35 Burst results for "HMO"

Faking a Factory: Creating and Operating a Realistic Honeypot

Cyber Security Weekly Podcast

06:06 min | Last month

Faking a Factory: Creating and Operating a Realistic Honeypot

"I want to touch on the set up of the honeypot first. So as you were alluding to at your presentation, one of the reasons for behind pod is to understand the kind of attackers that would be interested in manufacturing facility to compromise it. So can you tell us how you set up the ICS components industrial control systems components like the hitch? The robotics workstation and try to make it as realistic as possible. So we went through we we already had four different PLC's we've used for other projects, and so we took those sees initially we were going to try and create the logic. I. But we found out is that it was actually a lot easier for us to go through and create the h. m. i.. So he went through a couple of of what our factory should be. and. We decided that we would go with a prototyping factory and the reason for that is that we could make changes on the fly would be a little bit easier instead of only making one type of part, they're pretty much always going to have the same setup. So we wanted something that was a little bit flexible so that if we went through and made changes, it wouldn't. Be, unusual. So we took our pile sees a connected them into an HMO for the. We just started dropping in some different components of what we thought would be at a prototyping facility, and that included a like a hopper or a container for our product. Basically, it was plastics, and then that would feed into a process heater that would heat up the material that would then go through an extruder and that would essentially similar to like a three D. printer or a an injection moulding print out the product, and then it would go off to a conveyor belt essentially and then get shipped out. So we had the appeal see we had different peels for different components. One of the components that one of the PC's was for the agitator in the tank as well as one of. The pumps. So the product would flow out of the tank using the agitator and then get pumped into the process that was essentially one of our PC's we had another one map for the process heater. Then another one map for the stronger and conveyor belts, and then a final one for the politics and the traffic I challenge I was just GonNa say listen I'm not too familiar with industrial countries. Can you explain what Piazzi is and what Tim is So An H. M. I is basically just a graphical interface. So when a switch on appeal see is turned on or off, usually control that through the Hmo I, just really interface, it can do other things but the primary function of the. Our human machine interface is a graphical user interface. Essentially, the L. sees a parable logic controller it can be set up in a number of ways, but typically you have logic on the device you have inputs and. Output S-. So one of the inputs might be a temperature sensor another, which could be the RPM from a motor. The outputs can be as simple as an honor offs function to turn on and off the process heater or the conveyor belt could also be something that you would use to increase or decrease the temperature of the process heater the PAC controls through. I O ports it has logic in there so that you can automatically perform functions. So if the temperature goes above five hundred degrees Fahrenheit than the PLC would automatically turn that down to four hundred fifty degrees Fahrenheit. For instance, you can set preconditions within the appeal see, and then you can also perform other demands that are remotely done through something like the. HMO. So you have fall components in your sat out, you have the agitator, the burner, the conveyor about and polite tyler, and you have a POC inter phasing with each of these components to allow the operator to adjust to operate at the components. So mostly for monitoring some some of it was for turning the process on and off, and so they it they. Had A bunch of different or a few different functions primarily turning it off and on and monitoring while the actual PLC's and we use some kind of pseudo logic in there to make it look realistic although they weren't actually connected to a real conveyor belt they weren't connected to a real prosecutor. So we simulated some of that data. So how long did it take for your team to come out with this design including the logic in the PRC's? Once. We had kind of settled on what our business was. We took about two weeks to get all of the the. All of the logic setup up that included setting up all the monitoring and all the other pieces as well, and you also have robotics on his well. Yes. So that was a simulated by one of the PLC's we didn't have a real robotic arm we did have a robotics work station. Bats some software on there, but it didn't control anything. So the way that you exposed visit a net is by the time I and also the PIC's as well. Correct. So initially, we had exposed the the robotics work station and all of the Piel sees and we did that using VNC on view only after a while we weren't really seeing anything so. We exposed with on VNC using read and write, and that's when we started getting more attacks and how is this setup different from your previous research where you were looking where research water system and the gas monitoring system I think initially on those that they had just kind of exposed certain ports in certain services online that were common I, think with the. Confident it was common to a gas station setup. This one was a lot more interactive. It required a bit more monitoring a day to day basis the other projects we were just able to collect logs whereas this one, we were actually monitoring what people were doing on our system by doing video recordings and stuff like

HMO PLC PRC Piel Prosecutor PAC Piazzi Tyler TIM
"hmo" Discussed on FoundMyFitness

FoundMyFitness

02:52 min | 3 months ago

"hmo" Discussed on FoundMyFitness

"So babies that are fed formula their microbes looks very different than than breast milk, and actually what we see is breasts melk has a phone of at one of the major components of breast milk is this type of carbohydrate in human milk all rides are HMO's, and for a long time, it was really a mystery why those molecules were there because we knew that humans can't digest human male colleagues sacrilege. So why would a mother put so much? Effort into creating these compounds and putting them in her milk. It for baby can't even digest, it will come to find out. It's actually got microbes that are digesting these HMO's. So in breast milk, there's not just food for the baby in the form of lactose and fads but these HMO's that are food for the baby's growing microbiology. So the mothers feeding the baby and also her baby's growing microbiome, and these HMO's are very specific for human milk. And so far have not been able to be replicated in formula so that we think is a large reason why the communities are so different, and then of course antibiotics, the average American child is on a round antibiotics every year, and we know that that's a huge makes a huge impact on on that growing community. So all these things that happen early in life could really set a child on a trajectory potentially for having potentially A. Very good healthy robust microbiome or potentially one that that isn't as good and so I think as parents especially of new children, we need to be very mindful of the choices that we make early in a child's life because many of these microbes that we have by the time, we're say the age of five, any of these microbes will be with us throughout our entire lives. So we really want to get that community started in the best possible way. And Nature has come up with a way to get that microbial community started in the best possible way. Milk. But. That's not the end of the story of HMO's they also serve as decoys to protect the infant from gut infections in order for bad bacteria to cause infection, they must first target and bind to specific carbohydrates found on the cells that line that gut however, the overall structure and shape of HMO's mimics that of bacterial targets, the bad bacteria bind to the HMO's instead preventing them from establishing themselves in the gut. Another interesting quality of HMO's is their capacity to breakdown biofilms sticky slimy communities that the curious create to protect themselves from antimicrobials and antibiotics not only that they appear to enhance the activity of some antibiotics by increasing membrane permeability of pathogenic bacteria. So. To sum up. HMO's there the third most abundant factor in human breast milk after lactose in fat and they play roles in establishing infants gut microbial community, a key component of the immune system..

HMO
"hmo" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

WCBM 680 AM

04:09 min | 4 months ago

"hmo" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

"HMO's health maintenance organizations Are the problem in it, and they're awful and they're hurting people. This was led by Democrats, of course, and nobody was louder than Senator Ted Kennedy. What was left on said Was that Ted Kennedy created the HMO's with legislation in the seventies. I believe It was his baby. It was his monster than a graded. Well, we're going to solve whatever problem existed back then. Before my time and we're going to create these health maintenance organizations. They will save people money. They will do this. They will do that. And then when it became inconvenient They said the HMO's are why we need to take over more so they they've been doing none of this is by accident. They've been doing this incrementalism. Forever. Since the Great society and even before that they've been trying to take over have socialized medicine in this country. Once once parts of Europe, particularly the UK went this way after World War two. Progressives in this country have been trying to do the exact same thing. They've not been able to get it in one bite. So they've been trying to take it and nibble after noble after nimble so that when they will, agent Moser bad you're the guy who created HMO's Alright your law the bill you wrote that became law. Created HMO's. If HMO's are bad, why in the hell would we trust you to come up with what we should do? Next? Obama care if healthcare is such a disaster that it needs revamping that it needs more than his people are being hurt by it. Why in the hell would we trust? The people who designed the system to give us a new system. You know it hasn't been tried in this country. For a very, very long time, and you can trace back the exponential growth in the cost of health care in this country. Two government involvement in it. What hasn't been tried in this country is getting government out of it. Getting government out of the way right now, thanks to Obamacare. The federal government determines what is acceptable in your health insurance plan. You might not have a need you. Probably in fact, don't have a need for artificial insemination. Probably don't have got kids are You. Your kids are grown or you don't want kids or whatever. Most people don't Need it. Don't want it. But you got it. And it ain't cheap. So your premiums that have gone up over the past few years since Obama care are in part, and that's just one example. There are a 1,000,000 different things that the federal government Now forces to be required in your health insurance. You're paying for it, whether you want it or not. It used to be. There's all sorts of different varieties of plans. There's all sorts of different options. You Khun get coverage for the basics. You get catastrophic. If you want a plan that covers artificial insemination if you're having difficulty getting pregnant You convey by a plan. That covers it. Now you have no choice. So the 34% maybe tops who are interested in that. R. Able to pay less, and everybody else has to pay more. Meanwhile, the government says everybody's paying Mauritz unfair. Something's wrong. We need thio interfere even more under Obama care. You don't get to choose what you want. You don't get to choose what you.

HMO federal government Obama Senator Ted Kennedy UK Europe Moser Great society Khun
"hmo" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

WCBM 680 AM

01:40 min | 4 months ago

"hmo" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

"Welcome. Welcome. Welcome to our To get More of the media reaction in a second. I just saw this story. It's gonna be it's gonna be widely reported. I guarantee this is going to be widely reported, because it involves many other things that Democrats want health care. Without evil. Health insurance companies are And all that jazz. That's just Who they are and what they need to demonize health insurance companies because they want to destroy health insurance companies. It's kind of funny. They created the health care system that we have right now with Obamacare. And what are they doing in the system is horribly broken, and we need to revamp Medicare. For all. We need a complete takeover. We've got 80% takeover. Now we need a complete takeover because 80% takeover didn't work. It's the argument that big government has failed us. What we need is bigger government. It's the only Solution. New York Times Major U. S HEALTH INSURERS report BIG profits Benefiting from the pandemic we're gonna demonize, you know. If you remember during the Clinton administration, and throughout the nineties, really in the early two thousand's well, Democrats were pushing up till the Obama care thing. There was the mantra. HMO's air, terrible HMO's are really hurting their customers. HMO's are awful. We need to take over more of the health insurance industry because.

HMO New York Times Obama Clinton administration
From Glassblower to Software Developer using Free Coding Resources with Michael Pimentel

Learn to Code with Me

46:03 min | 5 months ago

From Glassblower to Software Developer using Free Coding Resources with Michael Pimentel

