say you know. What is you know? It's like these kinds of things. I could see a purse at a normal person. Feeling compelled to work on this day because soda people using it and they started it and yet they don't have the time they don't have the energy to do it. Yeah you work on open source because you care about other people great like that's just like a fundamental mental truth. Yeah like all. It's overwhelming for any human. When Lake all of a sudden you thought not you're having no kidding erling triplets or like you know like I have this many users and all of a sudden I have way more users technically? I signed up for this. And there's no one I can pass often you and like if I just give up. I feel like I'm letting people down because I am open source. Projects evolve appropriately and they have like succession in planning you know and they they have they kind of grow. You know like a inappropriate way but some a lot. Don't I think and and again that's like I think that's like the value companies add. Is They hire people to do that were like they recognize. That stuff is work and they hire people for it and people are like coach to do it. You know 'cause like the software is the thing that they care about. I mean that's where this all falls apart for me is just that like I mean. Maybe this is the issue that the open source community like the whole fundamental idea is that it's self managed by developers doing doing other developer jobs. And like you would have to have like a PM. WHO's like I'm GONNA do in my free time like I'm so committed to this open sourcing even though I don't use it but like I benefit from the team that uses it and that's just like getting too far away they like it. It's like yeah Utopian ideal. I don't think is realistic. I just think that you know the for a long time. The open source kind of wanted to achieve the same aim status as proprietary software. And I think the fact that it did basically kind of came with pluses and minuses. Exactly exactly yeah. I like this where we are right now. Like the truth of the matter is that people treat it like any other like consumer software right. They don't distinguish. Yeah and so given that and and they take the benefits for granted. Absolutely like the average person I talked to isn't like is python because I care about my job flexibility like like or they do that like in a way where it's like almost like the job dictates it like where it's like. Oh I use python because every job I could get asked for Python. It's like well. Did they ask for Python because we demanded it lake. Take a while back. You know what I mean and then I mean. It's almost like health insurance from jobs because originally that was like a union thing where unions like demanded health insurance from employers but now that's totally flipped where like people are like tied to their jobs because they get health insurance insurance. You see what I mean I think so kind any the planet. It's something like it made sense at the time announced doesn't aww but now people are much more like while health insurance is like a human right and that wasn't the case when unions were asking for it if it's like this is a huge benefit that we could get Like I can't even remember what but I feel like that was one of the big things with unions in the early days What are the things that is interesting? I think is that there's a lot of open source. Development happens happens in these large corporations like Microsoft and apple and Google and they all manage huge or open source projects. I think but So they so they fund the development of a lot of these huge big tools of mostly because they use them right. So I think a lot of that is like if you're using. I think Google pays for a lot of python right. I mean I think the python founder used to work for Google but an example. That was so like Apple. Apple pays for a lot of development of the Klang C compiler And so because they use it you know so it's like so if I use that like I don't feel that bad. Yeah right exactly. We're getting paid to do that. I feel like I've been to lake nona intuitively but like I I the thing. I've advocated in most for on this podcast is like look at the situation that developers so that you know if it's a sustainable project or not and that's why like our city so much because they're like pain open source developers well to do source. That's it they. I think with a lot of these large things like you know like the Lynx operating system like I don't like a lot of developers are paid to work on legs right to help the Knicks. Not everyone but a lot and so like that's kind of like okay we'll let it be But like there's a long tail of small medium to small open source projects that are used by lots of people I think are you know is one of them at that were I would probably say. The vast majority of people do not get paid to directly. Develop our yeah for sure. Yeah so it's then then it's like that it's a little different but yeah he had to look like very close. I don't know yeah like I said there's just there are people out there who are open source developers who are right like not happy with the way like and especially in like nitty gritty in the pull requests are like the attitude that the people have when they ask for things or like the way people complain about problems and sell like complained to their face like they're at a conference in a bunch of people. Come up here's the problem with XYZ So like it's the there's the UNH- and there's a there's a woman who worked at get hub and wrote this big big report on the state of open source who outlined this like really. Well yes. Yeah over her name. All it was like a couple of years ago vaguely remember the report. Yeah Yeah So. It's it's documented by people other than myself and again to the point like people are choosing it but it's just it's just like A. It's a I think he will get themselves into a jam like you said without totally realizing like what they signed up for and no one in the right mind would sign up for that. I want to take on tons of responsibility and have people Madda me all the time