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Fresh update on "hiv" discussed on RUMBLE with MICHAEL MOORE

RUMBLE with MICHAEL MOORE

01:02 min | 1 hr ago

Fresh update on "hiv" discussed on RUMBLE with MICHAEL MOORE

"Seven G. Twenty World Economic Forum the International Pharmaceutical Pursuit the World Trade Organization Air. Re Single International entity that is essential to creating a global coherent response so that we don't end up in a situation where country a develops a vaccine and says screw the rest of you were keeping it for our own only. Or as just happened secretary as our says rim disappear might provide some margin of a shorter hospitalization time for people who get full blown Kobe nineteen, so we are buying the entire Gilead supply, and it stays in America and the rest of the world can go to hell. We have to get out of VAT and into a whole new mindset that says their only way to conquer this diseases to conquer it everywhere, the only way to conquer it everywhere is with a global strategic plan, a global mutualist commitment with a sense of solidarity that cuts across all countries, and that's you know a clear set of rules of the game. You cannot deny treatments to another. Another nationality or to a subset within your country based on caste or race or religion, you have to have a clear sense. That America is back in the driver's seat back helping the whole world back being the leader of a positive approach that we were when George Bush, created pep far, and and changed the whole ballgame of how the world viewed the enormous toll of HIV in Africa. We can do this, but we have to get out of our. Nationalistic mind frames are populous mind frames, but more importantly. We have to get out of thinking that. There's some kind of inherent rights mechanism a sort of. Constitutional right to get sick. A constitutional right to refuse to. Take steps to protect your neighbor whether your neighbor is a seventy year old with cancer that lives down the hall from you in your apartment building or your neighbor is Mexico. And we have to get out of this notion that somehow I mean when I saw a protest demonstration in Austin Texas where a whole gang of no mask folks were screaming at a woman, wearing a mask and shouting. We're not communists. We won't wear masks win. The heck did protecting yourself and others from public health threat become Communist. No, it's insane at this point and and the fact that it's become political if they're wearing a mask that means against trump if they're not wearing a mask, therefore trump and and why trump would wanNA lead his own supporters to their possible. Graves makes no political sense. You need every vote possible donald trump. Why would you be supporting or acting in way where your very own people who are going to vote for? You may not be around on November. Third it. It boggles the mind Laurie I, just I. I, you know just on a political science level. It makes no sense but we're. We're at this point now. Where we just WANNA. Keep telling ourselves these. And I. Don't WanNa tell myself any I mean I'm in. I'm in. I'm daily I think like one seventeen, or whatever of in my own personal lockdown and you know. And I had pneumonia recent years and have a compromise situation. When my long, so the doctor told me you know you need to. You need isolate in. Be careful so I've been very careful..

Donald Trump America International Pharmaceutical P Secretary Austin Texas Kobe George Bush Pneumonia Mexico Africa Graves Laurie HIV
WHO discontinues two COVID-19 drug trials

Bloomberg Businessweek

00:30 sec | 21 hrs ago

WHO discontinues two COVID-19 drug trials

"Correspondent Marla's. Majerus reports. Trials for two drugs to Fight Corona virus have ended The World Health Organization says it's discontinuing its trials of the malaria drug hydroxy Clara Quinn. And a combination HIV drug in hospitalized patients with Koven, 19 after they failed to reduce mortality. The United Nations Agency said that the decision taken on the recommendation of the trials International steering Committee Does not affect other studies where the drugs are used for non hospitalized

International Steering Committ Clara Quinn United Nations Agency Marla World Health Organization HIV Koven
Fresh update on "hiv" discussed on 10 10 WINS 24 Hour News

10 10 WINS 24 Hour News

01:04 min | 8 hrs ago

Fresh update on "hiv" discussed on 10 10 WINS 24 Hour News

"5 22 A country marked very different Independence Day this year is the ongoing covert 19 pandemic pushed the numbers of cases hire nationwide. More from correspondent Martin Martin Sanders. As America celebrated her 244th birthday, public health officials pleaded with Americans to keep safe, noting the worst public health crisis in anyone's memory isn't going away. The numbers tell the story. Corona virus infections are spreading like wildfire in 36 states, with Arizona, Texas, Florida and California, posting record infection rates this past week alone. York. On the other hand, some mild improvement with 533 new covert cases reported yesterday. But that is less than 1% of the people tested statewide. There were eight over deaths in the last day. More people are going home from the hospital. 832 people are still being treated for Cove it in New York hospitals statewide. Wins NEWS time. 5 23 The World Health Organization is ending its hydroxy Claure Quinn trial on hospitalized covert 19 patients in combination with another antiviral used to treat HIV. The W. H O says a review of interim results showed little or no reduction in mortality when compared to standard care. As for a vaccine, FDA commissioner Dr Stephen Han has said he's optimistic. There will be a Corona virus vaccine late this year or early next on CNN State of the union. He was asked how likely it is that people will be able to get a vaccine in January of world class experts on this. They will look at those data when they're available, and they'll make the best judgment possible. Our solemn promised the American people. Is that we will look at data to adjudicate the safety and efficacy of that vaccine, and then one becomes available. U. S government on others will have a plan for distributing that vaccine. To all Americans. Harvard Global Health Initiatives. Top Expert, meanwhile, tells Fox News Sunday the first vaccine available could just stop you from getting very sick from the virus. It could be a shot you'd have to get every year. Wins news Time. 5 20 for the Hudson County Prosecutor's office is investigating the deaths of two people whose bodies were pulled from the Hudson near Jersey City yesterday. The first was a 22 year old woman from Manhattan, discovered at around 7 30 in the morning near the end of Morris Canal Park. It's five hours later, a second body was discovered 50 feet away, identified his 23 year old who, Marcella of Edison, The medical examiner is determining how they died. Investigation continues into a fatal shooting at a Greenville, South Carolina nightclub last night that left two people dead. Eight more wounded Greenville County Sheriff Hobart Lewis says they don't know yet what sparked the violence or even who was in the don't know who initiated it. There was a, uh, a band or a group performance. I think they work they had some involvement. No one has been taken into custody yet..

Dr Stephen Han America Martin Martin Sanders Greenville County World Health Organization Harvard Global Health Initiati Greenville Hudson County New York Fox News CNN HIV FDA York South Carolina Claure Quinn Hobart Lewis Manhattan Morris Canal Park
W.H.O halts trial of HIV drugs from COVID-19 treatment

Clark Howard

00:33 sec | 23 hrs ago

W.H.O halts trial of HIV drugs from COVID-19 treatment

"In place. The World Health Organization said it was discontinuing gets Cove in 19 trials of two drugs after they failed to reduce deaths. Correspondent carry Shoemaker reports. The drugs are hydroxy Chlorate, Quinn and an HIV drug combination. The U. N agency says its decision to stop the trial of hydroxy chloral Quinn, along with the HIV drug doesn't affect other studies. It's working on 18 Experimental Cove in 19 vaccines are being tested and nearly 150 treatments are under

HIV Experimental Cove Cove Quinn World Health Organization Shoemaker
Fresh update on "hiv" discussed on ABC News Perspective

ABC News Perspective

00:32 min | 9 hrs ago

Fresh update on "hiv" discussed on ABC News Perspective

"Men's self with Dr Katie Thompson. I'm Tim, Lance and Dr Katie. Good to be back talking to you again. We're still physically distancing you. The producer and I were all in different locations. Today we are making the best of this. Are we not? Yes, we are. Which begs the question for me before we get into Today's primary topic. How is it going? Are you finding that patients are are interested in doing the distance care because I know that a lot of doctors air getting online and Providing video conferences with patients. Are you finding you're doing mohr of that? Or how is that working for you? You know, I sure am. This is a timer. We have immense opportunity to invest in our health and vitality. And even though the quarantine presents really challenges it does present some blessed scenes. I think were offered some personal margin that we haven't had before, and this invites us to better understand personal health and Pursue healthy, resilient lives. So in my practice, it's also brought in many patients or their by dizziness or reticence have avoided treatment for sexual and urinary wellness. And we are offering both video and in person visits. So with the utmost safety precautions underway and I'm seeing Almost normal capacity. At this point, in some cases above normal capacity, people people do want to come in, and I'm grateful for that. Very interesting. Well, I would, after all of this time locked up in their homes in some cases. I'm sure that they also want to have some personal You know, one on one contact with an actual human being. And you forget through that, are we not so today I thought that you and I would talk about testosterone because we've covered on awful lot of ground in these previous programs we've done together, but I don't know that we've really talked enough. I think about testosterone. I know. I certainly have questions. I'm sure a lot of other men do. But can you talk to us about what is testosterone? Sure, absolutely hormone. You know testosterone, the hormone that's found in both men and women. But it's found in higher amounts in men. And it is associated with normal sexual function, bone and muscle mass red blood cell production and to some degree overall vitality. And so and so what is low testosterone, which is also known as male hypogonadism. We're going to talk a little bit about that today, and I'm gonna focus on male hypogonadism as associated with aging. A great deal of interest has been given to the disorder of low testosterone in the last few years and issues garnered some controversy because various men's health clinics and sexual health clinics have popped up around the country, offering testosterone replacement toe. All men. With promises of enhanced sexual and physical vitality, it would seem testosterone replacement therapy is positioned as the fountain of Youth for men as they age testosterone does decline naturally for men as they age and not all men notice a change in health and vitality. Interesting. So I mean, how common is low? T I As I understand it, The older you get the less testosterone you you produce. Is that right? That is true. Testosterone levels likely decline around the age of 40 and more than 50% of then we'll have testosterone levels in that low range by the age of 80 But not all men will have signs and symptoms of hypogonadism. Some common medical conditions that are associated with clue. Diabetes, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, kidney disease, HIV chronic steroid use some of those conditions. Interesting. So obviously there are some issues. I mean, other health issues that can be very serious health issues that are tied into this, there are and so for some men, testosterone replacement can provide some very really benefits, and that's what we want to talk about today who is the right candidate for testosterone replacement? What could we expect? Or what are the potential benefits of testosterone replacement? And what are some of the cautions around this discussion? So for a lot of men? Symptoms of low testosterone include depression, low energy weak, you know, change in muscle mass fatigue, increased body fat and sexual side effects, such as low libido and decreased morning erections. There are some signs that are concerning two physicians as well. And that would be anemia, low blood counts diminished bone density, hot flashes, impaired cognition and even breast growth. So some of those fine needs might prompt US tow pursuit testing. Okay, So I have some of the symptoms are they associated with other things as well? I mean, it sounds like You could. You could maybe say, I look I have symptoms x Y and Z. So that's probably low T. But it seems like instead of doing that your best bet is to go see a specialist someone like you who can give you a definitive answer. That might be wise. You know, there are a lot of other conditions that cost some of those same symptoms and so low testosterone isn't a catch all the fountain of youth that we might have hoped you know, to find a treat something that's treatable that would significantly improve those symptoms for men. Lifestyle modifications can really impact some of those symptoms. We've discussed this and other episodes. It is so crucial to pursue heart healthy, body healthy lifestyle and that can improve sexual function and heart health for all men, and those include maintaining a healthy weight. Exercising regularly watching your cholesterol watching your blood pressure. All of those things are likely to impact many of the symptoms that we just discussed. It can be associated with low testosterone. And in fact, for men that are candidates for testosterone replacement quite often in my practice, I'm encouraging them to pursue replacement really, for a period of time. With the hope that as they gain energy and motivation and muscle strength, they actually may be able to move on to a lifestyle modifications and come off the testosterone at a later date. Okay, So this is not something that they have to do The rest unnecessarily the rest of my life. I'm not a doctor folks, right? So So how is the diagnosis made well, it's made by measuring your testosterone levels. Early in the morning because they're really more reliably higher in the morning so we can get a more definitive diagnosis before 10 a.m. And that testosterone tests really should be confirmed at least once. To make the diagnosis of low testosterone. The lowest level of normal is it's about 252 315 anagrams per desa leader, and there's further testing that might help us identify. You know what could be the cause of the low testosterone and is it related to a pituitary abnormality? Just make further define, um, both the ideology and kind of the treatment course for men with low t All right now. I want to talk more about this, too, if we can when we come back from the break, But I also want to talk about your webinar..

Testosterone Hypogonadism Dr Katie Thompson Dr Katie Producer Dizziness United States Mohr Diabetes HIV
WHO Halts Trials of Hydroxychloroquine, Lopinavir/Ritonavir for COVID-19 Treatment

Love, Death, and Money

00:28 sec | 1 d ago

WHO Halts Trials of Hydroxychloroquine, Lopinavir/Ritonavir for COVID-19 Treatment

"The World Health Organization has announced its holding its trials of the malaria drug hydroxy, Clara Quinn and HIV treatment will pin a veer and Britain ofher in patients hospitalized with Corona virus after results show the drugs did not reduce mortality rates. The agency said it was ending the tests tests on on on the the the recommendation recommendation recommendation of of of the the the Drug Drug Drug Trials Trials Trials International International International Steering Steering Steering Committee. Committee. Committee. The The The W. W. W. H H H O O O is is is also also also examining examining examining the the the potential potential potential effect effect effect of of of the the the anti anti anti viral viral viral drug drug drug Graham Graham Graham Desert Desert Desert Beer Beer Beer on on on covert 19.

Trials Trials International In Graham Graham Graham Clara Quinn World Health Organization HIV Britain The W. W. W. H H H O O
Fresh update on "hiv" discussed on The Sunday Show

The Sunday Show

00:31 sec | 13 hrs ago

Fresh update on "hiv" discussed on The Sunday Show

"Toe having drugs now. Which one given in combination with one single pill, You can get someone who's HIV to live essentially. A normal life span, not quite almost a normal life span. So those years of investment in research with HIV have really paid off when it comes to therapy. As you mentioned, we still have The challenge of developing a vaccine, but the therapy is just spectacularly effective. Well, Dr Fauci. I really appreciate you taking the time to talk with me to reminisce about Larry Kramer. It's been wonderful talking with you. Same here, Amy. It's always a pleasure to be with you. Thank you for having me. Dr. Anthony Fauci is the director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases. At the National Institutes of Health. I spoke to him back in May shortly after the death of AIDS.