"And we're back in today's episode. I speak with Michael, Pimentel. Michael Story is fascinating worked in the glassblowing industry specifically for film sets for nine years before he started teaching himself how to Code. And what makes him even more? Interesting is the fact that he doesn't have a college degree. Anti never went to a coding bootcamp. He is entirely self-taught. and. That is exactly what we're GONNA be talking about today. How he taught himself to code. WOW, working fulltime. How guys first job in tack and how he got more roles in the tech industry as time went on. If you tips for staying motivated while learning how to Code. This episode is for you enjoy. Hey. Michael. Thank you so much for coming on the show today. It will on six February I'm real excited to talk with you. You have like interesting. Self taught experience in. That's what I would like to dive into I. Could you share with us how you got started in software engineering? Absolutely so kind of Story kind of goes back to a few years ago when I was working for a company that made life for the film industry now working there as a manufacturer glassblowing really interesting work. Kind of working in a manufacturing type of shop warehouse, loud, working on a lay, that spun in a really hot environment I was there for a really long time and things just. Kinda didn't progress in terms of career. Wise and financially it was just really typical I live in California and California being one of the most expensive place live. It just wasn't sustainable. married and I have a child and that it just wasn't something that I could maintain so it kind of motivated me to start thinking I need to. Probably either go back to school or another another route career choice so i. can you know build to support and have a career that can provide general finance, support and everything like that, so it kind of led me to back to. My interest in computers and everything like that, so I started to do some online, searching and everything like that and it. Brought me to software development coding, you know some booming career choice that is really big right now and everything like that was like okay. Maybe I should go back to school for that, but at the time it really wasn't the best option I went acted. As a couple of glasses time, that's what I could afford at my community college, and then just got really difficult to maintain a full-time job and take one or two classes, and it got really expensive, because my wife was what was going to school in college and everything like that, so it was really difficult for us to support both less going especially you know. Not really knowing what I wanted to do. So I I did a lot of searching and I came across recode camp and recode camp. You know like when you get on their landing page. It's like learning one to code for free and always people learn this way and I was like wait three. This isn't make sense. This will usually scams off there. Start off Rian. Then you have to pay something and everything like that and you know to my surprise actually was free, and then so I started I jumped right in, and just started to go to the curriculum, and it sparked my interest and I was like. Wow, this is really cool. It's it kind of. Goes about in a way that. Gets you interested really quickly? You know with hd Mounsey assassin how you can get feedback on the webpage really quickly. Let's kind of how it started because I. Just I just couldn't go. That route was a canoe into school because it was just really expensive and I already had like a car loan, I couldn't get like student loan. It was just wasn't really practical. It's like cave. Do put myself some really extreme debt that I don't know if it's GonNa lead to something. That's GONNA pay in the end so I had to find another option and looked like learning to code on my own free resources when that resource beginning with recode camp was was the route I took. Awesome so I, want to backtrack a little bit to your. Your work before you got into coding, so you you okay? You said he was a manufacturing role. I haven't made notes that you were a glass blower which anti note that is for movies today shows. Definitely. What is it glasses? Sure okay, so a glass blower, typically like of someone like Google glass large usually someone that takes some raw material which consists of the materials, t make glass essentially depending on what what the? The. End Product is going to be different types of glass. Of course so basically you take them in you hit Heaton furnace, or with a really hot torture claim so that it becomes like in this malleable state, and then you shape it essentially so what I did there? We work on a leave, and we basically built like the light bulb globe. It's spun on a lathe and then you would really. Really hot with a hydrogen oxygen burners, two thousand degrees, and then you shape it based on certain dimensions so basically they would take that, and then we'd have a filament type that would basically you know, have some kind of chemical reaction than light up base off whatever the the fixture needed you know for the filming, so the specific light that they made there was an Hmo which is like a chemical. Name that I really don't know all the details into it, but it basically replicates the color of the sun so like if you see like on film sets, use those lights that kind of are the background that make everything look real, daytime and night-time filming. Those are the lights that we made when I worked there we're one of the few American companies still made them like with our hands, still as opposed to a machine meaning making them in a in a warehouse somewhere. But in a sense, essentially, that's what it was. We were just making them with a glassblowing. That's what I did while working there while I think nine or ten years. We Really, oh my goodness. Wow so start I'm surprised. It was that long because for people. Listening to this show were actually speaking through video so I can see you so I'm like. Wow doesn't look like he can hold a John. Young so young to have a job for that long. Then start another career. Okay? Wow, that awful. How did you get into that? Because that feels very niche, you're essentially making bulldogs. That camera crews in production crews are using on the sets of TV shows I mean. We were chatting before we recorded you live in California. I know like the entertainment industry is. In the movie industry in all of that is obviously very prominent out there is that kind of how that happened or It's interesting so actually the reason why I got into it is because my dad worked in that industry or like thirty years, and I had come out of working at John Juice and I was their. First job actually was working as a team member workup to insistent manager, and then eventually needed to make more money, because I got married at a really young so I. My dad ended up helping me getting the job there and you know I just ended up staying there for a really long time, but it's really how I got into. It was as my dad was in that industry longtime. He had connections and everything like that. Dot It. Did you go to a trade school or anything for glassblowing? No I actually just learned on the job. And still to this day is one of the most difficult things that I've ever done. Physically I for almost anything that can compare it to I think. Programming is its own challenge, but is like the hardest physical. Thing I've ever had to learn because it was like. If you don't do it right the first time, then you ruin it. So there's no going back and fixing it once. You kind of ruin it because the glass that we would work with you'd have to mix it with metals, and then once it's kind of melted to a certain point, you can't go back in extract those materials out of the glass, so it's Kinda ruined. If you don't do it, right is probably there really nerve, wracking or when I did that job. Yeah Wow, it also sounds like it could be dangerous if you're working as really like high temperatures. Absolutely I got burned really bad third degree burns I have degree burns like all my arm from it, but yeah, it was. It's definitely. Was I'm just curious. Did that have any role in your decision to look for a new job like I? Know you mentioned like the financial side, but were there other things, too? Yeah absolutely a that part being okay, so the big part, actually a aside from like the financial reasons that it just didn't pay that much. It was the work environments. It is in the Central Valley of California which in the summertime gets you know triple digits consistently and the warehouse that it is done is basically like a garage. It doesn't have an air condition. It doesn't have any of those things so the environment itself was. was just really really taxing. There's been a couple of times when I had gotten heat exhaustion, I got sent home because of it because like say it's one hundred, three, hundred ten, even outside inside that shop where you'd be working is a hundred twenty one hundred thirty degrees, and it was just unbearable is the if you've our to look back on some old twitter posts? I probably have pictures of like a thermometer in the area. And it's just like maxed out because it was just so hot, but yeah, that's that's probably WANNA be. A motivating factors to wanting to look for another job. It got to point where I was like. I need to get out of here. No matter what this job is just killing me physically, and you know a lot of other reasons you can imagine in an environment like that the people that you tend to work around kind of like really. Not The best work environment because you know on a lot of stress and you know tend not to get along very well when they're under a lot of stress is mentally and just everything that came along with that job, so it just became kind of like a hostile work environment as well so it was like a lot of. Factors that Kinda came into me like I have to get out of here you to find something else you know. Yeah well I mean that definitely makes sense. There's a few other people or one that is coming to mind that. We had on the show in a previous season. Whose name is Josh Camp? And he was a hope I. Stay this right a horse I think it's a horse fairer fairer, hope, number news right, but he would change the hooves on horses, which could also be really dangerous. Obviously, a horse kicks you and I believe it was an injury that ultimately led him to. You know look for other work in in what will link to that in the show notes for people listening now 'cause it. Was You know a few years back when we had on the show and any other episode, I believe it could have had a few where there was someone with a moron. Sick physically dangerous or physically labor job, and that's kind of what led them to to make a pretty big pivot because I can like working for you as a glass blower in those in that environment, physical Super Super Hot. It's totally different from working as a software engineer. And when you started coding, you mentioned using Free Co camp in other free resources. Were you still working fulltime as the glass blower and you are learning outside of that? Yes I was so I would I had a fulltime job there, and because of the heat I would work really really early hours I try to go in his earliest possible as three in the morning. Get off at noon or whatever it was Leonard Twelve so that time that I would get off of course I'd already so exhausted. Matt jobs so I have to go home and sleep a little bit and then. The thing with those interesting with that is. It was hard for me to be going having a fulltime job like that. Maybe some people can relate to that. You know like a maybe just a fulltime job in general is exhausting, but this job probably pushed it because of the environment itself the hostility behind it. That kind of gave me more motivation to be like you know what I'm really tired right now. And I'm not really motivated to to learn coding complete, foreign and difficult, but when I get off work the way I did time, so you know wanting to leave that place so bad that it was just that extra boost motivation for me to learn and study and just do everything I needed to do to succeed in it on just because it was just so bad. I got desperate. Really desperate I just remember that I tend to forget that, but then when I do remember I'm like wow, it helps me to be like really grateful. You know to where I am now, and it was really hard working fulltime job in learning, because I did learn while working there probably about a year and a half, maybe almost two years I was learning. And There was there were times when I would make huge progresses, but then. At the same time thinking like is this really possible? How do people get a job doing? It's like yeah. I can build a website, but there's more to it you like. Is this all I need to get a job type thing you know But Yeah! It was it was hard and I. Don't want to say like Oh yeah. It's super easy because it. Wasn't especially having to work fulltime job in it's all I could just you know. Take days off now and everything like that. I had to work. But yeah. It was difficult. So you were. Doing ice, you said for like one and a half two years where you were doing boom things at the same time. appleaday mentioned this earlier, but you. Free Co camp. Did you use any other resources or you mentioned Community College? Were you taking classes there? Yeah so additional to recode camp so the there's a lot of other things that I did that helped me so free code camp opened up at the time. I haven't camp while, but at the time had lake. Away that you would join and beat up and it was through facebook. It was like face, looking need groups or something, and it was like find a recode camp. Meet up because I. Guess they had like an umbrella. Recode camp meet ups that you can join, and you would basically type in your city in order find the nearest one that was that was organized and everything like that, so I found one in my city and it was you know a few people apartment that would meet up in so I joined that group and I reached out on their. Pre Cochem does a really good job with trying to connect people, so it's like hey, introduce yourself in post on there, so that people can no, no your journey Cetera so i. did that and I ended up meeting up with the organizers of that? Meet Up. We met at starbucks talked about you know everything on learning this and that where you and Rico camped up thing so eventually, I got more involved in that met more people that were learning as well and then now it. Kinda led to Terry member Oh the Mita. Dot Com meet up. There was also the recode. KEMP MEDIA DOT COM for our area that was attached to that facebook group. And, he was like yeah. I just started this. Meet up group, so we can kind of be more broad for people that don't have facebook. We can just Kinda grow up there and he was like you WanNa, help me with that because you know. He was maintaining full job as well, and he needed someone to Kinda. Fill in that gap where he couldn't. You know sounds like yeah. Sure I could definitely help with that, so I helped him. kind of on the organization's portion of that. meet up and like. Hey, let's try to meet. Kind of swap the weeks you know will be on a Saturday one week and then. I'll take the next every type of thing we'd be out of starbucks. And then someone posted on the meet up of feed. Like hey does a hack upon coming up, you guys should come reach out and you know I think it was free, and it was in our area, so I went to the hacker thon and myself in a couple of other people that were in that group, and then we ended up a or ended meeting a few other people at that meet up. That were real professional programmers. At the thoughts I introduced myself to them and everything like that met some really really nice. And probably the most helpful in kind person was actually the the organizer of that Agathon. When. I met him and everything like that. He gave me his contact information in and said Hey, we should get together sometime. I'm Cha and he was a professional programmer, running his own business and everything like that, so eventually I stayed in contact with him, and I met up with him, and I told him my journey and what I'm trying to do, super supportive of us all about helping people in my situation, you know like make connections, and even even help them with an internship and everything like that, and that's Kinda weird kicked off actually where it went from me trying to learn to me, actually making connections in potentially those connections leading to jobs. That was huge. Actually so this person that ran out. Pakistan also ran his on meet up. and His name was a little bit more. Mature he had a organized large meet ups and organised like a speakers where he would teach people how to get started with a new technology and all that stuff you know, so. This percent met up with them, and they're willing to like. Hey, you WANNA work on a project with. Wow real project like that's what I need to experience with a project, so I met with him or opt in some of the people that worked with him, and he ended up working with a lot of other guys that or just people in general men and women that were like kind of doing their own thing that a little bit more advanced as As programmers they're building girl websites starting their own software business in lake, a consulting and everything like that. That's where kind of took off. Is that connection? You know I to a upon met some people, and then it led to more people that we're kind of in the same boat as me, and if they are more advanced, they're willing to help me. By struggled with something and everything like that. It was really a douse like typical in me being successful. Yeah that is a great story and Other interviews I've been doing this season. We invite the guests on, and we think they have a really interesting transformation. Story is kind of like who I've been really Trying to get on the show this season and every single person that I've interviewed so far and there's been you know. Handful have all. Had this like really awesome Lake County. Component to their story and men like Kinda. Showing how supportive the tech community is in in various ways, and it sounds like you found that you know through this. Through connections through other connections with more experienced people in the field that helped catapult you forward in the they were able to help support you in various ways and maybe help if you're stuck as you said, build your first project and I think that's really cool I. Think it's really good for beginners to hear that because I know when I first started out in probably you, too. I would imagine it can be really intimidating and feel like very overwhelming, and you can feel really alone, and it's like it's almost. I haven't experienced like trying to break into other industries, but in a lot of ways I feel like even though texts seemed really intense in really hard I mean it is, but there's just such kind and helpful people like a friend, totally random side story, but she's not intact. She was trying to break into. The entertainment like film like Moodley TV shows. and. She had to work at an unpaid internship for like a year in really like claw her way up. She actually does really awesome. producing on really awesome documentaries now but. It was like really hard, very competitive very very. Very like you know and I feel like the tech community is so different from that like it's. People are Super Helpful yeah definitely. I've heard that as well. I'm not sure if it's if it's like the demand in this industry that were like trying to get into maybe people, maybe a logical gotten to it, and they kind of see you know all the hard work that. It takes. I, guess that they want to help other people as well or like coming from something like my background and everything like that. They kind of want to help people as well, but yeah, I noticed that as well as a lot of really helpful people, even before I started going through the ups and everything I joined twitter, and that's when I found like just like a free code cannot co Newbie A. PODCAST are their Hashtag in general dislike just to get help and everything like that, and when I when I reached out that way, just random people that were professionals judgment like hey. I think I'll struggling with. Like centering Adib or CSS, something something kind of silly. You know I needed help with it and some random person was like. Hey, Gimme, your hub Repo albeit with that was like. Wow, some random person that realize but more Santander worked at Microsoft or something like that and are willing to help I didn't even know this person but yeah, definitely noticed that about the industry's is a lot of willing people to help you regardless. Of Your background and everything like that. Yeah another guest I. Literally just had on the podcast said that she had so many breakthroughs. A CAITLIN for people listening to the show and in episode Caitlin. She was talking about how she had so many breakthroughs on twitter asking for help in people that she didn't even know. Offering to help her in various capacities, I feel like twitter is such a good. Well, it's funny. Because social media like every platform kind of has its own. Little like corner or whatever it could be really good for certain things and I feel like asking for help. Like in that way. Twitter is awesome because people will jump in people. It's almost like a forum, but it's not, but people are very like. Communicate unlike you know instagram or something, which is mostly about the photos and it's. It's not the same kind of. Environment just different. Anyway, it's it's interesting. Yeah so switching gears a tiny bit I would like to hear about how the new ended up getting your first full-time real position. Yeah absolutely. So it was when our meet up grew so when I met this person a friend. His name is nate a probably. Give him recognition there because east been so huge in my in my career as a friend and generally slow parental today we kind of joined are meet ups and we grew into this big. Meet Up. And it was like three hundred people. We grew to over three hundred people, and then we. He had connections with someone that was really involved in trying to grow the tech scene in the Central Valley of California. Washable, probably think though in California. It's like tech everywhere. Tech is huge, but that's really isolated towards like Silicon Valley Bay area, and when you go to the outskirts where I live, it's like farms and orchards in just really like farmland in. The outskirts of all the techie over the hill and there's all the big central. Silicon Valley everything like that, but out here it's it's completely different. There's still a lot of factories out here and everything like that, so tech isn't the big thing out here, so he was trying to person. He tried to basically bring tech out this way like hey companies. There's a talent out here as well so he was a part of that big that this big movement. That's still going on today so anyways. We ended up getting a space with his help, and he supported he. He got funding for it and we moved our meet up there. And, we were able to go reach out to the computer. Science professors ask some of the community colleges. They are able to come out. We reached out to people that talk computer science in the high schools I reach people on facebook I went out trying to like introduce myself to all these people, so we can grow all his these groups that are people better in software or coating to hey, come to this, Mita because we can all grow with the tech in the valley, so we had this large event whereas kicking off are merging of our beat ups, and we had I think. Over one hundred fifty people like almost two hundred people from professors in computer science to high school teachers in computer science to people, learning and everything like that so I went up there and I was speaking in front of it, and I was basically motivating other people that were in my position like hey. You guys? Should really you know? I was trying to leaning towards free code camp like if you guys want to learn to cope because those people that were like thinking about it, you know not really that much into it, so I kind of wanted to focus on those people because that's where they had the experience of coming from so was like. Hey, you know it's not that hard to get into it. There's some really really great resources that are free. That doesn't cost anything you know. MEET UPS like this a lot of great connections here and people willing to help you. If you're struggling every twenty five solves talking. They're all that and at that. Meet up was a few other. That worked at companies nearby when Consulting Agency the the banks have some of their software people out in the Central Valley as well and a couple of of the people that were there were friends with my friend, nate, a one that have basically helped me out and everything that always connections. He introduced me to one of guys there and he said Hey his company's hiring. I want you. I want to introduce you to Michael and this is after all is kind of getting already getting. Getting experience with building some projects and everything and my friend was like. Yeah, he knows what he's doing now. He he's employable. He's definitely has experience with building front, and back and software and everything so introduced me to a friend of his name of Josh and he worked for a company that basically did consulting for like probations, law enforcement software. They did software for E N NJ Gallo, a lot of big companies, so they're really established there around for like twenty years so I met with him. And then he was like where we're actually looking for someone. More junior developer is like Amir number. We eventually had coffee. Just Kinda. Talk and everything like that and we just hit it off. We kind of our personalities. Kind of you know He. We liked hanging out and everything like that, so that kind of started like a friendship, you know. We talked for about a year and. And you'd help you with stuff like that and I was like. Hey, and he's like our company is kind of in the middle of Lake, you know hiring, but they kinda. Put a freeze on that everything like that, so after about a year when I. When I met him, he finally called me up one day, and the funny story is that I was getting to a point. In in learning how to Code and currently working where I was almost ready to give up, because it felt like I was putting effort and then. I wasn't getting any any reward from like. If I was applying everywhere and I wouldn't get any kind of response to resume. I reached out to people to help with resume all these things. Did I did a lot? Maybe not everything that could have just because I didn't know, but I felt like I was getting any hits on my resume or If I. DID GET A call. It was like you know I didn't know how to do some kind of algorithm that I didn't learn or memorize or whatever it was, so I was getting really discouraged, almost going to be like. Maybe I do need to go to school at unity at degree. Maybe I need to just join a boot camp or or joint something that is going to make me be more appealing to employers so I was looking. and. Just kind of getting really discouraged at that time. But the funny thing is that I got a call for my friend Josh and he goes. Hey, we have this contract coming up. We need to hire a developer and I've been talking to my boss about you and we'd like to bring you on. He's like. Of course we'll interview you and everything like that and he's like. Are you interested in? He's like. Like I'm almost one hundred percent, sure they've we bring you on because you know like I know you and I know your work, and I can help you and everything like that and I was like. Are you kidding me? And when he told me that I was thrilled, I was actually really scared. Same time this is reality is like real software coding. In, part of me was going to say no like I do this. This is too much like the difference between working on side projects that you know like whatever no one's really going to care about versus working on software that people use so I. I got really scared. I even once. My wife and I was like I. Don't know if I can do this like I'm GonNa. Quit my job and I go do this and then I fail. I can't go back to that job. I can't do that, you know. This is a big decision. You know I've been here for nine years or whatever it was. So ultimately, my my wife convinced me and was like you need to do this. People don't get good things unless they take some kind of risk. Regardless, you should try you know. So I call it my friend. I told him I concerns and Josh was like you know you're just trying to scare yourself out of. It Dude so just take it from me. I'm going to be there to help you, so don't worry us to take this. Just, take it you know and I was like. Okay, let's set up the interview and everything like that and goes all right, so set the interview and. They hired me. And that was basically it I started there with no professional experience. It was all because of someone was willing to help me know again back to that. You know this industry is always really helpful people that are willing to take a chance on you and help me help you and everything, and and and of course there's a lot of challenges you know working in in actually writing real software and everything like that, but in the long run it really helped me in was just huge into getting my job, and then after that first job. Of course, my resume after that just everyone always cared to look at it. You know I I didn't have nearly as. Much difficulty looking for next role after that I think it's like once you get your first job regardless of its junior level, or whatever in in this industry it kind of goes downhill OCTA that you actually get considered. You know you'll get your resume looked at. You'll get that first interview and everything like that. Yeah Wow, so. How long did you work there at the first job? And then what what kind? You don't have to get like super detailed, but like what kind of work redoing essentially. There year, so I started off working on a back end actually of in node framework, or on the no runtime. Basically, the contract was migrating some. It's funny because I went from like barely learning it in writing mostly front end to writing some back in code and the PRI, the contract was basically taking some old enterprise services that were written in Java and then rewriting them on no gs lambda, so that that was what I was doing for like the first four months and after that contract and they moved on to another. Another project and it was more full stack. It was job script. It was using angular on the front end no on the back end and some sequel server, but I got the rightful stack of front end back in using Java javascript note and everything like that. It was really fun. 'cause I got to work on two different big projects there and I learned so much. That's where my whole stack experience kind of took off I got I got to learn so much and the people that I worked with worse huge. It was just I can't even express how thankful I am to people that I work with there and I still am friends with them. That helped me explained things a broke things down. And having been able to understand these other languages. Yeah Wow and I know you recently got a laid off due to cove in nineteen. was that from this same employer or was this another job you had gotten after leaving that company? Another story so I was there at that company for about a year, and then towards the end my wife and I found out. We're GONNA. Have Child and so I needed to. That company was great for it was actually a bump in salary than I currently made up. My Company the light, Bulb Company, but it's I still needed to. I needed to progress I needed to move on and grow my career, and financially so I started to look I started. You know I even asked my boss at the time. I was like Hey I have a child, the ways or any chance that I can move up or anything like that, and you give me feedback, and it was like yeah, definitely, in whatever amount of time so I took that and say okay, that's CREPE. should start looking in see by even get my resume considered now that experience so I started to look, and then I got hired at a start up in the bay area and Silicon Valley. And I was there for almost a year way so i. don't want I. Don't want to interrupt you, but was at working remotely or you move there. I actually had hybrid role, so I would go into the office like an hour and a half commute two days a week. And then worked from home the other days, but yeah, it was a there. I got a taste of the whole silicon valley. Feel of how software companies ran, and my skills went up even higher because of that environment, but yeah, so I was there for about a year and It was a startup that wasn't able to get another round of funding, so actually we all. They started laying people off. fortunately they didn't lay the soccer team like right away, but since we found that out, we started to look all the engineers that worked at that company, or like Oh they're not getting. Funding is a good chance. They're gonNA lay people off, so we all started looking and I got hired at the Credit Union and I. was there for about a year? or about a year exactly actually, and due to the pandemic and everything like that they started to kind of restructure, reorganize everything and effected a lot of teams, including my own team and We're a part of that layoffs will. But yeah, it was. It was kind of something that I. Could. Imagine obviously has affected a lot of people everywhere, and it feels like it's just one of those times. That no-one can have planned for, but yeah. I've been a part of that have been affected by that as well. Yes, so justice like for myself in the listeners, so you basically had three different jobs like intech at this point in each for about a year. Give or take, so you essentially now have like three years of like fulltime software engineering experience. And the most recent position that you've got furloughed related offer a Is that a credit union? And what were you doing there so? It's interesting. 'cause you've such like different experience like from like like a consulting firm to a tech startup to credit union like I imagined that the experiences at each one were quite different like the environment of in the way people work in south. Absolutely so. Go working at a credit union, it's a pretty large credit union and the way things are done there as opposed to the other companies that I worked at. Worse it significantly different so look the startup that I worked at. They were pretty large. Start up there actually around for ten years they had employed over three hundred people. The engineering team was fifty engineers people and. They operated like they were a big tech company and everything like that, so but at the same time I had the experience of being able to shift. To project same time like there's times when I was working on a mobile APP and one for one sprint I'd be working on a whole two weeks on a mobile APP, and then I'd be pivoted to work on their web APP, clients. Front end code, and then after that I'd be working on some hardware code completely different working on a proprietary algorithm that needs to be converted in red on a mobile APP. It was different stuff all the time, and it was really exciting, but also really nerve wracking because of the context, switching a lot and learning new languages at the same time. So that was I learned a lot by lot of the fast paced stuff at that start up, and then when I got to the Credit Union. There was a little bit more relaxed because those only one product that I worked on essentially. Korb, inking APP and there I had a team of eight engineers that were dedicated for this core banking APP. I got brought on as a senior engineer there, and then that that role kind of pivoted towards a lead developer. I was on that project for about four months. And then my a boss. Promoted to the lead developer of that team so essentially there was a lot different roles because for one it was one project, and it was a mobile APP. I had experience with mobile APP at the other company, but not to this extent, it was just a huge mobile APP. And the primary, the primary objective being handling with people's money was probably a significant factor to the change of of like a importance of the application that part probably. At a lot to the stress when I worked knowing that you're working on something that deals with people's money and five hundred thousand active members so that was a big learning experience. And I do. I learned a lot of new stuff learned new languages learned how to do a lot of things that you wouldn't typically do web development, but yeah, it was a lot of differences in structure, probably a lot of different departments that you have to work with before you can get approval in changing something like maybe typically and. Change some piece of code that would maybe look slightly different, because it just makes more sense while at the Credit Union. It wasn't that simple. You had to get a lot of approvals and a lot of test. Writing to make sure lingers securer in a rented to different avenues. You know which was different. Yeah, that yeah makes dealing with financial information. You know sensitive data, and all that would be quite different. I imagined so now that your you by the time episode airs, you could already be in a new job, but. Being active in your job search now. What kind of company aiming to work out? What do you want to stay in like? The financial industry are trying to go back to a startup or maybe a consulting firm that you get to work all these different projects. Yeah, what were you? What did you like the most I guess? Let's see. Probably a ideally would wouldn't stay in the financial industry just because. All the little differences in how delayed development can be due to all those hoops. You have to jump through, but probably most fun I had was. Working in consulting agency. Because working so many different things. Different projects everything like that, but a lot of them had their own pros and cons. You know in terms of like. What I would prefer probably something that is more established due to. More stability just because of everything. That's going on right now. I've heard a lot of people have lost their jobs regardless of the industry even in software I would probably prefer stability. If I could choose regardless of the industry but Yeah. It's probably it's probably more geared towards that. You know what I can find that it is more stable and everything like that. I do have a few other avenues in alert. You know companies that I'm going through right now so I am confident that something will end soon. That's probably the good part is that they're still a high demand for software engineers and everything like that, so there's a lot of good a good places that are hiring right now and everything like that. But. They do specific Yeah Yeah Gotcha so I'm. Kind of jumping around here, but I really wanted to ask this question, and it goes back to your glassblowing experience. I was wondering if there was anything from that or your position before a Jumba juice that you. Were able to transfer or in some way to you in your job, your new job as a software developer. Probably the thing that. I don't know if it helped me, but there's a few different things probably so working probably in an environment that required me to have a lot of perseverance, probably aided to my benefit, and in general and just work ethic. It helps me To be able to deal with probably stresses and deadlines Challenges in my current role because I dealt with that a lot on any. Of can can relate to that. Is You know working in a place like that or just any kind of work that requires them to give a little bit extra is required, just laken. Succeed or do well their job. It probably just helps helped with those areas in work ethic to work hard enduro ally and everything like that but also know what I want going forward, and what I don't want in a career or or next role. Also of a big part of that. Working at that company helped me in was. Probably having difficult conversations with my employer I had a lot of those at that company and it prepared me to be able to deal with those difficult situations. A lot better at all night, other roles a and what I mean, my difficult situations, probably dealing with difficult people another one being having a conversation with your superiors about compensation You know asking for what you feel like. You deserve and everything like that I've had a lot of those, and they didn't go so well at that company that I feel really confident and know how to approach those types of people or Whenever those conversations need to happen, you know. It can be difficult for a lot of people, but I think have so much experience with it that it's. It's kind of more fluid and how to do in the right way. It's aided a lot in that in in my career going forward. Yeah that makes sense and like. I, I can only imagine like the stressors you deal with being in an environment with the glassblowing like Super Hot. You said you were sent home from heat exhaustion, the stress like literally the physical danger bringing yourself. It's like working from home as a software engineer or star office in Silicon. Valley is like the stress level would be so much less like the. They compare Cinderella the stressors you're dealing with compared to maybe like the ones at the other place. Yeah, like whole other scar accord whole other thing, right? We are like running at time and there's one last question I want to ask before we wrap this out and it's just if you could share any like final advice to people listening right now. Who are just starting out? Maybe they were where you were like. You know four or five years ago. Whenever whenever you got your start. What advice would you give them? All. Let's see so I. Think for one perseverence when things feel like it's difficult, it may be difficult at first, but the more and more you do it in the more and more you practice. You'll eventually understand it some complicated things that I. That I could not have imagined when I first started of doing I'm able to thoroughly explain. They seem like almost simple. Now I think the more and more you do it. The the more natural feel, and it'll be really simple. Just just keep on doing it and things easier. also in your journey and learning. It's really important to try to reach out to people to make connections go to meet UPS ask questions. Because those are going to be the areas where where you're gonNA find a connection that can help you find that career and ultimately successful in in this career field. But those are probably the two biggest ones is. Now I know it's hard at first, but it gets easier, and it gets fun on the challenges they start to face. Get really exciting, and it's really rewarding. Ultimately you know all hard work will pay off as long as you just keep to it. And it will pay off so yeah, awesome, great advice in a great way to end this interview. Thank you so much again for coming on. Where can people find you online? Yeah absolutely. Probably a mitre twitter, a twitter handle is mit p. j are eight eight. Or my website is just a my name, my first name Michael or implemental. Dial my personal, Mitchell my last name.