because I believe in this so much do not get rewarded like at all. I aside from like feeling like I'm doing social go up. Yeah exactly that sucks. I remember there was like a huge bug that was found into openness acelle library. Do you remember this is hardly it turns out that there was only like four people working on that lever it was like particularly well actively developed at that. You know it was kind of like it was at a point. I think and it's like made. The logo for the Lakers had some security firm. Because there's like literally a logo for the bug. Oh yeah there was yes yeah like like heart bleed like it gives like disaster. Everyone has this vulnerability probably more people worked on the logo. Then the yeah. It's like the branding. I'm dean of announcing the bug was like quite sophisticated. Were it was like every single security team in every single attack company. Stop everything you're doing like we're comments right. Now that's hilarious. There's only like four people it's like four but it was a relatively small number of people given like how critical piece of infrastructure this thing is. That's not right like they don't even have a way of tracking. You know what I mean like. It's not even clear who is using it because it's distributed in like any way possible bowl so just like he won't even know how many users you have like your but like all of them. We'll come to you. I guess the question remains at. How much of this is your problem? But yeah I mean kind of nuns really but I mean that's my emotional journey. How much do I take on here? But yeah I mean. I'm looking forward to different solutions. Similarly now okay. Maybe they won't be perfect. Our fate that there something happened. Yeah Yeah I don't know we did get an email from a listener. tangentially related A address wrote in saying asking developing open source software in your spare time seems to be expected in the community in a job search. I'm asked to provide samples of code but I clearly can't share code for my current company with them personally. Eight hours of coding per day seems to be sufficient. I find it difficult to motivate myself to continue continued coding. After work. Right attitude. Well yeah exactly. I thought that was a very kind of reasonable attitude. But that's kind of like I wouldn't I mean I don't know I haven't applied for job recently. But it wouldn't surprise me. If that was kind of the expectation I think like the I think this person's totally right and I think that it like the va like woke stance now is to not ask for it because it like prioritizes people have families families who are younger and probably white men. You know it's like you have to be financially secure enough that you wanted to do in your free time. You have free time you you know you don't need the there's just so much like privilege And so companies that get that won't ask for it although okay so that's the thing it's like in practice. It probably happens all the time but you can't talk about as much anymore so that means conventionally you might not do practice anymore like it. Yeah for sure. It's a disadvantage and like even like I've talked about on this podcast openly about not like getting my first job. In data science was like very highly enabled by having a blog post that Kylie went viral right around the same time. Yeah and that was my free time so yeah. That's kind of been the advice and I don't like it because that that said I have I feel like I have developed a fairly recent appreciation of being academia. He'd get a little bit biased. But I feel like the data scientists working industry tree. They don't have really a mechanism for talking about what they do really or or or distributing what they've done you know. I'm so used to this the idea of like publishing papers or whatnot you know. It's like in general. That's why I can see how some of these conferences are a big deal because that might be like your only chance to talk about like what you're doing or whatnot Fisher and there really isn't otherwise I mean or less you know you're not posting code to you know repositories or things like that and so I could see how like it is an issue both for some people who are hiring and for people who are working as data scientists is that. There's no way for other people to know really what you're doing totally I and I do think my like personal brand work is a form of job security. You know what I mean like being out there. There is very harmful for your career. I always tell people. It's not the only way though like it is a very specific choice. It's for a very frankly wrinklies. Small subset of people who are data scientists and 'cause it's not exactly correlated with like wanting to be in front of a computer eight hours a day it and then and yeah and it isn't it's only communicating one part of your lake the value value bring to accompany as a worker. Right sure yeah and like being an extremely effective is the individual contributor like person writing toad is like as much valid career path is lake establishing a personal brand. But it is. It is true that like again. This gets back to the like open source conversation on this where it's like well being able to communicate that work to other other jobs is like is is difficult in that inhibits your ability to change jobs and the only way to do that is to like do this free time stuff. But then I guess yeah like establishing the ability to change jobs is work outside of work by definition yeah rush. It's like there's different ways to do that in like networking quote unquote if you build up a reputation within your company. That's probably best for like getting promoted within the company but not necessarily moving to another company so then you have to somehow get people to figure out you do good work outside of it in either. He he just rely. You're like I'm so good that I'm just GonNa nail these interviews and like that usually works but that's that's also hard though. There's no optimal strategy. I feel a little bit like academia collaborate with people at your institution or do you clever with people outside..

