35 Burst results for "HIV"

"hiv" Discussed on Short Wave

Short Wave

02:11 min | Last month

"hiv" Discussed on Short Wave

"Lot of that got thrown off since COVID. Right. Yes, well, there was a new infectious virus in town that sapped a lot of the expertise and staff and funding from the HIV effort, but as I was finishing up the story, I called her up again and I asked her if she's still optimistic about the effort. I'm actually very encouraged or programs were incredibly effective even during COVID. I was incredibly shocked what happened in 2020 in that program. So that's been amazing. That's uplifting. That's great news. Yeah, it is. But then I asked her, what about efforts to end COVID-19? And on that, she was a lot less upbeat. She said she thinks a lot of Americans at this point are just not willing to get boosters, let alone do the lower threshold things like wear masks and social distance, and she said this. Much more broadly, unless we can really get the world vaccinated. I am not very optimistic. Another parallel with HIV to stop a pandemic, you have to think beyond just stopping the spread within one country's borders. Selena, thank you so much for bringing this story to us today. You're welcome. This story was edited for radio by Joe Neal, and for shortwave by giselle Grayson, who is also our senior supervising editor. Burly McCoy was a producer and the marvelous Margaret Serena checked the facts. The audio engineer for this episode was Josh Newell. Andrea kissick is the head of the science desk, Edith Chapin and Terence Samuel are the executive editors and vice presidents of news and Nancy Barnes is our senior vice president of news. I'm Regina barber, and I'm Selena Simmons Stefan..

HIV Joe Neal giselle Grayson Burly McCoy Margaret Serena Selena Josh Newell Andrea kissick science desk Edith Chapin Terence Samuel Nancy Barnes Regina barber Selena Simmons Stefan
"hiv" Discussed on Short Wave

Short Wave

07:33 min | Last month

"hiv" Discussed on Short Wave

"The following message comes from NPR sponsor REI. Chief customer officer Ben Steele shares the importance of engaging their co op community to make positive change in the outdoors. REI can not single handedly solve issues like sustainability, like climate change, like equity and participation in the outdoors. But if you think about the ripple effect of what millions of people can do together, what's possible starts to get pretty exciting pretty fast. To learn more, go to REI dot com slash better is out there. Stephanie Brooks Wiggins is 76 years old, she lives in Baltimore, she was diagnosed with HIV in 1986. Back then, there were no tools to help her. There was no treatment. There were no drugs. Dude, go to the clinic and the psychiatrist would talk to you to keep you from going off the deep end. Over the decades, scientists developed many HIV treatments and they got better and easier to take. She says, but HIV has not ended in the U.S. as these tools became available. A stubbornly high number, more than 30,000 people are diagnosed with HIV every year, only 25% of people who might be eligible actually take a preventive pill called prep, and even with accurate and at home options for testing, over a 150,000 people in the U.S. are HIV positive, but don't know it. Scientific discoveries are a necessary but not sufficient factor to completely eradicate disease. That's doctor adora, a physician and professor at the university of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. She first started treating people with HIV in the 1980s. She says the tools to combat HIV have come a long way. There are now topical gels and easy to take pills and even injections. I don't know that I ever greeted any of these new advances saying this is the thing that's going to end HIV. That's because she's seen the barriers to access and implementation, she says, barriers like the high cost of prescription drugs and the maddening patchwork healthcare system. The barriers to COVID's tools like tests and vaccines and Therapeutics have been different. But a Tony young says there are parallels and common mistakes. She lives in West Virginia and runs the community education group, which does public health outreach. We keep doing the same thing over and over and over again. Saying, it's over there. Why don't you go get it? That attitude hasn't worked to fight HIV or COVID young says. It doesn't work for people who don't have access to healthcare who don't trust the medical system or who don't think they're at risk. As she sees it when it comes to the COVID-19 pandemic, the country has missed out on the chance to make the most of the vaccine by failing to understand and work with people in all their complexity. It was all or nothing approach. You're either with me on this vaccine or you're not. You're either on my side or you're my interview when it comes to the vaccine. You're either a vaccine, denier or you're a vaccine, get it. And there's a whole lot of room between those two. The frame of us versus them is implicit in a lot of the rhetoric these days about getting back to normal. It's in terms like pandemic of the unvaccinated and telling people they've done the right thing by getting vaccinated and should therefore have special privileges like not being punished with things like indoor masking and testing requirements. That way of talking about public health, so Steven thrasher creates the conditions for pandemics to last longer. Thrasher is a Professor of journalism at northwestern and author of the forthcoming book the viral underclass with HIV in the mid 1990s when treatments became much more effective. People who got access to the drugs began to pull away and take their political capital and go home because they didn't need to be in the fight anymore. And the virus continued to pool and what I call a viral underclass in the United States. This was a sad and lethal mistake in the fight against HIV. He says, and now it's happening again. The lack of political will in Congress to pass more COVID-19 funding is a perfect example, he says, and those still at particular risk are those who are warehoused away out of sight. People who are in nursing homes as elderly people or who are in convalescent centers as disabled people and of course people who are incarcerated, they're already out of public view and people are not listening to them. Those settings can act as epidemic engines he explains. People visit their loved ones in these places, staff come and go back into the community, and so the pandemic drags on and lives are needlessly lost. He is disappointed that policymakers seem to be centering the people who have the most access to tools to protect themselves, not the least. I really hoped that that would be different this time. This is not to say no one is trying to get the available tools out to people who don't have as much power and access, a Tony young in West Virginia has one idea for how to do it. We want to hit people in the face with the COVID vaccination because we're in the middle of the pandemic. But maybe I got a slow walk you do that COVID vaccination. Here's how that might go. If you got 5 kids and y'all are hungry, you need to figure out where you're going to get food from. You don't care about my vaccine. Let me help you. What do you need from me? If I can get you the food that you need, when we do the follow-up, hey, did the food voucher work out for you? Great. Can we talk to you now about, again, about the COVID vaccine? Her organization has a $3.5 million cooperative agreement with CDC to use this approach to vaccinate people against COVID-19 and influenza in West Virginia. Young hope CDC will continue funding this for three years so they can expand. She also hopes to spread one of the lessons from HIV that people and their relationship to health is complicated and the public health response needs to be ready to meet them where they are. Selena, thank you so much for that reporting. So we just heard about the effort in West Virginia hoping for more money. Where are things with the bigger picture of pandemic funding? I know Congress got close to a deal back in April. Yeah, exactly. Well, we're recording this on Tuesday, may 3rd, and currently there is not a whole lot going on. The White House has been asking for more than $20 billion of pandemic funding. When Congress got close to a funding deal back in April, it was for less than half of that. And what that means is that uninsured people currently do not have free access to testing or vaccines or treatment, the funding for that program has run out and it's not clear if it would even start up again if the congressional funding did come through. And that's why so many people are pointing out that there are now these new kinds of haves and have nots in terms of access to protection from this pandemic, and that's concerning. And Regina, before we go, I want to return back to Dr. Laura Cheever, the HIV Doctor Who runs the national Ryan white program. Yeah, the official who was so optimistic about the initiative to end the HIV epidemic. Yeah, exactly. I'm guessing a.