Twitter California Michael Story Credit Union Josh Camp Facebook Central Valley Software Engineer Silicon Valley Mita Starbucks Hostile Work Environment Mounsey Google Pakistan End Product
S13E15  Vertical chopsticks - burst 1 - Edit 01

Ubuntu Podcast

01:10 min | 5 months ago

S13E15 Vertical chopsticks - burst 1 - Edit 01

"And WHAT IS HAPPENING HERE welcome to? Episode Fifteen via Bluetooth focused today is the AND THIS IS ANOTHER CHANGE thirtieth of June I think. This route, we're going to have some community news and some proper news. And I'm here. I'm Alan and I'm here with my good friends. You may remember me from past. That is very show. I'm here with my very good friends. Mark Mark. Hello very good friend. Welcome back and Martin, are you? Hello Maye on well good so. I've been doing some user testing for. Kim I'll see now, HMO. I looked at that and I thought that's the share. Waste Recycling, center. They realize it's not something else

Mark Mark Alan Maye KIM Martin
Pakistan jet with 98 onboard crashes in crowded neighbourhood.

THE NEWS with Anthony Davis

01:58 min | 6 months ago

Pakistan jet with 98 onboard crashes in crowded neighbourhood.

"Jetliner carrying nine. Nine hundred people crashed yesterday in a crowded neighborhood near the airport. In Pakistan's port city of Karachi after an apparent engine failure during landing officials said there were two survivors from the plane but they also found at least fifty seven bodies in the wreckage. It was unknown. How many people on the ground were hurt as the Pakistan International Airlines jet an Airbus a three twenty plowed into an alley and destroyed at least five houses. The pilot was heard. Transmitting a mayday to the tower. Shortly before the crash of flight eight three Oh three which was flying from Lahore to Karachi and carrying many traveling for the Muslim holiday of aid videos on social media appear to show the jet flying low with flames shooting from one of its engines. The plane went down at about two thirty nine. Pm Northeast of Jinnah International Airport in the poor and congested residential area known as model colony between houses that were smashed by its wings police in protective struggled to clear away crowds amid the smoke and dust so ambulances and fire trucks could reach the crash site as darkness fell crews worked under floodlights and a portable morgue was set up the local health department said it had recovered fifty seven bodies while Hmo an offshoot Malik said finding all the dead could take two to three days Pakistan had resumed domestic flights earlier. This week ahead of aid which marks the end of the holy month of Ramadan Pakistan has been in a countrywide lockdown since March because of corona virus and the airline has been using social distancing guidelines on its flights by leaving every other seat vacant transmission of the pilot's final exchange with air traffic control indicated. He had failed to land was circling to make a second attempt. We are proceeding direct. We have lost an engine. Co-pilot said

Pakistan Pakistan International Airline Karachi Jinnah International Airport Lahore Malik
The Logic of People

Between the Slides

08:13 min | 7 months ago

The Logic of People

"Everybody welcome back to the people process. Progress PODCASTS I'm your host Kevin Panel this episode twenty the logic of people in. We'll see why I'm calling that here in a little bit as we talk more with my Matt Schmitt. Ceo OF PEOPLE DOT AI. And thank you again for everyone. That's listen download subscribe. Please give us a rating out. There obviously more stars as good. Help US bump up to the top and share more great stories. Like we're GONNA get today talking with that and so today we'll learn about Matt where he grew up those kind of things Matt. Thank you again for being on the PODCAST. Really appreciate the opportunity to speak with you this evening. No Problem Kevin. Thanks so much for having me cool. So he mentioned. Let's you know the people process progress right so we're learning about you. Cover in the people component obviously a lot of process which is great. I'm excited to have that conversation and share that with other people all the processes you've been through in in in the industries that you've been part of and then of course share with folks As we make progress so kind of jumping into it. Where where are you from? And where did you grow up? Yeah so grew up in eastern North Carolina North Carolina's one of those interesting states. That has this island in the middle between the beaches and the mountains and everything in between is a farm country in in SPLAT and So I grew up in the farming country and was driven to build to get into technology and build a way to escape from the lack of of technology and progress in So came up to to the island here in Raleigh and went to College at NC State. That really kick me off in my My Journey Nice did you were you into technology. Maybe a lot. Were you excited about it or into it when you were younger like did you enjoy like Atari intendo or things like that? Did you have kind of a? You know an attraction to that and I'm GONNA be dated. I'm forty six. I may be older than ordering us. No totally totally had had all those things and you know we had. We had dial up internet. Remember getting my first computer and being intrigued by the potential of that and quickly taught myself how to program and That was really the first you know way to to begin. Escaping on started helping people build websites Back when I was a teenager and so that I've always had that sort of that entrepreneur. Draw ever since I was really young and That seems I've carried well for me did you. Did you get into any particular kind of code you know doing websites begging HMO or or just kind of a little bit everything a little bit of everything early on You know heavily into html and you know even before this was before there was really CSS and early into Java script and then quickly into building programs in basic and And then moving into languages like Java as I taught myself more and more about how to program it was really the I in the early days. It was really driven by You know funny enough as I had a an early computer and we had this. We had the dial up internet and I was really one of the things I was really driven by was. Hey you know. We don't have Microsoft word. I really think I could build something like that. That was foolish of me in the early days while ambitious vision ambition. Never Was Never Short on my in my youth man edge and that with Imagine right now what we're going through with dial up all. I don't understand the true pain that that is a you know when you had to have a separate phone line just so you get kicked off right Yeah that I I think I told some of the other day guys. We head this pandemic during the eighties or even the early nineties How much worse it would be and you didn't get your free Internet. Cd in the mail may trying to figure out how to get into AOL right. You're it'd be along in. Would you know what that's also included that bug of doing that making Got TO NC state and so did you major in computer science or similar a major there. Eso majored in computer engineering and computer and electrical engineering because Foolish me I thought I wanted to actually build the parts of the computer that I wanted to program them until I learned that I hated. Physics hunts so that that really kinda pointedly you know. I still went through with the computer engineering and the electrical engineering but was really focused on programming. And the more computer science aspect of it was doing that all throughout college and That was really where I found a guy connected with my partner. These on Long before it was called We started to build a business together. So were you you met at college. Yeah so he had a business that was had relocated from New York and was in Kerry and he was looking for some people to join his team. And this was in. You know I guess. Mid Dot Com crash Here And so you know. I joined in. You know everything plummeted as know. Our customers lost their customers. And so on and we had this great website called Java lobby and We figured out how to sell ads around and that was really the start of it as we built some interesting technology and learned how to publishers in turn that into a building one of the world's largest developer portals Diese wow I mean that's pioneering stuff right and then there weren't as many tools right to be able to that kind of wrote a lot of scripts for you or helped you along. So did you all have to do a lot of you know just a lot of hours in front of the keyboard. And you know mapping and work like that. Yeah this was you know long before you could really you know there were You had to build everything in those days send so there were know the early days of even things like Google ad sense in go blab words in those types of things. But you know we were. We had to build our own community software And so it was. This was even probably before the May have even been before blogs but certainly before blogs became the place that everybody Trying to put their communities. How did you find Many like minded in in school folks at school they are or were you able to against still pretty. I guess earliest days kind of reach out to other where their user communities than that you all could kind of bounce ideas off each other as well. you know. So that's what we provided primarily and so job lobby had been started by my partner as we scanned it. But in those days you know. The the developing world is much more fragmented job lobby really provided a place for developers have an independent voice in an independent community that was separate from the vendors who were really controlling the messaging Peru tools and development. The is in those days Which is is somewhat different than than what you get. These days and open source was what it was. You know what it is now. It was a big deal if he were open source back so everything is sorta come much further much more quickly than it was in those days.