Dr. Anthony Fauci National Institute Of Allergy National Institutes Of Health AMY Larry Kramer Director
Global Health and Malaria with Dr. Chandy John

Healthcare Triage Podcast

05:50 min | 3 d ago

Global Health and Malaria with Dr. Chandy John

"Today we. We have with US Dr Chandi John He is the Ryan White Professor of Pediatrics and the Director of the Division of Infectious Diseases in global health at Indiana University School of Medicine I should note that this episode was recorded before the pandemic started since then. Dr John's Infectious Disease Expertise helped lay the foundation for to covert related studies tactic, which is looking at how many. People in Indiana Wade. Actually be infected and discover which is looking at how immunity responses occur. After people are infected, we should also note that his research about sickle cell anemia, African children was recently published in the New England, Journal of Medicine and people might want to check that out as well Chandy. Welcome, thank you so you're the Ryan Way Professor Pediatrics. Who Is Ryan White? And what does he have to do? With Indiana Ryan White is in Indiana. Indiana heroes everyone in Indiana and the United States should know about him. Ryan White was really the first child in the United States, who was publicly known to have issued in make a secret and the reason he got into the news was because we lived. They didn't want him attending school with all the kids and he insisted on going to school. This is a very brave individual and kind of push this where a lot of. Of other people just kind of shrunk into themselves and bring it up because it's one of those things where it's like I remember I did live in Indiana at the time, but I remember it being in the news for people old enough. It was a huge huge deal I mean because up until that point. It felt like it was a pretty stigmatized disease were many people were blamed, but he seemed to be the face. If I'm remembering correctly. Correctly like the first quit I'm putting in quotes. Nobody else can see my equity. You're like innocent. Where we sort of public in this child at a big deal that everybody was so public about it. Yeah, it was a huge deal is very brave of him because he got a lot of discrimination and hate mail, and the rest of it, or you know hateful comments right to his face where he lived but he refused to sort. Back away from that and also I. Think very importantly. He also refused to be the quote unquote innocent face of it. He said that everybody who has HIV is say they should be respected. However, it was easier for the public to handle that than maybe to handle gay men who they thought of as other or or something he really did in the United States help to give face HIV that many people could relate to more And I'm the Ryan White Professor, of Pediatrics, and I always mentioned this because our whole division was supported. By an endowment for the Indiana University, Dance Marathon, and that endowment and the Indiana University dance, marathon itself were started by Ryan White's best friend from High Yeah To Stewart I believe her name was, and so she started at more than twenty five years ago and to start, it was started in honor of him, so he was supposed to start at you that fall and died before he could start the started, and she organized a dance marathons, and they've evolved this massive huge. Yeah, and if your local Indiana's a big deal with your kids and these guys are amazing, high school kids in college, kids and they raise funds for Hospital for children, but for the first many years they raised it just for our division, and so that was amazing. It's funny because I knew I knew there is money for Riley but I didn't know it was for that purpose and I. It's funny. One of those I knew Ryan White was, but when I moved here I was like. Why do they have the professorship year? Like didn't know He. INDIANA. No, it's it's amazing, and so now the funds from the Indiana. Brisy dance marathon go to the whole department of beating. US For the first twenty years it was to raise his endowment, and so when people ask me who this rich donor was, who gave the endowment that allowed us to create this amazing or build this amazing division It was It's the college kids, and and I should also very important dimension. The connection there is that writes. Doctor was Marty climate. Who is the? The founder of our division, so that was when they wanted a way to honor Ryan White and and support the things that were important to him. The sought out Dr Climate. He said supporting research in this areas is critical, and that's what they did. Well, that's great and not just completely veer directions, but you know the time what we wanted to talk about. About. Today is global health. So I like to always start by talking to you like. How did you decide? This is the area that what you wanted to be in in studying not just infectious diseases, but how they the impact, the world, not just even the United States. How'd you get here? Yeah, so there are many answers that question, but the beginning always starts with. With my parents so My parents are from India. They came here to do their residency I. always mention because this is a fact that. When they came here, they were paid to come here, so there was a doctor shortage. So when people are talking about all these terrible foreign medical grads and stuff boy. The US has relied on those foreign medical grads and. Show all the time. Yeah, it's it's a big deal and they've added a lot to the country. research wise clinical is an in every aspect of so. They came here for their residencies, and then they went back to India to work at a mission hospital and so we sort of went back and forth from the United States indie when I was a kid, but when they were there this mission hospital, its mission was to serve the poor, and so they would take us on rounds or to the hospital on a fairly regular basis because they really wanted us to be sure to see why. Why they were doing what they're doing. Their lives were very busy. They both doctors and so They were at the hospital a lot and you know kids could sort of feel like hey, why aren't you you know here with me? But we never felt that way because we saw what they were doing, and it was important, so that sense of those who have have a responsibility to serve those who have less because none of us earned what we have. It's all just you kind of like what we started with.

Indiana Ryan White United States Ryan Way Professor Pediatrics Ryan White Professor Of Pediat Indiana University School Of M Ryan White Professor Dr Chandi John He Indiana University Dr John Journal Of Medicine India New England Director Of The Division Of In Riley Marty Founder Stewart
Washington DC to provide AIDS home testing kits

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:45 sec | Last week

Washington DC to provide AIDS home testing kits

"The top stories we're following this hour. Saturday marked National HIV Testing Day and the day also marked the start of programs in which D C residents can get tested for a potential the potentially deadly disease from the comfort of their own home. Treating HIV early opens up the door to medical treatments that can prevent it from turning into full blown AIDS. But finding out you have the sexually transmitted disease early is important. They help you find out your status, The city has launched a website get checked d c dot or GE for city residents where you can have an at home test kit mailed to your house. It's simple. You swab your mouth and 20 minutes later, you know the results. The D. C. Department of Health says it's part of a plan to make sure all residents know their status. And according to City data,

GE D. C. Department Of Health
Dr. Fauci says White House testing everyone

KNX Evening News

06:30 min | Last week

Dr. Fauci says White House testing everyone

"Back now with doctor Anthony Fauci the man at the forefront of trying to slow down covert nineteen in the U. S. he's head of the National Institute of allergy and infectious diseases I'm curious as to how you been out operating in the world if you have gone out or maybe you're still children emplacement going straight to work work but but have have you you been been to to a a restaurant restaurant have have you you been been to to the the gym gym I I live live in in Washington Washington DC DC I'm I'm an an essential essential personnel personnel for for obvious obvious reasons reasons on on the the temperature temperature of of the the task task force force I wear a mask whenever I go out in public I don't congregate in crowd safety sixty sixty away from people I go to my place at the national institutes of health in Bethesda morning I stay there you know half the day and then I go down to the White House you don't go into the White House unless you get tested for the protection of the president the staff so every time I walk into the White House to get tested so today I got tested and I'm negative do you worry though because everybody wants you to stay healthy so the highs are negative yeah and and you know we were watching a bunch of us were watching the news conference earlier we couldn't help but noting noting that although you were wearing a mask when everybody goes up to the podium you know you don't wipe down the microphone to your figure what kind of standard do you first do you personally worry much about contracting covert because you're in a high risk group let's face it you know I am I am I am I I I think you know nobody knew was a lie group risk will be delivered to talk about my age yeah I'd like now to really know it but I am I am in in in in a high risk group you know as an infectious disease person the life that I've chosen I was involved in the very early years of HIV what we know what the heck it was I was taking care of patients you know day and night you know I've been through the ball are taking care of the ball of patients I've been through all of the infectious disease outbreaks so I have to say it isn't that I'm braver than anybody else but this is what I do this is my job it's kind of like yes the fireman you know you're free to go into a fight with that's the life that that person is chosen I've chosen a life of tracking down there fighting infectious diseases is there a risk yes but you know I'm the one that shows it so I don't I don't worry about it have you eaten one of the cupcakes with your face on it no so I have but you see them right I mean you've seen the T. shirts you see and bumper stickers in the Fouts on the couch pillow is a good one I found today what do you think of all this well you know it's it's a it's a bit surreal I don't take that seriously that that's me I think what it is it's become a symbol because I've been out there speaking the truth trying to get data route trying to talk in an evidence based way in a country that you know that I love dearly and about a country that script in something that they need some comfort and some confidence that people are taking seriously so I become all right bye made my my image has become a symbol but but you know I'm still twenty found she the scientist Dr you know live in Washington DC my friends you know who I am but the rest of the public when they see that you know it becomes more of a symbol than the reality of what I am are you apply no you're worried about other pandemics in the future and maybe you won't be so long before we have the next one have we learned anything from this one and are we taking any action based on what we've learned so that when the inevitable next pandemic comms we are more prepared well yes I mean we have done that we had a pandemic preparedness plan which we put a lot of work into as we were worrying about you remember the famous bird flu the chicken flew back in two thousand five thousand thirteen at a high mortality but it never developed the capability of an effectively and efficiently going from human to human we put a big plant together but this virus that we dealing with now is really so unprecedented certainly if you analyze it and people will analyze it every which way but Sunday when this is over about what we could've done better what we did poorly but this is such an extraordinary virus it kind of like the perfect store form of an outbreak in why it took the world with such a crush and why it is already done so much damage you know there are a couple of characteristics the virus have that would make it really really difficult to contain you know one jump species is a new virus that we've never seen before number two it infects humans number three it affects them very very efficiently spreads like wildfire and then the before what it is it has a high degree of morbidity mortality particularly in vulnerable people so if you have one but not the other of those things are not that bad I give you two quick examples of these because it's important for people to appreciate when we had the chicken flu the one that just jumped from chickens to humans what it did affect the unfortunate children the mortality with like thirty five forty percent terrible the only thing is it was extremely efficient it didn't fit in the person it did not spread from person to person then in two thousand and nine we had the famous swine flu pandemic which was really a pandemic a new virus H. one N. one it had the capability of spreading very very rapidly but on the other side of the coin it wasn't particularly virulent would hardly kill anybody compared to the seasonal flu but what we have here we have one virus that has all of the above it jump species from animal to human it very very efficiently spread from human to human I mean in a frightening way and then number three it have a high degree of ability of metallic particularly among the vulnerable that's the perfect storm of a pandemic and that's the thing that happens like the last time this happened was over a hundred years ago in nineteen eighteen so yes we prepared but clearly the world was not prepared enough hopefully the lesson you learned from this that we know that the unimaginable which this was actually can happen so you really have to be prepared for it well it was a perfect storm Dr we're glad you're working on

Anthony Fauci National Institute Of Allergy
With coronavirus fading in UK, Oxford vaccine trial expands into hard-hit South Africa

Seattle's Morning News with Dave Ross

00:46 sec | Last week

With coronavirus fading in UK, Oxford vaccine trial expands into hard-hit South Africa

"Tracy Taylor. Human testing for a possible covert 19 vaccine just started in South Africa with the University of Oxford and AstraZeneca 2000 volunteers, 50 of them with HIV are being tested. Bloomberg reports the trial's in three sites in the country's most populated province. Helen Reese. She's the chair of the health products. A regulatory authority said in a press conference that they need to have the vaccine that's tried and tested throughout the world and in all populations. South Africa has the world's largest HIV and affected population with about seven million patients as well as having fast growing coded 19 cases. University of Oxford and AstraZeneca. Vaccine trials are already underway in the UK and other trials trials are are starting starting in in Brazil Brazil and and the the U. U. S. S. Cairo Cairo Radio Radio

University Of Oxford Helen Reese South Africa Astrazeneca Brazil Brazil Tracy Taylor Cairo Bloomberg UK
With coronavirus fading in UK, Oxford vaccine trial expands into hard-hit South Africa

Seattle's Morning News with Dave Ross

00:49 sec | Last week

With coronavirus fading in UK, Oxford vaccine trial expands into hard-hit South Africa

"The cure and Tracy Taylor. Human testing for a possible covert 19 vaccine just started in South Africa with the University of Oxford and AstraZeneca 2000 volunteers, 50 of them with HIV are being tested. Bloomberg reports the trial's in three sites in the country's most populated province. Helen Reese. She's the chair of the health products. A regulatory authority said in a press conference that they need to have the vaccine that's tried and tested throughout the world and in all populations. South Africa has the world's largest HIV and affected population with about seven million patients as well as having fast growing coded 19 cases. University of Oxford and AstraZeneca. Vaccine trials are already underway in the UK and other trials trials are are starting starting in in Brazil Brazil and and the the U. U. S. S. Cairo Cairo Radio Radio your your first first source source to to know know and and understand understand

University Of Oxford Helen Reese South Africa Astrazeneca Brazil Brazil Tracy Taylor Cairo Cure Bloomberg UK
COVID-19 vaccine could start human trials as early as August

Vickie Allen and Levon Putney

01:49 min | Last month

COVID-19 vaccine could start human trials as early as August

"Although the trump administration is expected to soon name five vaccine candidates chosen as part of operation warp speed since January Dr Dan Bruce hasn't taken a day off working long hours to develop a vaccine to help stop the spread of the outbreak vaccine development for Culver nineteen is proceeding at a pace that is far faster than any vaccine development in history Dr Bruce is the director of the center for virology in vaccine research at Beth Israel deaconess Medical Center he has led ground breaking work on vaccines for HIV and Zika are you concerned you're moving too fast the goal is not to compromise patient safety at all because ultimately a vaccine absolutely must be safe it is going to be administered to large numbers of healthy people researchers are taking part of the corona virus DNA in transferring it into we can common cold virus after it is placed into a cell the body will produce antibodies triggering an immune response we know from using this vaccine technology for other pathogens in the past that raises remarkably potent and durable neutralizing antibody responses from group believes this approach will allow them to quickly mass produce this vaccine if it's approved it's a gamble that Johnson and Johnson is already betting on with the commitment to produce a billion doses as soon as it's ready the outcome of our production will start late this year with millions of **** scenes as more manufacturing capacity comes on board early next year we'll go up to in the ten millions and on into the Hyundai the roof is optimistic they will start human trials as early as August a step closer he hopes to ending the