HIV Tony young Ben Steele Stephanie Brooks Wiggins COVID U.S. West Virginia Steven thrasher adora NPR university of North Carolina Chapel Hill Baltimore Thrasher Congress CDC
Dr. Zelenko on the Latest Developments With Omicron

The Charlie Kirk Show

01:52 min | 6 months ago

Dr. Zelenko on the Latest Developments With Omicron

"Doctor zelenko is here back by popular demand in the Charlie Kirk show doctor. How are you doing? I'm doing great. How are you? Very good. Thank you, and thank you for joining us. There's so much I want to get into. Let's just start with since the last time we talked, amaran has come onto the scene. What are you seeing in your patients? What do you believe on Macron is? And do you think there's anything to the argument that this might have been developed in a lab as a form of a vaccine through natural transmission? Do you think there's any truth to that? So first of all, all Macron is unstoppable. It's more infectious than measles. Everyone will get it. And it's also not dangerous. It attacks the upper airway. In most cases, it doesn't touch a lower airway. And so you'll get a cold. So it really is in dangerous. Regarding the origin of variants, you have to look at it and three possibilities. One is that it's a natural process. Let's say God is causing it because viruses have a natural mutation rate. It helps them adapt and survive. Look man figure who won the Nobel Prize. Finally HIV in 2008, doctor suffered badly who is the most published imminent immunologist in the history of the field. And that the men involved one of the top immunologists from Netherlands. They all said the following that if you vaccinate people during active pandemic, you breathe

Doctor Zelenko Charlie Kirk Amaran Nobel Prize HIV Netherlands
The Truth About COVID Vaccines with Dr. Judy Mikovitz

The Charlie Kirk Show

02:30 min | 6 months ago

The Truth About COVID Vaccines with Dr. Judy Mikovitz

"The earlier part, I want to make sure our audience understands it. So even though if it's a series of viruses introduced by the flu vaccine, has there been research done to actually be able to find the markers of what this is? It's not just the flu vaccine. It's literally every vaccine and see no, I know, but it all seemed to culminate within one year. But then you say it's because of the masking and the fear and the immunosuppression. And the culmination is kill the most vulnerable. Who's being injected? It's a medical racism. Children are getting injected. But the elderly. They're very people with the disease. Again, you've got an emergency use, and the reason I mentioned Ebola is because Doctor John, who is the head of that team of Christians and is from where I'm from and to her, California and leading the healthcare system there. He did two things when he suspected the doctor got infected. And that it was actually contagious Ebola that Tony Fauci and company had been created. So they sent contagious Ebola. What did he give him? He gave him hydroxychloroquine. And saline, a quiet room, prayed for him, prayed for him. The book, the day, sorry, the book called for life by Kent and amber Brantley. That's the Doctor Who got sick. And so we remember the cover up is Tony Fauci and Obama in a plane went to the CDC. This was just when senator posey, I believe a Florida was going to bring to Congress to the Senate and unveil the thousands of pages of documents of the crimes committed in these vaccine programs in the tens of millions of people murdered and injured around the world starting with 8. And that's what the movie plandemic is about. Plandemic shows you the history, and that's why Mickey Willis can elevate films. They called it plandemic and I called it a plandemic because we've witnessed this since HIV aids, where gain of function studies were done to make a virus more deadly and then develop

Ebola Tony Fauci FLU Doctor John Amber Brantley Senator Posey California Kent CDC Mickey Willis Barack Obama Senate Congress Florida HIV Aids
"hiv" Discussed on The Bio Report

The Bio Report

04:41 min | 6 months ago

"hiv" Discussed on The Bio Report

"So the FDA was already amenable to this type of approach for a disease, this ex vivo cell modification approach using lentiviruses. Again, it's all very technical, but the idea is is that we saw that this would meet the least resistance and we had a tremendous amount of expertise in HIV and it just started moving the fastest out of all of them. So the answer is we didn't set out to cure anything in particular. And HIV turned out to be within the scope of this platform that we have developed, some really great people signed on to AGT and they ironed out all of the details. They dotted all the ice and crossed all the teas. And so it just coincidentally ended up being the first one in the clinic. But this is truly the tip of the iceberg because this doesn't just prove an HIV cure. It proves that the platform approach works and it's a more efficient way to do thousands of diseases in the future. Maybe our platform has a scope of a couple hundred diseases right now, but we keep on adding components sort of like MS dos becoming Windows and Windows becoming Windows 8 and Windows 8 becoming Windows 10 and eventually the iPhone being this incredibly sophisticated platform, right? That the more we tuck into the platform, the wider the scope of the diseases that we can address with little app developments, little creative add ons to that platform. So now maybe we can do a couple hundred diseases, but in the future, there's probably eventually 10,000 diseases that will be cured in this way. And we can see quite clearly that the HIV drug is so similar to carrying something like HTLV or human papillomavirus or Epstein var CMV herpes or even hepatitis B, that those are natural follow on products that use most of the same components with tiny little tweaks to the application layer in order.

HIV FDA hepatitis B
"hiv" Discussed on The Bio Report

The Bio Report

04:29 min | 6 months ago

"hiv" Discussed on The Bio Report

"On antiretrovirals long enough for their immune system to recover because the initial HIV infection will wipe out all of their HIV T cells. But once they're on antiretroviral therapy, suppressing the virus, they're normal immune system comes back. That's why they don't get aids. They don't get problems fighting colds or flus. They also get HIV T cells back. At that point, we do a blood draw. It's called the Luca phoresis, which is a filtration of leukocytes. So white blood cells, out of the blood, we take about 300 to 400 mL of blood. It's an outpatient procedure. It takes a few hours. And then that blood is put into an automated cell processor that carries out a bunch of steps on it and converts it into a billion HIV specific CD4 positive helper T cells that conductor of the immune orchestra that are immune to HIV that can then be infused back into the patient, still in outpatient procedure. And then once they in graft, so a few weeks later, that patient should be able to throw away their antiretrovirals and live a normal life without any fear of HIV and without any need for HIV treatment. And the steps in the automated cell processor are fairly straightforward. The first thing we do is we stimulate those HIV T cells with what's called a peptide mix. So that it activates them and proliferates them in the mix. So now, the blood that we drew from this patient has a slightly higher percentage of HIV specific T cells than it would normally have. Then we do a depletion protocol to get rid of all the non HIV T cells because the only T cells you need to fight HIV are HIV specific T cells. Every T cell in your body has got an antigen receptor that makes it specific to a disease. So we only care about the ones that are going to hunt and kill HIV, and we don't want to spend a lot of money on reagents, protecting T cells that don't matter. So we deplete them out. Then we put in a lentivirus, a lentivirus is actually hollowed out HIV. So we've scooped out aids out of the HIV virus. So it's an empty shell and empty stuff bomber that can deliver anything..

HIV colds aids
"hiv" Discussed on The Bio Report

The Bio Report

04:06 min | 6 months ago

"hiv" Discussed on The Bio Report

"And you may have heard of CRISPR in CRISPR not only can you tell a CRISPR molecule to cut something, but you can tell that CRISPR molecule to replace it with something else. It's like a universal find and replace. It doesn't work as well as it sounds. So CRISPR is not quite there yet in the clinic. But the basic idea of being able to get in there and cut the actual gene out of the DNA existed with zinc finger nuclease and you could cut about ten you could put enough of this reagent into a pool of T cells that you could get about one tenth of the cells have their CCR 5 gene cut at least once. Because you have two of the genes. So about 10% of the cells would get one of the genes destroyed. Well, it turned out that if they had the other gene, the other allele was still intact, they were making enough CCR 5 where they didn't get the benefit of being immune to HIV. So they retried the experiment with people that were already missing half of their CCR 5. And that's when they showed that it was about one in ten patients that was the reliability of this method of cutting out CCR 5 that in one in ten patients, it would work. So we used a different method to do what's called knocking out CCR 5. So instead of trying to cut it out of the genome, we put something else in there that creates an interrupting innocent strand. It also sounds very technical, but it produces something in the cell that turns off the message from those genes and it turns off both genes simultaneously. So we don't have to cut out two things in a cell to get rid of CCR 5. We only have to install one thing and it gets rid of both sources of CCR 5..