Matt Schmitt NC Partner North Carolina Kevin Panel United States CEO Raleigh ESO AOL Google New York Developer Kerry
Israel's Response to the Coronavirus

People of the Pod

10:55 min | 9 months ago

Israel's Response to the Coronavirus

"The corona virus threat to most of the world including the US in Israel there are major differences in the approach of the two countries. Could you please share with us? How Israelis handling the current situation? So I think I'll just by spending to people awaiting. I'm sure everybody's probably pretty saturated with the news but just putting perspective where we started off in December of two thousand nineteen at Corona virus outbreak was announced in our province China by the end of December China already decayed a type of epidemic on the thirtieth of January which now seems to me being involved in so much already ages ago but on a video of China that will actually one hundred seventy debts in China at that stage. Of course by now we have other three thousand deaths in China by at that stage. One hundred seventeen Israel is one of the first countries in the world to decide to stop and links with China and all flights is China was suspended so as I said. Israel started a regular on the first countries in the world to cut any links with China. Consider very drastic step. We have a lot of trade links to China but this is considered necessary to stop the spread of the virus to Israel and the mantra quarantine was puts affect for Old People. Returning owners writing systems quite rapidly. Air Pardon team was extended to other countries career Taiwan and Singapore Hong Kong and over the next few weeks We saw Restriction slowly being formed of people returning from different countries including Western Europe when it started become evident that there were cases. Coming out of its Leeann Austria This was very controversial in the beginning. It wasn't well accepted by the public. But as a result we saw very few cases in Israeli the beginning there was one or two cases and devices being very slow to develop in the country at the same time the Health Organization started preparing and this is one of the big issues and one of the strengths because we really are under the law of centralized control of the health system. We basically all got a direct to to prepare. I'll give you examples of how the country has been preparing over the last five weeks already. For example even before there was even one patient in intensive care in any hostile all medical staff were forbidden for travelling overseas so we all had our holidays that conferences and everything cancelled and none of us know. Doctors nurses physiotherapists though on his allowed to travel overseas. We've all been basically restrained to Israel and this is quite. A strange thing happened in a democracy. I don't think this has ever happened in the past in Israel's history and immediately after that All the for example. I'm in a position. Where presponse area of five hundred thousand people? We started having initially weekly meetings with Health Ministry to be brought up to date and start preparing for what was thought to become now. This all sounds strange but we still didn't have any patients In Israel we had three or four comeback from that famous cruise ship. The diamond princess in Japan. But we didn't really have any patients that we seem to be doing a lot of preparations for nothing. And maybe that's an important message to you in Americans start preparing. This is coming and when it comes it's going to be big and so the type of things that we've started preparing us. How are we going to deliver healthcare? Keep going to be stuck in their homes. How are we going to deal with sick? People and much more secure than we're used to dealing with at one stage and all this has been going on for the last few weeks and I can stay navy just in time. Because increasing amount of patients seek is increasing exponentially stabbed by the cross device Every patient every person's device can potentially a averaging fit and other four people. Save you start off the beginning of the week with two people and if a doubles every three days you got four eight sixteen and basically by the end of the month without realizing thinking that you've only got four six patients by the end of the month. You can have ten twenty thousand and the next month you can have one hundred thousand or even more in fact it is the World Health Organization estimates that if we don't do anything to prevent the spread of the disease about fitting into the world will become infected in the although the community health situation. These excellent Since we one of the Best Community L. Services in the world out suggestions of hospital is not as have very few hospital beds per thousand people two point two thousand people in Japan for example. It's over seven bits. Two thousand people so if we get a lot of sick people in hospitals having and people are going to get into trouble includes concrete them. And that's really why we'd be preparing curious rallies famous for its spirit. I would say you have seen a leading researcher in an exciting first of its kind project. Can you please explain to us about the technology developed? How it supporting the current challenge and how the Ministry of Health became also a partner of yours through this project. Wonderful thank you for the questions. I'm one of the founders of company called diagnostic robotics confronted with Professor Shawn in Johnston Amir and we started the company. I tried to bill automated systems up for triaging patients in emergency rooms. In order to reduce the loads inside emergency rooms over time we started working with different hospitals in Israel started collaborations with hospitals in the U asks out with a mostly my Mayo Clinic. And then with time we realized that we can also bring value in star triaging from the community so we started working with the differentials mos here in this row and recently started collaborating with different payers. The United States Last week Israel government decided to start aching digital triaging and spread it on a daily basis for the entitled Police Into Stock Monitoring. Data is to identify patients. Who are starting to develop symptoms of Corona virus by a set of systems that actually calling them or texting them going on a clinical triage additionally. We're getting ready for hospitalization at home. So people at home and hospitalized we WanNa make sure that we can identify deteriorations. All of this information is eventually being delivered as Fred. Flax or different. Hmo's nine one services here. In Israel an poppulation level healthcare would actually providing a map off. Were viruses right now and how actually building a system to predict how Zagat spread? All of this information is going to be very bottled make better decisions understanding around which areas should be in isolation which ones need more attention which once we can actually reduce the isolated in its trump. I would like to ask you. Is this project which sounds to me quite something to make revolution here. Is this project you think. The international community could benefit from it. And if so. In what way so. We're actually reaching out to whatever needs our help. Everybody can use our platform for triaging. Where here feel free to contact us? Directly will be glad to share it A. including the knowledge that we started a gaining. We see the information over time as well also can start learning about the disease together. So who's listening here and needs access in any way please do conduct's so having heard your description and actually this very unique kind of system we have your in Israel. What would you say are the one or two major lessons that the US can learn from Israel's experiencing the current crisis so subtle Remarked that what you that. It's very important to track where the cases are because the most effective thing for preventive screenings is is to isolate people are sick and separate in from from other people and from the contact. So the mapping is crucial. I think the first thing that we can try to experiences that it's important not not threat. It's coming you've gotta believe it's coming and and don't ignore it that just because you can't see it doesn't mean it's not there and by the time you're aware of being married it might be too late to start preparing start preparing. Doesn't mean you need to stockpile on on on toilet paper. I mean for some reason. This is a big thing network over the will. I don't know what's going on with that. You don't need a supermarket I'm not gonNA collapse. Brought to pair is to make sure this disease which affects especially the elderly. So make sure that your your your parents are built to cope with being maybe a known for a few weeks that have medications that have lines of communication with their primary caregiver their doctor. That's on a personal basis on a countrywide basis. You've got to start preparing medical teams. The the many teams have to realize that they are going to go through quite difficult period. And you need to start thinking about how you'd be protecting your medical teams a physically and mentally. Because they're going to be dealing with a lot of sick people on a government level. You need mobilized local governments. You've got inside what you're going to be doing when you find people wave and keep them a lot of people aren't that sequel other people. I've just got a little bit of color but you don't want them going around spreading the cease to other people so how you can explain and you've got to keep people updated all the time and updating is not essentially you know what's on the the the news broadcast evening they tend to sensationalize things you need to have good public education and it needs to be done now already quick

Israel China United States Corona Japan World Health Organization Health Organization Leeann Austria Health Ministry HMO Ministry Of Health Taiwan Western Europe Triaging Best Community L. Services Researcher Singapore Hong Kong Professor Shawn Mayo Clinic
Moderna surge after first coronavirus vaccine sent for testing

CNBC's Fast Money

01:28 min | 10 months ago

Moderna surge after first coronavirus vaccine sent for testing

"Brian. While it's about biotech company Madonna that companies shares are higher on a report from the Wall Street Journal that the company has shipped the first batch of its potential corona virus vaccine to the age where a small human clinical trial is set to begin potentially by the end of April and they may expect results as soon as over the summer guys. This is incredibly quick for vaccine development. And you are seeing during a stop now. Almost six and a half percent on this news Brian. Back to you or I make thank you very much. Guys is talk about this as well. I mean it's a little bit tough talking about biotechs anybody out there in the market today in the biotech space. Yeah the the problem though with the biotech space is you have heddon headwinds that are political so biotech and HMO's so you have those headwinds coming. Then you have. The tail wins of maybe a vaccine. But the problem is when you look at these charts. They've already given back. All of those moves. Meg just talked about a stock. That rallied aggressively a month ago. Based on a vaccine and then came in aggressively or more. So so you can't trade it off vaccines you have to trade it off political headwinds and I still think the space is still a cell on every so on every pub. Yeah I mean listen to this this sector was going in. My view is going to do quite well up until about June right because then you end up with these political headwinds so I would think if you get any type of a rally here going into the end of the first quarter second quarter you WANNA probably sell these names and take profits

Wall Street Journal HMO Brian MEG Brian.
Host The Party By Starting A Blog Or Vlog

Trent365

01:58 min | 10 months ago

Host The Party By Starting A Blog Or Vlog

"In yesterday's show. I spoke about this concept of hosting the party. The idea that the way that you can control the narrative is is to be the guy or the girl that hosts an event. That people will come in participating. And they're the people that you want to connect with one of the examples. We looked at yesterday. Was the idea of of a podcast. If you host the podcast invite the guests on that you want to connect with all of a sudden you are hosting the party. You are in control of the narrative with you're not all quite up to the whole podcast thing which by the way is actually pretty easy. You could also do it in the form of a blog just a written blog start a blog. Invite people to either come. I WANNA be interviewed in a blog. You can send Melissa ten questions. They can answer them back or you could actually get them to. Maybe contributed an article to your blog. Either way you're hosting the potty ready. You're starting to control the narrative starting to be seen as a personal authority in that spice. The other option of course is a Vlogger a video blog and for a lot two people these days. That's even easier because we're always on social media. We're always doing little videos and selfish. So they're actually do it with somebody else. Isn't that big a state so so a blog which is kind of what this is really like video blog of sorts. And I strip the audio lighter and make that into the podcast. So it's a blog or log doug or podcast. HMO's alternatives is still an example of u hosting the POTTY. If you want to know how to create a block there's a great tool is called G. O. G. L.. Just go onto Google search. How do I start a blog and there it is. How do I start a podcast. They're already what is a blog verities. So there's no excuses get onto google if you're not sure oh how to do it. And they'll be step by steps very easy to follow if you want to control the narrative if you WANNA raise your profile host. The party one of the great ways to do that is to start a blog or a log and invite the people that you want onto that blog all that blog to be interviewed to write articles to contribute to the narrative already. But you're in control that's the

Google Vlogger Melissa G. O. G. L
Helping Medical Students with Voice with Dr. Neel Desai, Co-Founder of MedFlashGo

Inside VOICE

05:16 min | 11 months ago

Helping Medical Students with Voice with Dr. Neel Desai, Co-Founder of MedFlashGo

"So you've been practicing medicine for about about fifteen years. What got you interested in medicine in the first place so I come from a medical family and my parents positions and almost half? I say half of my family are in the medical field They're pretty much all. We joke that we could probably make our own. HMO PPO it was just kind of like growing family it it was more like this is pretty much what it was kind of expected but at the same time it was something I did find interest in helping people and also science ensue also education just kind of being teacher on the oldest brother and so that came naturally to me kind of guiding and teaching the younger generation. That's kind of on my passions too. I I love that and I had found on twitter because I saw you had posted a video with your son using voice technology and I wanted to share your story A. and your son has a why can you tell us about what that is and what his struggles are and how voice is helping him live a better life. Yeah exactly so for those. That don't know Hawaii are genesis and Perfecta is it's basically it's commonly referred to as brittle bone disease which causes have bones to fracture with minimal all to no trauma but it's really more of a structural kind of connective. Tissue problems really affects multiple areas of his health. So one of the things that ah very passionate about is educating the general medical public about his condition so rare even the medical community doesn't even I didn't see much of diagnosed with it and one of the things that we found that was very helpful as certain monitoring technology especially things like boys technology so one of the things that it does help is is for example with it can affect physical tippy falls or pressures we have like a lot of like we speakers Smarter Sin Speakers in the home so if he falls being it's help you can kind kind of communicate through that way another way like to kind of turn on rooms like light sir appliance like things that are turn off the lights or just kind of help because he has uh-huh shorter stature but this kind of helps her those kind of had to be adopted those kinds of situations and I know you personally. You're co-founder have also created to voice. We skills can you tell us about them in where the idea came from and what they're about one of the things that I also do as a family doctors. I teach medical students. The University of Cincinnati in University Kentucky Person Secure Medical Soon so and one of my co founders also teaches medical students while hand one of the things that were. We're very passionate medical education and this came about from actually kind of hanging out with my son one day he was actually doing a skill on Alexa where he was just asking. State capitals battles. I got the idea of Lexicon Athletes State capitals. I wonder if you could do that. For more complex new learning material like medical board questions and medical exam damn questions so we got looking into that and we ask that question we started kind of looking for some developers a couple of years ago bound developer team out in California which actually turned out being from the same hometown as my co founder and Secretary Brown and wake up Eventually long story short of last year near and a half we created the first goal was met Westcote so basically medical test exam questioning or medical Ford questions medical exams and we're also in the process of creating like dental exams exams rushing banks and a third one is also an underproduction while and so do you have people using this. What has been their feedback? Has It helped them pass the exam. What's Kinda been the feedback in the success? So far right so it's really early. We haven't really start like we just kinda released April. We are just kind of doing the final kind of quality. Ali checks this week actually and now the board exam prep season is going to be start going into high gear over the next three or four months. This is why we're going to start really kind of marketing at more and Kind of promoting medical schools. But we've shown it's a medical students and so we've had good positive response to it so far so it's still very early in the process but this is kind of. We're relying the foundation over the next couple years. Did you find that this also came from the Axa medical students were meeting this that they needed someone to ask them questions. Send that and help them. Maybe comprehend certain things better. Yeah this is more from the medical students biggest problems that we're solving with medical suances. They have they have no time under a lot of stress and they're also have like a lot of financial. Couple is one of the things that we want to do. It was were marking is like the supplement during downtime to save them time like so. It's not a primary learnings where it's more supplemental thing like in the car or taking the dog for a walk or kind of doing the laundry or preparing dinner so it's Kinda like get those couple of extra questions and the other thing is also it's using the voice. Instead of like a lot of times students day they get like is there in front of screens screens all day. So this kind of let's do other things and not gonna like one of my co-founder said one of the big things for him. When News Time per boards was his eyes got really tired strains certain kinds of rest there is this allows them to connor? Restaurant do other things than study at the same time. So it's it's kind of that. Marketing has basically to do it during down sometime to save some time crushes learning on the golf basically.