"hsp" Discussed on UnF*ck Your Brain to Create Feminist Confidence

UnF*ck Your Brain to Create Feminist Confidence

10:14 min | 1 year ago

"hsp" Discussed on UnF*ck Your Brain to Create Feminist Confidence

"Agains on this episode of Listener Q. and A.. I am going to answer some questions about coaching and and business and how I think about my own kind of growth process. All that kind of stuff is about to say like my thoughts on things but every episode is my thoughts on things. But before I do that remember to tell you we have a giveaway this episode. If you follow me on social media then you probably know that I do a lot of podcast cast interviews for other people's podcasts. On like all Kinda issues like on aging and body the image and business and getting organized and creativity and like. I feel like I've done Emma so but we don't I don't talk about them on the podcast that often and and I don't usually email about them so you really only know about them. If you're following me on social media so is one reason for you to follow me on social media. It's just my name mm at instagram or facebook but we are also giving away a list of all of the podcast interviews. I have done which I need to look at how many there are. I think there's like there's at least thirty five of them. May there might be a couple. That aren't out by Thursday between thirty and thirty five. That are out right now. So that's a Lotta teaching so all you need to do. If you want to get it is is text your email two three four seven nine nine seven one seven eight four three four seven nine nine seven one seven eight four. If you text that number your email address it will text you back asking for your code and you just send back the word interview all one word interview and then we will email you a list of the interviews with kickable links so you can catch up on every every podcast. I've been on. I'm just looking at the list. There's so many good ones it's on the million dollar bad ass with Rachel Rodgers talking about scaling to seven figures on an then. Do it scared with Ruth Suco puzder national bestselling author talking about confidence in fear on the chest your body project talking about body image work mark as on women in the middle talking about thoughts about Midlife and body image and age. The Gen Y.. Lawyer been on the PODCAST. Fifty one first dates talking securities thought leadership school speaking body Puzzle Yoga. podcast the not your average runner podcast. I met with loving race photos so many good ones. I forgot about some of these. They're all really good. Oh Girl Boehner radio talking about orgasm blocking thoughts. That's a good one. The creativity school so many good ones so texture email two three four seven nine nine seven one seventy four and then when you get prompted text back the code word interview and we will email mill you with a list of all of them so fun that keep you guys set for awhile all right so let me ask answer some questions about coaching and business. I because I get a lot of these yes and I want to answer some of them so first question is do. I need to be a certified master coach to start a credible podcast and the answer is no nobody. Nobody cares seriously. I don't think any of you were like. Oh well. She's a certified master coach so I will listen to her podcast rate. You're like fuck your brain. That sounds like what I need. The having a particular certification or I think obviously I think it's a very good idea to get certified as a coach. If you want coach people a hundred percent but do you have to be serve as a master coach to start a podcast. Know what this question is really about. Is this person has doubts and fears about their own credibility. Being trained as a coach is important. If you're going to coach people and being trained as a master coaches for sure even better if you're going to catch the people but I don't think that that's the same question. As what makes you credible podcast host ray. What makes hugh credible as a podcast host is that you're teaching something that people get value from right and I think when you hire a coach you want to be sure that they are trained and certified? They're gonNA be working directly with you. I think when it comes to a podcast like you're just talking into the void and people can listen or not Ryan. They can turn you off if they don't like you so when you're talking about the podcast nobody is sticking around my podcast. Because I'm a certified master coach rather stick around my podcast because what I'm teaching resonates doesn't seem to help them. That's what gives credibility to them and that's where I have to find my own credibility because the truth is even being certified master coach doesn't mean that I necessarily will believe myself or that. I necessarily have something useful to say right. You need both so the answer is no but really the question for you is. Why are you down in your own credibility right? Where do you think that comes from? And why is that. What you're focusing on like my question when starting this podcast and in every episode episode is like what can I teach? That will help someone right. It's not do what do I need to do. So other people think I'm credible so that's such a big difference that you're focused on your own credibility your own qualifications. That's all about you. You're not being focused on. How can I show up and serve? What can I offer? People is a huge difference that impacts everything your business because when you are focused on yourself again it's not because you're a bad person or you're like self involved. It's all actually just insecurity rape when you're focused on yourself. Then that's all you're thinking of and it's very cramped defensive way of thinking and showing up whereas when you're focused on how you can serve and how you can help people. It's very expensive and hot and you are willing to be uncomfortable like if you're out there just to try to proved yourself that you're credible you're never gonNA WANNA be uncomfortable but if you're out there to serve other people you're going to be willing to be uncomfortable because you know that it matters more that you show up to serve them than that. You feel comfortable so so much is kind of embedded in the way you're even framing that question and kind of related somebody asked. What do you think draws people to coaches so oh I could answer this question two ways like? Why do I think coaching is popular? I think because a lot of people feel like life should not be as hard as it is and they're right about that like we aren't taught these basic tools and skills that enable us to both to have some more control of our life than we think we can and to stop controlling the shit that we actually can't control and be okay with that uncertainty. Right that's kind of the duality for me of the way that coaching is a blend of kind of these big big spiritual questions that humans have been asking forever and really concrete advice. That helps you change your own thoughts and feelings and behaviors and get sued. So you'd you get more control over the things you can control and you relinquish trying to control things you can't so it's really about like discernment and seeing clearly right. What's the difference ends between those two things so I think that people are drawn to coaching in general? Because in this day and age coaches are often the people who are offering that blend and answer those questions. UH-HUH I really think from time immemorial humans have had questions about like. What are we doing here? What is the good life? How should I live my life? Life like what is happening my brain. What is happening in my body? How do I make things happen? Like these are questions. People have had for Millennia and who answers those. Those questions has changed over time and like maybe it used to be the village elder the village or like the tribes wise person right or a shaman. And then maybe it was like the a local priest or the teacher or the clergy or maybe it was the professors or maybe it was that it was a therapist. And now maybe it's also coaches right like in the ancient Greeks Socrates was philosophers like who it is has changed but these questions have preoccupied humans forever so I think that's kind of which also coaching in general. Aw and that it's much more kind of forward and action and results oriented than some forms of talk therapy that people have experienced in terms of like. I don't know if this person for cement individual coaches like how can you become a coach that people are drawn to. It's not really the right question because you can't sort of try to become a person that other other people are drawn to as if that's the goal I think especially with coaching. I was talking about this. This was out with my mom actually and a friend of hers and she said like they came to my live. PODCAST taping being with bus pop tarts podcast. which will be on the interview list so they came that taping and then afterwards my students it was like a small group we only had twenty tickets? Alborz something I think and I think everybody who came ended up being. Either one of my students are podcast listener and so people were wanted to take pictures and we're seeing saying Nice things about my work all very lovely afterwards. My Mom's friend was like how much does like feel so amazing that you're changing people's lives and that they're telling you that you've helped them so much and you must feel like you're on cloud and I was like it's so interesting but not really like of course it's wonderful. I'm so happy for my students that this work is changing their lives but in order to become a person that people look to to learn to become confident and accept themselves. You have to have done that work yourself and so oh lick in order to put myself out there to teach others this work. I had to do the work myself. And then once you've done the work yourself and you truly feel confident and accept yourself. Compliments they're fine. They're nice like I. Of course think it's lovely that people want to give them to me but they don't really change my mood right. It's only when you're like desperately insecure. That complement it feels so amazing because it's like momentary relief invalidation from all your negative self critical thinking about yourself. If you actually like or love yourself then. China compliment is just like your like. Yeah I know like yeah. This work is great. I'm so glad that it's helping you. That's why I put it out there and you know I'm so proud out of you for doing it. It's just like you don't take it personally. I don't take the hating personally and I don't take the loving personally. It's all other people's.

facebook Emma Rachel Rodgers Ruth Suco Midlife rape hugh Ryan China Millennia
"hsp" Discussed on WAAM Talk 1600