HIV
"hiv" Discussed on The Bio Report

The Bio Report

04:49 min | 6 months ago

"hiv" Discussed on The Bio Report

"So that's not a practical way to treat HIV. But they were able to do the experiment because they got plenty of HIV positive people that had acute leukemias and they could do the experiment again. And what they found is that it works provided that the only strain of HIV that the person has in their body is what's called R 5 strain. In other words, it's a particular strain of HIV, which is the most common one that needs that CCR 5 in order to attach to an immune cell. So the two discoveries, they sort of re validated the idea that if your CCR 5 negative your immune to HIV provided that it's the R 5 strain and that some people are co infected with what's called a CXCR four strain, so it uses a different receptor to get into the cells and being CCR 5 negative doesn't protect you from that. So that was the Berlin patient was the start of a number of different bone marrow transplants that proved and reproved that theory. And so that's that pivotal moment, but the art goes on from there. You know, it was sort of a well, there were numerous people that thought of this, including myself. At AGT, that, well, if being CCR 5 negative makes you functionally cured from HIV, can't we use gene therapy to make you CCR 5 negative instead of using bone marrow transplants? And what that means is can we repurpose viruses to carry instructions into your immune cells that would turn off CCR 5. That's what gene therapy is is we can re regulate your DNA by delivering things by viruses. We can hollow out deadly viruses or viruses that are carrying bad DNA that hijacks your cells in a negative manner. Like COVID, like HIV, like adeno associated viruses like cold sluice, all those things can now be cracked open. We can scoop out the bad code. And we can use the shell of that virus to deliver good code that improves your health instead..

HIV CCR Berlin
"hiv" Discussed on The Bio Report

The Bio Report

03:33 min | 6 months ago

"hiv" Discussed on The Bio Report

"And so what happens is is that it's not a virus that is really overt in your body that blows up really quickly and is either going to kill you or your immune system is going to get on top of it. No, it slowly takes over all of its target cells in the body and the consequence of it moving slowly between all the different immune cells in your body is eventually it wipes out different types of immune cells. And as a result, you're missing immunity to common viruses out there like the cold or the flu. Well, when you can't fight a common virus, it can rip through your body in a way where it can kill you very, very quickly. So the flu without ordinary flu immune protection will kill you within weeks with an incurable pneumonia or something else. Sort of like the COVID deaths that we saw. This is the consequence of when your body can not get on top of a relatively ordinary virus that spreads quickly. So as a virus, it's pretty much like a normal virus like every other virus that you could get like a cold or a flu or COVID or whatever. But it has this very slow moving nature and it and it can hide in the body and it can hide in the cells for a long periods of time and take many, many years to do its work. So that's how HIV gets into the body. The same as any other virus. Now, another unique property of HIV is that it likes to attach to receptors called CD4 and CCR 5. Sounds very technical, but these are two receptors that are common on your immune cells. So the target of HIV, the place that it's looking for to attach is immune cells. So when it gets into the bloodstream, it finds an immune cell attaches to it and installs the DNA and then it uses that cell as a factory to produce more virus to go and infect more cells. And so the cells that are supposed to protect you from HIV, guess what they are. Immune cells. So when your normal immune cells run over to the HIV viral to kill it, instead they get infected. So the sentinel T cells in your body that were supposed to protect you from this virus are the target of the virus and they become the beachhead of the virus of the virus because that virus can actually infect the cell before the faster than the cell can kill the virus. So that's why you have no most people have no protection from HIV and a small amount of it getting into the bloodstream has approximately a 10% chance of permanently infecting that person with HIV. And then there's no way to fight it after that. HIV will sweep through the HIV specific T cells in your body very, very quickly. And after about 90 days you have zero HIV protection and then HIV is free to take its time to destroy the rest of your immune system and give you aids. So that's how HIV gets into the body and those differences are absolutely critical in terms of making it hard to treat but also giving us an approach to potentially curing.

HIV flu pneumonia aids
Dr. Marc Siegel Responds to Dr. Fauci's 'I Am Science' Comments

America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

00:59 min | 7 months ago

Dr. Marc Siegel Responds to Dr. Fauci's 'I Am Science' Comments

"We have doctor Anthony Fauci in his position for 37 years, takes her home $438,000 of taxpayer money, who at the weekend said attacks on him are attacks on science because I am science. He actually said that. Isn't that dangerous when any one individual believes they are science, doctor Siegel? Well, sure, especially because that is dangerous because people are wrong. And he's been wrong. He's a very bright guy. He's got a tremendous history of HIV forward, but no, he's not science. And one of the ways that science comes about and this is really important is that things that seem to be experimental. And we like to say science is throwing things at the wall. It's not about dogma. It's about it's about learning and experimenting. That's one of the word experiment comes from. Everyone would agree that the word experiment fits with science will experiment means you didn't know and then you'll learn. That's humble. Science is

Anthony Fauci Siegel HIV
"hiv" Discussed on Sounds of Science

Sounds of Science

04:18 min | 7 months ago

"hiv" Discussed on Sounds of Science

"They were poor women from the townships. And so we had to take discussions of the HIV life cycle, the genes and proteins that are produced. The opportunities of infections, the antiviral drugs and their side effects. The organs of the body and translate it into way that was understandable. To people without necessarily any sort of secondary education, let alone university biology class or and what was amazing to me is that it was totally possible, right? If you are a good teacher, you can teach people many things. And what happened with the treatment action campaign is that they were able to take that basic training that we did in the early 2000s and turn it into a national treatment education campaign. So that in all of South Africa's languages, they had posters and brochures and booklets that talked to you about drug trafficking confections and posters that said fluconazole tweets fungal diseases associated with aids. Find out if your clinic has it, if not advocate for it. They took sort of what was a political tool by act up and that people who were driving the NIH and the FDA and the drug companies entered into a tool of mass mobilization..

HIV South Africa aids NIH FDA
The Latest: Pfizer tests COVID pill as preventive medicine

AP News Radio

00:43 sec | 9 months ago

The Latest: Pfizer tests COVID pill as preventive medicine

"Pfizer has started testing its potential covert nineteen treatment as a preventive medicine aimed at warding off the virus of a close contact gets it the drug maker says it will study the pale it's developing in combination with low dose of the HIV drug per ton of air in people who are at least eighteen years old living in the same household with someone who's infected the pills goal is to block a key enzyme that the virus needs to replicate Fizer plans to enroll some twenty six hundred people in a late stage study researchers expect that the use of the HIV drug will help slow the breakdown of the potential treatment so it remains active longer to help fight the virus I'm surely Adler

Pfizer Fizer HIV Adler
Kenny Sacht of Wipe Every Tear on Rescuing Women Trapped in the Sex Industry

The Eric Metaxas Show

02:33 min | 10 months ago

Kenny Sacht of Wipe Every Tear on Rescuing Women Trapped in the Sex Industry

"What would give you the idea that you could succeed at this. I mean it seems like most people will just shrug and to say like. There's nothing i can do. You seem to have this idea that there was something you could do. What did you think you could do and what are you doing. It starts with decades ago. I found myself crying out to god and say god break my heart with the things that break yours. That was constant in my life. I want to cry with the things that you cry with. God i want to smile at the things you smile with. And so he. I saw any broke my and i just i just. It wasn't one of those things here. i am. Send me god. It was like here. i am cut. I'll do anything if this is it. I'll do it. And he took this coaches teacher. I would never durant here in this place. And i just wanted it. Were simply making wrong. Things right in the name of jesus and the pow we're seeing signs and wonders and miracles in the sex trade. Okay now when you say that. That's another order of conversation. It's one thing practically to to get these girls to believe you can get them out of this disgusting degrading life but you're saying you see miracles. You see what you just said about the worship. Yes that i mean people understand. There's a spiritual element. This is not just good works. We're gonna we're gonna do some good stuff. It's a spiritual battle but when you say you've seen miracles give me example either of you because i'm just fat. Most people should be fascinated with girl with hiv two tests. And she's scared. She has goes in for a third test. It's gone it's gone. The girls get some girls have got visions and some girls have got dreams before we've come to the bar and this is in their words. They say coach. I had a dream three nights before you came in before one of your teams came in and god said listen. She said there were. There was white girls with filipinos. Listen to what they say and trust them and she goes. I trusted and now she's a college graduate so you don't just get them out of this. Hell you install them in amazing lives that you give them hope a future. Yes

