35 Burst results for "HIV"

Is It Legal for Employers to Mandate COVID-19 Vaccinations?

NPR's Business Story of the Day

02:07 min | 3 d ago

Is It Legal for Employers to Mandate COVID-19 Vaccinations?

"Vaccinations are on the rise in the us and some employers are thinking about how and when to bring people back to work but what about those employees who won't get the vaccine. Can they be forced to do so. Npr's using gucci reports allies for health and wellbeing is an hiv clinic in pittsburgh many of its patients have weakened immune systems so the pandemic has been dangerous time then the covid vaccine became available and with it says human resources director. Marson the question of whether to require a vaccination among its staff of fifty. The clinic decided not to go. That far recurrently strongly recommend that all of our stuff e- vaccinated but that could shift marcin says allies board of directors is still considering an out and out vaccine requirement. He says the clinic is searching for the right balance between managing safety and fairness to workers the two issues public health and organizational culture on one hand. There's the risk of infection on the other. The clinic has moved away from an authoritarian workplace culture in recent years it emphasizes listening to an accommodating staff to the thou shalt vaccinate seem very contrary to the messages that we were building. Meanwhile marson says a larger clinic nearby took a different approach. They did mandate that. All of their employees have code vaccination and i did ask the head of the organization whether anybody had to be fired and he said two people were many experts agree. It's legal for employers to mandate vaccination especially in high risk environments like factories or hospitals but employers are still wrestling with whether to do so by law employers have obligations to keep the workplace safe and to not discriminate against workers. But it comes to mandating new vaccines. What does that mean in

Marson NPR Gucci Marcin Pittsburgh United States Wrestling
Federal officials reverse limits on fetal tissue research

AP News Radio

00:53 sec | Last month

Federal officials reverse limits on fetal tissue research

"The blighted ministrations reverse trump error restrictions on the use of human fetal tissue for medical research government scientists will be able to resume their work and research that uses tissue from elective abortions looking for treatments for various diseases including coal bed in the past such researches help produce vaccines for rubella rabies and drugs to treat HIV but the work has been criticized by abortion opponents the trump administration changed the policy in June of twenty nineteen requiring permission from a special ethics panel for any federal grants end consent from anyone donating fetal tissue health and Human Services secretary hobby Erebus era says researchers can go back to past policies members of Congress who sought the reversal are praising the move but the national right to life committee call city sickening decision Jackie Quinn Washington

Trump Administration Rubella HIV Congress Jackie Quinn Washington
COVID in Your Genes: The Risk Factors

Naked Genetics

02:33 min | Last month

COVID in Your Genes: The Risk Factors

"Since march we've been discussing how. Covert nineteen varies between different people depending on their genes and back at the start. The evidence was patchy. Look how far we've come a recent study combines. The work of a couple thousand geneticists using dna kindly contributed for millions of people around the world to pin down which common genetic variations are doing us dirty. The study hasn't yet been peer reviewed. But it's such a large collaboration that we're going to spend the whole program learning what they've found hughes geneticists nathan pearson from the cove in nineteen hosts genetics initiative. We have uneven examples where human genetic variation shapes who gets given infection and maybe shapes how severely they get it at cetera so we had kind of a hunch going in like other infectious diseases. This might play out similarly and given. That's our expertise. That's our our bailiwick. What can we bring to the table along with everyone else from you know. Virologists themselves to public health. Scientists to people are studying all facets at every scale of society and our response to it. What can we bring to understanding. How responses vary perhaps in part by the genetic spellings the dna in us. And did you have a hunch. About how much of role. Genetics would play personally. I didn't go in with a strong hunch. Either way and i think that people who are more expert in corona viruses or in viruses generally in in our responses to them might have gone in with stronger or weaker. Hunches on that front but for me it was sort of an open question and i think for a lot of our colleagues we felt similarly we. We weren't gonna put all our chips on that part of the of of the board but that we might have some say let they give you an example. There you know one of the better studied viruses before this one that afflicts people was hiv. And we know for example that human genetic variation in a couple of parts of our genome strongly shapes who gets hiv generally controls the load of that virus over time. It's a very different kind of virus so we can't extrapolate too much from hiv because it stays in us. It's a retrovirus. But we knew that it played a role in addition to the variation hiv one hiv to etcetera in the virus. Itself

Nathan Pearson Hughes
Indiana Extends Needle Exchange Authority to 2026

Hammer and Nigel

00:34 sec | Last month

Indiana Extends Needle Exchange Authority to 2026

"Extension for Indiana's needle exchange programs. Eric Berman report signed counties have programs or addicts can exchange used needles for clean ones currently expires next year. Legislators have been to extend it to 2026. The programs began as a way to stop the spread of HIV and hepatitis of Mental Health. America of Indiana Vice President Brandon George says they connect addicts to brought her health services people that don't normally get touched and giving them a bunch. Of services that just happens to include syringes, George says those who take part have been five times more likely to enter treatment.