University Kentucky Person Sec Co-Founder Co Founder Twitter University Of Cincinnati Alexa Bone Disease Golf Hawaii AXA Connor Perfecta ALI California Developer Secretary Brown Westcote Ford
Adina Hoffman: Ben Hecht: Fighting Words, Moving Pictures

Bookworm

09:37 min | 1 year ago

Adina Hoffman: Ben Hecht: Fighting Words, Moving Pictures

"I'm Michael Silver Blah this bookworm arm and today I'm very pleased to have as my guest. Adina Hoffman the Dina has written a life of the great almost mind boggling screenwriter Ben. Hecht the book has the Subtitle Fighting Words moving pictures this Ben Hecht had his. Oh would you say finger in so many tries He starts out now having moved with his family to the mid West as soon as he graduates from high school. He realizes this is. The college is not for him and he high tails it to Chicago where he becomes a very well-known newspaper this paper Man Song well known that his adventures in the newspaper business but come perhaps the most is famous play ever to be written about newspapers that he wrote with Charles MacArthur. Yes called the front page. The the front page becomes his girl Friday with cary grant and Rosalind Russell and thereby hangs a tale every the time Ben Hecht turns around. There's a revision of something. He's done a new who've version of it by someone else that he in turn revise right even his own memoirs has multiple versions of what happened to him in his own life life. He's kind of astonishing. This came from the days when face at a writer wrote right. These were people who wrote all the time there's also literary life that Hecht has in Chicago and actually this was one of the fascinating things for me is where his kind of the big city You know newspaper world met the world of the Chicago Renaissance and a lot of the people who were in that newspaper world. People like Carl Sandberg. who was a really good friend of Heck's you know he was also a reporter and they were sort of Newspaperman by day and then by night they were writing their poems in their novels and Hecht was not only hanging around with people like Sherwood Anderson Jason and he was also publishing in the little review which is unbelievable magazine? Push some of the first chapters of James Joyce's ulysses and they felt. What was her name? Margaret Anderson Anderson felt that Ben Heck was every bit as much a member of of the little review says dream straight. And he's there on almost every single issue. He was a kind of a pet of hers. He was sort of in love with her. She was unfortunately Very distracted by high art and she was also a lesbian was not interested in in that way but she loved him and she published him. Ben Has a great fiction writer. I mean he was. He fancied himself self novelist But he was very devoted to that calling but at the same time that he was writing. These very heavy breathing stories for Margaret Anderson. He was also writing he. He was whipping off these commercials stories for Lincoln at the smart set. HMO MINKIN was one of his heroes. Mencken was a cynic cynic and a sophisticated and he had every bit of hostility toward the dumb aspects of American culture. He was trying to make America smart op. He wrote fascinating essays sason books on the American language as opposed to British. We don't get an American writer per se until until Mark Twain who's writing the Mississippi River. Talk that he learned when he was a boatman. Well by the time you've got the middle of the country Chicago you've got gangsters you've got prohibition you've got flappers you've got an American language wood jr that was invented here and Hecht loved. -actly yeah and I think for me. That was one of the wonderful things about spending time with him. I was reading. This book was spending time with his language. I mean whatever you WANNA say about. Whether his books are wonderful books or not so wonderful books he was a wonderful maker of sentences and paragraphs graphs and just terrific wit on top of it and he and Macarthur wrote the front page. which was kind of Valentine to that newspaper World of Chicago? You go where they've both been cub reporters you see. He comes in to the newspaper office. Writing these things. In Extreme Telegraphy Telegraphy as as you quote them right they are made of twenty three delight phrases. He's putting them together hurling them together and eventually he's going to have some fame as the newspaper Komo's rining calms every every day made up of just what he heard some Hobo say right or what some very wealthy people were saying in a casino no to be a writer then will start out as journalists. That's where Hemingway starts. He proposed this idea of. But this daily column that you've mentioned which would become known as a thousand and one afternoons in Chicago and they're kind of remarkable pieces they're just little snippets and there's a sense that the news is not just test the news of the grant headline it's also all these sort of marginal lives and people. You know the guy who runs the laundromat and the woman who works as a manicurist and has to fend off her lecherous clients. There's a way in which he's tossing this stuff off in a very casual way reading them daily. They're published on the back page of the newspaper next to the to the comic strips and he's not taking them too seriously or taking himself too seriously and there's so much better than the fiction into which he was pouring his all of his artistic ambition. That just is not the effective whereas these things that he was doing kind of on the fly as you say they're wonderful and they're incredibly generous and sympathetic. You feel him identifying with all of the city of Chicago In a way they kind of anticipate the work of later colonists people like beat Hamill and Jimmy Breslin. Who would become more famous in a way for doing doing that? who may also by now have been forgotten but act. was doing that early on. I'm talking to Adina Hoffman about. Don't her book Ben. Hecht its subtitle fighting. Words moving pictures and it's published in the Jewish writers series series published by Yale University. Press you mention that a lot of these people have been forgotten even people more recent Jonathan head so why Ben Hair. Well IT'S A. It's the question that I get all the time. And it's a good question and I mean basically at some level I feel like I've known Ben Hecht before before I knew Ben Hecht if you grow up watching American movies. He's his words are in your head even if you've never heard his name and so and I used to watch a lot of old movies as a kid but it was only when I became more conscious conscious and started to read about film history I actually worked as a film critic throughout most of the ninety s Then I was very aware of who Ben Hecht was and I I read his wonderful memoir child trial of the century. And I thought wow you know okay the movies he's known as you know. Pauline Kale called him the greatest American screenwriter Gianluca Dard said he invented eighty percent percent. Of what is used in Hollywood movies today called him a genius and all of that is true but the fact is that for heck the movies were really just a piece of it and in some ways they were actually may be one of the smaller pieces pieces of it in that memoir is full of all these other lives that we've just been talking about so I was first of all fascinated by that multiplicity of his the fact that he could contain multitudes dude but I also was drawn to heck in terms of his relationship to Jewish things. And here's a place where he basically an American Jew who claims not to have really paid much attention to the fact of his Jewishness until his consciousness was sort of raised by the Holocaust there. He's been in Chicago. He knows the woman. Editing the little review he knows call Sandberg. He knows Sherwood Anderson he moves to New York becomes friends with Herman Mankiewicz Herman Mankiewicz and also the roundtable tape Dorothy Parker and Benchley and S J Perelman and the Algonquin New Yorker Gang. He he moves to Los Angeles. He does what's so many do he has nothing but contempt damned for the people who started the motion picture industry. You say that you're interested in Hicks. Judaism with those were hits Jews. He didn't like them. There are a lot of Jews in heck's life he was actually born on the lower east side and he spent the first few years of his life. There and I don't actually think that that's Unimportant I mean. He grew up in Racine Wisconsin. which is this pastoral American American place etc but there is a way in which those tenements were in him in a very deep

Ben Hecht Chicago Writer BEN Margaret Anderson Anderson Adina Hoffman Ben Heck Charles Macarthur Cary Grant Sherwood Anderson Michael Silver Herman Mankiewicz Herman Manki James Joyce Extreme Telegraphy Telegraphy Rosalind Russell Sherwood Anderson Jason Los Angeles Yale University Mississippi River America
"hmo" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

860AM The Answer

01:50 min | 1 year ago

"hmo" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

"We have PPO preferred provider plans HMO health maintenance organizations which as you probably remember the big way to cut costs back in the early nineties when people found out that they couldn't get the the doctor eat see the doctor they wanted I'm okay timely treatment couldn't see specialist that the HMO kind of went on their return on their head and PPO came on but we have we have the first service within the HMO and PPO and employer sponsored coverage and then of course under the government we have fifty percent of the healthcare in this country is already in the hands of government through Medicare part here Medicaid for low income Americans which of course is being expanded tremendously under under obamacare and about seventy two million Americans are now on the Medicaid program which pays doctors even lower rates and notes to treat Medicare patients and then we have the chip program for children and we have the veterans administration which of course is a single payer system and of course we read that count many many stories of problems with the VA and Howard that get on long line don't have access to the latest the calls and things and that is a single payer system if that's what everybody is that but the American people want for everyone it would be a disaster now Sally we're good to go to break for thirty seconds we'll be come back tell us how the what kind of choice what kind of freedom we would have in and control over our healthcare under a single payment system how will choice be diminished we'll be back in thirty seconds with the answer to that crucial question the question of freedom in health care and control over one's body.

Medicaid VA Medicare Howard Sally thirty seconds fifty percent
"hmo" Discussed on WFAN Sports Radio_FM

WFAN Sports Radio_FM

02:14 min | 1 year ago

"hmo" Discussed on WFAN Sports Radio_FM

"Junior as often as the best team in baseball is using those guys they are not luxury items they are not add ons they are not a racing stripe they're a carburetor there an engine there alternator they they they matter they're coolant big nicknamed you need them and your mind set of this organization has to be we need them we can't have dead weight on the major league roster we can't be planned don Smith in left field and hoping as if we were in double A. trying to develop a player it is unfair to our fans it is unfair to our other players who see it themselves just as I told you the Yankee players know that there are low on starters and it's not a good feeling for them the met players know that this organization is reaching but you can't keep don Smith appeal although no matter how much you want to you can't sorry but to get the D. HMO National League which isn't coming soon enough he only got eight batters you got eight batters and a picture eight batters that's what I want to keep because they need the batters they need the offense but there's no place to play him in my opinion it's true there's no place to play him not some Eric a talk show host tell you some you don't already know it's flat out true you already know so that's why they're frustrating I mean it it it's you know they got to show you that they know what they want and that they have a plan for fixing it one step at a time and that they're not just acquiring players to acquire and let's go get J. Bruce let's go get Todd Frazier let's go get the taste a let's go get a drink it solace when the pieces don't fit and they don't build you anything they are just individual aspects that you hope pan out but they don't there's no cohesion.

baseball don Smith D. HMO National League Eric J. Bruce Todd Frazier
Shinzo Abe's Iran Visit Overshadowed by Oil Tanker Attacks

Bloomberg Daybreak: Europe

00:27 sec | 1 year ago

Shinzo Abe's Iran Visit Overshadowed by Oil Tanker Attacks

"Japanese Prime minister Shinzo while base historic trip to Iran aimed at easing tensions has been overshadowed by the attacks onto oil tankers in the straits of HMOs from take begs, Isabel Reynolds reports. Well, I said, I told her how many had told him around had no intention of developing nuclear weapons. The Iranian supremely later tweeted that he was not planning to communicate with US President Donald Trump in. In Tokyo, Isabel Reynolds. Bloomberg

Isabel Reynolds Donald Trump Bloomberg Iran Tokyo President Trump
Gulf Of Oman, Bloomberg And Murray Hordern discussed on Bloomberg Daybreak

Bloomberg Daybreak

00:36 sec | 1 year ago

Gulf Of Oman, Bloomberg And Murray Hordern discussed on Bloomberg Daybreak

"Oil, rebounding from a near five on the low after two tankers were damage, and is suspected attack in the Gulf of Oman, we get more from Bloomberg's and Murray Hordern. This is a region is responsible for so much of the world's oil supply, more than sixteen million barrels a day to the strait of HMOs any sort of incident. Here could disrupt not just two vessels. It could potentially be not more that is why you see this immediate spike in the oil market checking prices right now. Nymex crude oil. Up two point eight percent of a dollar forty four to fifty to fifty eight a barrel. Brent is up three point. Two percent. It's at sixty one dollars eighty seven

Gulf Of Oman Bloomberg Murray Hordern Brent Sixteen Million Barrels Sixty One Dollars Eight Percent Two Percent
The pride of the PLA

Correspondents Report

06:11 min | 1 year ago

The pride of the PLA

"That's not every day you get to go on a Chinese warship, but for China. Correspondent Bill Birtles the rare opportunity came up during a naval fleet. Review off the port city of ching Tao, and, despite terrible, weather, and heavy handed media management. He says it was a day out like no other. Several kilometers out to sea of China's east coast, watching the pride of the Palay nineties flight go by, at close range from my vantage point on a training ship. Chidi Guang, China's first aircraft carrier. The Liaoning is just one hundred meters away, and yet I can barely see it. It's almost completely lost in the heavy fog and constant rain. The reason I was on a Chinese navy, ship in the middle of a massive international fleet review was because of diplomacy. This actually wasn't my first time on a Chinese warship my very first assignment for the IB see and China was to cover joint drills between the astride Sean's and Chinese off the coast of Guangdong province back ban. I managed to get on a Chinese ship in the port, but this time was different. We were. Being taken out to witness more than thirty Chinese submarines destroyers and the carrier go by president Xi Jinping was on Jason ship observing the review that they were also seventeen foreign ships, including HMO Melvin, which is why we were invited. Astrid was in good company. The Japanese South Koreans Vietnamese and Indians were among the nations that sent ships like Astrid area, all of them had their differences with China yet, this was a goodwill parade. The city of ching, Dow was in lockdown for the event, I asked one tourist retiree if he was excited about watching the naval parade from the shore, he told me he was disappointed that police had blocked all the roads to ching Dow's Haba. So we couldn't walk down and see all the ships himself. He wasn't happy about it. But as I was. Talking to him a couple came over and corrected him sighing the heavy handed security misses a normal and other countries do the same. They were Cain to assure me. It wasn't security. Overkill, Justin necessary safety measure. Of course. If the strategy indefens- falls gathered more than fifty ships in sight. Sydney Haba for a parade and then blocked all the access to the harvest side. I suspect people would not be too happy, but this is China and extreme security is the norm here. So then it was time for what when Cam for the fleet review with my cameraman Steve Young. We convened at the hotel with other invited journalists and began the first of many security checks. All our equipment was meticulously sqauad. We were. Then boss to the port where we went through to lots of airports styles security to get onto the ship. It took ages. But once on board, we will take into a lodge, dining room where we were served a box lunch vacuum packed bheith assaulted Koenig, some cake, and fruit. And then now ship again. Chugging out to see all this was fairly smooth, but there was one very obvious problem. We've come to ching now to get amazing shots of dozens of warships lined up fighter jets in formation flying above us. The might of China's rapidly growing navy on full display and yet the weather was atrocious. Thick fog and constant rain meant we could barely see more than one hundred meters in front of us when it was time for the parade to begin. We couldn't see more than one ship at a time Justice, the Ryan new intensified further, the announcing declared the Liaoning aircraft carrier was going by this was the mine event after all, and yet everyone on day was staring into the grave wondering where the heck it was. West for us is the moment when the astride Ian ships, sail by Steve long couldn't see HMAS Melvin even with the maximum zoom on his camera, you couldn't take a worse style for Nival fleet review and with it over, we scrambled to a pace to camera on dick. This is awesome flexing a celebration. I tonight Melvin from Friday or is here. I thought my summarize something senior Chinese official had said at a function, the night before that the parade, according to China wasn't about muscle flexing. And yet, one of my military minders listening in took umbrage at that as the ship chopped back to poor. He warned us that we must delete that he's the camera or risk access to the navy in future. Such threads and not uncommon in China. But it seemed to me it was a bit light to be threatening us given that all the filming was done in the story pretty much finished the pace the cameras stayed in our report as Dido all ou- shots of the warships lost in the fog. Visually stunning naval parade. It wasn't but a Diana's, see with China's navy is not something you forget easily. The frustrations of correspondence life, Bill Birtles, there reporting from Beijing or ching Tao, more accurately.

China Liaoning Bill Birtles Ching Tao Navy DOW Cain Sydney Haba Palay Chidi Guang Astrid Guangdong Hmas Melvin Xi Jinping Nival Beijing Koenig CAM Sean
Alabama, Bill And Senate discussed on Here & Now

Here & Now

04:05 min | 1 year ago

Alabama, Bill And Senate discussed on Here & Now

"Vote on a strict abortion. Ben, maybe one of the strictest in the country was the first item on the agenda for lawmakers in Alabama state Senate today and immediately became fiery. Now they've delayed that vote at least until next week. Several other states are also limiting abortion rights this week. Georgia became the fourth state to pass a so-called heartbeat. Bill banning an abortion six weeks into a pregnancy. Or when a heartbeat can be heard by doctor it also grants embryos at six weeks and fetuses person hood, Alabama's abortion ban would criminalize doctors who perform the procedure. Andrea Jaeger reporter and hosted WB HMO in Birmingham is on this story. And Andrew we spoke to you last week when state reps past their Bill to Ben pretty much all abortions, with the exception of a serious health risk to the mother. This was senators today what happened and how different is their Bill. Well, there was a small difference in. That's what created that chaos. In the Senate. When this Bill was passed that of a cynic committee yesterday, the senators there added an exception for rape and incest. The original Bill had no exception for rape, and incest, but they added that in and so when this Bill was brought up in the Senate this morning, some Republicans moved to mmediately table that amendment the chair approve that and chaos ensue with with with Democrats objecting to that. And so we had discussions around net procedural issue and coming out of that you had Senate president proteomic Republican state Senator Dole Marsh, he offered this this particular amendment that was just stripped wasn't amendment that I've always wanted on a Bill in any Bill I've ever supported and what I'm going to ask for, and maybe this would be the time is that everybody's go home this weekend. They need to listen to the constituents about this Bill with them without the amendment. We just took off and we need to come back Tuesday. Have extended debate and make that final decision. And that's what I'm going to ask at this point that we care this over to the call of the chair until you deal with this on next Tuesday. That's exactly what they did. He get pretty chaotic before. That though is that a surprise as you've said, this is seems to be if there are Democrats, of course, who wanted the exception for rape, and incest cases. But is it a surprise that you have Republicans as we just heard who also wanted that what we knew going into it that this was a point of contention even within the Republican caucus not all of them were keen with having to build. It didn't have exception. We didn't know is how exactly that was going to be dealt with how it was going to play out. And as we saw this morning at means delay a little little more time to work that out. Well, and talk about you know, because we are seeing this move in many states to bring up these bills, and in most of the states, and people are lawmakers are saying we are hoping that this goes to the courts, we want this to go all the way to the supreme court with two very conservative recent appointees is that the sense in Alabama. And how does it compare to the so-called heartbeat bills? Yeah. That's the supporters of the Bill. Here in Alabama are very explicit that they intend this Bill as a court challenge, they expect it to be challenged and make its way to the federal court system. They hope to the supreme court where the nineteen seventy three Roe v. Wade decision might be reconsidered on paper. It is certainly a stronger Bill than say the heartbeat bills. We've seen in other states because it does we send original form does criminalize abortion in all cases, except for the health of the mother. Opponents would argue though that the heartbeat bills. Functionally are abortion banned because for many women, they don't know at six weeks that they're pregnant, but but regardless of that court challenges most likely are ahead, and that's what proponents of this legislation. Went to see and how are pro choice advocates opponents reacting to the spill don't they're gearing up for the fight as well groups such as Planned Parenthood and the American Civil Liberties union of Alabama promised a lawsuit here in Alabama. If. Does pass.