Durant
Author Sabrina Strings on the Racial Origins of Fat Phobia

Food Heaven Podcast

01:55 min | 10 months ago

Author Sabrina Strings on the Racial Origins of Fat Phobia

"To the podcast. Sabrina thank you on so excited to have you so tell us about how you started to explore issues of body image and wait specifically for women of color while this is actually almost like a family legacy for me. My grandmother was born in rural georgia during the late nineteen thirties and so she was growing up the jim crow era and lived in a racially segregated community as part of the great migration in nineteen sixty. She traveled west and at that time for the first time in her life she lived and worked around white women and she was amazed by the number of white women diets. Seems like what is this. You know sort of like a typical black grandmother fashioned. By the time. I came of age in the one thousand nine hundred ninety s. When i was in high school she was still troubling over. This question like what is going on here. She would even ask me like why women dying to be thin. And i was like sixteen years old but it wasn't until about ten years later when i was working in a predominantly black community in san francisco baby hunters points. I met women of color who were hiv positive. And we're attaining an hiv medication adherence clinic where i was a researcher who refuse to take their medications for fear of gaining weight. And i thought oh. Wow you know this. What was clearly a phenomenon that was mostly about middle class white women in the nineteen sixties arguably even through the ninety s. Clearly by the early dots was something. That was impacting women of color as well so i wanted to be able to dig further into this question of why is it so important for women of all racial ethnic backgrounds at this point to feel like they need to discipline themselves and maintain a particular. Wait

Sabrina Georgia San Francisco
The Fear Mongering Seen Today by Biden and the Media Over COVID

The Dan Bongino Show

01:56 min | 10 months ago

The Fear Mongering Seen Today by Biden and the Media Over COVID

"With Fox and I went on a network and I'm going to say where. But I remember doing a segment on He bother Ebola virus. Remember Ebola when we had a case that was in Texas, right, Jim that the Ebola case was, Yeah, I was in Texas. And I specifically remember one of the bookers at the network saying, Hey, listen, You know it was if I needed to be told this, but they were like, you know, let's stay calm. Let's see if I was going to go on the air. Everyone's gonna die like I don't do. That's not my bag of donuts, you know? But I remember that that was, but they even scolded and chastised Joe Biden when Joe Biden remember was at the outbreak of Was it H one n one. Or remember that where Joe Biden went and said, Don't fly on planes. It's recycled there And then, Um, Obama's press secretary, Jay Carney, comes out here. Then they actually made him look like it is there like, please don't listen to the vice president. He's a moron, all right. They didn't say that. Exactly. But trust me, that's exactly what they were saying. No, I'm serious. I know this is hard to digest now, because you're like, Wait. Now it's completely different. Biden and everybody else Where a mask. Fauci panic all the time. The media we gotta panic. Everybody is dying, right? You can't even remember a time with Ebola and H one n one and even HIV back in the eighties, I was alive for that. So it's Jim. So it was Mike. I remember that was a virus with a 100% fatality rate back then. One of everybody who got it essentially died. Coronavirus for healthy young people has like a 1 to 2% tops for younger folks. Fatality rate HIV had a 100% fatality rate. And in the beginning, nobody knew how it was spread. It took a while for them to figure it out. It was sexually transmitted And folks even back then the panic wasn't like it is now. Think about that at 100% fatality rate. I remember

Ebola Joe Biden Texas JIM Jay Carney FOX Fauci Biden Barack Obama HIV Mike
The Investigation Into Dr. Paolo Macchiarini

Dr. Death: Miracle Man

02:32 min | 10 months ago

The Investigation Into Dr. Paolo Macchiarini

"Paolo shared his ultimate vision using stem cells to regrow or repair. The body's organs. This incredible idea that i hadn't thought previously if you could actually make that become true would be fantastic innovation in the past busa had met his share of medical luminaries through other projects oliver sacks robert gallo who co discovered hiv. Carlton gadget sick. Who'd help discover mad cow disease. What paolo macarena was doing was if it was true. Just as incredible as those discoveries i wanted to go. Bt bring this story and see who was in the wrong what actually happened was powder genius. Or was he possibly soon. After busa went to get the other side of the story he reached out to each of the doctors who had made the allegations against paolo. That i didn't want to talk to me. A very fearful and Suspicious and afraid. Eventually one of them agreed to meet with them on a cold day. In february busa walked up to the door of an apartment building in central stockholm. Dr matias chorba show buzzed him. In and he rode the elevator up to his apartment in rang the bell true to form the six foot. One american was wearing a black sabbath shirt. He invited busa into the apartment and proceeded to tell him everything had learned. He had a really hard time believing what i was saying. Car basha was making some pretty alarming. Comparisons and i started telling him stories about joseph angola. Now sweats and medical experiments or what was going on at caroline scott. I felt that maybe they were paranoid that they were afraid of things. The magnified things that perhaps exists. I thought that they would claims where a bit outlandish and we talked for like two hours. And then my wife came home and she's a blonde swedish woman presses. Well and looks like a normal person and he asked her. If what i was saying was of all this actually true and she said yes. Yes this is is absolutely true. This is absolutely what's going on. And he said after meeting her that he it was. I found that he actually started leaving me. Just like benita. Alexander in new york boost the link fest resolved to get to the bottom of the paulo macura. Any mystery

Busa Oliver Sacks Robert Gallo Paolo Macarena Dr Matias Chorba Paolo Carlton Joseph Angola Caroline Scott Basha Stockholm Benita Alexander New York
Study: Air Pollution May Reduce Life Expectancy

CNN 5 Things

00:46 sec | 10 months ago

Study: Air Pollution May Reduce Life Expectancy

"Air. Pollution is a greater breadth. Who people's lives around the world than smoking. hiv aids or war. that's out of the university of chicago's energy policy institute. Cnn's anna sterler as more. According to a new report published. Wednesday people are losing nearly two and a half years of their lives. On average in countries where air pollution levels or below standards set by the world health organization. India has the highest levels of air pollution. Globally and residents have an average of nearly six shaved off their lives. According to air quality life index the index calculates years loss based on what the life expectancy would be if a country met clean air guidelines. Set by the who. The top five countries with the highest average number of years lost were india bangladesh nepal pakistan and

University Of Chicago's Energy Anna Sterler Aids CNN World Health Organization India Bangladesh Nepal Pakistan
Birth Justice: How Are Racialized Bodies Pathologized in New Zealand’s Health Sector?

Diaspora Blues

02:38 min | 11 months ago

Birth Justice: How Are Racialized Bodies Pathologized in New Zealand’s Health Sector?

"Racialist or black or people of color's bodies specifically but college in the health sector. Well there's a lot to say about this and also. I just want to correct an assumption that you have a little bit which is around who supports boosting people in new zealand. It's one of the countries that lead the way in terms of autonomous midwifery practice so i actually expected beta of midwives. That's what i need to say here. You know i. And the thing about midwifery is an explicit. Critique of biomedical is ation. So i was really surprised that midwives who already had the agenda critique would not extending it more broadly but in terms of more broad kind of conversations around how racialist buddies treated we know that pregnant people who are recent immigrants indigenous and doesn't franchise by the lowest social economic status race ethnicity in customization substance dependence or housing instability will have an increased risk for poor health outcomes and reduced access to high quality care. Now the thing that's important about that Is even though. That's sort of a global very general finding The multicultural center for women's health Produced a report that came out last week about sexual and reproductive health and what they found is fiscal is the lack of data a migrant and refugee women's sexual reproductive health but the other evidence that we have you know even though it's limited as that they list likely to have access to evidence base and culturally culturally relevant information which will enable them to manage their own family controls contraceptive choices and minstrel health This a few other findings that i'd like to flag as well. You know the list likely to participate and preventative. Health services and This is what i found in my own research around. Cervical cancer screening there will set greater risk of contracting sexually transmitted conditions for example hiv or hepatitis b In terms of that booth thing space they tend to excess antenatal k. Later and experience high rates of still booth