WAAM Talk 1600

07:10 min | 1 year ago

"hsp" Discussed on WAAM Talk 1600

"They did charge someone but get a load of this Peter brown Walter who was the head of HSP Switzerland okay the conspiracy with French citizens to evade one point eight billion in taxes he was fined five hundred and sixty thousand and he received a very tough sentence of one year suspended sentence I'm not so sure that that isn't that doesn't that sound draconian yeah but anyway I you know I wrote an article about HSBC in its conduct in other banks back in September of twenty ten I was published in The New York Times in an article on title follow the dirty money but at that time in two thousand and twelve there was a Senate subcommittee senator Levin from Detroit let that and did a marvelous job in detail and the criminality of HSBC and what they found was that back then this is in two thousand and twelve HSBC had two point five trillion in assets eighty nine million customers three hundred thousand employees and operates in eighty nine countries that four and seventy branches in the U. S. that's principally at a New York here's what they they wound up doing they agreed to pay one point nine two billion in fines and forfeitures with respect to the two thousand and twelve investigation it was done by the U. S. A. laundered admitted that they move at least eight hundred and eighty one million nearly a billion dollars for the similar law cartel of Mexico and the north today by a cartel of Colombia they failed to monitor two hundred trillion key in wire transfers between two thousand and six and two thousand and nine and they felt a minor monitor billions in purchases of US currency including nearly ten billion that they picked up out of Mexico now they're Mexican branches were very focused in Santa lower in Korea con guess who comes from those said that city the leaders of this at a lower cartel including el Chapo Goodman so in in late two thousand eight to give you an idea of the reputation of age at HSBC there was a wire tap on a Mexican drug lord and during the course of the wire taps what he had to say was that the best place to launder money with HSBC there are many many other things that they did with respect to cash in one of the things that disturbs me the most is that they sold a billion dollars in bulk US currency to the cash starved bank of all righty bank in Saudi Arabia Saudi Arabia's largest private bank and guess what senior executive that bank is documented as a financial supporter of al Qaeda so you know that they needed the US dollars and they were able to get them from there but but in that defined in that deferred prosecution agreement from two thousand and twelve it was the third time in the past ten years that HSBC was penalized for similar conduct so it's it's not a very very short story and it's not a story that goes only with respect HSBC because I want to share with you some names of banks and finds that they have received over the last ten years but we can start with those banks that were admitted to criminal conduct in stripping intentionally removing information from wire transfers principally they were helping nations that have been sanctioned by the U. S. and other countries such as a run now Lloyds bank a three hundred fifty million for doing that Credit Suisse five and thirty six million for doing that ABN amro paid five hundred million for doing that Barclays paid two hundred ninety eight million for doing that ng paid six hundred nineteen million for doing that standard chartered bank paid a combined about six hundred and sixty million dollars in fines BNP paradise eight nine billion dollars commerce bank eight one point four five billion and Deutsche Bank was fined two hundred and fifty eight million but then if you go to banks that have admitted and I I find so interesting they they call it feel intentionally failing to maintain an anti money laundering program principally it means you move drug money the question is did you do it intentionally or did you do it because she had a lousy plan well I'll I'll let the public decide for that but here's BankAtlantic paid ten million in fines American Express fifty five million union bank of California twenty one point six million welcome via bank a hundred and sixty million ocean bank eleven million Lebanese Canadian bank they went out of business they forfeited a hundred and two million and HSBC in December of twenty twelve one point nine billion a rob a bank in February twenty eighteen three hundred sixty nine million four find the conspired to defraud the US will they had branches along the US Mexican border we're taking in huge amounts of cash it was not being reported so you can go from there to the to the banks that have admitted criminal conduct in connection with tax conspiracies and you have the union bank of Switzerland seven hundred eighty million Deutsche Bank five hundred fifty three million Credit Suisse there's billion that were involved in and that one and it goes on and on and on with with other banks so going back to what we said in the very beginning let's reflect on what was said by the senior executives of BCC I as they were sitting in orange jumpsuits behind bars when they said we're not doing anything the rest of the international banking community isn't doing believe me the US government has been got got much much better especially at night and the tax conspiracy side at on earth thing evidence about these types of criminality but the fact remains it's a rich for the day again and we've we've got to change the mentality within the banking community and it's my view that we need to find ways to get the sales side to embrace compliance you know I accidentally met a fellow who was very much involved in the sale side of an international bank when I was at a conference and and he said to me you know we don't have that kind of problem at my bank and I just kind of chuckled as I hear from everybody goes no no we don't because you know what senior management made me sign a personal guarantee you that if I and convince them to override compliance and we took in the account based upon my assertions in my teens assertions if the bank lost funds I would be responsible multiple folders for any losses at the banking Kurd and he said you know what compliance is now my friend I want to tell them everything and I can possibly tell them because the last thing I want to do is to be stuck under the umbrella of my personal.

Peter brown Walter HSP Switzerland
"hsp" Discussed on The Virtual Couch

The Virtual Couch

03:04 min | 2 years ago

"hsp" Discussed on The Virtual Couch

"I see the world differently than you. Do. I'm sorry. I see the pain in the world. I'm sorry. SPCA commercials. Break my heart. I'm sorry that I can't just watch that horrific vile movie with you and be comfortable. I'm sorry. I'm sorry. I'm sorry. We have to stop it. And we have to own that. It's our job to paint the stage for people, and when we're painting the stage for people with. I'm sorry. I'm problems says the problem they're going to meet us and go. Yeah. Okay. It's a problem when I step up for myself and say, this is how I am in this actually display strain. Get some just a moment. I'm not gonna do that not gonna see it and so- healers really believe that's the tasks there is to help people step more fully into that. Rabi year Asia's beat people. I ready. This is good. This is really good. What before in this? We talked forty minutes fast that just went Nikki, we could probably go whole day. It'd be really need someone to relevant with the timer before. I let you go. I want to hear I didn't get to enough of your story. I mean, so did you have another few minutes to kinda share absolutely do. So when when you so you didn't you didn't really have this awareness of of what that you are were in HSP or there was a name for it. So you are in your practice. You are doing the work. I was working in addiction work. What started to to make me realize? All right. I have some kind of perception ability as I did I did addiction work with doctors, and nurses, which is a very hard group of people again baptism by fire during the of Katrina, so overwhelmed, everyone in Louisiana was totally overwhelming fried trying to do that work and manage our own self care with everyone else's and what happened over. This year's is. I start went from the I o p the intensive outpatient where people don't live the facility come in. If you're not familiar with those terms, and then I moved into the trauma group, and as I was in the trauma group would started happening was in our clinical meetings, and that just means all the staff, so the medical doctors addiction gist, the clinical staff, the fair pissed would all get together and discuss different patients. Where were they in decide how to step them down or they needed more care, and we collaborate that way in this profession, and those professional to very much, my mentors, and I was the newbie, and I was learning from that they started saying to me, Nikki, will you watch these parents in the family groups, I moved from I o pey to the residential program. And what started happening as I met family members? And would do big groups with thirty people at of their their families and the patient. I would pick up vibes, and I could just see how interacted and I would know who their sexual abuse net family, and because I have such a super responsibility about not putting my own stuff. Right..