Eric Berman Indiana Vice President Brandon George Hepatitis HIV America George
Controversial needle exchange program suspended in Seattle's King County

News, Traffic and Weather

01:55 min | Last month

Controversial needle exchange program suspended in Seattle's King County

"Poses as a drug user and claims outreach workers gave her 100 clean needles. Now it has the mayor of federal Way, pushing paws on King County's Needle Exchange program. It was time we will toss a live without. The program has been suspended in the city. After pleas from neighbors tonight, Tammy. Said, And this was a huge topic. A lot of people signed up to talk at this council meeting about this needle exchange program, voicing concern neighbors saying that crime is up and needles are turning up everywhere in the community. But others who've been struggling with addiction say if the program is gone for good, it'll only make things worse. I'm seeing people. They're just in the parking lot shooting up or they go down a couple of blocks and he's shooting up, fed up with pervasive drug use and littered needles captured in these neighborhood Photos Grace LeBron Oh says she posed as a drug user to stake out a King County needle exchange program in action, Gray says she set up an appointment with the South County outreach, referral and exchange program or score. She met a van at a park and ride and they went up to the van and I said Don't have a needle to exchange Can I still get something? And the guy? Hands me a box of 100 needles, and that was it. Tonight, The Mayor and council passed a resolution temporarily suspending needle exchange programs in federal way until the city in King County can come up with another plan on its website, King County Public Health says in the last two years, the needle exchange program place 739 people and drug treatment, some have struggled with addiction voice. Concerned about suspending the program in federal way, There's someone who's been there. It's really upsetting. To see running the needle exchange to out of town is not gonna do anything to reduce drug use. In fact, it's just gonna increase HIV rates. People will not have a chance to recover if they're dead,

King County Grace Lebron Tammy Mayor And Council South County King County Public Health Gray HIV
Arkansas Senate OKs ban on treatments for transgender youth

Democracy Now! Audio

00:33 sec | Last month

Arkansas Senate OKs ban on treatments for transgender youth

"The arkansas state senate has passed a bill that would ban gender affirming care to transgender minors including hormones and puberty blockers if republican governor asa hutchinson signs. The bill arkansas will become the first state to ban gender affirming care to trans youth chase strange deputy director for transgender justice at the aclu's and hiv project. Denounce the bill. As quote the single most extreme anti trans law to ever pass through a state legislature.

Asa Hutchinson Arkansas Senate Aclu Legislature
For the first time in decades, vaccines are having a moment