Multicultural Center For Women New Zealand Cervical Cancer Hepatitis B HIV
U.S. Vows to Stay in Kabul to Get All Americans Out

Word on the Street

00:34 sec | 11 months ago

U.S. Vows to Stay in Kabul to Get All Americans Out

"And today, vowing to evacuate Americans in Afghanistan and Afghan allies as safely as possible. Thousands more have been evacuated on private charter flights facilitated By the U. S government. These numbers include American citizens and permanent residents, as well as their families. It includes HIV applicants and their family this amid the Taliban takeover there, Biden says Next week, the G seven will be meeting to discuss the situation in Afghanistan. Biden is facing criticism from some over the chaos and violence outside the Kabul airport as crowds struggle to reach

Afghanistan U. Biden HIV Taliban Kabul Airport
Fox News Mandates Employees Disclose Vaccination Status

Mike Gallagher Podcast

02:35 min | 11 months ago

Fox News Mandates Employees Disclose Vaccination Status

"Fox news ordering all staffers to disclose vaccination status and getting a bunch of emails from a lot of people who work in the pharmaceutical industry. I worked for a large pharmaceutical company. We're required to tell them our vaccine status starting this week. If you're not vaccinated you must work remotely from home but see. Here's the problem with this argument. The problem seems to be to me. We're fighting all these breakthrough cases of people who are vaccinated who get covert now. They're not dying. So maybe we got to remember the goal of the vaccine three. Us senators who are all vaccinated have tested positive for kogo. Senators angus king roger. Wicker and john. Hickenlooper have all been experiencing breakthrough kobe. Nineteen cases all three senators. Say they're isolating and following doctor's orders either strangest reaction to the idea of mike. My company came to me and i. I've shared that. I've gotten vaccinated. But i wouldn't want to be forced to tell anybody my vaccination status if listen i've already had battles with people over stuff making me wear a mask in an empty building walking from my car into a studio twelve feet and i don't encounter anybody but you must wear a mask and i got into a big fight with somebody who i like. A lot saw a cope somebody a colleague or whatever you wanna call the person in the building and she's very very corporate. She's very by the book. it's not her fault. She got follow the rules. We are a big company. We got a lotta mandates. We got a lot of the people have their hands full. I get it. I don't wanna be that guy but are you crazy where amass from your car to walk fifteen feet to your empty studio in the empty hall where you have to. Yeah but if somebody sees you mike it's a bad image for it puts us in a bad put you your set common sense. I vaccinated doesn't matter. I would have a very. I'm sorry. I think this would be hypothetically a bridge too far for me. If somebody said you must tell somebody your what's next my body mass index. What do you want to know now. You wanna know a list of sexual partners. I mean what you listen my hiv status. Go down the list of privacy issues.

Angus King Roger Fox News Hickenlooper Wicker Mike Empty Hall John United States
How Are the Latinx Community Represented on TV

Latino USA

02:00 min | 11 months ago

How Are the Latinx Community Represented on TV

"Latino and latina representation in film and television is an age old conversation topic and despite some recent milestones. The numbers are still pretty disappointing. According to a recent study by the la times latinos and latinas are underrepresented across all aspects of television and film productions despite making up nearly twenty percent of the us population that dino's and latina's constitute only six percent of main cast members less than nine percent of writers seven percent of directors and six percent of senior executives. The presence of african and indigenous latinos in the industry is even smaller but statistics can only tell us so much how latino individuals and communities are portrayed. Onscreen is another part of the conversation. That's why today we're taking you behind the scenes with two award winning latino creators were breaking stereotypes about how our communities are depicted on television. Stephen canals and linda evatt charges. My name is steven canals. I am co-creator executive producer writer and director of the f. Extra series pose. The category is hosed centers. The black and latin queer and trans individuals who are part of the new york city. Underground ballroom community as they are navigating the difficulties of the hiv as and crack epidemic of the eighties and early nineties. Stephen was born and raised in the bronx to an afro. Puerto rican mother and an african american dad. He made history when posed premiered in twenty eighteen featuring the largest cast of transgender actors in tv history

La Times Stephen Canals Linda Evatt Dino Steven Canals United States New York City Bronx Puerto Rican Stephen
Who Qualifies for a Coronavirus Booster Shot?

The Afternoon News with Kitty O'Neal

00:42 sec | 11 months ago

Who Qualifies for a Coronavirus Booster Shot?

"Adults with compromised immune systems receive a booster shot of a coronavirus vaccine enables all persons 12 in order to obtain a third just in the primary care series to increase the protection. This comes one day after the FDA granted emergency approval of a third dose of the Pfizer and Moderna vaccines booster will be given to people who do not produce inadequate immune response after getting two doses of the vaccine. Specifically HIV and cancer patients. The unanimous move from the CDC advisory panel was highly anticipated as the Delta Variant continues to spread across the U. S. But during his vaccine can be distributed to adults, 18 and up fighters vaccine can be distributed People ages 12 and up.

Moderna Pfizer FDA HIV CDC Cancer
Democrats Love Promoting COVID Fear to Push Their Agenda

The Dan Bongino Show

01:26 min | 11 months ago

Democrats Love Promoting COVID Fear to Push Their Agenda

"You think you're doing. Fauci Fauci fears of Covid Very There's a headline Covid varied worse than Delta could become. Yeah, it could. It could. Folks, there could be a virus worse than HIV. There could be a bacteria worse than staff coming. Of course, of course they could. We live in a world full of pathogens that can infect human beings, damage them or kill them and definitely can make the mill. Why the endless focus on fear all the time. Why not again? Just the public information campaign done in a sober, rational fashion. Hey, we've got to live with this thing. It's here. It's probably going to be here forever. You have a vaccine. We have therapeutics were working on You know, take precautionary measures. If someone is sick, wash your hands And thanks for listening. What do you want us to? What else do you want them to do? Why the endless Beaverton campaign. Because, folks, there's a reason the Democrats don't do anything by accident. They are enjoying this Fear campaign. It works for them. We've spent unprecedented amounts of government money. The teachers unions have now taken over America who donate conveniently to Democrats. You have people's sense of what their own civil liberties are evaporating. There are actually American citizens right now, who are convinced they don't have the right to go to church or assemble in public because the CDC director told them to You

Fauci Fauci Delta HIV Beaverton America CDC
Working Toward a More Inclusive Music Industry

Morning Edition

01:51 min | 11 months ago

Working Toward a More Inclusive Music Industry

"One of the big stories in the music industry right now has been the response to hip hop star two babies homophobic comments, which he made during a festival in Miami late last month. As NPR's Elizabeth Blair reports, the fallout was swift as multiple festivals canceled his shows. With his millions of followers on social media. The baby has a powerful platform. He's one BT awards and been nominated for Grammys. I'm one of the greatest ain't no debate. No, no, I'm still levitated medicated. Ironic I gave him love and they and the painting on me. That's the baby on a Dua Lipa song that's in the top 10 of the Billboard's hot 100 chart. During his concert at the Rolling Loud festival in Miami, he told the audience to put your cell phone light up. If you didn't show up with HIV AIDS, you didn't show up today with HIV AIDS and get up there and essentially transmitted disease making died. 23 weeks put his cell phone right now. The backlash was immediate. Dua Lipa distanced herself from the baby Lollapalooza removed him from the lineup. Then more festivals canceled two shows Elton John and Madonna railed against the misinformation in his comments about HIV. I think there's a new moment. There's definitely a new moment. The baby is a big star and Brown University professor Tricia Rose says The cost to his career is significant. At the same time, she says, the music industry has long tolerated and profited from artists like the baby. There's many, many artists who are promoted by the industry, who are celebrated by the industry because of their quote unquote edgy, extreme behavior. And you know that is a longstanding pattern that has not abated in any way And then you know when they step out of line about when and how they actually live into that identity. Then there's all this sort of, you know we're all about peace, love and

Elizabeth Blair HIV Miami Dua Lipa Grammys Aids NPR Tricia Rose Elton John Madonna Brown University
DaBaby Booted From Lollapalooza After Homophobic Comments