Nikki clinical staff SPCA Rabi Katrina Asia Louisiana forty minutes
"hsp" Discussed on The Virtual Couch

The Virtual Couch

02:11 min | 2 years ago

"hsp" Discussed on The Virtual Couch

"Therapist. You would be Medicated into being as AVI. And that that's really dangerous. You talked about both being addiction specialist. I did addiction in mind early career. And part of how this H is stuff was forming at the time when I didn't have the language was I would know in addiction, if someone would leave treatment, I I had the sense of knowing this person will be okay. Even though they didn't hit all this criteria that my treatment team thinks that they should base it hit before they leave. I would. No, I it's gonna be okay. Even if they have some slips this relapses, I know they're going to be okay. With other people. I would think this person is not going to be okay. And I would have thought this person is gonna die every now. And then I would have all these judgments, and this is what happens for ages piece in. Then they have these judgments what's wrong with me. That's main. Why am I putting that on someone? How dare is a therapist put that even idea thought. Within myself on someone. I don't know I couldn't possibly know that and really participate in that shaming that self shaming and having to really get past that to a point of having a step back, and because of my profession, and this is what I think the average HSP person isn't getting unless they're in this field or some of my hairstylist figured out because they see people a lot like we do our to our back to back, and what that gives us is this great, big experiment. We're not taking notes on it. We're not documenting it in every way that a scientific experiment goes down. But we are having Hurson after personnel to person come in and give feedback, and that's a very interesting perspective in so I would have people's tell me like the same thing like four people out of seeing five people in a day would come in. And tell me things on the same exact topic in the same exact way without knowing each other. I thought were. Just going on here. And I the common thread in my early addiction work, what got validated for me as a new kind of baby green therapist and therapist in from New Orleans..

New Orleans HSP Hurson
"hsp" Discussed on The Virtual Couch

The Virtual Couch

04:28 min | 2 years ago

"hsp" Discussed on The Virtual Couch

"Clients deal with their sensitivity invalids bar? Oh, yeah. Tracking. This is good. Okay. Good track. Ma'am. I get lost. When you were when you say that it how does that present as a kid would it look like anxiety or what it looks like a guess while exert more anxiety. Mornings -iety says sometimes it can be a lot of parrots notice it at first in the physical round sensitive kids may have a sensitivity to light to sounds to crowds to fabrics that type of thing. So again, just like the site. We may be are more comfortable with our tactile senses than our emotional senses. But if we step back in look, oh, that's where I was going. What I found an my my hunch don't have any statistics on this. I don't know if we ever will. And that that's part of why made my show is in in this emotional kind of round we can only measure so much. So I don't know how much science is going to get on board with what I'm observing within my own process and not of my clients over the thirteen years, I've been doing this one of the things that I see that. Kind of a wild trend for me to see is that I think most of us that are born highly sensitive are often born in the families where other people are not. Okay. And I believe that there's often this I had parents of personality disorders, which means they did not hold personal responsibility for themselves. Okay. Yeah. If I'm a highly sensitive kid with dysfunctional parents who may be aren't very emotionally intellectually mature in their emotional processing and their emotional intelligence, and they don't take personal responsibility. They don't own their own stuff. So it's. New year the one that's over-reacting. You're the one. Messages, a really strong, and what I believe conceptually. What happens is those parents? It's like the responsibility is a ball and that like a ball or balloon, and it floats around in the family, and because the parents aren't holding it here comes highly sensitive kid now as a rule, we we have an over develops of responsibility. Okay. That that's a factory setting in. Or is that I think it's both. I think it's a factory setting. But I also believe if we have that factory setting and we lined up born into a family where the parents aren't taking responsibility for their own behavior their own flaws, their own psychological work that we all as doing whether we're sensitive or not what happens is that all of responsibility floats and a little ages PK, just grabs. On top of the normal developmental milestones of children being egocentric. And that's why kids think even if when their parents are having a great divorce and are saying all the right things. It's still say will know why is it my fault? It must be my fault. If I was good enough because their world worldview isn't big enough to hold that it it's not them. So on top of the developmental milestones. H P kids. Hold a tremendous amount of responsibility. So you go sorry to cut in but cut it. And look it makes me feel like maybe this is part of the way that we want to just immediately solve everything. But people listening to this if they are saying, okay, they go through divorce. One of the kids doesn't seem care the other kid. Your does feel like it's all them is it that easy to say HSE kit, or is that just you know, one of the many traits of HFS peak it it's one of the many traits of HSP kid. It really is. And it would who those parents to reach. Out to somebody like me and just ask some questions and really understand is the parent sensitive is the parent. Not okay. If the parent isn't highly sensitive, how do they become an ally for the child, and how do they not participate in the what's wrong with you? You know, why won't you just do this like your sibling? I don't get it. Because I don't feel this way. Therefore, something must be wrong with you all the, you know, the person internalizes that what's wrong with what I do. Yes. So one of the workshops that I teach don't know when I'm teaching it again, as I say this I taught it last year is a how to unleash the superpowers of high sensitivity..