Alabama Bill Senate Rape BEN Andrea Jaeger American Civil Liberties Union Senator Dole Marsh Georgia Andrew Birmingham Reporter ROE Wade President Trump Six Weeks
Drugmakers will have to reveal medication prices in TV ads

Bill Handel

06:49 min | 1 year ago

Drugmakers will have to reveal medication prices in TV ads

"By the end of the summer, probably when you see those ads for drugs on TV they're going to be adding the retail cost and that is going to be stunning. When you see that? Absolutely a stunner. And why is that because as you see people prancing dancing around and hanging out with their grandkids. And throwing the little ones in the air and going out on boats and gardening 'cause they couldn't be happier. Even the elderly people always look spectacular because they are professional models and actors you fascinating, how it works is that since the law change, and they they had to add the side effects of thirty seconds of the ad is side effects. And I mean, they're horrific when you actually listen to them your face is going to fall out. It's going to be as big as a watermelon. They'll be blood hammer, gene from every orifice, you have huge open Shankar's your livers gonna literally pop out of your body. I mean, just really good stuff because side effects ordinance. Oh, and by the way, you may die. That's also very important. And so that's already in there. But the people are still prancing, dancing everything. Everybody's very happy. And as at the end of the commercial as the prancing Nancy goes on. It's ask your doctor about this drug, which incidentally is a very powerful message because doctors listened to their patients it's not the other way around because doctors want to keep those patients, and so they're writing scripts like crazy and with the patients come in based on the ads is the newest bestest. Drug that's on the market G. I wanna try that. And then then the shocker comes how much is it a here's what the drug companies are saying and what a fantastic defense. They have putting up prices is confusing. Those aren't the real prices because we discount so many of these drugs, and there are paybacks, and you have these organizations that distribute and these various HMO and hospital groups that go she ate with us. So it's not the actual price. Okay. Then simply put up the actual retail price and say prices may vary depending on your insurance, depending on whether you're paying out of pocket, depending on whether you're a member of group and all you do is put that up. That's for example, not letting car companies put up the P or not letting WalMart put up the price of a product because it's confusing to actually know the price. I mean, I am stunned with that. Because let me tell you when you find out how much these things actually cost. Brand new drug, and it'll make you feel better if you have insert name of Edelman disease here. You're going to be thousands of dollars per month. Even if you're talking about a single hit. It's completely insane. Marjorie went through some pain awhile ago and the doctor prescribed Oxycontin, not actually not not Oxy Coton cotton, which is a long atla- long lasting, which incidentally, you can't get. I mean it because these are opiates pharmacies. Just don't stock them finally found one pharmacy near my house. That stocked it and I had called around that cheapest the cheapest price I could get was twenty bucks a pill. And then there were some that were selling them at thirty bucks a pill. I thought I was on the street out there talking to a drug dealer. And there's no generic for it. Either. And wait until you see on TV. Eighty dollars a pill two hundred dollars a pill twenty thousand dollars a year for this course of drug treatment. Well, of course, the drug companies don't want you to see that. You know, why? Because it's confusing. Uh-huh. And it'll stop people. Here's the other one. It will stop people from using the drug and therefore we want to not stop people. We want to help people with our drug. So they can get better. Well, yeah, it you're right. Paying forty thousand dollars for a year worth the drug is going to stop people from UCLA. I got that. So therefore, you should know how much drug costs you should actually get the sticker shock when you go to the pharmacy. When they say you put in your prescription. It's thirty pills when they say, oh, that's twenty eight hundred dollars. I for example, take little as you know. I even like skittles to bring down my boiling point. It's so I don't overreact is. So I don't go crazy have no idea what I used to be like pre lamentable days. And there was a time. When I couldn't even take the generic matter of fact, I don't take the generic we have some. But I for the most part, I take the real thing. Three grand a month. Wow. And that's with insurance. No, my copay because I have Kaiser is very, okay. But it's it's three thousand dollars a month. So can you imagine the advertising for la- McDonnell? And there it is. If you take little if you are handle less in the way, you live life that is completely out of your mind. Blowing up walking around your head is about to explode because you have such high blood pressure be prepared to spend three thousand dollars a month for that drug not counting cholesterol drugs, not counting anything else. At our house. We thank God that we're part of an HMO. We're probably at five six thousand dollars a month worth of drugs. And if we were out of pocket, I mean, it's it's crazy which by the way, so many people are out of pocket, and then we go right into the topic of health care in this country, and how it

La- Mcdonnell Walmart Ucla Shankar Oxy Coton Nancy Edelman Marjorie Kaiser Three Thousand Dollars Twenty Eight Hundred Dollars Five Six Thousand Dollars Twenty Thousand Dollars Forty Thousand Dollars Two Hundred Dollars Eighty Dollars Thirty Seconds
How Sanders plans to cut prescription drug prices in half

KDWN Programming

07:47 min | 1 year ago

How Sanders plans to cut prescription drug prices in half

"Because there was about a one and a half percent reduction in ACA enrollments. And the reason was simple people know, there's no more penalty sort of like why why are we paying for crap insurance? So part of this story regarding the case for Medicare for all the underinsured America is because people can't afford out of pocket so high. That's a true that that part is right? Administratively the insurance companies are very efficient where the government's inefficient. But he says we could do all these things we can make the major second major savings. Our study, we're come from government. Go sheeting prescription drug prices. Which would eliminate about six percent of the total systems cost per prescription drug prices in the United States are about twice as high as advanced economies. Well, you know, there's a lot of truth to that. I'll give them that one. But the question is how come we haven't done anything in the last five to seven years and prescription prices have risen dramatically. How is it in the United States? You manufacture drugs in United States cost us on average double or more than it would in Canada, etc. That is socialism where they control the cost. But here's where he loses. He loses. Everything he tells you how to government we could cut all these expenses by doing this that the other thing he says larger firms that haven't provided coverage for every worker would pay five hundred dollars for each uninsured worker while small businesses would be exempt from this. But these premiums this measure would raise six hundred billion dollars. So the big companies once again would have to pay little companies will be off. This somebody's got to pay. It's the little companies right after that after two or three years. The system would be would make a transition to a one point seventy tax on groceries seats or eight point two percent payroll tax, either which generally would generate the six hundred billion. So really thorough efficiency, isn't there? And they're not cutting our cost they're raising our taxes significantly the remaining four hundred billion necessary would comfort to measure. Here's a national sales tax a three point seven five percent. I nine necessities, which we generate about two hundred billion and a wealth tax point thirty eight thirty basis points after exempting the first one million for families what a net worth of which we generate another two hundred billion dollars. So essentially this Medicare for all system is a tax. A greater tax. But it's, but we're going to go home with more money, we won't have to pay copays. This is true don't deductibles, but you're going to pay taxes? So essentially what he's saying if you make one hundred thousand dollars a year a half family makes two hundred thousand a year, they're going to pay seventeen thousand dollars for health insurance. That's what I pay. Now. Just show me where I'm getting save y'all. Out of pocket. And how do you control the out of pocket cost? You're going to tell these physicians and big pharma. You gotta take less money. Which is what I said earlier in the conversation. United States is a for profit industry. And I'm sick and tired of hearing how the United States is health care system sucks compared around the world. That's why all the billionaires around the world come to the United States for healthcare. And you go to UCLA they go to Sloan Kettering, they go to Stanford. Here's here's a here's one for you. My wife's in hospital, and I'm talking to my friend, who's a doctor, and we're talking about the various hospitals in Clark county. Don't go to Summerlin hospital. He says you'll die my wife. He goes he says to me my sister died, and when he goes the worst hospital might be desert springs. You know, what's interesting. If you go on and you Google search, these hospitals, you get ratings you start to wonder where the facts are. Maybe there's some truth to somebody's statements. My father was killed in my opinion, centennial hills. I thought the physician's care was horrible. The same physician. I talk to for ten years suffered a medical malady until he went to Stanford and within twenty minutes at Stanford. You gotta solution that was medical problem. And he's fine now, but medically you take medicine. Yes. But for ten years here in Vata, he couldn't get handled. Healthcare and United States vary state to state a certain facilities in California. It's exceptional is certain facilities around the country. It sucks. Each facility has its own shining. Knight of shining armor. You MC opinions a fabulous facility. It's a trauma center. I went there. It's been great. I wanted my wife to go there, and it didn't work out. But the bottom line is when you look at our healthcare system as a whole today. These are the problems that we have in America. We expecting United States to medical system. They'd be perfect exceptional. You should go there with cancer and walkout a new person. Healthy one hundred percent, and maybe a couple of hundred dollars in your pocket. That's not realistic. But I will tell you this prior to the Affordable Care Act the healthcare system may have been broken. But it wasn't broken to the point where you couldn't acquire health insurance. See this crap about pre existing conditions is cracked if you went to work. At a company that offered benefits. There was no pre existing freight Shimo. If a company offered an HMO our point of service plan, you didn't have pre existing case in point the chamber of commerce metro chamber at the time was the Las Vegas chamber had a health plan being offered to small businesses. The MAC they had write ups. Yes. But there was no pre existing on their point of service HMO through health plan in Nevada. How many people know that? And it might thirty years is providing Asian insurance. I've never had a client cancelled by an insurance company. Once they got sick. Quite to the contrary. I've made it rain now if you bought a PPO plan for your business. They have a one year look back where they can give you a one year pre existing non an individual plants whole different platform. But do you remember when Obama ran on the platform of you can have you no longer have to rely on your group policy can go become self employed. So what you do is you go on the Affordable Care Act. Get your own health plan, and you can go become an entrepreneur how to premium is looking at and the platform private platform. If you make one hundred thousand laser pre what's the average premium for somebody fifty five six hundred dollars a month. That's cheap, right. Seventy two hundred dollars. Oh, let's go. Let's say you're one hundred thousand dollars that's seven point two percent of your income that falls right into the wheelhouse of what this not this. Not this not. This guy's telling you about eight point two percent payroll tax, right? Oh, and they got out of pocket maximum of seventy nine hundred fifteen one fifty one of one hundred fifteen point one percent. That's what that that's why people don't go become self-employed. They can't afford that fifty percent. But let's say you get a job working for somebody. And because you don't want any risk. You're going to get eighty thousand and they pay one hundred percent of your health insurance and your exposure seventy nine hundred which is almost ten percent of your gross income again is that affordable. The answer is no pre Obama Care. The average plant is sold as a broker. The average family out of pocket was seven thousand individuals thirty five hundred that was an HSA. Thinking about what I'm saying seven thousand family out of pocket thirty five hundred for an individual and today, it's four is fourteen thousand Indiana and the premiums are exorbitant the premium furniture say today, make the HSA of

United States Stanford Medicare Barack Obama America Summerlin Hospital ACA HMO Google Clark County Indiana Canada Ucla California
"hmo" Discussed on NewsRadio 1020 KDKA

NewsRadio 1020 KDKA

02:33 min | 2 years ago

"hmo" Discussed on NewsRadio 1020 KDKA

"There are advantage plans. HMO PPO out there where you can go to every hospital in western Pennsylvania. There are plans out there. You can go to Cleveland Clinic. That's another thing. Rob. We want to talk to I had a client. We brought this up two weeks ago. I have a client that got a rare parasite from tainted Romain lettuce at the end of two thousand seventeen just a little over a year ago. She there's no there was only two hospitals in the country that could treat this parasite Cleveland Clinic. And the mayo clinic because Elon Musk had donated a piece of equipment a piece of technology that could treat it. If she didn't have a plan that she can go to Cleveland Clinic Schumer died there are two companies out there that there's one company out there that not only provides access to every doctor and hospital. Well, I shouldn't say every doctor ninety nine percent of all doctors in western Pennsylvania, right in every hospital in Pennsylvania. But also has in network access to Cleveland Clinic, which is my understanding is it's rated one of the three best hospitals in the world, and you can have access to that. So if you don't right now, you still they're still a very good possibility. You can. And I want to talk about that. Also, I wanna mention if you didn't change during open enrollment during annual action period which runs from October fifteenth to December seventh lots and lots of people can use what are called special election periods to change. Now, you won't have to wait. So that's special election period. Now, you can access that now in any time during the year and don't think just because you make good money. You might not qualify for show as we go to break. Maybe somebody's not. Thinking about it because they think it's done. Right. What should they be asking themselves all the same questions? We were talking about rob. When we were here during annual election, period. What is my premium? What do I pay if I end up in the hospital? What I what is my maximum Bill. I could get during the year. If I have an HMO PPO all of those things right now, it's not, you know, the phone didn't ring that much last week and during annual election period, we come back from the break there before people in the waiting waiting. Don't think you shouldn't be asking these questions right now because you you have a platform to do it. So you should do it. Absolutely. Just because we're not in this quote, unquote critical. We're everybody can do, you know, everything there still questions that need to be asked you could possibly still change plans and be in much better position, premium wise, copay wise, access to doctors and hospitals. It's not too late to be asking this question. So if you're wondering about any or all of the above that, Aaron just said, call us, all of our lines are open. You can get some free information. For.