AP News Radio

00:37 sec | 11 months ago

DaBaby Booted From Lollapalooza After Homophobic Comments

"The Lollapalooza music festival in Chicago cuts rapper da baby from the lineup after he made homophobic remarks at a festival outside Miami last week marches are loaded with the latest well the blues organizer say the festival was founded on diversity inclusivity respect and love and with that in mind to baby was dropped at Sunday night's closing act last week at the rolling loud festival the baby used crude language to call out members of the LGBTQ community and people with HIV and aids the baby's representatives did not respond to requests for comment young thug took the baby's closing night slot in G. Herbo was added to feel young thug's original performance time

Da Baby Chicago Miami HIV Aids G. Herbo
Lollapalooza Music Festival Cancels DaBaby Performance After Homophobic Remarks

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:16 sec | 11 months ago

Lollapalooza Music Festival Cancels DaBaby Performance After Homophobic Remarks

"One of Chicago's biggest music festivals. The baby will no longer perform a closing set at Lollapalooza today after derogatory, homophobic remarks referencing HIV AIDS at a festival in Miami. This is CBS

Chicago HIV Aids Miami CBS
"hiv" Discussed on Sex with Dr. Jess

Sex with Dr. Jess

05:35 min | 1 year ago

"hiv" Discussed on Sex with Dr. Jess

"Seventy eight percent of the americans of americans live within five miles of a walgreens pharmacy. And i believe that we have a great opportunity right now. Really get the word out that in the event that people have questions about is prep rights for me. Or what do i do about each testing. Or where can i get my medications. How can i afford my medications very specials questions like that that they should go into a walgreens pharmacy or pick up the phone or even address. Those questions do our pharmacy chat. Because the important thing is is that individuals that believed that they may be at risk. They should at least inquire about that they should consider hiv testing that should consider pre exposure prophylaxis and the various ways that they can protect themselves one of the things that i think that the pandemic has taught us is that we all play a role in that we all have an opportunity to protect us and protect the communities that we live in. Whether it's through wearing face masks various others the same applies to hiv. We all complain apart whether it's an educating whether it's getting hiv test or asking questions about is bright for me. i believe that we all play a role. And if we all do that we can all help to end the hiv. Emma and i do believe very very hopeful that we can actually see this epidemic. Come to an end during our lifetimes. What you're really doing is normalizing and encouraging these types of conversations You know here obviously but also in pharmacy. I don't think people naturally think of you know going to a pharmacist. I i think oftentimes we think of going to a doctor and there can be barriers of course to going to a doctor whether it's a matter of time or coverage I'm very interested however in the chat feature online. So i do not like talking on the phone It really stresses me out to make a phone call. I think a lot of people. I don't know if it's true that a lot of younger people but many of us have anxiety even around phone calls although i've never really labeled it that How does the pharmacy chat work. Is it real time. Is it like is it. All the time How can we access that if we wanna chat because for me if i can chat with my fingers and not my mouth..

Emma Seventy eight percent five miles one each testing things americans prophylaxis
"hiv" Discussed on Sex with Dr. Jess

Sex with Dr. Jess

05:31 min | 1 year ago

"hiv" Discussed on Sex with Dr. Jess

"And when i looked into the research it says it's over ninety nine percent effective to reduce the risk of transmission. in sexual activity. I think the efficacy is a bit lower for shared needles and other other practices that can potentially transmit hiv But i'm really curious about how prep works in the body. So how does the medication work to reduce transmission to me great question and you are exactly correct really when we're talking about hiv prevention. We have multiple tools at our disposal now so as we were just talking about treatment as prevention that is one way that we can actually help in the epidemic but in addition to that we have exposure prophylaxis. Currently there's basically two different medications that can be used Fool or pre exposure prophylaxis. It is recommended that patients take this medication on a daily basis. In really the reason for that is to ensure that there's enough drug in the body that prevents hiv from replicating and so as we discussed earlier. Hiv is trying to take up or get taken up into the immune system into some of the cells of incest specifically that the defense mechanism of our body in one of the things that pre exposure prophylaxis is going to do. It's really going to prevent that virus from continuing to replicate in a in a healthy individual and then if it cannot replicate that it can. It cannot in fact additional a cells or it can basically take up in our make Make a home within the immune system of the body and so just quite plainly if you think of other medications that we take from a preventive standpoint malaria for instance if an individual's go into an area that may be. I have a high incidence of malaria than you can take medications to prevent you from contracting malaria. We'll same thing with hiv if we take that. Have that medication. In our system and continuing to take it on a daily basis and really can provide that protection for that individual in the of that that they may be exposed to hiv. And so i've a question about sarah discordant partner so where one partner is positive and the other partner is negative. Do you see partners. Where the monogamous. Okay just to make it clear. So if i'm positive and brennan's negative and i am taking anti retrovirals to get my viral load super super low and undetectable. Would he also consider what brandon my sexual partner also consider taking prep as a precautionary measure to people. I wanna use the double up. But that's my lay.

one partner over ninety nine percent one way two different medications brennan one double sarah brandon hiv
"hiv" Discussed on KLBJ 590AM

KLBJ 590AM

03:59 min | 1 year ago

"hiv" Discussed on KLBJ 590AM

"I am And you're one of our your send his patients all the time. I love Your insight. You're just a real smart person and great question. Great questions And just just just somebody who I really appreciate cold partnering on case care with. Well, Thank you. I appreciate that. So, you know, Shawn, what I want to talk to you about today, especially at the time of one pandemic was that there was a pandemic that kind of shape my medical career too. And that was, you know, not exactly a pandemic, but the AIDS. Epidemic cracks and when I was first training as a medical student, we still had many, many patients that came in that were HIV positive that either had AIDS or had HIV related illnesses and we, you know we had limitations on what we could do. We couldn't as a medical student. You couldn't participate in some of their surgeries. And there was a real fear. And then it just seemed to like, go away. Yeah. Go away or something like the fear went away, Right and selling coronavirus. Like everyone was scared to death for a few months. You know, they're still scared. They're still scared, but it scared. Just just you just me. Okay? Just tired of being scared to you. Always. You know where to get a vaccine Easy. They came Medical s. Oh, I thought you could talk to us about just the HIV kind of you know your experience with the disease process where you think it's at right now. Ecologically where people and then I'd love to talk about prevention strategies. Well, fantastic. So HIV numbers have definitely decreased over the years, which is a great thing. Bad thing is, the numbers are starting to increase again. People are getting too complacent switches about so in 2012, there was a new drug that was put on the market. It was advertised as a gay HIV prevention medication, and FDA later approved it in the next year for war men and women, heterosexual and homosexual, and it wasn't until Out four more years. After that. The gill EOD manufacturer really made a big splash and starts doing all kinds of marketing for it to Bada and now disco be the two medications that are used for HIV prevention. It's a daily medication to make intake and is 99.7% effective for prevention of HIV. When taken appropriately. So do with these medicines. You know when when I talk to people who are at risk we're talking about men who often are having sex. With men and want to make sure that they don't contract HIV. But the treatment for HIV itself has also seen some incredible improvements that right almost definitely when I was first in school way back a few years ago, working with HIV patients, we're talking 30 40 pills a day. Now it's down to one small pill a day for HIV treatment. It's also moves from infectious disease treating to now I'm treating here in primary care as well. And is it more of a chronic disease management and many patients have under Electable levels, right? Most people that are on any of the HIV medications that are available now do become undetectable, typically within 6 to 12 months now, just because we have a good treatment for it doesn't mean that we shouldn't try not to get it. Correct. Okay, quickly. You know, as I tell my patients, you know if you're gonna have sex great. Hallelujah! That's your choice. I'm here to help you out and make sure that you're using smarter choices. Overall s O that you're not getting any STDs, like Also in right now is higher national average for STDs, especially syphilis and HIV. So if we can use prep, or, um, condoms or tomorrow choices overall, and we're gonna get people todos One of it is the live music capital world and one of the drunker cities, So they're just not making good decisions, Shawn. Exactly. And the other number that should scare people. We also have Congress here. Hmm. That's very true, Thea. Other thing that should scare some people is after gay men. That number two group getting HIV is 13 to 35 year old women. So all that means they've got to be getting it from somewhere..