HSE HSP thirteen years
"hsp" Discussed on The Virtual Couch

The Virtual Couch

04:22 min | 2 years ago

"hsp" Discussed on The Virtual Couch

"Our even. To start right out with you. We kind of joked off offline off air, whatever the kids say these days were very aligned things about mindfulness Antic being present. Right. We are start with various antics story. Are you ready? I'm ready if I did more in the production value, there would be some very very touching music right now that will take you back to a seventeen year old Tony over bay at his home growing up this very quick. So I went to the leadership camp over over a summer between my junior and senior years, and it was supposedly these future leaders of the world. It was in upstate New York had to go through an interview process. So we've got like a thirty kids from the US thirty or forty kids from the world these guys now, I'm I'm the biggest not success whole group. They all these doctors attorneys, congressmen whatever, but I come home there when you went to teenage boys the other language gets a little bit. So I'm home. And I think I'm still very using colorful language, my mom, kind of called me out on it. And I said something the effective fine. I will never say that word again. I can't lie. I'm now forty nine. So I know the math. But I really have I have friends say batteries all the time. And I laugh, and it's funny, and I don't judge. I'm very I'm very, but to me, it's just been something. Like, it's almost like a when the fonz happy days can say sorry. So the name of your podcast, Nikki, I'm about to like, I don't know. Yes. So noticed on the link to invite you to be emotional bad, a dollar sign dollar side. Did notice that I did. So you're really pushing your Grefe edge to my. So I don't wanna to love your I've now been on your podcast in again it so, but I don't know Nikki being offended by feel like it would be an insult to say that you are from the very successful podcast, emotional bad. A yes, there you go. I'll take it's close up. Yeah. Just at the end of just throwing out there. You know, do it. If you feel it feel it. So great believes the time though. And you know, when I reached out to you now that I've done the deep dive, I would love to talk to you about so many things, and we were even talking about a topic very near to my heart of of fighting porn addiction. And that sorta thing like, you're you have a lot of yours, which is. I. Irish out you because I had a client. Come in ask me, if I knew anything about HSP, and in my brain, I did ESP jokes. I did all kinds of stuff. I didn't stay allowed because I want to be there for this client. I don't know HSP's. And then I just did a little bit of digging end didn't realize there this thing. And but I'm I'm coming to this. I just wanna hear teach me, Nikki, okay, highly sensitive people. That's what that that's that stands for. I didn't come across this term in school. I've got an undergraduate in psychology. I've got a master's degree in counseling. And this was not something that even therapists were taught. And I think people that are figuring this out. That's a real shocker that we weren't being taught about high sensitivity. I think just now starting to enter graduate programs. Dr Elaine, Aaron and our Judith Orlov. Who's a psychiatrist Elaine Aaron is a researcher a Dr lane Aaron really started this research. And so if you get into her work, it's very much. It's like reading a textbook. It will bring you back to college. But it's really that kind of nitty gritty scientific based information on high sensitivity being real and the best way that I can explain it to you is I'm looking with glasses on and if and I'm sitting there without glasses on I don't have context on if you and I are standing next to each other. And we both do a seeing test in I test. It makes perfect sense to us that your sense of sight is going to be different than my sense of sight and just because I have a stronger sense of sight that doesn't elicit any uncomfortableness that doesn't sound. Woo at all, right. Okay. When we go into feelings immediately all of us have the judgment of batches. Woo. So for standing next to each other..

Nikki Elaine Aaron HSP US New York Tony Dr Elaine researcher Judith Orlov seventeen year
"hsp" Discussed on The Virtual Couch

The Virtual Couch

03:49 min | 2 years ago

"hsp" Discussed on The Virtual Couch

"Then on the website. This is lane Aaron she says dear highly sensitive person or anybody raising highly sensitive child, which she calls HSE shows. I'm late Aaron bien researching high sensitivity in one thousand nine hundred and continue to do research on it. Now, also calling it sensory processing sensitivity USPS traits scientific term. I never played right at self help books, but those seen this tree trait seem to gain great a great deal of knowledge from writing about it. She's written a few books, but here's some of the data that she's collective your trait is normal. It's founded about fifteen to twenty percent of the population, which I thought was interesting because she said that with that large of a number. It's too many to be a disorder, and Nikki talks about that will but on the pike cast, but not enough to be well understood by the majority of those around you. She says it's an eight in fact, biologists around it over one hundred species probably more from fruit flies birds fish, dogs, cats, horses, and primates, and this trait reflects a certain type of survival strategy being observant before acting. So the brains of highly sensitive persons HSP's, actually work a little differently than others. And to learn more about that Shiksha as a leak to the research for HSP's some of the other traits. You're more aware of other subtleties. This is mainly because your brain processes information and reflects on it more deeply, so we've if you wear glasses, for example, you see more than others by noticing war. But she also says you're more easily overwhelmed, if you notice everything you're naturally going to be over stimulated when things are too intense or complex or chaotic or novel for a long time. She said this trait is not a new discovery, but it has been misunderstood because he just peace preferred a look before entering new situations often called shy, but shyness learned not an eighth. And in fact, thirty percent of HSP's are extroverts all of the trade is often mislabeled as introversion it's also been called inhibited nece fearfulness neuroticism and some just peace behave in these ways, but it is not an eight to do. So and not the basic trait. And this was an interesting thing that Elaine mentioned as well since the titties differently in different cultures and cultures where? In cultures where it's not now you'd a just peace tend to have low self esteem. They're told don't be so sensitive so that they start to feel abnormal. So she says though, you are definitely not alone. For example, tens of thousands of people subscribed to newsletter she has called the comfort zone. And so you can check that out on her site HFS person dot com, but my guest today. Nikki is an hour. And we'll talk about the plugs. I'll have the links on the show notes that sort of thing Nikki has programs. She has an incredible podcast with hundreds of episodes. And so I just really encourage you to go look up, Nikki after you hear this wonderful interview about what is a highly sensitive person. And again, the reason I'm so excited to present this information after I did the interview with Nikki and done a little bit of a deep dive even trying to learn more to to help some of the clients that I thought this might apply to just became a little bit more as I became more aware, I pointed a few of my clients to the the YouTube interview since recorded this podcast yet and just got some. Really really interesting feedback people that come opened up with some things that they never shared with anybody before because this whole concept of highly sensitive person, and some of the things that Nikki talks about helped people feel a little bit better. Because I think that a lot of people if they're told, hey, you're too sensitive. Don't cry don't be baby just get over it. They learned to bottle a lot of the things up that they feel or even things they experience or express or see or or hear. And so I just really feel like this is one of these episodes that is going to resonate with a lot of people again, maybe even between ten and twenty percent of the population identifies. HSP's and you'll hear a pretty funny story of why I had a very hard time even saying the name of Nikki's podcast. But Nick, he's been mazing fantastic. And I highly encourage at checkout her website and her podcast. So let's get right to my interview with Nikki Eisenhower..