Dr Dan Bruce Culver Director Beth Israel Deaconess Medical HIV Johnson Hyundai Zika
The coronavirus may surge this Australian winter. Here's why

Coronacast

03:42 min | Last month

The coronavirus may surge this Australian winter. Here's why

"Monday the first of June the first of winter. And give it is beginning of winter. Maybe we could talk about whether we can expect things to get worse as we come into the called a months. Do We know Norman? What effect it has? On covid nineteen transmission, the short answer to that question is that the experts think it probably will make a difference, but it depends in which environment you're in so in countries where you've got a rising epidemic, pandemic or very large numbers of cases, you probably won't notice the difference of winter, but you could in places like Australia in New Zealand where we've got very little virus around in a small increase could give you a significant blip. And essentially what we're talking about here is that we're indoors more more likely to transmit the virus to other people indoors. We've spoken about before is the high risk area it could be that the environment in winter favors the virus as well because it does other corona viruses, so you would expect it to get a little bit worse winter, but you might not notice it in amongst the noise in countries like the United States in the United Kingdom. You might notice it in Australia one of the things that we were sort of worried about. About, a few months ago is coming into winter. At the same time of these new pandemic was that perhaps it was going to coincide with the flu season, but everyone's staying harm. So is it a we? Is that still something that we're worried about? Or maybe? Is it going to be a good season for US hard to know? We are now coming back out of isolation, and maybe I'll be that seasonal flu remarriages, but there's also been quite a high uptake of influenza immunization, so it remains to be seen what we see about. Flu But you would expect seasonal flu to make a bit of a resurgence as we get out and about a bit more over the next few weeks. Another thing that we were hearing a bit more over the weekend about was this name that just won't go away. The Ruby Princess so passengers on board. The Ruby Princess cruise have have led to one of the biggest current of ours clusters, but there's been another health warning issued around that boat. A cream has been diagnosed with tuberculosis. Yes, you another reason not to call on crucial think, but you know just when you thought it was safe to go out here's somebody with Berko losses. The probably health artists are saying that the risk is low to other people on the ship, which it certainly lower than corona virus. Temecula losses can actually be quite infectious. Just remind you what this is this is. An inch a very very ancient disease. It's been around longer. Probably than humans have been around and was scourged, particularly in the nineteenth century, causes a lung disease, but can affects your kidneys can almost any part of your body, so it's pretty nasty and high high degree of fatality particularly if you're immune, compromised such as HIV AIDS. You can get clusters of tuberculosis. I covered the story a story a few years ago and outbreak of tuberculosis in Adelaide and when the traced back the outbreak, it was sprayed. It was a man on boss. He caught the bus each morning from the Adelaide hills down into the city, and he spread it to other people on the bus. So Tobacco can be infectious, but it's not as infectious as corona virus. Do We know given byes? Lung Diseases is they a people with take a at higher risk of complications from Iris very good question. Don't know the answer to it intuitively. You'd say yes, you've got. Got Pommery TB you would be you. You'd think that you're more susceptible. although TV does funny things to your immune system, and that may affect responses well to the corona virus, because sometimes the things going on in your lungs and the immune response, they are helped to dampen the immune response to covid nineteen, so it's complicated story, but I don't think anybody's published on that yet.

FLU United States Lung Diseases Australia Norman Adelaide Adelaide Hills United Kingdom Iris HIV New Zealand Aids
Larry Kramer, playwright and AIDS activist, dies at 84

KCBS 24 Hour News

01:04 min | Last month

Larry Kramer, playwright and AIDS activist, dies at 84

"Writer playwright author gay rights activists and aids activist Larry Kramer has died of pneumonia at the age of eighty four here's Jim Chevy our reporter once described Larry Kramer as the game worlds leading apostle of unrest certainly he was an active he co founded the group's gay men's health crisis and act up in the nineteen eighties in response to the aids epidemic and Kramer's writings were meant to stir up the audience his play the normal heart portraying the pain of HIV still even though Kramer's set out to be confrontational he told CBS news it was not easy making a full of himself in front of others but you know you kind of think of the greater but Jim Shannon B. C. B. S. news Kramer and his husband architectural designer David Webster have been together since nineteen ninety one they were also a couple back in the seventies act up said the Kramers raids helped inspire a movement and Elton John said today that we've lost a giant of a man who stood up for gay rights like a

Larry Kramer Pneumonia Jim Chevy David Webster Elton John Writer Reporter CBS Jim Shannon B. C. B.
AIDS activist and "The Normal Heart" playwright Larry Kramer dies at 84

News, Traffic and Weather

00:37 sec | Last month

AIDS activist and "The Normal Heart" playwright Larry Kramer dies at 84

"Back in the eighties when HIV aids became a crisis playwright Larry Kramer used his angry voice to raise theater goers consciousness of it later forming the game men's health crisis and then act up Larry Kramer died on Wednesday many remember in play right now aids activist Larry Kramer best known for his play the normal heart Elton John said in a statement that we have lost a giant of a man who stood up for gay rights like a warrior Lin Manuel Miranda writes on Twitter that Cramer was an extraordinary writer Rosie o'donnell called him an American hero Kramer was diagnosed with HIV in nineteen eighty nine he died of pneumonia Larry Kramer was eighty

Larry Kramer Elton John Lin Manuel Miranda Twitter Cramer Rosie O'donnell HIV Writer
New York governor's daily coronavirus briefing

Midday News

13:16 min | Last month

New York governor's daily coronavirus briefing

"That your monstrous not a real doctor Dr we restrict actor Robert Mujica director the budget to my right Mr rose a secretary to the governor my far right real doctor have a darker commissioner of health good morning to all of you happy Memorial Day weekend starts today summer is Nero upon us this will be the one hundred and fifty shift Memorial Day press gets to ask me questions here's my question for you guys today where was the first officially recognized Memorial Day celebration no answer no way let the record show there is not a single submission from the assembled press aggression Waterloo New York Seneca county eighteen sixty six President Johnson declared Waterloo New York the birthplace of the Memorial Day parade and as you are a press corps from the state of New York I would hope that you said you remember this going forward and there's the sign just in case you forget Waterloo New York birthplace of Memorial Day today's the day eighty three of the covert nineteen crisis some of my young guns saying US eighty three days we haven't had a day off its Memorial Day weekend life is about stamina stamina it's Memorial Day weekend major imagine if you were in a real war overseas war World War one World War two rien war Vietnam War day eighty three it's nothing short of duty news is good today hospitalizations are down net change in hospitalizations is down the number of new cases per day is down this is low level now that is lower than when we first began so that's good number of deaths painfully hi at any number right and you see that this number has been stubborn on its way down but it's one hundred and nine yesterday they're all in our thoughts and prayers again you see how quick that spike one up and you see how slow it is to come down so we want to make sure we don't go back there ever ever again we're talking about re opening question is not whether or not to re open the question is how you reopen smart how fast and safe can you reopen re open as fast as you can as long as it is safe and your safe if you're acting smart what a smart mean phasing it in by metrics just study what's happening continue to test so you can you have an idea of the growth of the virus trace those cases isolate those positives watch your hospital capacity and monitor what's going on so all your actions are based on data we post all the data anyone can in the state can go online and see where they are by their region Long Island the mid Hudson region if the number of deaths continues to decline the way it has and they get their tracing online every region has a certain number of tracers that they need to re open because we want to make sure when they re open they have the testing and tracing operation working but if the number of deaths continues to decline they get their tracing up and online both Regis could reopen this week in anticipation of that we're going to allow construction staging phase one construction begins before you can begin construction you have to have stage the construction the materials have to be on site at cetera safety precautions have to be on site so we're going to allow that construction staging now for the Long Island in the mid Hudson we're hopeful that the number of deaths continues to decline and then they would be re opening this week testing is big component of all of this New York state tests more than any other state per capita we test more than any other country per capita so we are far ahead in terms of getting this operation online and this is the first case nobody's ever done this before putting together this tracing and testing capacity but we've signed up another fifty two independent pharmacies that brings the total number of sites in the state of New York to seven hundred and fifty and our message is very simple get a test we have a state run sites where we have more capacity than when now performing tests we have some drive ins where we can do fifteen thousand tests were only doing five thousand per day get a test if you have any symptoms of covert which are basically the same symptoms as the flow if you have any symptoms get a test if you were exposed to a person who you find that was positive get a test get a test and you can go to this website you know tell you exactly the side closest to you in terms of tracing all the reasons that I've come on line had to have the right number of tracers so we're talking about mid Hudson in Long Island has to get their tracing numbers up but every region has the tracing functioning Mike Bloomberg former mayor of New York City volunteered to have his Bloomberg philanthropies put together any tracing program because there is no such thing as a tracing program how do you train tracers how do you recruit tracers how do you what software do the tracers use they've been doing that with Johns Hopkins they've been fantastic we have that in place now and we're going to share that with other states online and we're going to do that with the national governors association because New York is I had and we do have more advanced curriculum and training and protocols so we're going to work with the NGA and make that available to any state that wants to use it small business is a priority federal government attached to small business assistance program that is run out of money and small businesses are taking a real beating in this situation they are ninety percent of new York's business and they're facing the toughest challenges the economic projections vis a vis small business are actually frightening more than one hundred thousand have shut permanently since the pandemic hit many small businesses just don't have the staying power to continue to pay all the fixed cost at least at cetera when they have no income whatsoever minority owned businesses face a far greater risk and have received less in federal relief so New York state is starting its own small business relief program working with private banks we have over one hundred million dollars available to make loans to small businesses we're going to focus on M. W. B. ease that did not receive federal assistance and focus on really small business you know the federal definition of small business has what many would consider large businesses but we're going to focus on troops small businesses twenty or fewer fewer employees less than three million dollars in gross revenues people who are interested in participating in this program can go to the website that is on the screen this Memorial Day weekend we expect people to be getting out going to parks beaches it cetera we understand that but we have to remain vigilant at the same time I know the weather is warmer I know people been cooped up I know this tremendous energy to get out you have to remain village vigilant you read in the papers that they're talking now about a possible second wave are hot spots for places that have opened too fast or opened without testing and tracing or opened without doing monitoring I would be the worst situation is if we went through everything we went through you start to re open you're not doing the monitoring in the vigilance and it actually winds up with another hot spot or cluster or worse frankly and remember we are still learning about the scope of nineteen virus and one of the things I find most infuriating is the facts continue to change with this virus nobody's fault but since we didn't know about the virus we had certain assumptions that quote unquote experts may and those facts change from day one from day one it started that this virus was coming from China so everybody's looking to the west coast from the west and it turns out the virus came from the east came from Europe and walked right through our airports and nobody was screening and know what no one was doing anything I'm not it was not in March was coming here January February and March virus was here much before it much sooner than anybody knows fact was if you will have the virus and you have the antibodies in your immune so we can put together a work force they can go back to work people who have the virus and now have the antibodies now they're not so sure if you're immune if you have the antibodies started children were not going to be affected by the coronavirus now we're not so sure the children are not affected and we're watching carefully this inflammatory syndrome that is starting to hit children for covert positive or have the antibodies for positive most recently C. D. C. says infected surfaces are not a major source of transmission when we started it was about infected surfaces and you could get it from infected surfaces and that was a major problem we have a very aggressive disinfecting campaign going on across the state public transit it's at right now the CDC says yeah that's not a major source it's airborne it's droplets that's a major source if the major source if they're right and the major transmission source is airborne it takes you back to where a mass where a mass and you know this reminds me in some ways of the education we campaign we went through after we learned about the HIV virus and transmission of the HIV I remember how many times and how long we have to talk to people about wearing a prophylactic and how he could make the difference between life and death the mask can make the difference between life and death I know it's a small thing it's de minimus it doesn't look like much but if it's now primarily airborne you know the mask works how do you know the mask works first responders have a lower infection rate than the general population nurses doctors in emergency rooms have a lower infection rate than the general population how can that possibly be because they wear the mask and they do the hand sanitizer you feel out of control you can't protect yourself you can protect your family yes you can that's what the mass does you want to be in control of yourself you want to greatly increase your odds where the mass by the way not just asking you the mask is

Director Secretary Commissioner Robert Mujica
Leading the Gates Foundation Fight Against Coronavirus