HIV Shawn AIDS Bada FDA Epidemic Congress
"hiv" Discussed on WTVN

WTVN

03:13 min | 1 year ago

"hiv" Discussed on WTVN

"Owner, whether HIV positive or negative. I'll have a rotor blades are empowerment lies in our knowledge and understanding of his disease who would effects how it spread? How it's not. Hi, guys. I'm really excited about being here with you, ladies today. It's really an honor for me to sit I'll be with you and talk with you and get to know you a little bit better gives me a chance to learn more sort of HIV and AIDS in effects. That's all. That's right. Right. I'm talking about this here. No, you're right. You're right. I don't even having these kind of conversations with him so learning Just how much HIV and AIDS are affecting women in particular, I got fired up until one of just speak more and feel like us to have it done. That's natural. What is it? Woman You're like, OK, where we're not talking about this. And I know why This is not being you know, output out there more than what it is. Do you think that we know that we're at risk? As women Are we doing know wherever. No, I don't think it's all think the reality said, and to say that where it risk because before I got diagnosed, I didn't think I was at risk. I don't think I was either. And pretty much everyone who ends up HIV positive says I didn't think it could have any on then it happened to me, I guess living with HIV Day today. Is In a way it's a bubble. Because Don't understand everybody else's perceptions and every once in a while, I get a peek into it because I find out that somebody who's don't me for a while. Had no idea I was HIV positive, and then they're shocked. You know, how could you be a mom and you have a husband and he's HIV negative and you two have sex. We had the Asia the world and what we do when they speak within. We have what people don't know about us. They see us, but they have no idea what's in the background. So it's just It's like a double life, find yourself more comfortable and one space or the other. I thought myself more comfortable in the HIV world because I have nothing. High society is afraid of what they don't know. Right And it's okay to be scared because Here is a fair emotion I have but his new don't if we don't look at the people who are scared and tried it as a community, move our fear into Let's be motivated to work. Let's be motivated, said Let's be motivated to try to understand whether it's affected, infected at risk, not at risk. You know, in any stage of our life, and I think that's where fear can be a really powerful emotion very much, but only if we take it to the next one. Right. We have to channel it exactly. I really think we have the control right now. To end this virus in our generation if we stay informed, but as long as we continue to educate, educate is gonna always be that key, and that's that's just, you know, the way I feel about that whole stigma thing. We got it. Wait. Just gotta knock it out the box. Yes. And I'm listening to you speaking. I'm not okay with slowly. Hmm. I'm not okay with stigma for another 30.

HIV AIDS Asia
"hiv" Discussed on The Naked Scientists

The Naked Scientists

05:20 min | 1 year ago

"hiv" Discussed on The Naked Scientists

"I this week there was cause for celebration as a covid. Vaccine became a regulator approved reality in the uk. All the time we've been waiting and hoping for the day when the searchlights of science would pick out invisible enemy. Give the pala to stop the enemy from making us ill. And now the scientists have done it and they used the virus itself to perform a kind of biological jujitsu and in fact because of that jujitsu the uk has become the focus of world media attention as the first western nation to formally approve corona virus vaccine for public use. Nevertheless some are questioning. Why britain's been able to move so fast according to the uk education secretary govern williamson. Speaking to see it's because we live in great britain. I just reckon we've got the very best people in this country and we've obviously got the best medical regulators much better than were french. Arab muslim belgians have much better than me americans. That doesn't surprise me at all because we're much better country than every single was okay but if that is actually true then what is that. We're better at in reality. The buck stops with a body called the nhra there. The medicines and healthcare products regulatory agency and down to them. That we've been able to approve sizes new coronavirus vaccine in record time and to explain what's involved what gaps still remain in our knowledge. And what is happening with the other major vaccine contender. The one being made by astrazeneca. His gino martini from the royal pharmaceutical society. Any new medicine has to be reviewed and tested the mitchell ray. The job is to inspect review. The data that's being generated so foams physical companies have to pay the testing. We'll clinical trials. Testing will phase one face to face free with effectively. The the medicine in this case. The vaccine is tested in human volunteers and subjects which representative while the population people. You're gonna begin the vaccine to create these clinical trials. The data's collected and the whole basis have put together a dossier and that's been reviewed by the shaarei in this case. What is the damage of being working in real time with manufacturers review the data in real time so that's why we've been able to get an accelerated. Is it as simple as that. Because what some people. Think quite legitimately appointing out is that normally. It takes ten years to make a drug or vaccine and get that to market. Which means by the time it gets there. You've got ten years in some cases of follow up from the first time a person was exposed to that drug to the time at which you begin to marketed. Here we've got ten months so we don't have that long term insight true. What's happening here. Is that the nhra actively viewing people being executed. So there's already assistant quotes called surveillance. And so they'll be muller shaking people. Boxing aged just in case there are any adverse events alba to understand. The nhra is a very very good regulatory agency. Got great expertise in looking out biological jokes. Vaccines whom the signing. What data is needed sensual. Quality and safety and of course efficacy. Interestingly though the nhra have approved this agent for uk use but the the european counterpart for the hr a have not approved this more. Broadly across the rest of the eu and other countries in the eu. Haven't done what the uk's done. So why have we got that difference. And if it's good enough for us why is it not good enough for the rest of europe. But these things do happen. I mean differences do occur in interpretation with with data particularly when you have those as just the s but again a while alluded to before is immature <unk>. About could lead robertson so a lead coordinates when they were part of the mea for all the you took applications like said sixty percent of new medicines being less than ten years or so the amateur were coordination. I got great experience in this kind of area and a great network of keeping lead his experts. Who can give council on this data so you know. I'm i'm fairly confidence. That amateur are happy. With the safety and efficacy and quality than out of oxygen. There are some gaps in our understanding and in the data we've had generated so far though. Aren't there for instance. No one under eighteen has had the agent tried on them so they won't be being vaccinated pregnant women. Currently there regarded as a risk group. But they've not been included intentionally in the charles. They've been actually excluded from the trials. So how we gonna deal with the fact that there are these individuals or groups in the population that haven't been actively explored as time evolves. They will obviously investigate. Those subjects will be evolving. The plan with the mitchell ray in finding house was the best way to include those people.

nhra uk mitchell ray govern williamson gino martini royal pharmaceutical society astrazeneca great britain eu britain muller Boxing robertson europe charles michelle ray
"hiv" Discussed on Marsha's Plate: Black Trans Podcast

Marsha's Plate: Black Trans Podcast

01:42 min | 1 year ago

"hiv" Discussed on Marsha's Plate: Black Trans Podcast

"Long time which I have and I've never had a symptom. I've never had a pneumonia. He had to go to the hospital for anything. A lot of people like oh you're walking Miracle. No. This is just what it does if you take care of yourself, but a lot of times people don't realize that they weren't expecting us to get old with HIV. So now we're aging with HIV and we have them call Marvin. He's that intersect with HIV just like these comorbidities intersect with Coleman. It may you if you catch cold it. It's going to be worse. If you have heart disease HIV diabetes high cholesterol heart disease if you have any of those and you get Kovac dead Edition is going to be worked because it's a higher upper respiratory disease. And black and brown populations have these Commodities that intersect with Blackness and brownies and you're always going to find a high diagnosis area in black and brown populations where there are a higher black and brown population in the space and people are not talking about that medical races took. Yeah, there's involved in white supremacy. Absolutely. That is you brought over to how for a person cuz when you first went cold it first started to blow up the first the first two things that you heard was it's really really affecting older people. And then it.