Nikki Eisenhower HSP Aaron bien Nikki Shiksha USPS HSE Elaine YouTube Nick twenty percent thirty percent
"hsp" Discussed on The Virtual Couch

The Virtual Couch

02:32 min | 2 years ago

"hsp" Discussed on The Virtual Couch

"But again, I could not wait to get to this interview with today's guests. Nikki eisenhower. So we talk about it on the podcast a lot. So I'll kind of give I'll just give a real brief overview, Nikki is she's a psychotherapist. She's also an international coach, and she is host of the award winning podcast called emotional Badea. But more about that title coming up you have to listen to the inning of this episode, but we talked to her about her experience as and working with what is called highly sensitive people HSP and some estimates say that somewhere between ten and fifteen percent of the population would fall. Under the spectrum of HSP and highly sensitive person is believed to experience the world differently than others highly sensitive, people are more aware of subtleties. And they process information more deeply, and I just have to tell you. This is one of those things where I can now say that I've been doing this career for a little while and a huge evidence-based guy feel like just found such a flow with whether we're talking about couples relationships this mostly focused Airbnb tea or for individuals acceptance and commitment therapy, if it's parenting, it's the nurtured heart approach, and I just I just love these things are all evidence based modalities they kind of play nicely together. And I feel like it just kind of gives me a nice holistic view of ways to help individuals help couples help families, and I had someone that I really was enjoying working with. But just because you enjoy working with someone doesn't mean that you always feel like you're doing all that you can. And it was just it was killing me the that I wasn't able to help this person and this person actually, then brought me this information. And asking me if I've ever heard of any just pee a highly sensitive person and just by that title. It doesn't sound very. Right. Very scientific or very disowns. Like well. Yeah, you'll sensitive sometimes like the Mike cry at the end of a movie some dog and cat, get reunited or something. Like that. Maybe I'm sensitive highly sensitive, but the more expert dig the HSP is more than just a a title. There's a lot more under the surface. So what I let me too was just a quick deep dive, you do a Google search one of the first things I found was h s person dot com and street a little bit about what Jesperson dot com says. And then I'm gonna get to this interview with NICKY. But just kind of says this you easily overwhelmed by such things as bright lights strong smells coarse fabrics sirens. Nearby DEA rattle when you have a lot to do a short amount of time. Do you make a point of avoiding violent movies and TV shows teed withdraw during busy days into bed.

Nikki eisenhower Nikki Airbnb NICKY Google Mike fifteen percent
"hsp" Discussed on Risky Business

Risky Business

04:04 min | 2 years ago

"hsp" Discussed on Risky Business

"We've been hearing in at least since late two thousand fifteen when China adopted its so-called anti-terrorism law. That's a law that very much raised the backdoor concerned because it requires companies to quote provide technical support in assistance, including decryption close quote to the government in terrorism investigations terrorism investigations in China. They tend to be a brought tends to be a broad concept everywhere. It's a very broad concept in China between that and the much broader intelligence support law that I mentioned a moment to go. It's just clear as former legal matter the China. China's government can of course, obliged companies operating there to do with the state feels as necessary by way of providing technical support. So there it is you can judge Mr. n statements in light of that backdrop. So if this were normal episode of risky business adamant, I would've loved about it and said, yeah, hey, but they go Chesney giving us a little bit more detail on that totally agree with bobby's analysis in this. You know, the one thing I'll say is these the products people are really worried about from alway are there products that are formed the backbone of wireless networks, those are not things that you just drop in and install they come with support contracts. They come with intentional backdoors. So people engineers in the company can come in and troubleshoot. So when you. When you buy into the way ecosystem, you're not just buying products. That might have a backdoor sitting on them. You're buying into a multi year relationship where there are many many things that could be exploited. You're going to be dealing with all manner of contractors and personnel. And that's another big thing that people don't often talk about oh, we're going to send him specialist from Beijing. You know that sort of stuff now look this tiles nicely with the story from the New York Times written by the former champion of the Federal Communications Commission. Tom huila? I find this story a little bit off to actually because essentially what we've got here is Huila trying to say that the Trump administration has sort of back pedaled on mandating secure standards, the five G, and I think well when is that I've worked anyway, seems seems like an old thing to take issue with. But I'm curious feel thoughts. Yeah. So we Lurs complaint seems to be mostly paperwork complaint in that. When he was he was at the administration, they put in requirements around the security of five G, but kind of standard government language about things being secured, not lots of specificity. The Trump administration has dropped that retracted a white paper. Now, I don't really understand what is behind the motivation of the Trump FCC to do that. In the end, we've had trouble with these networks for years. Right. So these standards are created by called the GP this body of bunch of companies that run these nets. Works and build the underlying technology like Qualcomm in such and the promise they have a very secretive process. This is done not out in public, but in private even buying getting access to some of these standards requires you to have special membership in the organization, and as been proven over and over again that is not how you build good secure cryptographic protocols over and over again, we've had serious breaches in HSP as security GSM security LT security, and it doesn't look like five G has done a lot of work here. If these are going to change what we really need is a open standards process. Much more like t-, less the standards behind us one point three. So that you can have good professional Taga Fers up part of the Christian standards in the end. This isn't actually the hardest possible. Cryptographic problem the provision device onto a wireless network is a very heavy duty situation. You put in a physical sim or you you provision in e sim this isn't a situation where you need to be able to handle all kinds of anonymous traffic like you do in the teal s situation..