The Strategerist

06:10 min | Last month

Leading the Gates Foundation Fight Against Coronavirus

"We have a really exciting opportunity today to talk to someone. That's helping lead the charge against the crow virus. Mark Suzman is CEO of the bill and Melinda Gates Foundation who are putting a ton of resources behind looking for solutions right now and we're really grateful to have a few minutes of your time mark. Thank you for doing this. Great detroi- well. The Gates Foundation has a publication called the optimist which we think is exactly the kind of attitude that we need right now and we'll have time to talk about specifics of the virus in treatments soon but I in general terms at a high level. What's keeping optimistic right now? Well we do have publication called the optimistic with inter-regional you're listening to subscribe. It's a great publication that sort of sends out an US on a pretty regular basis actually comes from Bill and Melinda Gates who are like to call themselves impatient optimists we we decided not to call the publication. The impatient optimists and at times like this. It's sometimes challenging to to feel optimistic but on the real plus side one. We're seeing are really unprecedented progress in of the search for a vaccine that still going to be a wild but we're a pretty confident that they will be a successful vaccine you know unlike say with HIV where we struggle to find one up to more than thirty years. And it's going to be the foster. Sfaxien ever successfully developed in human history there already number of candidates in trials but we have a lot of scientists who look at that and feel pretty confidence and the challenge is going to be really about getting them through as quickly as possible getting them into distribution and manufacturing and trying to make sure that they are globally accessible. Because it's something the world's GonNa need so that probably the biggest one on the horizon. The second one is a cautious optimism. But it's also combined with a worry Which is so far. We haven't seen the kind of days in the developing world which we were very worried about probably off the levels we've seen in the US and Europe. We're working very hard and you. These places with very low and weak health resources to try and help with preparation still worries that there may be major outbreaks but again the steps that have been taken by these countries today despite their challenging circumstances have certainly a voted foul outcomes and that's being another bid relatively good news and I know that that global outlook is really important to the Gates Foundation. What are y'all doing to make sure that the work that you're doing is able to be used worldwide. Yes so that's something we do for like when we work extensively across the US obviously and we have carry lodge program. Which of being heavily disrupted and Writing educational opportunities for low income students and kids of Color in K twelve and post-second buck most by workers in global health and global development issues. And everything we do as informed by what he calls global access so we do a lot of research and development Some of that is in helpings like New Treatments. Or vaccines or things that are Diseases like malaria or tobacco. So I do think that disproportionately affect poor people and we have requirement whenever we make grunts that Any results Former global access. You know they need to be accessible and affordable globally and we support directly a number of organizations that help ensure that happens so the Global Fund to fight. Hiv Malaria Which was actually something where President Bush was the inaugural funded from the US and and was the counterpart to the pet. Far -Unding is a huge operation. That actually helps keep many millions of people on anti retrovirals but also that's bednets across the developing world to prevent Larrea to Berkey Laos's treatments. And what it does is it. Cools or sources including from the foundation many governments including the US which is the largest Funda. And then how? Purchase those at bulk because it is a crisis and then distribute them to the needy globally and we have the partnerships that do the same in areas like vaccines. So I know that scenario that we've worked together on before is in is in global health. We had Bill Melinda Gates recently at our form on leadership for them to talk about the work that they've done and Y'all done a lot of work with global epidemics previously like in global health. You've been very active. What did you learn from the worthy done previously? That's helping you today. So some of it is pretty simple stuff right. You need basic functional primary healthcare systems that that may sound and we're kind of used most people can excess at least minimal basic healthcare in the US effectively but You in very poor countries. That means often. There's barely a clinic with basic equipment or tools. But we need that. We make a lot of investments in trying to support those kind of experts if you have accessible primary care that's able to take early action than that helps prevent a whole lot of the health outcomes and then the car. Koga crisis where you're trying to Provide community engagement or involvement to help support challenges. Where you're often working in situations like crowded urban slums where it's very difficult to sort of isolate if you have symptoms we've seen countries like South Outta go for example which have extensive networks that have been set up to deal with HIV crisis actually being able to mobilize those network to help support Kobe or simply one of the talents we have. We are the largest. Funders globally the. Us is also very generous support of the Global Polio Eradication Initiative that unfortunately it had to be put on pause for why because we can't currently vaccinate children because it's the opposite of social distancing malaria polio vaccine. Excuse me drops that needs to be put in the mouth of a baby. That's held by their parents but we had big infrastructure that we've developed Without the partners over the years including Eunice and the World Health Organization Rotary that is very expert at surveillance and tracking and tracing Things which can now again be used in that Jacobin. So we've had a lot of those kinds of blessedness Which we wish. We didn't have to have them to help. But there certainly are helping with the current crisis

United States Gates Foundation Melinda Gates Melinda Gates Foundation Global Polio Eradication Initi Global Fund Malaria Mark Suzman Polio Vaccine CEO World Health Organization Europe Sfaxien Bill President Bush Eunice Jacobin HIV
Paul Burston:  So Many Men, So Little Time

Probably True Podcast

09:59 min | Last month

Paul Burston: So Many Men, So Little Time

"It was nineteen eighty-eight so I would have been twenty two. I think I finished university and I devoted myself base being a full-time seen queen and I was having a lot of fun of fun. There wasn't really low drugs around that I was not that I was aware of anyway. People get drunk on beer or steal beer. Sometimes I could not that pint of that so it wasn't that kind of like glass frontier. We're happy to be seen. It was all quite behind doc windows. And it was like ultra ultraviolet lights everywhere because everyone's dandruff. On their showed there's video. Scrimmage was a novelty a video screen and a bar and you can pay money to choose videos. We should be done for videos in those days to watch pope whenever you want it to always have. Don't leave me this way by Bouncy. Cb there was always on when whenever into Harpoon Louie's that was on and there was. I WANNA dance with somebody by Whitney. Houston they take me back to those year to that place there were different of tribes within that as well so that look you had that kind of Franken Hollywood's look should. I was pretty those Saturday night at half and that was I was the only night at Heaven which I actually came out by going to heaven so I came. I didn't tell anybody I just went to have on my own and stood outside and I knew I knew there was GEICO. Having everyone knew that and I've seen something in time out magazine I think it was And I went to long understood outside. I spiked up. Hair like friendly McCullough from Akron. The bunny man. I had plucked eyebrows and makeup. I think two hearings in each year on knows that as well and I stood side for about two hours. Watching these men queuing up. None of looked tore like me. They all looked like village people and number shirts and moustaches and I couldn't. I just couldn't go in so I said as a chain smoking I went back to Waterloo train back to Richmond and university again but I went back the next Saturday and the next Saturday and then invention third week I actually picked up the courage to go in getting a little bit closer and I went down those hallowed stairs and I remember that the sense of the smell which I didn't mechanism bustos was poppers. Didn't what he wants to start old socks and you walk into this room and the first thing I heard was this guy sort of swished by saying so many men so little time extra popular tune if the time and I just turned and ran out again because it terrified me and then the funding we went back and I stood literally lately with my back against the wall. Didn't talk to anybody. Stood up against the wall looking people as nineteen of so terrified and then eventually someone talked to me and then not wanting another with that particular. One just generally without something with that particular. Someone broke my heart though. Of course best bastard but to do it come out. It wasn't the best way probably be go to pick new. Only be terrified. Puts ME IN MIND TO SWIM? You start off just you in the water. Then you float. He's on and yes and above our and then you start moving around and I. I've always tend to jump into things too much so I have my local Gay Mitchell. After goes the biggest gates and in the whole world. The time probably to do it. Yeah just throw from seven to that. I left. I'd many many many great times than many great times then over the subsequent years and there so many men so little time. Well they were yes definitely in both senses because we didn't realize then just many men. We're going to have so little time unusual. Change very very quickly became quite prophetic. Really I was making up for lost time. I had fun. I made lots of new friends. Even if you didn't the names at least at least we were together. I'm quite choosy like that. Yeah I actually had sex with somebody wants waiting for night bus into Vulgar Square. Actually in the night in the queue of the night in the kids. Yeah Yeah Yeah by. The National Gallery was no one else in the queue tempted to join in offer offer. Some kind of the neighbors and developed square knows. Days was a real hotbed activity. Whatever would come from heaven or Soho in the middle of the week and they just be. So many gay guys queuing the but Vulgar Square. Honestly say people from that period for similar stories of just like getting on the different night because you fancied some but in finding you in Eastland and you live in Richmond. Just there was. There was a hottie on the and hoping that they'd give you some wet they usually did of charity for me. Part of the fun of those of that period of my life was that you'd go out and you'd meet people and you would normally meet meet a cross section of people. I have friends all different ages. Different backgrounds and sexualities and genders much more fragmented later and I think that the sex it can victim of own success in a way. Because there wasn't there wasn't the connections after AIDS happens because that was a huge thing in my life or knows about twenty five twenty six most of my gay male friends at that point. Were some years old me because I was I I wanted to learn. I wanted to own it someone to be my older brother and teach me and show me the ropes and some and they were the ones that died so I lost all of them pretty much and then I became an aids activist and got me involved in that and the for all of the for all the things that I would not change for anything but a lot of things about the eighty S. I would never want to have back. But there was a sense of community. People did pull together and they did rally and there were. There was communication between different generations. Different tribes within within our communities. And now it is. That's true anymore. I think that there was a break in the chain because there was generation that was kind of lost to HIV AIDS. There was the generation that we're impacted by it like my generation who went to flow of grief innovation space sandwiches very traumatic. And I'm probably not really over yet still in there some degree and then it becomes a very difficult subject to talk about so you don't talk about it very often and then the younger kids come in. And they've got half of this happens. They know the history half the time when you talk to. You have no idea what was going on ten fifteen years before they were. Because why would you know? I didn't WANNA die. Young either. Must be about twenty two when I first heard about it my boyfriend at the time. Read something in one of gay papers and said we have to stop using condoms and I was like. Whoa and then I'd heard that someone I was at college with who was a mature student and he disappeared for a long period. He didn't come back after this term. I then learned on the grapevine that he was gay. Had THIS BOYFRIEND WHO AMERICAN. They basically both contracted dictionary and he died really community rapidly. I wasn't really. I didn't know he might just name to say hi to billy and he was the first person that was. I that I knew of and then the guy was living in the in the tower block with who I was very close to and it was the real mentor of mine. I moved and I went to see him one night and He was he was all something ought to buy it. The whole evening was very strange and strained and I remember asking him about how he say. Seeing somebody recently this new boyfriend and I saw how things go with a boyfriend and he said Oh. What's been difficult because he he's he's a he's upset because I don't I don't have sex now that I majorly positive. And that was how that was how he told me. And I just put the spray face on and just get through this conversation. I was absolutely shocked. Devastated because at that in that back. They're not meant to death. Sentence there was there was no treatment and I remember sitting to this dinner feeding. Obser- your phone and then getting home on the train and just crying. The whole journey home. He became really really quickly and then he was. He won't one of his dying wishes as you wanted to go to. Amsterdam you know Vietnam and his friends. Most of them were straight women elected person to take him and I went. I took him to them on this trip and I spent the whole time. What thinking he was going to die on me. And how am I going to manage to get him what I do? I was twenty four years of age. Twenty five this. It was horrendous. It was very frightening when he was hospitalized to visit him and habit. Bobi helping with things. I remember one time picking up urine bottle onto the bed and tipping acid typically myself and being paranoid even though I knew deep down that this was not something that was good pose. Any risk to me. We didn't really know people didn't really know no. There wasn't much information. And this is before lady. Diana went into the AIDS. Ward this before this sort of stuff happened it was it was still appeared it was not really spoken about if it was spoken about hushed voices and it was very frightening time and he was a very very good community minded person he he was involved in the running of the building and everyone knew who he was he would chair meetings and whatever and then after he got. L. Someone Daubed on his front door house of AIDS on his front door and then he died and I was really in the state about it and reading the papers. There was a meeting happening at the London. Lesbian Gay Entering Cow Cross Street and Farrington. Which is not no longer there but it was very popular but place back then and there was a meeting happening and his act up and I I knew I act up was happening in America. Knew what actor boss I went to this meeting. I just threw myself into it and it took up my life completely for like three years and it was way of channelling the grief because in an over over those three years it was just one funeral after another. He was just he got to the point. Where you'd actually dread answering the phone. And I used to a Filofax that was an effects back in the eighty s. My member year just taking all the names out taking people out because people are just dying all the time even my family. I mean little bits but they just did not understand why this was any different to my grandfather dying because that's expected because he's fucking eighteen easily and he smokes these ill and mentioned me dying and late. Twenties and early Thirties. It's it's completely mad. It was it was like there was a war going on but only we knew about it was the why was completely oblivious and yet within our world which is very very contains. Gay London world. There was a war going on and people were dying all around us and we were expected to carry on as normal. What you have the you do that.