HIV Marvin pneumonia Kovac Coleman
"hiv" Discussed on The Good Problem

The Good Problem

03:01 min | 2 years ago

"hiv" Discussed on The Good Problem

"So you're constantly trying to as activists get this new important updated information out there people just in a concept thinking about that big story that narrative that that Hey Chavez scary and something to be incredibly fearful of in protect yourself and everyone you love from and it's it's not just now collective minds. Tonight lows too. You know we have a Louis astill uprising of this eighties and nineties concept of Hijab AIDS and so we're still saying people go to jail people be prosecuted threatened with prosecution for not disclosing HIV status in some places some couple of years ago that Woman six OHKA was extradited from new. South Wales to post and putting them in prison of for HIV criminalization case. You know I was in the court when when she was sentenced and it was of the hottest outbreaking days of Mike Chevy activists. Seeing the impact that should never have happened on so many levels like that was a systemic failure from before diagnosis before she contracted. HIV through to her diagnosis three to the care that she was. Able to be able to access you know so many steps along the way. Bush was systemic failure and it's all tied up in in people known embracing the. the scientific developments and changes and half our lowest policies quota if anything kinda going backwards. New. South. Wales. Issuing, a change that would say people be forcibly tested full Hov if they spy on a police officer, which is a a change that has been rolling around the country over the last few years that is in direct opposition to the science that there's no I mean beyond civil liberties nightmare forcibly detaining a person full a test for HIV and the implications of that. There's no way that you could transmit high faith through spitting and yet police unions of just kind of aggressively pushing for these to come enacted the benefit of pot from giving them more Powell. Medication can prevent you. Reduce the transmissible Loyd to undetectable. Why is the public health policy not to ensure that everybody has access to that medication easily access and the support systems that are required to be around that. Would not be in the long-term public health benefits from preventive kind of perspective to invest in that rather than invest in as say forcibly testing people for HIV, will I mean firstly and this comes back to what before bat? Not Letting could be the enemy of tended enemy goods white around. I.

Chavez HIV South Wales Bush OHKA Louis astill Mike Chevy Loyd officer Powell AIDS
"hiv" Discussed on The Good Problem

The Good Problem

04:23 min | 2 years ago

"hiv" Discussed on The Good Problem

"Our large has zero risk of transmission that that means you can have kids that are going to die they reaction is oh gosh I hadn't heard of that. Why haven't I heard of that? That's great news whereas the affected communities who have been living under the cloud tech so much longer to accept that scientific reality. As Truth and fold that truth into their lives and use it to let go of the fear of their ignorance which in sometimes willful, you have these examples of lateral violence of caring from within the creek community of High Chubby, negative game in a holding onto the high negatively and excluding people living with HIV from their lives in front the narrative and. Demanding that they do more to keep everyone safe including being criminalised than you have in the general community which I think teaches us a lot about the way that FIA can be exploited to ten communities against each other absolutely an. Makes you think about as you said, the lessons that we can learn from this. And how they're applicable to current. Coronavirus pandemic wearing and I think you starting to see some of the long term results of the FIA happening in and that comes through out through policies but also say behaviors unite towards people that may or may not have the virus and The whole idea of quarantine and yeah, it's really interesting. The state relies on this crowd sourcing of policing that individuals should be silenced by their own communities to ensure old world quote unquote doing the right thing if you don't do the right thing. needs to be some sort of cuffs aerial response to that some sort of policing response to it, which has been proven to be highly ineffective apart from making. People feel more afraid and thus dual reporting. D think that full. Those people who lived through. Those times when. It was a very scary issue that was a lot of fear coming as you say from from places. Do you think for those people that are still with us? Anna, a living through corona virus now that there's a, there's a kind of. Increased sense of or triggering of the trauma that they experienced. It's interesting chatting a community's response to coronavirus in in the Tim. Community in kind of looking at at the time of conversations and we sorted this uptick anxiety in the group in Tim community there's no one universal experience some some folks who will survive. It's though era. Of A, saying this. Triggering name reminded them exactly like you said of of that was previous. They. Were feeling also things and then they would conversely people saying that Kerlin virus is nothing like idea in Australia that the speed of the government response to take care of as many people as possible and not just silo minority communities of Keio or neglect is one thing this was before the towers went into look down. So I think we've also seen some pretty clear examples of the style exceptionalism in other minority communities with the lack of nuance that has done. Yeah absolutely. So. One issue that POPs up in media quite regularly is the issue of allowing gay or bisexual men to donate blood. You've written on this and something new you right was was pretty confronting I think for a will for a lot of people it is confronting you said the most inclusive ethical way to allow gay. Oh, by men to donate blood is to end. Hey, chai anything else is a slap in the face for those of US living with the virus and insult to the decades of activism and organizing and a forgetting of those lost to the AIDS? Crisis. This is something I do feel very passionately about, and this is something that I have skin in the game about I i. also, WanNa say that.

FIA US HIV WanNa Tim Anna Keio AIDS Australia
"hiv" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

04:00 min | 2 years ago

"hiv" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"The hour in the U. S. HIV and aids is often associated with urban areas recent data suggest that rates of new infection in urban areas are actually going down to an all time low but the new front line is in rural areas Stephen Williams fresh a professor at Northwestern University in Chicago has been monitoring this new front all of these small rate of HIV is higher than it is in rural parts of the United States but the rates are falling pretty quickly and it's quite impressive municipal and state health that commissions in cities like New York some Cisco Los Angeles are taking very comprehensive approaches and they are doing so because you can stand clean needle exchanges and things like that and in the lower parts of the United States at the opposite trend is emerging and it's hard to even know how many there are because we don't even have the mechanisms to count right now if city campaigns work because they have a concentration of population and a concentration of resources what is different outside the city what are you seeing in the countryside that might lead to this rise in infection rates there are a couple of things some cities have infrastructures just for getting people to see doctors created we don't have the National Health Service like you have in England so we have two wildly disparate rates of how people ever see doctors at all in the west south you might get people who come into a doctor they haven't seen one for ten or fifteen years and they're dying of aids and HIV aids quite quickly and so places like real West Virginia the Appalachian Trail people just don't see doctors that much and at the same time kind of what's different is as these counts the industrialized they lose jobs the opioid crisis and then as people can't maintain the high from them they will often turn to use on drugs by injection with needles and that's with hepatitis C. H. A. B. start to move very quickly many of the states are also abstinence only education they don't teach anything about gay sex I'm so there's things already make the justice sexual doctors of transmission move much quicker because you're just as an education about what about cultural changes in that kind of thing because people can often you know over emphasize the cultural differences between city and country these days but they are still that to an extent well the challenges are that doctors might not even there to test people for it so I I've lived in New York and Chicago my whole adult life and I'm a gay man when I go to my doctor and a variety of settings and doctors I've seen they will suggest that get an HIV caps I could also if I wanted to I could go to a to an HIV testing clinic and feel pretty anonymous and New York or Chicago well in the country the only doctor people might now in a fifty mile radius knows everybody they now and so the student I might keep them from even going to ask or seek out such a test at a clinic where they can go and she should have been honestly that they're the stigma makes them frightened that someone might find out this thing about them what do you think would be most effective to to try to put some shackle on the rise of rates in the country that for what would you advise we need Medicare for all we need something like you have in England where everyone's just seeing a doctor quite regularly we also need to decriminalize various kinds of sex sex work and intravenous drug use just take it down to ground level force in every you know what I know for example the research Missouri what's the picture like that talking to people I know the state of Missouri pretty well because I have been reporting on a young man who was charged with HIV transmission and sentenced to thirty years in prison and that the sentence was originally was eventually overturned and in that state I found that criminalizing HIV doesn't help with anything it doesn't help lower the rates of infection that doesn't help stop people from from engaging in certain disorders but what it does do is increase stigma makes it less likely for people to get tested Stephen William thresher journalist also professor at Northwestern University who's been researching the latest data on that the new frontline in HIV aids infections in the U. S. no longer the urban areas with lots.

HIV aids fifteen years thirty years