China Tom huila technical support Federal Communications Commiss Qualcomm Beijing New York Times Chesney HSP Mr. n bobby five G
Italian bonds tumble after Rome agrees higher deficit

Bloomberg Daybreak

01:58 min | 2 years ago

Italian bonds tumble after Rome agrees higher deficit

"Daybreak Italian bonds plunging today by the most in almost four months after the country's populous leaders gain the upper hand in a battle over spending. Let's discuss this now with Deir mar head of FX strategy for HSP security's good morning and welcome. So Italy sets a wider deficit target than expected. Does that raise questions for you about the Italian government's debt sustainability? And it raises questions about why people at you were so nervous about the dollar on the fiscal side. When as we can see this morning, you know, Europe has fiscal issues to deal with and you just on your traffic news. And I think it's pretty clear from the numbers. The Italian government are proposing and at the direction of travel, and it's not the one the fiscal rules would would aim for. There is there's likely to be a deterioration in the structural deficit rather than the improvement. That's required. So yeah, it's it's not moving in the direction. You would want at debt sustainability part of that is obviously going to hinge on how much are these yields move. And and for how long, but this is the market verdict ball, you know, we see who euro lower. We've seen the bond markets lower equity markets lower. And this is just how the world works. So would you support see some pushback from the European Commission? I think I think that can wait. It's the only has to formally submit his budget for an October fifteenth deadlines if you're like rusty six weeks away. So I think that's that's the formal process begins. But, you know, our our only columnists Heritage's to see if you had to like, you're done isn't he will be put back under what they called the excessive deficit procedure, which is kind of if you like the the risk slaps on the, but it can carry penalties. They haven't been used in the past. So yeah, I think there will be pushed back, but you know, we can have a from the EU perspective. I guess they can argue. Let's wait and see. We'll we'll come into where we see the formal submission when whenever that

Italian Government Deir Mar Hsp Security Italy Europe EU European Commission Heritage Four Months Six Weeks
"hsp" Discussed on Pet Life Radio

Pet Life Radio

01:48 min | 2 years ago

"hsp" Discussed on Pet Life Radio

"A major shakeup in leadership at the Amine society of the. United, States otherwise. Known as h. s. US prompted by allegations of sexual misconduct against CEO wing Pacelli and other leaders has, rattled animal welfare circles but its. Impact, on the organization's overall mission and future remains unknown allegations of sexual misconduct by for Sally against. Female employees extending back more than a decade we're I made public in January and the, rumblings of other indiscretions organization are rising. In its aftermath Sally sometimes polarizing figure. In terms of support in the veterinary community resigned in early February but, the damage may already been done Shelley's work in animal welfare began early he was. Appointed executive director of the fund for animals at twenty three and he joined h s US in nineteen Ninety-four four, as, a lobbyist in spokesperson he was installed as CEO of the US In two thousand four and was involved in the passage of more than twenty. Five federal animal welfare statutes during his tenure Anti-noise facilities, views and his efforts. With HSA conflicted with the views of professional veterinary organizations like the av, particularly on food, animal issues Shelly highlighted these differences when he helped s. US launch an alternative to avian a humane society veterinary medical association otherwise known as HIV in two thousand and eight Gary block MS NDA CV I, am board president for the now nine thousand members strong, h. as a says he doesn't anticipate the fallout from h. s. USA's turmoil with negatively impact the veterinary community or reach HSP MA.

US Sally CEO Pacelli HSA HSP MA Shelley Shelly executive director Gary president
"hsp" Discussed on The Dan Le Batard Show with Stugotz

The Dan Le Batard Show with Stugotz

02:00 min | 3 years ago

"hsp" Discussed on The Dan Le Batard Show with Stugotz

"Be that he dude did he bought that about hsps i'll do do bebop bop bop all right let's get him on plays let's get him on before the end of the show and the uh surgery laser fodder d c c don lemon tires show with is still god's on espn radio and it's opera straight talk it's brought to you by straight talk wireless best phones best network no contract well here's the straight talks to god's is worried about adam schefter yeah i book schefter on the show for noon today because its nba trade deadline day and what do you think it's funny to do nba with the nfl guy because adam schefter really likes to hodges both he does both yeah i mean you're you're going for the job we take it seriously but i'm concerned because normally when a tech schefter he gets right back to me i texted i'm a couple of time this morning saying i just reminding you noon eastern mba calls i'm telling you did every time i do that within fifteen seconds i get a response he has not responded wants and in fact the last time he responded to me he said to me i haven't slept in two weeks but on the run and then i saw ahmad sports at of that night and his left eye was drooping ghirma put on the poll was adam schefter is left eye drooping from fatigue yes or no i'll tell you i was concerned man yoda that hate from asia from his office it looks you know it's got the michigan thing be i didn't know all the bucks that he's never add and all that stuff there and i'm tanya i was good sir it's the first time i was concerned for adam schefter sal in all the years of a watch it on october and you over the last of miles and the last month i've developed a concern for adam schefter general misery and life over the last month on his show well this is why i'm not saying he is miserable in his personal life i'm seeing that his i'm saying his professional life seems to be a real misery seems unpleasant just not sleeping for two weeks yes chase in the story chasing stories getting football people managed you.

adam schefter hodges asia espn nba nfl ahmad michigan football two weeks fifteen seconds