Aids Vulgar Square Harpoon Louie Geico London Gay Mitchell Whitney Houston Franken Hollywood Mccullough Richmond America Farrington Soho Filofax Eastland National Gallery Akron
Getting it right: States struggle with contact tracing push

Sarah and Vinnie

07:17 min | Last month

Getting it right: States struggle with contact tracing push

"For us what it is that this contract tracing work in tales I mean this is a this is a pretty old approach to public health is it not you know not as if you think nineteen thirty seven as older not all prospective song perspective right this is been used primarily for sexually transmitted diseases it was originally designed for circles control but as we use it for HIV but we also use it for tuberculosis measles other things like that as well so the idea is that what we're trying to do is identify people who are infected or who may become infected and who are excreting virus shedding virus and those who have been exposed and may turn and may become fully infected and start to excrete virus so that's two groups those are were infected and those were been exposed so when someone is reported with covert nineteen infection from the labs are from their doctors are they self report someone from the city will call them and say you know we're sorry about your diagnosis do you need anything you know symptoms you need to have a hospital that kind of stuff got a case management and then they'll say we need to talk to you about your people with whom you pay cut in a contact the last five days or whatever the period of time is it's kind of defined by what your symptoms began at an all state will I need to know the people with whom you've come in contact and got it for how long and what sorts of contact so if we think that they're a close contact that they've been in close enough contact to actually become infected will say okay what we think you need to go get a test and so the test they would go get a test we would follow up with them find out whether the test was positive or negative the test is positive they're a case and they have to go into isolation until there are no longer infectious no longer contagious which is about eight days from the onset of symptoms clearly you can't tell people just gonna shut the door and good luck and also will open at fourteen days and see what's going on yet to be in daily contact with people a lot of people need to have things arranged someone can't shelter camp stay at home they don't have extra bedrooms they're they're living for people to up to a household are they might have to you know if it's a it's a wage earner in a family and that person goes into goes into isolation somebody has to make sure there's money for the family and that there's food and as well as for the prisoners in isolation but also for the family and the governor has brought in a weight support program where people have to go into isolation and contact which isolation and quarantine which the city is also supplemented so there's a fair amount of social service part on the back and for people who are actually have to go into isolation or or or quarantine but the idea here is that instead of finding someone has been exposed and treating them with the drug which is how we do it with with us support us or tuberculosis or with a vaccine just how we deal with measles here the the treatment is to get out of circulation so they made themselves they made them selves not get treatment depending on the severity of their disease point is is that we're limiting their ability to transmit the virus to other people so with the end of shelter in place this become as children play starts to wind down this becomes kind of our first line of defense against a transmission it's interesting calling in on the first line of defense again we're speaking on KCBS in depth to doctor George Rutherford who is a epidemiologist with UC San Francisco helping to lead up an effort to train more contact tracers in California so when it comes to the training that is taking place what does it take to be a good contact tracer and how do you train somebody I understand that the course that you you you mentioned some of its in person some of it's gonna be online it's something like a twenty hour training course what it take to make somebody able to do this work right so they have to be able to talk to people they have to be not afraid to call people up and and talk them through this I and I think it's ever since we've done a pretty good job the mayor's been great about talking about it and so people are just you know people are surprised when the calls come more last so it's you know that's the you know that's the big thing is getting your foot in the door talking to him understood having our understand we're trying to do what's in it for them right no more transmission the family number transmission of friends you know you get a diagnosis you're able to you're able to have your income supported while you're gone so that's you know that that's the important part is to get them yes past the first sentence and be able to talk to them talk through all the the issues what needs to happen next so the training is first of all understanding the biology of the disease and epidemiology of the disease a lot of the social aspects of that brings up you know this is as you as I think we're all aware we have haves and have nots in our society and this this disease has yet again emphasize those divides so that's an important thing for everybody to be really clear about we also do role plays a apps that sample scripts that people can work from in smaller workgroups hi and then we'll look over people's shoulders as they're making calls the look over our shoulders we'll do one together and then we'll we will look over their shoulders while they make them and at the end of twenty hours there actually you know quite competent at doing this I'm I'm kind of curious and and I I don't want to cut this to come off as a criticism or being impetuous and anyway but obviously everybody is very eager to come out of this like down as quickly as possible and obviously we have known that this is a need for some time now why is this something that's coming off the ground right now was we were there it is just help us understand that you know the difficulties in getting something this monumental up and running sure well we've been doing in San Francisco for four weeks just to give you my first things first things first so this was recognized early on by the department of public health and Dr Colfax and Dr Oregon and we you know we we with their help we yeah and you know it as a joint effort we pushed it down the roadway and got it launched and you know I've been doing this now for four weeks and have a lot of the the Kinks knocked out of it coming forward a lot of counties have been doing a little bit of this but not a lot they don't know where the work force is coming from the county all the county or most of the counties not the little counties but most of the big counties at people who do this for a living they do it for STD control they do it for tuberculosis control you do a premiumization programs the server standard public health programs but they're just not very many of them so in San Francisco for instance when this started your ten people doing this we were doing the case investigations and then trying to follow up on the context we've added a hundred and forty people to that so just to give you an idea of the numbers and so this ten thousand people that the governor talks about that's the

Gilead’s remdesivir is a rare example of foresight in this pandemic

Bloomberg Politics, Policy and Power

05:35 min | Last month

Gilead’s remdesivir is a rare example of foresight in this pandemic

"Up let's go inside the magazine the cover story it's all about how Kelly adds wind does appear is an example of foresight in this pandemic we caught up with magazine editor Joe Webber and the writer of the piece Robert Langer from the beginning of this series character really clear that there weren't that many drugs that could do that and like lab data against corona viruses to go right into trials plane to human trials and this is one of a kind of handful found some from very early on you know if there's going to was going to early drugs qualifiers this is likely to be excised paying attention only on those talking to Billy you know early on trying to get interviews with some of their executives which was very hard to but what one thing we were able to get you know before this completely closed off or if you get a to talk to for you know into a one of A. R. the plants for the filling the file got in California this is why does everything was shutting down in mid March in U. appointment last days we could have done it we gotta talk over there a couple of great pictures and make videos suggesting that really helped make the story and then I just kept talking to them and you know get more detail at the earliest years of compounding then yeah finally is able to get me to deal with one of the top you know manufacture accurately tell me all the the seven different chemicals went into this and they get a twenty five different steps and you can compare the two making a very yeah yes the very specific or local of type of gratitude bakery if you don't if you don't already huge amount of your specially flower advance you have to wait for the new crop wheat to grow up to be a big delay that's right January all the specialty ingredients in the right order the flyers in China and Europe Wayans dance I was like the biggest smartest thing that they did yeah it's that's really such a key detail what to bring into Weber the editor of Bloomberg business week he joins us from Brooklyn and jolt you put this on the cover it makes a huge amount of sense because it's such a good read give us the contact from your perspective because you're looking across all of these stories not just as it relates to the crown of ours but across the world of business you know I think the story's significance is is huge and it's also the way that I I think is the best part of it but this is almost like the most hopeful news the only hopeful news basically to date in this coronavirus saga you either with like it it feels like it one bit of bad news after not act and it's almost like this cacophony of incompetence sometimes and so what I think Bob will be able to do in this Gilead story was actually shows like here's a good example of like one of the only ones really of a company that had incredible foresight and preparedness and you know how do you not actually ordered the raw materials that they needed to actually make this creep back in January even before it was you know before we knew how bad this was going to be having not done that back then we would not have the treatment that we certainly you know I like to be sure this is not a cure it's a treatment it takes corona virus from being fifteen gate operation down to maybe like eleven Coolidge down to like a linen suit you know if it's a modest improvement over nothing but at least it's something and you don't bother are you sort of you know reported around if you know if it's actually even more incredible than that because this is a drug that actually you know it's been around for like eleven years now and it never could find a purpose even right what what's the backstory you know the first thing that is you know looking for hepatitis C. drugs that was hard to administer the a better one for pills with conditional for that and then you know they tried it for a bola and they spend years on that you know because the first attempt to prolong a ball out quicker than the outbreak faded before they could get into even falls lake Catherine reasonable outbreak and then it didn't work that well so they are but in the end so they're trying to figure out what to do next and when the moment came along and they didn't have the thing that he definitely was I did not in January they didn't assume the best case scenario they didn't play has to wait a few weeks we'll see if this goes away because they're gay in case this is a pandemic worker or a whole bunch of stuff right now and it's just very different from what a lot of other folks did I have to say what's really cool in the story and if if people don't totally understand how significant this is it you're right Mr how Anthony Fauci has pointed out that he is like in the trial of ambassador to the first big trial of AZ T. the first drug for HIV right and so then you understand because that too was something we just couldn't figure out a treatment and so you understand Bob how room disappear is really a first very important step well yeah absolutely I mean the way to think of this is as a first step or first thing over again as the sea of going to self censor any a lot more drugs they're working on better drugs and better ways to administrative right now to confusion and we're definitely gonna need vaccines this doesn't solve the problem this is you know and as you said the first up from the second you know hospitalized patients in this reporter Robert Langer and of course Joe Webber the editor of Bloomberg business week and Carol what I really liked about this story from the pretty arresting cover image all the way through the pieces we talk so much about sort of botched response in on preparedness this was a case where a company anticipated some of this a lot still to be seen about whether this will be the drug that we need but I a company in the

Joe Webber Writer Kelly Editor
"hiv" Discussed on KMOX News Radio 1120

KMOX News Radio 1120

02:33 min | 3 months ago

"hiv" Discussed on KMOX News Radio 1120

"Emails rush sounds like you're holding back a little bit when you discuss what went on with HIV and aids and I some holding back well there are a couple other things I can tell you it is just it's it's it's it's it's it's it's the history of it everybody was scared to death when this first hit it it could not it was it was not permitted that the only way to get this disease wise through a certain kind of behavior that was not permit politically that was not gonna fly and the the the sad fact was that it was behavior really spread there was one way to get it anal sex and and it's it's sad but that's that's what it was but that was we couldn't have that so they've they've they've the dirty needles came later and the and the blood transfusion that people didn't get aids HIV virus from from blood transfusions the people were donating blood long before anybody knew this it happened there was tainted blood was not really tested and were people who went in for for surgery needed blood transfusions and they succumbed those were not behavioral related deaths so they were they were highlighted as you can get it anybody can get it there was even an attempt there was a thought there was a fear that that you can get it by kissing bodily fluid transfer from kissing and the yeoman's work went in to disproving that because of that it's been the case why we want to start in sequestering people faster than you can say look if you split and so a lot of great work was done to demonstrate that it was not spread by kissing me are swapping of bodily fluids and shall we say but it was at first thought to be a dangerous thing and they were telling us it's gonna drop it's going to jump ahead of such a community knoll body is safe because it could not be it just was not permitted to be a virus that attach the only one form of behavior even though it was but everybody was terrified and everybody was terrified on purpose it was made political now.

HIV
Katie Adamson on how the YMCA is like an Iceburg

HIT Like a Girl

06:51 min | 3 months ago

Katie Adamson on how the YMCA is like an Iceburg

"My Name Is Katie. Adamson and I am Vice President of Health Partnerships in policy at the YMCA The USA. I have been at the Y. For fifteen years that I've been in the space for thirty so old I am about prevention and at the Y. We're about community health and so a bit different from the conference. I think I'm a bit of an outlier in terms of that. But that's kind of exciting. So I started my career out working for elected officials and so the first one was Pat Schroeder from Colorado and she stealth helped start the congressional women's caucus and children's caucus and she was one of the first graduates of Harvard law school too. She was a super big innovator in women's rights and I also got to work for a member of parliament and Ireland row when I was yeah when I was there. He brought the whole government down for itchy rights again so it was kind of neat to see the parliament go down because he felt like everyone should get access to HIV care and treatment. Ap Don't mind my asking. When is this like right out of college? He was right out of college. Okay now. They're probably more progressive in the United States. Went back then. They weren't that guy that I worked for a very desmond. He introduced contraception into Ireland around the pope. While that kind of tells you he was a real meek guy I was lucky to work for him and then came back and went back to pat. Schroeder's Office. I had been an intern for her. And I said I still want to work on the hill. Can you help me find a job in so Bernie? Sanders had just been elected so when I worked for him. Nobody who was now. Everybody knows who he is. And Bernie's known a lot more. His super super liberal left issues but he was a huge and continues to be a huge advocate for prevention and that the system is skewed and needs to be right-sized towards bigger investment in prevention. So that really influenced me a lot and for him. I worked on those issues primarily and we introduced legislation to establish national cancer registry in this country so that we you know we have more baseball statistics about guys in the world series than we do about women who got breast cancer and so the idea was if you could really kind of capture when people were diagnosed how they were diagnosed that public health could intervene catch it earlier do better screening referral. Things like that so we were able to pass. That legislation helped him get reelected helped him work with Republicans which he had to do in order to get reelected so I was doing a lot of work at the time for him to increase funding for prevention and so the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said. You know we're the only federal agency outside of Washington and we don't have anyone to help us. Educate the hill about what we do. Would you come work for us so took us about me about a year to get that job? But then I gotta go down to the Centers for Disease Control and help them come up and educate members of Congress about what the problems were and how big of an issue diabetes and cancer arthritis and all these issues were for the nation and how we needed to be doing more and building more programs in communities and that was an incredible experience for me. I came back and I work for some law firms as I was A nonprofit lobbyists basically so it was a law firm for profit. But I I worked for twenty nonprofits and I had to get all of them federal money. Wow so it's very hard. That's a huge responsibility was back in the earmark days and those are really good earmarks. I worked for Christopher and Dana. Reeve when they were alive. Superman and Dino's goal was that no one would ever have to make more than one phone call after a family member had become paralyzed because she was in a privileged position. She had all the access to anything. You could need in in terms of getting help for Chris. It took her like twenty six phone calls to get just a few things answered and so we built this entire center to help people living with paralysis. Get ACCESS TO CARE and information. Our Son had an issue so I've actually reached out to the Christopher Dana Reeve's foundation in having left the hospital after six months day with something that turned their lives upside down there just tremendous. Aren't they incredible? They really are and ours was not an interest spinal cord injury issue. It was non interested central nervous system but the people over there are just a pleasure to work with. I'm so glad to hear that because I was a long time ago so I'm so glad there's still doing three. Oh yes I was lucky enough to also work for Queen Noor of Jordan. Tell us more cues one of our clients and she and her husband when he was alive did so much to get rid of landmines in Jordan. And she helped takeover after. Diana died so she took over and ran the landmines survivor network and they'd won the Nobel Peace Prize with a group of others. Trying to get land mines out of the ground but they also started a landmine survivor. Peer Support Network around the world and so when they start this peer support network around the world. They helped landmines fibers. Get jobs and be able to survive as a lot of people few lose a lamb in another country. You're completely ostracized because you're not value to your family anymore. So long story short one of my clients was Ymca. When I was working at the law firm for just six months and I was about ready to get married and have a family and I needed to slow down because it was a really busy work so I came to the YMCA. And I've been there for fifteen years and so when I came to the YMCA. It was a really good time because the why was looking at trying to take the network of twenty seven hundred wise in the country and ten thousand communities we reach and drive the ship in the direction of prevention and control of chronic disease. And we've done this a few times in our history before during World War One and World War Two. We won the Nobel Peace Prize for our work during wartime a lot of people. Don't know that you know that. Yeah we were on the ground helping prisoners of war sadly were giving him some cigarettes and some donuts but back then we didn't have the science and that was part of what we did but we did a lot of social support the why was also on the Japanese internment camps providing health and well being in recreation so really got a lot of history in this country for things we've done and collectively tried to respond to community crisis a needs later when women were going back to work and we had latchkey kid problems. Why became one of the leading provider childcare? So the why was looking at it. It's makeup and saying we have challenge here. We are hello being organization we wake up everyday thing about spirit mind and body for all and we're losing the war here and if we're not part of the solution part of the problem so how do we get everybody moving in the same direction so that was kind of when I got to be hired and so it was Super Fun. Time to start helping our wise be connected to the innovators and so we worked with Folks like the Institute for Healthcare Improvement and we taught wise. How do plan do study? Act Really How to evaluate your work how to change the building so people felt welcome when they came in so they didn't see this gym equipment Or get a tour of the why they saw coffee and people sitting down and talking