Cleveland Clinic Pennsylvania Elon Musk mayo clinic Cleveland Romain Schumer Aaron ninety nine percent two weeks
Trump Says Safety Net For Federal Workers Not Getting Paid Is A 'Strong Border'

KNX Midday News with Brian Ping

00:39 sec | 2 years ago

Trump Says Safety Net For Federal Workers Not Getting Paid Is A 'Strong Border'

"People many of the people that we're talking about many of the people you're discussing I really believe that they agree with what we're doing asked by CBS's major Garrett whether he'd freeze pay raises due to his cabinet because of the shutdown. The president said consider that you know, that's something. I may consider. It's a very good question and vice President Mike Pence nodded to reporters when asked if he would refuse his pay raises, the shutdown continues CBS news special report, I'm Bill Rakoff. Stay with KNX for more in-depth team coverage. Another live report coming up at the bottom of the hour at twelve thirty. Check of your money. Here's Frank Bocek right roller. The calling the sleep Powell pop on Wall Street fed chairman Jerome Powell getting some of the credit for propelling the stock market to a gain of eight hundred plus points for the Dow Jones industrial average right now we're off the best level seen so far today at seven fifty NASDAQ's up to seventy one and the S and P five hundred eighty three apple among the stocks on the rebound today of five dollars. At one forty six and we see oil also moving higher dollar at forty eight away. Markets reacting positively to the latest jobs report plans for the US and China to talk trade again early next week and the comments from the fed chair easing concerns about interest rates. We check the money twenty and fifty each hour Langbo Motech from the HMO's capital money desk. KNX ten seventy NewsRadio. If it happens over

Jerome Powell Mike Pence KNX CBS Garrett President Trump Vice President Bill Rakoff FED Frank Bocek Chairman United States China Five Dollars
Tribune Publishing Fights Cyberattack, Resumes On-Time Deliveries

Coast to Coast AM with George Noory

03:47 min | 2 years ago

Tribune Publishing Fights Cyberattack, Resumes On-Time Deliveries

"The form of real are. Why UK ransomware Tribune publishing said the LA times and San Diego union Tribune earlier this year me the LA times. Tribune publishing sold the LA times and the San Diego union for five hundred million to Dr Patrick soon. Shiong the biotech billionaire here in Los Angeles. An advisory to the US department of health and human services cybersecurity program earlier this year described real attacks is highly targeted well resourced and planned and they are ransomware. And usually the first outbreak of this started a couple years ago, and it was usually targeting HMO's and a couple of hospitals. I think early on in Kentucky and Tennessee they had their systems locked up and some cyber interwebs, computer. Basement hacker said we'll unlike your computer for a million of bitcoin, or whatever they started paying whatever the ransom was it wasn't ridiculous. It wasn't like ninety million dollars or anything like that. It was enough that they could actually cobbling together and get the site unlocked and many many experts at at wired and the rest are saying that was probably a big mistake to do that that that affectively what that was was the equivalent of having your kid kidnapped and the kidnapper saying, we can do this real quick for five thousand bucks, but you can never ever report me to anyone. And so you go do it you get the kid back, and you don't warn the FBI or anyone that there's a guy out there, you know, kidnapping kids that this is settled very quickly, it'd probably shouldn't have been. But so anyway for the LA times. I I guess no harm no foul or or whatever. Yes. Guess what? All you LA, USD studs. The if your kids are at the in the LA USD the district is planning on using subs. If the teachers go on strike, they're making a Raymond's to go back to school with or without full-time. Teachers hundreds of substitutes have been tapped in case staffers. Go ahead of the strike on January tenth some say. It's a sign a deal is not incite hundreds of schools across LA layers set to go back to school a week from tomorrow and one local who spokesman CBS channel to Los Angeles says her kids won't be in the classroom full-time teachers aren't there with them? Oh, sorry, lady. Jenness Schwartz says, quote, everything they're asking for is for us it benefits us they want. Smaller classroom sizes. They want less testing. I'm keeping my kids home. We don't cross picket lines close. You know, what they always say that crap they say at a lower student, whatever ratio. But winds up happening is they continue hiring one administrator per three teachers. It's it's ridiculous. If it if it did actually lead to lower teacher to student ratios than that would be a first fairly unified, which which by the way, again, you're not being anti union. You're not being a scab if he's simply point out that that LA unified is a vast multibillion dollar annual budget. It's the second largest school district in America. And it has some of the worst outcomes in the entire country like fifty percent graduation rate, and that they have ample budget for smaller class sizes. Do you really think teachers are going out on strike because they want fewer students in their honestly. But go ahead. Go ahead up. Your virtue signal is is left on. But you're not changing lanes. We'll be back next hour. The Chris boroughs postmortem has been done. But the toxicology will take weeks.

La Times Los Angeles La Usd Tribune San Diego HMO Us Department Of Health FBI Jenness Schwartz UK Dr Patrick USD Kentucky Kidnapping CBS Administrator Raymond Tennessee America
"hmo" Discussed on KFI AM 640

KFI AM 640

05:15 min | 2 years ago

"hmo" Discussed on KFI AM 640

"Back to Ben Fuchs, Ben constant emails, keep coming in people having problems all kinds of different issues. I gotta tell you though, I've never seen more people with more ailments in all my life. How about you? Crazy, george. It's absolutely critical sound saying earlier, we get doctored. And we got medical is. And we get diagnosis, and we got health insurance of HMO's and devices and all. These these health accoutrements, but we're missing the basics and the basics are that complicated. We've gotta take out of the medical realm. We've got to take off and put it into the lifestyle round. That's the foundational message here. Yes. Supplementation important Georgian diet is important, but there's other lifestyle aspects of play a part in being healthy relaxation. The relaxation response thinking correct fought feeling correct feelings coming up with some kind of spiritual strategies, whatever that is in a nondenominational fashion. This is worth health needs to to reside not in the doctor's office. But in our homes with our families, and in the choices we make it how we live our lives day to day. I want to get your take as a pharmacist about this opioid epidemic grades out his rampant. Why it's crazy. We people I believe that we have an existential crisis of existential pain. No, it's not the physical pain. Although, yeah, you'd people start off taking opioids because they're physical pain a lot of the time. But then it's hard to get off of the drugs. The opioid drugs. Opioids. Dictum, aren't they men mix of chemicals that your brain naturally makes your brain makes its own opioids? They're called endorphins. I'm sure you've heard of those. And so when you take taken a substance that your body naturally makes what ends up happening is that substance that your body's naturally making is suppressed so your own natural opiates are suppressed to the extent that you're taking artificial be in the body slows down on the production of the natural star. And so you can't get off of them because when you get off of them now, you don't have any because your body's natural opioid endorphin productions have been surpressed, it's very very difficult. If you're trying to get off of opioids couple of strategies, one of the things that happens when you get off of your awesome. Trying to quit cold Turkey on OBT off of your opioid is your body goes through a tremendous stress response, and that stress response manifests. Shakes fevers and chills diarrhea, and it's just an absolutely miserable experience. So Jack to do is you wanna win. Yourself off very slowly. And you want to make sure that you're very very kind to your body as you're doing it using things like hot showers and a warm showers and warm, baths, and massage therapy and slow deep breathing. I what I call SDR slow deep. Rhythmic breathing techniques you can use nutritional supplements magnesium. We're talking about that earlier that has a relaxing effect on the body vitamin c is a wonderful stress management substances. CBD, you know, a couple of years ago when you talked about CBD nobody ever heard a CD. Now, it's everywhere everywhere. Jevon even produces CBD products. Absolutely. The half affects line wonderful way to wean yourself off of off of opiates is to use as CBD then you don't want to run into a problem. We have to ask CBD's, but he's a little bit more gentle on the bodies and the opiates. But the bottom line is is that you can use lifestyle strategy to triple supplementation things like CBD and herbal medicine gently. Wean yourself off off the opioids if you're on it, and it is absolutely horrific horrific problem. Let's go to Perry. And then lump whole, California, our dear friend, high pair, welcome back. Hey carrying us. Thank you so much low pharmacists, Dan. Can I really quick quick quick here? Imcompetence union KFI. They just raised a lot of money for arenas club. Leaving the the motel kids the homeless children are good for them. And they raised a lot of money this year. And I if I could just give the website out here. Really, sure. Absolutely, absolutely. Here's pastathon dot com. They're good people over at KFI. They care. They really do. And I know Kim is listening right now. So high Tim Conway here. Okay. My main point here is in. Thank you. Both of you, gentlemen. You you are just amazing is this holiday season. Bye mom lost some weight. He's still weighs about two three hundred seventy pounds. Wow. About three times a year. She gets an infection. In her lungs, and my God, we thought we were gonna lose her about four days ago and God. Yeah. And Duckie bounce beggars plan. What are they giving you your IB's mom vitamins too? You know, and I wanted to problems that a lot of people don't get enough definitely in hospital..

CBD KFI Ben Fuchs Jack endorphin Tim Conway California Perry Dan Kim two three hundred seventy poun four days
"hmo" Discussed on WWL

WWL

01:48 min | 2 years ago

"hmo" Discussed on WWL

"Guys don't know the black and gold like we do so turn down the sound and your TV and turn up WWL one zero five three FM, then get your remote and pause. The game to sync up to a broadcast real simple. Let's continue the saints game day tradition who DAT with the home team on WWL. Does Medicare have you? Puzzled Blue Cross can help our subsidiary. HMO Louisiana offers blue advantage HMO, the combined your hospital medical and prescription drug benefits in one convenient plan with zero monthly premium. Blue also has zero medical deductible zero drug deductible and zero co pay for some drugs. Plus flu advantage has more than twelve thousand doctors and one hundred hospitals in its statewide network. Find out if your doctors in the blue advantage network, call one eighty three find blue that's one eight three F I N D B L U E wherever eight AM to eight PM seven days. A week advantage is available in all parishes premiums. Vary by parish blue advantage. From HMO Louisiana is an HMO plan with Medicare contract in Roman and blue advantage depends on contract. Renewal. Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Louisiana is incorporated as Louisiana health service and indemnity company today. Cousins jobs back looks right under pressure. Forty five. The saints battle the Rams at home in the Superdome. Pre-game eleven o'clock kick-off three twenty five on saints radio. WWL switches on sharp document imaging technology from all all it took for Christianity, owner of Coleman roofing and construction was a visit from an all fax sales Representative she came in asked the right questions got the right answers and gave us the solution..

HMO Louisiana Blue Cross Blue Medicare Rams fax sales Representative Louisiana flu Coleman seven days
"hmo" Discussed on WSB-AM

WSB-AM

04:54 min | 2 years ago

"hmo" Discussed on WSB-AM

"Researchers. At the university. Of Florida Was published in a medical journal recently Found that when patients sit down with the doctor when he or she comes in the room to talk to the patient Patients are typically interrupted After the first eleven seconds talking to the doctor about what ails them. And why they're there Doctors are under so much pressure to see so many patients that they've lost the patience and the ability to concentrate on what's going on with you And so you is the patient have to advocate for yourself I remember once reading a study about the big HMO Kaiser Permanente That is huge in California smaller some other places around the country and what they found in that study was, that patients who were not good advocates who were pretty quiet and, soft spoken kinda got run over by the bureaucracy at Kaiser trying to get appointments trying to get things done with their. Health but people who would advocate for themselves who would speak up Got better care and we're seeing more frequently and quicker When you're with a doctor You, don't wanna be rude hey, you're not listening. To me but you wanna you want to make sure that you've gotten the doctor to slow down and explain to him or her what's going on with you what you've done. About, it and the rest now there's one thing I really like for you to do if you go to a medical practice where you can, tell the doctors are harried it's hard for them to focus when, you get in the room say Hello, to, the doctor and say. Hey to make it quicker I've written down why I'm. Here and hand the doctor a short note That explains, what's going on what symptoms you're having and what you've done about, it to that point if you do, that, you're not gonna it's. If somebody can read so much quicker than they can hear somebody talking You're not going to waste the doctor's time you're not going to waste your time having made that trip there and all that and. You're. Gonna get, the, doctor to breathe deep for a second focus. And zero. In on what actually ails you and why you're there Roberts with us on the Clark. Howard show Hulo Robert Clarke how you doing today great thank. You. Robert you're getting emails, that have your little nervous that's right they are telling me that. I qualify for student, loan forgiveness programs and. Mortaring Arlene legitimate and how would, they know that I even, have student loans okay so first. Of all the emails people are getting about student loan forgiveness or a scam that's what I thought but it is possible if you do. Have student loans you, may at some. Point be eligible for student loan forgiveness it's one of those things we're using Little kernel of truth, covers up a big fat lie because these organizations that are there. Blanketing the country by, the way with these. Scam messages they are trying to, get in your pocket with, people that are frustrated or over. It or whatever about their student loans Yeah that's what I thought so let's deal with the truth okay you have federal student loans yes and how old are your student loans. Eighteen years wow okay and are, you making progress with them or are you still well I had to take. Some. Time off because of a financial issue is involved in? And actively been paying on them. For the past twelve years for the first. Number of years I. Was just doing the. Minimum? But, I've increased hang, basically like one and a half payments every month now great and. Do. You know what interest, rates you're these loans eighteen years a long time ago what interest rates there at another. Really low it's like three percent three and a half right so but I well I've actually got them down. To open more than half paid off, wonderful so in your case you're probably in a position where you just wanna keep paying because you're making progress now now Now every. Dish Paying more but it's going to principal, than interest anyway the loan forgiveness is based on.

Robert Florida California principal Arlene Robert Clarke Roberts Clark Howard Eighteen years eighteen years eleven seconds three percent twelve years
"hmo" Discussed on News 96.5 WDBO

News 96.5 WDBO

10:43 min | 2 years ago

"hmo" Discussed on News 96.5 WDBO

"Nation's population where you can do a video office visit this is something that has been done mostly within. HMO's but now CVS is rolling. This out, to its entire service territory where. They have licensed medical providers available and so around the clock seven days a week You'll be able for minor issues to be able to have a virtual. Visit right over your phone, for fifty nine dollars The marketplace over time we'll, decide is this an adequate substitute for let's. Say a lot of the visits to emergency. Rooms which are not classic emergencies and you. Sit there forever and all that and so this is. The kind of experimentation I'm really excited to see going on again we'll see how it works in real life over time But what you. Do is you download the CVS out onto your phone And then there's a questionnaire you fill out when you want to have a video visit with a medical provider depending on the state. And circumstance and can be a doctor a nurse practitioner or physician's assistant And, you fill out the information and they'll either, light you know based, on, what you filled out this. Is something you need to go, to an emergency, room for or we can do the video visit at let's say you you fill out the information the app at four forty five on a. Sunday afternoon we can do this at six ten or whatever and they'll let you know if it is something that seems within the wheelhouse of what they can do consult, with you a visit with you Video to way, if. It fits then they'll give you the appointment time and that's when you'll. Have it now I have for my own family tested a local version of this. And it was fascinating and it actually work again it, depends on, the circumstance the situation as to, whether or not it is appropriate but we're going to have a lot of experimentation as we move forward on, alternatives to, deal with off hours you know, medicine has always operated, on, an nine to five kind. Of thing or eight to four, whatever and medicine, has always failed at one hundred and sixty eight hour thing but that failure is going to lead to any of a number of new ways You're going to have access to medical care and many many things that might ale is off hours. Are things, that truly are not dangerous events but they are events that you, need to be seen, about. And for fifty nine dollars you're able to do it we'll see if. They can stick at that price point as this thing lives and breathes over time Jessica's with us on the Clark Howard show Hello Jessica Clark Jessica I understand you've got a great story about how you have been successful where I have not been teaching kids about money Well I just hate owing people money and I didn't want my kids to ever oh the Bank money So how. Did, you teach him Well when they were old, enough to get a credit card I added that to my accounts and I would paying. For things like gas credit card but when they were, old enough for their own cards I showed them how to use the code and immediately come. Home log onto their Bank accounts Take a look at. The receipt whatever is that they bought and transfer the, money from their checking account to their credit card right away so, they never had that much Okay that is very smart so you did it and a high touch kind of way that immediate feedback when they. Would try to do something when they use the card that, they would then immediately have to deal with, the cost of that at that, same time on that same day so there was no real separation from when the transaction occurred and then. Dealing with the economics of it Yeah so that was especially helpful because they didn't like to carry cash Yeah I told a story recently. About a young schoolteacher who had a really great experience on. A flight when people decided hearing a story from her out of nowhere people started giving her cash, to buy supplies and not, only, was, she grateful to people. Did it but she said the reporter gosh nobody my age. Carries. Cash no one could have done with these people did for me Right and so, your kids growing up in, an, era, where the whole idea. Of carrying cash is like why why would I do that So? Can I tell you you are so smart doing this bit now people have come up with businesses, that? Automatically do this for you I wasn't aware of, that so I want to tell you. About one called deputize d. e. b. IT is e. e. dot com Essentially turns a credit card into the equivalent of a debit card by whenever something is purchased it's immediately basically, paid, for from your own. Account so that you're never. Running a balance that you get to the end of the month and say Oops I owe that money We have the protection, of, a credit card but Convenience I guess of the debit card. Where it's really not a debt that's owed exactly it's like the perfect solution to the fact that when the laws were, originally drafted for credit cards, in the. Nineteen sixties there were, meaningful consumer protections put. Him but by the time debit cards became popular the banks were so powerful in Washington that they fought. Any meaningful consumer protections for people using debit cards and that's, why it's so risky to use, a debit card but deputize and their competitor debock which is. Deby d. e. b. x. dot CO dot, com Dot com Both of those have figured out a way for people to have the legal protections with credit and at the, same time not get into debt like you've taught your kids They'll have to look at those but what you did made it, high touch your kids had to deal with it Right away each day right. Right and they sell, their balance is going down so they knew that they didn't have money after a little while so for a kid what you've done is much better than these two websites and apps have, given because you need the, kids, to really get it. In, their brains to be. Involved with it having happening automatically but. Manually having to see okay I, got pay this oh look at my balance, and I think that's a great idea Well good Help somebody else will you sure have helped a lot, of people and I appreciate the idea and. The, suggestion Well thanks Stephanie's with, us on the Clark Howard. Show Hello Stephanie Great. Thank, you Stephanie you have a question for me about. Buying. Wheels Yes yes, I'm looking to buy a new car I know you recommend us generally. But. I I. Want. To buy a new car and keep it forever Which is absolutely, fine, mathematically if you buy a car and. Keep it for a long long, time generally, more than ten years your wallet really smiles on you because Depreciation really starts to level out off the, roller coaster at about the depending on the model the fifth to sixth year of ownership, and after, that there's very little cost, owning and operating that automobile moving forward I quit So my question for you is the best time of year to buy a. New car You know I'm not into time of year I know that's a popular thing that you'll see stories. About what I'm much more interested in is how you buy a new car not went Okay because the car buying process has become so much. More favorable particularly for new cars for consumers than it's ever been because, you now we're in a situation where you have more knowledge usually than the salesperson. Who would be at a dealership you even have the ability now to just buy a car right online and. The only thing you have to do it a dealer is? Take, delivery there, and my experience is that people. Get really great deals buying a car online through the various car buying programs are you a member of USAA or Sam's Club or, Costco wholesale Well then that gives you the, ability to survey the waterfront on a vehicle I would do probably USA and Costco 'cause they use completely different methods for shopping for cars but as a USAA member there are. Times where not only do they have the ideals for you through USAA, where you just put in have you ever seen this when you sign into your. USAA account and there'll be other services and at the very bottom I think in the right they'll be a. Little teeny thing it says new car.