Christopher Dana Reeve Centers For Disease Control An Pat Schroeder Ireland Parliament Bernie Vice President Of Health Partn Harvard Law School Colorado Adamson Breast Cancer United States Queen Noor Washington Intern Sanders Institute For Healthcare Impro
"hiv" Discussed on Medical Mysteries

Medical Mysteries

09:11 min | 3 months ago

"hiv" Discussed on Medical Mysteries

"Unfortunately this time they're optimism was misplaced Ryan died April Eighth Nineteen Ninety at eighteen years old. He was surrounded by his mother sister grandparents and even his most famous cheerleader. Elton John who had flown to Indianapolis just to be there. Ryan had passed away one month shy of graduating high school a few months later congress passed his namesake legistlation the Ryan white comprehensive AIDS resources. Emergency Act or care act in August nineteen ninety. The Care Act was a bipartisan measure. Signed into law by President George H W Bush. It provided two hundred twenty point five million dollars in federal funds for care and treatment including grants to help low income PEOPLE AFFORD EXPENSIVE. Aids medicine managed by the US Department of Health Resources and Services Administration. The first grants under the care. Act were distributed just a short time later in nineteen ninety one nineteen ninety one also saw finally another drug that could treat HIV and AIDS. Die Dancing an oral solution of powder and water when a person sells absorbed identity. Seen It. Slow down the HIV's ability to replicate and spread through the body. Unfortunately didanosine couldn't cure AIDS and it had dangerous side effects including potential neural damage however it was very effective at slowing the progression of AIDS in patients who previously used. Act if he'd lived long enough to see it hit the market Ryan. White might have responded to die dancing very well and thanks to people like Ryan who helps de Stigmatize AIDS researchers were able to raise funds and keep looking for better cures their efforts led the FDA to approve the use of highly active antiretroviral therapy heart in Nineteen ninety-six heart referred to any treatment regimen. That involved two or more prescription medications for example researchers found that didanosine could be more effective when used in combination with a C. T. Each form of heart is customize to an individual specific needs. It works best when patients can have honest conversations with their doctors about what is and isn't working conversations free of judgment or shame while Heart Camp Cure AIDS heart can help people manage their symptoms and it will slow the progression of HIV and related conditions after five years the care act was reauthorized in nineteen ninety-six including several additions to make the initiative more accessible part of the legislation introduced funding for the newly approved heart treatment the following year the health resources and Services Administration created the HIV AIDS Bureau responsible solely for overseeing an administering funds in relation to the Ryan White HIV AIDS program. In two thousand. The Care Act was reauthorized again. This time with new provisions for enhancing the health outcomes of patients with HIV and AIDS and in two thousand six it was renamed the Ryan White HIV AIDS treatment modernization. Act of two thousand six up until this point. Most AIDS breakthroughs had been about managing the disease in slowing its progress. But then something remarkable happened. Something that had never happened before Timothy Ray Brown was cured of AIDS. He didn't go public until two thousand ten until then he was simply known as the Berlin patient Brown tested positive for HIV in Nineteen ninety-five on February. Sixth Two thousand seven. He underwent a stem cell transplant to treat his leukemia within three months. Hiv couldn't be detected in his blood stem cell. Transplants are highly controversial and incredibly expensive. But another possible solution appeared in two thousand nineteen that year nature reported on an HIV patient in London. Who received a bone marrow transplant? He currently has no detectable. Hiv in his blood while the procedure is too expensive and risky for widespread use researchers view the London patient and the Berlin patient as proof that HIV can be cured meanwhile other strides are being made to prevent its spread in the past decade the FDA approved a more accessible drug that would prevent HIV transmission through sacs and drug use prep or pre exposure. Prophylaxis is a highly effective medication for HIV negative individuals who are at risk of contracting the disease. Thanks to prep. Scientists today have the tools to halt AIDS in its path but they still have to work around a lot of social stigma. Nearly forty million people live with the disease worldwide. One in seven are unaware that they're infected and may inadvertently spread it if they're too embarrassed or afraid to get tested. Information campaigns have helped a little as efforts to fix the mistakes of the past including the demonization of Gaetano. Duga or patient. Oh as we discussed last week. Duga was identified in the early days of the AIDS epidemic. He was dubbed Patient Zero by Randy shifts author of and the band played on the nineteen eighty-seven book and the Nineteen ninety-three movie adaptation on. Hbo depicted Duga as simply a bad guy. Somehow he got infected with the virus and then he continued to sleep around and spread the disease. It took more than thirty years but Gaetano Gaas name was finally cleared in a study published in nature in two thousand sixteen. It describe a new genetic analysis of stored blood samples from Duga it proved DIGOS. Specific strain of HIV was prevalent in the country long before he began globetrotting with Air Canada. In nineteen seventy four. In other words he wasn't responsible for the spread of AIDS. Since dugas name was cleared. Scientists have continued to search for solutions and for ways to right. The wrongs of the past. Nobody can bring back those individuals who died when AIDS was so hated. That officials refused to cooperate to find a cure. But there's still time to build a better future. New Breakthroughs are promising but only so long as doctors patients researchers in the federal government are willing to work together the history of AIDS and HIV is one of stigma government irresponsibility and unnecessary deaths with better education in open communication. The future can be one of hope. Thanks for listening to medical mysteries. We'll be back next week with another episode for more information on Ryan White amongst the many sources we used. We found the biography Ryan White my own story extremely helpful to our research. You can find all episodes of medical mysteries and all other park has originals for free on spotify. Not only to spotify already. Have all of your favorite music but now spotify is making it easy for you to enjoy all of your favorite podcast originals. Like medical mysteries for free from your phone. Desktop or smart speaker to stream medical mysteries on spotify. Just open the APP tap browse and type medical mysteries in the search bar. And don't forget to follow us on facebook and Instagram. At podcast and twitter at our cast network. We'll see you next time. Medical mysteries was created by Max Cutler. And disappear cast studios original executive producers include Max and Ron Cutler sound designed by Juan Boorda with production assistance by Ron Shapiro Carly Madden Freddie Beckley and Joel Stein. This episode of medical mysteries was written by Geno Lennon with writing assistance by Maggie Admire and stars Molly Brandenburg and Richard Rosner..

AIDS HIV Ryan White HIV AIDS Ryan White Ryan HIV AIDS Bureau Gaetano Gaas spotify President George H W Bush Duga FDA Elton John didanosine Indianapolis US Department of Health Resour congress Berlin facebook twitter
"hiv" Discussed on 2 Docs Talk

2 Docs Talk

08:53 min | 4 months ago

"hiv" Discussed on 2 Docs Talk

"Hello and welcome to talk. Who podcast about healthcare the science of medicine and everything in between before we jump in. Let's clarify what exactly HIV and AIDS are good call. Hiv stands for human immunodeficiency virus which is a virus that causes Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome or AIDS. Yes so HIV is a retrovirus which means it is an rn. A virus that is a cellular machinery from the infected cell to do a reverse transcription of itself a DNA version which is inserted into the cells on DNA when the cell becomes active. It will make new copies of the virus that go out and continue the cycle and this is important because the drugs that we use today to combat HIV a variety of antiretroviral agents target different points in the cycle. The right combination of drugs can keep the viral load solo that it isn't detectable exactly so HIV infects a specific immune cell the CD four cell and over time the virus kills a CD foresaw which being part of the immune system plays a critical role in the body's ability to fight infection as de decline. The body becomes susceptible to opportunistic infections. Right these are often infections caused by pathogens that are normally present in on or around the body but a healthy immune system recognizes them and keep them in check someone with the depleted immune system however is susceptible to unusual infections. That healthy folks don't need to worry about. Plus they're they're susceptible. To all the irregular infections even healthy people get okay so an untreated course of goes something like this. A person is infected with HIV. The virus being transmitted during sexual activity directly into the bloodstream during childbirth or breastfeeding or a blood transfusion at this point the virus makes its way to the lymph nodes where has access to lots of CD. Four cells and replicates like crazy? This goes on for about three weeks three or four weeks. The patient may experience a viral type of illness during this time period. Fever swollen glands rash but not everyone experiences this yes and it feels like a regular just viral infections. So you don't really think about that. That might be what it is but after about two weeks the viral load in the blood is at a peak and CD four levels fall. This is a period of time where it is really easy to transmit the disease to another sexual partner because the viral load is so high after about six months the viral load and CD. Four count stabilized to set point and the chronic phase issue begins. This can last a up to ten years without treatment during which HIV gradually destroys CD. Four cells at some point the CD four count gets low enough. That opportunistic infections are possible. Yes and that's how we define AIDS either the CD. Four count is below two hundred cells per mil or the patient has an AIDS defining conditions such as retinitis from cmv cytomegalovirus or invasive cervical cancer or many many others so this was the typical course of disease for people early in the epidemic. Did you amy? That AIDS was around before the Nineteen Seventy S. That's when the epidemic began but it is believed that the virus jump from chimpanzees to humans in the Democratic Republic of the Congo in one thousand. Nine hundred and sporadic cases were reported from then until the mid seventies when the epidemic got its legs. Very interesting now. It wasn't until Nineteen eighty-one that we really understood what was happening in. La There were five young gay men who develop Mrs to screen pneumonia PCP which is now new. Mississippi'S VICI pneumonia. I know I can never get used to that. I still call it. Pcp Yeah. I'm sure a lot of school. It was pretty much standard at the time right. I mean that was like defy so defining but anyways another group in New York in California who developed Kassy's sarcoma which is an aggressive cancer caused by the human herpes virus eight that wouldn't normally happen without a suppressed. Immune system right both of those diseases. And by the end of that year there were two hundred seventy cases of severe immune deficiency among gay men and nearly half had died. Yeah that we knew so fast forward. A few years by the end of nineteen eighty five. There were over. Twenty thousand reported cases coming from every region of the world. The virus was officially named in Nineteen eighty-six and in nineteen eighty seven A. Z. T. was introduced. The this was the first antiretroviral drug this drug worked by inhibiting the initial reverse transcription of the virus into DNA. This was a very exciting development because the epidemic was growing quickly. Now there were three hundred seven thousand reported AIDS cases worldwide compared to the twenty thousand. You mentioned just fine. Harsh prior and two hundred and seventy just nine years prior to that. It's impressive how. The pharmaceutical industry kind of ramped up so quickly research development. Yeah and those remember. Those were the reported numbers so they estimated that there were actually a million AIDS cases in another eight to ten million living with HIV worldwide. At that point. So if you're younger just in med school residency right now. It's hard to explain. How unsettling this was that how fast it was spreading right. Yeah and these patients were so sick and dying in such large numbers and there didn't seem to be in and site to the expansion of the epidemic. So there's a lot of fear and misinformation out there the had a policy to not allow those infected with HIV into the country and it was still viewed as a gay disease. So that created a lot of stigma for the LGBTQ community so by nineteen ninety three. There were two point five million AIDS cases globally the US Congress dug in and voted to continue the travel ban. Things are not looking good even with easy. T- which wasn't really panning out as everyone had hoped. And the fact that it was approved at all was questioned by many. Yeah so but in one thousand nine hundred things really started changing. This was kind of a turning point. The first price inhibitor was approved these inhibit the protease enzyme. Which is important in the translation of HIV v? Virus back into Aurigny. Yeah and this was the beginning of Heart H. A. RT highly active antiretroviral therapy and it immediately dropped deaths from AIDS related diseases by at least sixty percent but still there were thirty three million people living with HIV by nineteen ninety nine and fourteen million people had died since epidemic began. Those are huge as is to be expected the UN had to step in and negotiate prices to make antiretroviral therapy available to the people who need it The World Trade Organization that announce the Doha Declaration allowing developing countries to manufacture generic versions of drugs. Go See Fire Dallas buyers club. Yes also yeah so in the two thousands people who needed it weren't getting treatment aids. Was the number one cause of death in sub Saharan Africa. That blows my mind by the two thousand ten. A lot of goals had been set to get treatment where it was needed and have the spread of HIV an organization such as the UN and the World Health Organization and individual government agencies are getting involved at this point yeah the US finally lifted the travel ban for people with HIV treatments that decrease the chance of spread were discovered pre exposure prophylaxis or prep was shown to reduce transmission between male and male sexual partners by about forty four percent. Yeah in two thousand. Eleven research demonstrated that early initiation of antiretroviral treatment reduce transmission to partners by ninety six percent. So this is a real game changer. Because until this time the antiretrovirals weren't started until HIV was had started advancing and causing aids. So this is when they started the treatment early after the infection was discovered and it really changed things as far as transmission. Yeah as related. Deaths fell thirty percent from the peak. Year two thousand five and thirty five million people were living with HIV dramatic slowdown in the spread of the epidemic compared to previous decades. Yeah Okay but now we may find yourselves at a standstill here. We are twenty twenty because the immediate crisis of the wildfire spread and almost certain death is well behind us. Attention has waned key populations that account for over half of new infections are not receiving access to combination therapy and the gap between resource need and provisions as widening. The funding is is shrinking. It's pretty typical right. Yeah as a species. Humans aren't very good at thinking long term. If it's not an immediate threat it's not threat right well. It is a threat to those populations. So there's clearly still stigma that has marginalizing them absolutely but still is hard to ignore the progress. As two thousand seventeen undetectable equals untranslatable. Or you equals. You was endorsed by many global groups. This means if the virus is. Undetectable in the blood because of suppressive combination.