USAA Stephanie Great Clark Howard Jessica Clark Jessica HMO Costco Washington reporter USA Sam's Club fifty nine dollars sixty eight hour seven days ten years
"hmo" Discussed on Escape the Rat Race Radio

Escape the Rat Race Radio

04:11 min | 2 years ago

"hmo" Discussed on Escape the Rat Race Radio

"Hi, Roxanne. Welcome to escape radio today. How you doing? I'm great. Thanks, Chris. Yeah, yeah, you welcome. And you just told me, oh, in Canada right now? Yes, we're actually beautiful Victoria. It's fabulous, hot same as in England. Yeah. Ashley. When you back home, we, we're not too far away from each other way. I'm in Kingston. You're in Richmond upon Thames sorry. So yeah, we hooked up a few weeks ago. We had lovely lunch Rivera, and yeah, we said, hi, we definitely needs to get you on the shy and sharing your story. So I wrote sign, wider, stop by telling everyone listening what business you're in and we'll specifically that involves day. Okay. So the business I'm in is I'm in property. I focused on cashless strategy which is HMO's and on a day-to-day basis, I manage the properties. So I do the tenant management and property management, and I have a little team that helped me out in keeping the places. In. I guess the best standard quite high end HMO's ACI just explained more what an HMO is for someone who doesn't. I, it's a has multiplex say, so the way I position I create happy homes when room at a time. So it's it's a bit how shares I cater to professionals. I do boutique HMO's so there the the standard is more like a service department for professionals come to the area there. They're working in the area for the first time, so they don't know anyone. They don't know where exactly they wanna live, so they choose to stay in might places which are, I I think. think. A quality of life choice on call e life versus a compromise for them. So you giving babe of run for their money. Cool. So so today's interview is going to be split into free pass. Roxanne part one is way you were part two as way you are. Now. I'm part free is way once get. Let's roll straits part one. And can you tell our listeners way used to work on what used today? I used to be in marketing, says a head of marketing for a audiovisual company when plasma screens used to be all the rage, and then I. So it was where I used to work. What was the next one where I wanna be. No, no. What used to do so you what was the grow in the marketing department? It was, let's say it was is all very much tight timelines of working websites, advertising dealing with advertising agencies and trying to do around the UK roadshows. So I I had a bad up end. It was chaos and stressful reduce. I did you feel that you truly in the rat race at that point? I definitely was. I was so committed to working my every hour, my weekends, my evenings, I seem to love my day job for some reason. And then I realized that there's more to light. So how did you settle then upon a decision as to exactly we're going to focus on to generate additional income and Nuff so that you could quit that job? Well, firstly, we renovated a host it while I was working and we decided to sell that go traveling. So I think at some point I decided that enough was enough. I didn't wanna work for someone else, but I didn't know what was going into. So we decided to my husband, I decided to quit and travel and. And then at when we came back, I was always adamant though I wouldn't work for anyone else. I would focus on my own thing so that I didn't just put all my energy into someone else's business. I knew that for me, that was very clear. I just wasn't clear exactly what businesses going to go into that state. Yeah, so so did you have to set yourself some kind of goals parameters? If you knew that you weren't going to rely on a steady income? Did you kind of have to do some some sums workout? You know you needed to generate from passive incomes? We, yes, we did have that..

HMO Chris Victoria Roxanne Kingston Richmond head of marketing Rivera Ashley Canada England UK Nuff
"hmo" Discussed on KMET 1490-AM

KMET 1490-AM

02:06 min | 2 years ago

"hmo" Discussed on KMET 1490-AM

"People that have these meetings in lots of these hmo's will have meetings than they will have tell you what you advantages and disadvantages are but it is important like the caller there he brought thought well it wasn't important on a i'm going to have more than no it's not you gotta be on it and you gotta be even though some people are older and their mind is not necessarily working on a in this area did not sharp as they wanna be on it should be so a lot of time they figured well i'm just don't have time to do it i don't want to do it but they don't know that they're harming themselves and their arm and their benefits when they do so make sure that you listen to this make sure you realize that you have to sign up is you know like i say if you report nineteen thirty seven at you were born you don't have to do that but anytime after that recently the these all new rules that just came in social security probably shouldn't even be there i think social security should have been left alone long time ago but we'll get people in there who trying to think they getting brownie points by cutting back or cutting that back and taken away from them thing that i always remember what united we stand they not united would a day trying to find a way to to satisfy somebody i don't order tom satisfy border is wrong thing so get busy and remember that you're sixty attorney sixty five try to remember some of the things that we tried to bring you up to date on that you may need to know you may need to hear and i'll figure that you can't remember all this we have an mp threes this go to let grandpa's speak seventy seven yes and you can see our listen to our so that we have done previously and you so man grandma tell you that you if you turn sixty five you have a birthday the week congratulate you a happy birthday to you.

grandpa attorney
"hmo" Discussed on WAAM Talk 1600

WAAM Talk 1600

01:41 min | 2 years ago

"hmo" Discussed on WAAM Talk 1600

"Bedside manner and and having great communication skills and great treatment of skills it's not based on that at it's based on how good a quote team player you are with the globalist in the government well yes and let's take it a step further it's really based on how well you come lie with the rubik's rubrics that they have deemed important and they're going to use those to evaluate you and those rubrics they've even stated are there to push physician behavior into a direction of quote alternative payment models and you and i both know that those alternative payment models are the old hmo's and what are called the capitated hmo's are where the doctor bears some of the risk is too much money is spent too many people and the end result wasn't of course they weren't financially viable number one number two people receive substandard care because if they that more money on a given patient let's say a heart attack and then some other event than the doctor was deemed financially all these alternative payment models pretty much debunked and yet here they appear again in the back row law it defies actual understanding so what were these toads in congress pushing on you guys you should just shut up and just deal with macro and let it run its course and destroy the doctor patient relationship and healthcare delivery further is that what is that's what this weekend gathering was about.

congress
"hmo" Discussed on Arch City Foot & Ankle

Arch City Foot & Ankle

05:52 min | 7 years ago

"hmo" Discussed on Arch City Foot & Ankle

"You go car shopping and you want to buy a car and you see the sticker price on the window and you see that total price you know twenty five thousand. Okay. So you know Chevy Volt thirty thousand. While it's more like forty thousand. And? You don't need to go down the list and okay. Thank God we have Ford or GM because then. They have the sticker and they put everything together now if you didn't have those dealerships than you would have to. Buy The body okay. The body costs this much. The tires cost this much. The elect electronic parts cost this much the engine costs this much. Then you've got to put it all together and figure it out yourself. Well, that's when a CEO is an ACO is like that GM or that Ford you're going to go to that ACO you're gonNA, they're gonNA give you the price you're GonNa say I need a heart transplant or I need a bunion act me on. And they're going to tell you what it's GonNa cost, and so you can go to different ACO's kind of shop around. So I don't know if that's the best best thing because I think some doctors you know even in my profession I mean. They need to look. And see which doctors are actually spending less money. For example, I can do a hammer toe procedure a lot cheaper than some other doctors that are doing hammer toe procedures utilizing. I'm utilizing a simple K. wire, the old fashioned technique, which might cost ten bucks but some doctor down the road is doing the same procedure is going to use a special new titanium. Cobalt you know type of you know. Piece of metal that goes in your toe does the same thing that piece might cost four hundred dollars mine cost ten bucks the same result is the same I'm GonNa fix your toe. So you need to look at those doctors that are utilizing better efficient, more economical techniques and that's the key. So, we need to figure out a way to do that, and I think a lot of hospitals already know that answer from the doctors even the surgery centers that are performing these surgeries. So these ACO's are there to help save money. It's going and sent to ins-, incentivize these doctors and these hospitals to spend less. And help. People prevent. Problems. And then the government will pay you for that. So it's Kinda interesting Some of the hospitals are thinking well, wait a minute. So you want me not to do procedures and you're gonNA pay me more. Nowadays where it's like now, the more procedures you do the more pay you get. The more. Bunions I fix the more money I make and might not be a lot. But if I'm doing more a making more quantity. Not Quality. So they want to switch that around. They want you to do less procedures, which means less money. For the specialists, less money for the doctors like the orthopedics, the anesthesiologists..

ACO Ford GM bunion CEO
"hmo" Discussed on Arch City Foot & Ankle

Arch City Foot & Ankle

02:12 min | 7 years ago

"hmo" Discussed on Arch City Foot & Ankle

"Like HMO's back in the nineteen nineties. An HMO was an insurance that somebody would sign up for. And it would be a lot cheaper. The reason why it'd be a lot cheaper because you would have one doctor. it'd be written on your card called your PCP, your primary care physician that doctor would be like your gatekeeper. So if you had a problem, any type of problem foot problem, you know mental problem, heart problem. sore throat whatever it is, you would go to that doctor. That doctor would evaluate you. There'd. Be. No Co Pay You would get in the doctor would see you and then he would say, I can take care of this and he would take area and then you'd go home If he knew what he needed to do. Now, if you had a problem like a foot problem and he couldn't take care of it, now he would have to refer you to a specialist. That resemble would need to be written by that doctor and that doctor would end up having a cost him his finances. So it's an incentive for the doctor to take care of the patient on his own. For example, he gets capitated financial incentive. For example two, thousand dollars per month per patient I'm just making that number up, but it's an example. If. It costs that Dr to send somebody to surgery in that surgery costs five, hundred dollars will. That five dollars comes out of that two thousand dollars and that doctor at the end of the month only gets fifteen hundred and not two thousand. So it's an incentive for him to prevent you from spending money. But if you need to get better in you need help. It was required that he'd send you to somebody that knew how to do the procedure. If he did not know how to do the procedure I'm sorry he or she. Didn't want to do the procedure so So that's what an HMO is, but an ACO is slightly different in the sense that it's not forcing you.

HMO
"hmo" Discussed on Arch City Foot & Ankle

Arch City Foot & Ankle

04:58 min | 7 years ago

"hmo" Discussed on Arch City Foot & Ankle

"This company also makes a BRA and a t shirt for men and ABROA- for sports offer women that will eliminate the need to put a big strap around your chest to identify your heart rate. So that's kind of an up and coming thing and I think with cardiologists I think that's kind of a interesting idea. So it's just early phases. but anyway, that's my tech rant We're going to go forward and talk about these ACO's and accountable care organizations. But. Before we talk about these ACO's I did have one issue that I wanted to shout out I'm currently. Having, my personal insurance got cancelled. You know with this whole bomb thing. you can keep your insurance Well, I wasn't allowed to keep insurance my insurance actually increased premium. Not much. But my deductible went from twelve hundred to thirteen thirty, two, hundred dollars. That's pretty big increase of what I'd have to pay my pocket. So I canceled back in December and They still build me. For. My first month's premium well I called them that in answer the phone I was put on hold I waited and waited and waited. Almost five hours of being on hold I finally gave up. So they kept saying on the hold message that do to. Obamacare. In healthcare reform, we've had more calls and Blah Blah Blah. So this is our issue here in our country. We are at a time where healthcare is doing a drastic drastic change. It's not going to be easy and the hardest part is GonNa come from the doctors and the patients. and. So it's just a little warning from my personal experience that we're GonNa have a hard time with this adjustment and change healthcare is just not the same. So if anybody out, there is thinking about being a doctor or You know is a doctor, but they have other options. Now's the time to change. Honestly think there was a They had some kind of vote on dietary today I get a newsletter like every. Day through podiatrist management and they asked the question if there were some podiatrists out there that would at this time change. Their career if they had the choice and seventy percent of doctors answered. Yes. Seventy percent. So that's telling you something right out there is you know doctors in my profession and I'm sure there another other professions are fed up with the system tired of doing the extra work were spending more time on administrative stuff. Left's time with our patients and we went into this. I went into this to be a doctor to take care patients and I wanted to get patients better. Yes I wanted to make money. Yes. I wanted to pay my bills but comes to.

ACO Obamacare
"hmo" Discussed on Arch City Foot & Ankle

Arch City Foot & Ankle

03:22 min | 7 years ago

"hmo" Discussed on Arch City Foot & Ankle

"He was suspended for the entire year two, thousand fourteen, which is actually kind of Nice as a Yankees Fan. Knowing that the Yankees will save now. Two million dollars in two, thousand, fourteen, which means they can. Reduce on their payroll taxes and not pay the penalty or use that money to. Get needed pitching. So anyway, that's my short thing. I. Do believe that the a rod did do PD's he actually spoke about it back two, thousand, seven I believe he did. State, he did take something back in two thousand, one to two, thousand and three, and then he said he didn't then now he's saying he never did. So you can't ever believe this guy. he's thirty nine years old. So he's probably not going to do much from this point on. Kinda. Wasted money going forward which I would never have signed him in the first place. But Hey, what do you know you get one? Year World Series from them I guess it's good enough. Anyway. Let's talk about something from the before we get into our main talk about accountable care organizations, and we'll go over that briefly. And how I feel about that in healthcare reform I. wanted to talk about a certain product that was in my. Tech. Rant. About that was founded in the in the. Fourteen consumer electronics show in Las Vegas on. There was something that was related to podiatrist that I heard about Thanks to my wife's cousin give me the information and but it's called the. sense Oria. Socks and it's a company sounds like international company that developed a pair of socks for hundred fifty dollars. I think regular price hundred, ninety, nine, two, hundred bucks but. For one hundred and fifty bucks to have an opening price right now out in I think it comes out in March. So it's not actually out. So be interesting. See what we find out about these hundred fifty dollars socks. But they have sensors in the ball of the foot and in the heel that when you wear these with the little anklet that goes around your ankle, it sends a Sensor Bluetooth to your phone and you can identify it will tell you if you're running on your heel or you need to be running more on the forefoot. It tells you your pace pretty interesting stuff. Kind of a cool concept have always had that idea in my mind that I wanted to develop some sort of shoe that did something similar. But with little more data, I think this is kind of the early stages I think there could be some room for improvement It sounds like it doesn't give you the full range of the entire pressure on the bottom of your feet. It kind of just shows little circles on the. Fifth Metatarsal Flange join in the first metatarsal flamed Jill joint in the heel. So was like three spots. And I think we need a little more information when it comes to. Pressure spots and I think it'd be a great idea for diabetics showing pressure spots, possible ration- before it actually occurs..

Yankees Oria Las Vegas