HIV AIDS Nineteen Seventy partner pneumonia immunodeficiency US Congress retinitis UN Congo amy Saharan Africa California Mrs Mississippi New York Aurigny
"hiv" Discussed on What Next | Daily News and Analysis

What Next | Daily News and Analysis

02:42 min | 7 months ago

"hiv" Discussed on What Next | Daily News and Analysis

"This map Tony was looking at and it had been released by the Centers for Disease Control the showed places the agency thought were most vulnerable to an HIV outbreak not big cities but rural counties including more than half of the counties in West Virginia. That's pretty ridiculous. Math easy about it and and I called her back and I was working on this stuff. This is crazy. Where's the money for this and was like There's no resources nobody's nobody's working on it and I guess you and on up the phone this map it almost perfectly flee matches up with a different map one that shows where the pharmaceutical companies sent most of their pain pills at the height of the OPIOID crisis. Tony says the understand. How the CDC decided that people in Appalachia were at risk for HIV? You've got to know what you're looking at here these counties. They're in trouble because of high levels unemployment low incomes and also because of their overdose rates that's where HIV comes from so it had to come because as you've got opioid use H- you've got poverty. You got low educational attainment so the only thing that can come next is HIV because you've All of these factors so when you look at that map you see Rachel the not there but it's the caboose of the train ever since she saw this map Tony's been waiting keeping an the health alerts she gets and then the spring cluster of HIV. Infections is now present in Campbell county the majority of the cases are attributed to the sharing area of needles among drugging. And that's when they found out holy Moly we have a problem. Human Services reveal that Cavalcante has had more HIV. It'd be cases in a single year than the entire state of West Virginia. Since two thousand eight in the last six months dozens of West Virginians have been diagnosed most with HIV many of them in a single county Tony says this HIV cluster might look like an outlier but she thinks thinks it's just the beginning. Nobody that's running health department in these Twenty eight vulnerable counties was was prepared for HIV outbreak..

HIV Tony West Virginia Centers for Disease Control Infections Rachel Cavalcante CDC Appalachia Campbell county
"hiv" Discussed on Short Wave

Short Wave

09:05 min | 7 months ago

"hiv" Discussed on Short Wave

"Today we're talking about the progress that has been made in HIV treatment. Over the past three decades. Dr Maggie Hoffman. Terry has spent the past five years researching HIV and providing care to patients living with the virus once we started to understand you know the basics about HIV before we had any treatments. Tell me a little bit about what that time. Period was like I think very scary because initially we didn't know even how HIV have you were spread. My first exposure to it was as a pre medical student. I went over to a local hospital and worked with the infection. Doctor there but he he took me in to see two cousins who both had. HIV and held their hands without gloves. Because he said Is that I think it would be a terrible thing saying to be alone and to not be able to touch someone and to be the sick Because they were both dying and beyond that they just didn't know what to do except to keep people going as long as you could They used lots of different palliative kind of things things that we use said end of life to this day with cancer patients but that was all that was available to us and really so the first ray of hope was really. AZT The first drug. That was it was used to treat it. That is true. I remember the posters of vividly from my third year of medical school with an alarm clock on that said. If you're willing to get up every four hours and you have AIDS. We have a drug for you. I went to medical school and Temple North Philadelphia which was very hard hit area the AIDS epidemic even early on and people were lining up to get this magical drug even if it meant you got up every four hours to take at least a gave people finally some home before we talk about how. HIV drugs work. You need to know a couple of things. Our immune system is made up of all kinds of different cells. One type called T.. Cells specializes in protecting our bodies from viruses like HIV Maggie calls HIV a smart virus because it specifically attacks those t cells basically the virus kills the very cells that are trying to hunt them one way. HIV kills t cells is by hijacking genetic machinery Henry inside those cells forcing the cells to bake more and more copies of the virus eventually bursting out of the cell killing it so easy t- The first major drug targeted. HIV Pretty early on in its viral. Life cycle disrupting this process. The problem was that easy T- worked for a few months but in and of of itself as a single agent the virus was smart enough to get around it so it improved things for a few months but it never improved things in in the long run right that continued I did my infection fellowship. Nineteen Ninety two to one thousand nine hundred ninety four and it was still similar. At that time you were are uniformly telling young people time and again That they were going to die and that they should get their fares in order that they had children we would get them to meet with a case manager to figure out who was going to raise their children It was just a terrible. I can't I can't imagine what that was like. I think what often kept us going was the dream that better treatment would come along and we were fortunate enough in our fellowship to be involved in nearly nearly studies on protease inhibitors. So let's talk about that because that was another big Development and other big moment in this treatment was the development of heart and protease inhibitors. So talk to me a little bit about those so. HIV is like snowflakes in the body every time it divides it mutates at at least one spot and by doing so no to viruses in the body your body if you're infected with HIV. No two viruses viruses are alike in that way it is able to figure out how to get around easy T- so what we did was we developed drugs that hit hit from other targets and we're more potent So hard stands for highly active antiretroviral therapy And by combining signing three drugs that were working you know usually at least two different angles two different ways and the body We were able to finally finally get the virus. All the way controlled. Get it down to what we call. Undetectable but if we stopped the medicines it will come back but but having said that many of them were anywhere from ten to eighteen pills a day and they often cause side effects such as nausea vomiting meeting And leipold dystrophy which was this redistribution fat. But as these singled tablet regimens came out. They did not what caused these side effects. Right so that kind of brings us to the next big game changing moment around two thousand seven where you know a lot of those treatments that are a a lot of pills have become kind of one or two pills yes so the single pill once a day you know very much changed. The game from having to Rearrange Injured Day around two to three times having to ingest multiple pills so they were much better and much easier to take and greatly improve people's both compliance with the medicine the likelihood that they would take it every day and they're virus wouldn't develop resistance but improve their lifestyle also because because all they had to do was make sure they took that pill as they went to bed each night or with breakfast each morning Safer single tablet pills have come along now now containing integrase inhibitors and those are very easy and much much less toxic pills to take And I think we're really finally at the point in time That easy one pill a day combinations are here. Maggie says these treatments when used correctly and effectively also act as a form of prevention. When it comes to transmitting? HIV through sex treating HIV itself and getting that viral load down to undetectable undetectable prevents many many infections because even if patients sleeps with someone else so someone who has HIV if thyroid medication and they have unprotected sex. They are extremely unlikely to spread it to someone else If they are on medication so that's one. The type of prevention another form of prevention came in twenty twelve a strategy called pre exposure prophylaxis or prep in this case a daily pill. That's taken by people who don't have HIV and it prevents them from getting HIV from somebody else but when it comes to the latest treatments despite the real progress that's been made the issue of access is to these life. Changing medications is also very real. What what still needs to be done so that everybody that needs them has them well? The drugs need to be affordable because there have been states where the drugs have been waiting listed We have AIDS drug assistance programs and all of our states but they are federal dollars that have to be batch by state dollars and not every state matches them and Pennsylvania gene you were. I practice were very fortunate because we have a very very good extremely good program but there are many southern states where that's not the case And that has has been a problem for a while according to the US Department of Health and Human Services in twenty eighteen only sixty two percent of the worldwide HIV positive population were accessing assessing antiretroviral. Therapy and in some countries progress towards preventing new infections and increasing access to treatment is actually slowing down or getting worse but for those who do have access to care. The progress is undeniable. You know now that people that do have access to these like good. HIV drugs are living longer and healthier lives. Has that kind of shifted your role as a healthcare provider I in types of patients that you're seeing now The big pushes rushes looking at getting your patient into old age and Many of my patients I think our oldest patient currently is eighty seven But the average change our patients now is over fifty So we're looking at caring for later middle aged and geriatric population And that is much of what my care is pre you know in today's world So I admit early in that epidemic. I why it never thought I would be reading geriatric articles but that is much of what. HIV CARE is now a big. Thanks to both Maggie and and stash for talking with us. Today's episode was produced by Brett Hansen in edited by B at Les. I'm Anne Safai. Thanks for listening.

HIV Dr Maggie Hoffman access US Department of Health and Hu AIDS cancer Terry nausea Temple North Philadelphia Brett Hansen Anne Safai Pennsylvania
"hiv" Discussed on Sex Talk Podcast

Sex Talk Podcast

02:16 min | 1 year ago

"hiv" Discussed on Sex Talk Podcast

"But it's the stigma that makes it such a difference disease in the new way, you can get a stigma where you can address Dick Morris by talking about things and being open about things this should be in the school curriculum, and it's that ripple effect of a conversation starting so far. They haven't done another national campaign. I think they need to do one. And social media is a great platform in this is a great platform. So it's looking at every platform possible to to start those conversations we have we have one ask on our website of is like go. We'd when you've seen this go away and talk to ten of your friends about HIV. And then ask them to talk ten of their friends. The whole treatment makes HIV manageable has got a double edged sword to it because it does from a bio medical point of view. But you still got the stigma an intil is is addressed and reduces you'll still going to have people who are presenting late. You still gonna have people who dying, and you still going to have people who you know, if they were able to access access services without the fear of discrimination, all the stigma the then that's why we still got third of the population walking around not knowing about their HIV status third. Wow. I mean, Sophie, a love that practical step talk to ten of e people. And hopefully, they talk to another ten, you know, because that's exactly what needs to do needs to be done a news spreads and people have say much more access to the internet and stuff. And it's like there are some really good websites out. The you've got T H T, go aids map. Now, who I think you had here recently got the severe for a website. You've got the women in prep website. You've got the beaver website. And this loads of information on the around HIV that people can access and the national aids trust some really really really good information out there. It's getting better. But it can get a lot better. Yeah. Especially for women. Thank you. Thank you. Thank you. So faye. Faye sex tool. Unfortunately, we're out of time on today's edition of sex talk. If you need further advice or support on any of the issues raised in this episode of sex talk,.

HIV faye Dick Morris Sophie
"hiv" Discussed on Sex Talk Podcast

Sex Talk Podcast

02:16 min | 1 year ago

"hiv" Discussed on Sex Talk Podcast

"But it's the stigma that makes it such a difference disease in the new way, you can get a stigma where you can address Dick Morris by talking about things and being open about things this should be in the school curriculum, and it's that ripple effect of a conversation starting so far. They haven't done another national campaign. I think they need to do one. And social media is a great platform in this is a great platform. So it's looking at every platform possible to to start those conversations we have we have one ask on our website of is like go. We'd when you've seen this go away and talk to ten of your friends about HIV. And then ask them to talk ten of their friends. The whole treatment makes HIV manageable has got a double edged sword to it because it does from a bio medical point of view. But you still got the stigma an intil is is addressed and reduces you'll still going to have people who are presenting late. You still gonna have people who dying, and you still going to have people who you know, if they were able to access access services without the fear of discrimination, all the stigma the then that's why we still got third of the population walking around not knowing about their HIV status third. Wow. I mean, Sophie, a love that practical step talk to ten of e people. And hopefully, they talk to another ten, you know, because that's exactly what needs to do needs to be done a news spreads and people have say much more access to the internet and stuff. And it's like there are some really good websites out. The you've got T H T, go aids map. Now, who I think you had here recently got the severe for a website. You've got the women in prep website. You've got the beaver website. And this loads of information on the around HIV that people can access and the national aids trust some really really really good information out there. It's getting better. But it can get a lot better. Yeah. Especially for women. Thank you. Thank you. Thank you. So faye. Faye sex tool. Unfortunately, we're out of time on today's edition of sex talk. If you need further advice or support on any of the issues raised in this episode of sex talk,.

HIV faye Dick Morris Sophie
"hiv" Discussed on Sex Talk Podcast

Sex Talk Podcast

04:25 min | 1 year ago

"hiv" Discussed on Sex Talk Podcast

"You know, I've started talking to friends about it and stuff, and and then I'll call you in my off name women for Jewish their hours at work because of the impact of the menopause. You know, the hot flushes, you can kind of you know, you can do with not necessarily pleasant. But for me, they'd be one of the more minor ones. Will they've been getting worse recently. It's the insomnia, and when you're in the workplace, you the to work, so you can't really kind of be scenes be going in and out if you mood swings. If you're in a professional environment. So I think one of the issues with women living with HIV is that GP's get very scared about prescribing anything because they didn't feel like they have a handle on antiretroviral therapy. And it's true that there are. Lays of interactions with other drugs by think GP's, lack that specialist knowledge. So if a woman who's already have HIV and presents with menopausal symptoms. They get told because they're living with HIV. It's probably that say, they get told going speak to their HIV specialist and their HIV's specialist. Probably doesn't know anything about menopause, and because my women access hormone replacement therapy three that GP, and there's always that barrier thing with women living with HIV that you if you go and see oh GPO GP feels like they don't know enough about HIV. They kind of send you back to the hospital. I think women in general get flipped off with menopausal symptoms. Probably women living with HIV, even more. So because deep is reluctant to prescribe anything for them. So that's prime. Can we talk about your report it did invisible? No longer in regards to HIV prevention in women, what has been learned or gleaned from this report what could be done to. Improve HIV prevention in women. There was you know, historically, been little done in terms of helping women identify around the risk of HIV. We still don't necessarily know the whole picture of which women are at risk say getting the information in the education out there. You know, everyone accesses a GP. No, everyone accesses a sexual health clinic. So loss of the conversations that are going on at the moment is about engaging with the community organizations that are on the ground level. But but no even community. No, even just community organizations. It's about finding out where those communities meet the community spaces the communities are there, and it's going in and starting a conversation with them. So it's looking at how we can get the conversations happening beyond a sexual health connect because not everyone is going to access that. And then it's also about educating them. To the different forms of prevention methods that goes beyond a condom because that's not going to be everybody's choice in for some. Then not going to be able to negotiate that for example. So is there anything else in poll that was highlighted that? Perhaps you think needs to be spoken about. Every page. When it comes to the national response to HIV all women are by default seemed to be heterosexual. There is a lack of understanding of the diversity of sexualities of women living with an at risk of HIV as well as a lack of targeted information and interventions to support sexual health needs of lesbian, bisexual women and women if other sexualities, and that is absolutely true. Yeah. How can we include women will in this discussion around HIV? What can we do? Maybe we can just get one bit of advice from both of you. I think it's really challenging because I think as safety said women are much less able to perceive their risk of getting HIV. I think education is always going to be the key. I mean, I've started talking about to my children, they're five and t. Five. I mean, I pass me my hopeless fee of life is I start hooking synergy can. Nightstop king. And I think the thing that just permeates every conversation and every experiences stigma. It's a lifelong condition. That's really good treatments. We can prevent transmission. People living with HIV have every other choice. Everyone else does..

HIV GP menopause menopausal symptoms insomnia one bit
"hiv" Discussed on Sex Talk Podcast

Sex Talk Podcast

04:25 min | 1 year ago

"hiv" Discussed on Sex Talk Podcast

"You know, I've started talking to friends about it and stuff, and and then I'll call you in my off name women for Jewish their hours at work because of the impact of the menopause. You know, the hot flushes, you can kind of you know, you can do with not necessarily pleasant. But for me, they'd be one of the more minor ones. Will they've been getting worse recently. It's the insomnia, and when you're in the workplace, you the to work, so you can't really kind of be scenes be going in and out if you mood swings. If you're in a professional environment. So I think one of the issues with women living with HIV is that GP's get very scared about prescribing anything because they didn't feel like they have a handle on antiretroviral therapy. And it's true that there are. Lays of interactions with other drugs by think GP's, lack that specialist knowledge. So if a woman who's already have HIV and presents with menopausal symptoms. They get told because they're living with HIV. It's probably that say, they get told going speak to their HIV specialist and their HIV's specialist. Probably doesn't know anything about menopause, and because my women access hormone replacement therapy three that GP, and there's always that barrier thing with women living with HIV that you if you go and see oh GPO GP feels like they don't know enough about HIV. They kind of send you back to the hospital. I think women in general get flipped off with menopausal symptoms. Probably women living with HIV, even more. So because deep is reluctant to prescribe anything for them. So that's prime. Can we talk about your report it did invisible? No longer in regards to HIV prevention in women, what has been learned or gleaned from this report what could be done to. Improve HIV prevention in women. There was you know, historically, been little done in terms of helping women identify around the risk of HIV. We still don't necessarily know the whole picture of which women are at risk say getting the information in the education out there. You know, everyone accesses a GP. No, everyone accesses a sexual health clinic. So loss of the conversations that are going on at the moment is about engaging with the community organizations that are on the ground level. But but no even community. No, even just community organizations. It's about finding out where those communities meet the community spaces the communities are there, and it's going in and starting a conversation with them. So it's looking at how we can get the conversations happening beyond a sexual health connect because not everyone is going to access that. And then it's also about educating them. To the different forms of prevention methods that goes beyond a condom because that's not going to be everybody's choice in for some. Then not going to be able to negotiate that for example. So is there anything else in poll that was highlighted that? Perhaps you think needs to be spoken about. Every page. When it comes to the national response to HIV all women are by default seemed to be heterosexual. There is a lack of understanding of the diversity of sexualities of women living with an at risk of HIV as well as a lack of targeted information and interventions to support sexual health needs of lesbian, bisexual women and women if other sexualities, and that is absolutely true. Yeah. How can we include women will in this discussion around HIV? What can we do? Maybe we can just get one bit of advice from both of you. I think it's really challenging because I think as safety said women are much less able to perceive their risk of getting HIV. I think education is always going to be the key. I mean, I've started talking about to my children, they're five and t. Five. I mean, I pass me my hopeless fee of life is I start hooking synergy can. Nightstop king. And I think the thing that just permeates every conversation and every experiences stigma. It's a lifelong condition. That's really good treatments. We can prevent transmission. People living with HIV have every other choice. Everyone else does..

HIV GP menopause menopausal symptoms insomnia one bit
"hiv" Discussed on Sex Talk Podcast

Sex Talk Podcast

10:35 min | 2 years ago

"hiv" Discussed on Sex Talk Podcast

HIV Matthew Hodson UK Africa London Dr. Stewart Dr Stuart Flanagan Adele Bates Yvonne Saxe Dr shit Appeareance executive director Pank Kim Dr Stewart
"hiv" Discussed on This Podcast Will Kill You

This Podcast Will Kill You

01:37 min | 2 years ago

"hiv" Discussed on This Podcast Will Kill You

"Ninety five secs alarm for being the hateful hockey energetic 5yearolds you'll the lid you go to sing kid i'm in about of bounce my body done to break down and doctors started cut the ordinary misses you could even wherever intent on some other countries and conclusion they came seer says you know i know he's not out risk for hiv but that's happened for hiv result sending back and i was diagnosed with fullblown aids given five months to that by newsouth how got zero they put company on 23 on medication three ibn about a concealed gestion daily a majority of those were not available was chevron not the time five thirty bucks top five mark uh and other stand before you today what does it see my fix base that but come next month be celebrated much 27 faith that as we talked about last week a diagnosis of hiv or aids carried with it a stigma and a feeling some times of impending doom particularly during the height of the aids crisis from the mid '80s to the end of the nineties when treatment was hard to come by an ignorance of how the disease worked was rampant both in the scientific community and in the public hill l and brian discussed with us the emotional told that their diagnoses took on their lives were earth return our diagnosed workers jargon my body was drip the ryder ramalkilled her mother were reagan gone by bernebeu becoming widow and.

hiv hockey brian reagan Ninety five secs five months
"hiv" Discussed on This Podcast Will Kill You

This Podcast Will Kill You

02:05 min | 2 years ago

"hiv" Discussed on This Podcast Will Kill You

"Being alliance was founded now some thirty three or more years ago five two hiv positive guys remember this was the darkest days of the academic can they sounded this has a wage for hiv positive men and women she comes together and speak openly chore 'nother of our shearer's and and share the rumors her because our doctors were completely sell assured sure they formed the organization where a few good speech in an authentic voice because we were living in every region i give him the watch lots of money to the arrive find me it was my charge you put my put some skin in the game effective treatment for people with hiv didn't really emerge until the mid 1990s with the introduction of antiretroviral therapy all of a sudden aides diagnosis was no longer the death sentence in once was for a lot of people though frank remained hiv negative throughout the epidemic he lost countless friends and his partner at the time and hello had been diagnosed with hiv in 1987 we asked them both how things changed once these socalled miracle drugs came onto the scene were talking or gaurd lease ten years or so i'm guessing for murder memory uh when we first heard about aids up to that point where most recombination therapies came into play in old during those years just seeing the every week in words some other work or some other treatment that was coming in c play what was he in than there was this and than those that and so in retrospect when those drugs those therapies came out we did not know at that time obviously when a gamechanger in was born to be for you know so us it was just now.

shearer partner hiv frank murder ten years
"hiv" Discussed on This Podcast Will Kill You

This Podcast Will Kill You

02:14 min | 2 years ago

"hiv" Discussed on This Podcast Will Kill You

"We have an i mean we haven't learned anything yeah yeah and now we've talked a lot today about hiv aids in the us but this is by no means a disease of the us this is a global pandemic the who currently estimates that there are over thirty six million people globally living with hiv how including two million children and there were almost two million cases new cases diagnosed last year two million new cases and remember that these new cases don't necessarily represent new infections they just mean that people are finally coming in seeking treatment or getting tested and so those are hiv those are hiv cases islands of right the saddest statistic is that only around fifty percent of adults and forty three percent of children that currently live with hiv are actually receiving any sort of antiretroviral therapy why look why is that number fifty percent wise at number not one hundred percent right yeah that is why the things accessibility as he gets a lack of access by this lack of access means often times not just logistics but actual right my natural yes definitely definitely financials and the who also estimates that only about seventy percent of people living with hiv or seventy percent of people who are hiv positive actually know their status and even today in 20 it's 2018 now yeah one in three people that present with hiv for the first time are presenting with advanced disease which means they're not getting tested early they're waiting you know they don't know that are infected until the disease has already progressed to either aids or you know stage two or something like that so wow and that the thing about getting tested which i i didn't i didn't talk much about but the term diseases so or diseased is so interesting and if part of the the the fear of getting tested and it's a completely legitimate fear is that if even if if you get an hiv positive result even though that's no longer the death sentence that it used to be you were automatically.

us hiv global pandemic seventy percent fifty percent forty three percent one hundred percent
"hiv" Discussed on TEDTalks (audio)

TEDTalks (audio)

01:33 min | 2 years ago

"hiv" Discussed on TEDTalks (audio)

"These are incredible advancements that we have made in fighting hiv yet they have not managed to dent the perception that most americans have of the virus and those living with it and i don't want you to think on downplaying the danger of this virus and i am not ignorant of the harrowing past of the aids epidemic i am trying to convey that there is hope for those infected and hiv is not the death sentence it was in the 80s and now you may ask and i asked this question myself initially where the stories where are these people living with hiv why haven't they been vocal how can i believe these successes are these statistics without seeing the successes and this is actually very easy question for me to answer fear stigma and shame these keep those living with hiv in the closet so to speak our sexual histories are his personal to us as our medical histories and when you overlap the too you can find yourself in a very sensitive space the fear of how others perceive us when we're honest keeps us from doing many things in life and this is the case for the hiv positive population to face social scrutiny and ridicule is the price that we pay for transparency and why become a martyr when you can effectively pass as someone without hiv after all there are no physical indications you have the virus there's no sign that you wear.

aids hiv
"hiv" Discussed on Latino USA

Latino USA

01:53 min | 2 years ago

"hiv" Discussed on Latino USA

"The man we can't be silent about it and when i was finally able to talk to my parents are dinner table in my childhood home four days before that episode aired it was the hardest thing i could ever do but when i told them i said mom dad i have to tell you something and i just want to let you know that i am a happier and healthier than i've ever been in my life and then i told them hiv positive and my mom i remember this she looked at me and she said i know and she said and i'm happy that you told us and i'm happy that you told your story and i hope that you inspire other people to tell their story you're revelation about living with hiv is that it led to another kind of career path right you now are out doing hiv and aids education jessica after the show i wanted to continue the conversation about hiv aids i knew that that was very very important but did you ever like think i'm going to become an hiv ilan's activistsn now i didn't mean i couldn't because i was allowing it to her be so heavy on myself you know i remember when i was creating things in my room alone and not going outside are being invited to the pull party or whatever it was my back in my mind i news at it would lead somewhere bigger than that broom and i didn't know what it was and i still don't but i feel that it's going to be bigger than what i ever expected that's the beauty and just allowing things to evolve.

hiv ilan four days
"hiv" Discussed on Throwing Shade

Throwing Shade

02:12 min | 2 years ago

"hiv" Discussed on Throwing Shade

"Cheer her scar pasqua by the way the number of people who came up to me on to rome is like it's cure skoro go jokes on you we don't care we don't care the director of hiv cheers grow for georgia department of health okay so betty price had this question for this idiot expert an asia expert were on their run where i'm pascal side yes representative betty price quoting or now my thinking sometimes goes in strains direction bush had neares which already it's like okay martian norman just my thinking sometimes goes in strange directions but before you proceed if you wouldn't mind commenting on the surveillance of partners tracking of contacts that sort of thing she's talking about partners of people actually they tracking contacts that sort of thing what are we legally able to do and i don't wanna see the quarantine word but i guess i just said it is the hunt ability since i would guess the public dollars or expended heavily in prophylaxis and treatment of this condition is their inability so that we have public interest in curtailing the spread are there any methods what would you advise are there any methods legally that we could do that would curtail the spread as though essentially what she has suggested is whether people diagnosed with hiv should be quarantined to stop the spread of hiv now i have a question did she say the word gay she did not i'm okay it doesn't matter but just all by the way everyone should know that is always the insinuation while we is an hiv epidemic in opioid regions of the united states theory and i by the way that are taking everybody sounds like you my for me but what i'm saying is that and it doesn't even really matter that she has it or not the idea that you would corn someone with a disease like hiv that has come such a long way and that you know.

director betty price bush norman hiv rome georgia department of health representative united states
"hiv" Discussed on GSMC Technology Podcast

GSMC Technology Podcast

01:34 min | 3 years ago

"hiv" Discussed on GSMC Technology Podcast

"When it comes to hiv test drop of blood a new sb stick may be all patients need in the near future scientists at the imperial college in london developed a device that helps with help the medical testing community a company excuse me dna elettronica detects hiv levels in the bloodstream it creates a signal that can be red using a pewter or handheld gadget this disposable testing its could be used to help hiv patients monitor the treatment as well as improve how doctors manage the virus in remote locations now my first thought on this is on remote locations where honestly hiv tests are hard and long drawn out you could test people by plugging something in doing a few things and boom okay this is what you got to do because honestly education is key of sony has hiv you have to tell them 'cause they're going to have to do certain steps to help themselves i dissident basing i'm i'm generally thrilled if this can help the community the aids community and people from getting the disease i i this is amazing and i i know you can't tell how excited i am but trust me i am i'm this is amazing the compact of ice monitors the amount of hiv the hiv virus that present the patient's blood stream and measurement that expecially that is essentially keeping tabs on how effective treatment is and battling the virus monitoring the amount of virus its present the bloodstream can let doctors nova patients stop taking their medicine or if the current course of action has stop working researchers are also hoping the technology can be used to test for hepatitis and other viruses.

sony hiv virus hepatitis london hiv