Part Time Genius

08:48 min | 2 months ago

For the first time in decades, vaccines are having a moment

"Healthcare reporter at The Wall Street Journal. X for joining us, Peter Thanks for having me on Lot is being made right now about the vaccines were obviously going through the rollout. Things are ramping up. But, you know, I really have found very fascinating. The story of how these vaccines have come to be in the new technologies that were using. Obviously, the Fizer and Moderna vaccines are using this M or in a technology. We've never had a vaccine that has been approved before. And Johnson and Johnson, the new one that just got approved. They also are using new technology. There's is a little different. It's called viral vector technology. You know, these brand new things are showing a lot of promise and big hopes for Writing, you know, infections in the future, other pandemics, just other diseases. There's a lot of potential with all of these. So, Peter, tell us a little bit about your reporting on this. You know, Vaccines have been around for a couple 100 years, and for most of that time they used sort of tried and true method of making them and a lot of cases. That meant Taking part of the virus of the pathogen that you want to try to protect against. And using it in the vaccine itself to deliver that into the body to induce an immune response. And so those air still in use, But there have been efforts over the past few decades. Find new ways to make vaccines and the pandemic has really brought that out in the sense that, you know, even though some of these technologies were years in the making this pandemic has sort of been there moment to actually deliver, if not for the very first time, then In the biggest way possible for that. Vaccine technology and so As you mentioned the first couple vaccines used this messenger RNA technology and this Johnson and Johnson, one uses a viral vector technology and they're both Newer ways of making vaccines, and they both involved. Essentially delivering the genetic code and genetic instructions that tell the body to do certain things to induce the an immune response rather than deliver. The actual virus into the body that you're trying to fight against. We've talked about the M R D vaccines for a bit now only because they were approved first from Fizer, Moderna, Johnson and Johnson, as I mentioned recently approved They're using this viral vector technology. Tell us a little bit more about that. It's different from the old ways as you were describing, but they still use a virus that they kind of readjust to help do this. So how does the viral vector stuff work? There. That's a good point, because I don't want to mislead people to think that there's no viral material in these viral vector event vaccines, But the difference is that you're using a virus that has Essentially nothing to do with the disease You're trying to combat and the general concept for these viral vector vaccines is to take one harmless virus and to use it against more deadly virus. And so in the case of the Johnson and Johnson vaccine A couple others. They're out there for cove is like the one from AstraZeneca and University of Oxford is to take something called it in a dental virus, which is Relatively harmless virus that can cause common colds or conjunctivitis. And to tweak it in such a way so that if it's injected into your body, it's not going to cause disease is not going to cause the coldest fellow certainly not going to cause coverted. It serves as sort of a carrier, and it's modified in a way so that it actually then carries Edna that tells the body's cells. Make this spike protein that found on the surface of the coronavirus finding that right virus of such an interesting part of this story, Johnson and Johnson decided they were going to go this route. Viral vector technology, and they had to be on the hunt or the right virus because there was also concerns. You know you're using viral material. What if you build up an immunity to that specific virus, then could you build up an immunity to the vaccine itself? So they were on the hunt for a very specific one to use as well. That question of whether this viral vector or this sort of carrier that makes up the vaccine is going toe compose an issue and so in the past there have been in is where that's been a problem. And I think it's not been entirely solved. And so in the past, the problem was that when they tried using one of these dental viruses to be the sort of carrier in the vaccine in people who had pre existing immunity to that identify Iris that this common cold virus it's sort of interfered with The effectiveness of the vaccine against various diseases. And so what Johnson and Johnson had to do was sort of figure out. Okay, Well, we need to pick the right carrier that the right dental virus and you know, ideally one that is just not that common out in the world so that not as many people have pre existing immunity to it. But even the people who do have preexisting immunity to it. Maybe it's not going to be such a strong immune response against the carrier that would interfere with the underlying vaccine is trying to do Tell me a little bit more about Johnson and Johnson and the company. You know how they got into this because my understanding I'm obviously we know Johnson and Johnson for a myriad of products, but they're fairly new to the vaccine game. And they didn't achieve a little bit of success with an Ebola vaccine using this viral vector technology also, so you know how did that work out for them? And then obviously they transition into working on the covert virus. He's got the world well known brands that you alluded to band aid baby powder, and they've long had a very strong prescription drug business. So drugs like Remedy Cade that that treat people who are already sick and then there are major player but they've not been a major player in vaccines. And so about 10 years ago, they decided they wanted to get into vaccines. More so they bought this Such a biotechnology company called Crew Cell, and that's really where this viral vector technology came from that JJ is using, and so they kind of spent. Several years just designing vaccines against various infectious diseases and then running them through the regular series of tests, So this would be things like Ebola. Enrica. Then they were able to start testing they rebel a vaccine using this sector technology in Africa after I think first after that, the really big outbreak in West Africa five or six years ago and then more recently In the Congo, where there was another outbreak, and so they went through the whole series of studies for that vaccine, and then eventually got European Commission approval for it in the middle of last year. So now they do have this sort of platform that Could work not only against over 19 but also against Ebola's and then potentially additional infectious diseases the night in fact, they even have the vaccine and development for HIV, which is sort of been this Notoriously difficult virus to target in the form of a vaccine. I mean, it's so interesting how far we've come. How much we've learned about the human body so much so that you know we're hacking the genetic software. You know of the body to produce these things. You know all these insights into the immune system that we've gained have led us to this stuff. So what's the promise for these things Like, you know, what can we expect? I know they're working on Vaccines for other diseases. Gene therapies, There's a lot of promise with us Yeah, And it's in a way. It's sort of the convergence of a couple different strains that have been going on in pharmaceutical research and academic research. And that is The genetic revolution on the one hand, but also immunology, and that's immunology is kind of feeding into both. Vaccines to prevent disease but also ah, whole new class of drugs to treat disease by in some way affecting the immune system. And so I mean, there are people that Infectious disease experts who say that this is really the golden Age of vaccine ology that these advances kind of signal that and think that it really shows that there's promised to really target a lot of Other infectious diseases. And in the case of Ah, big emerging outbreak like we've seen To do it in a way that is really quick and can actually Have in effect in actually stemming of pandemic. While it's under way, you know, rather than just developed paintings and the normal timeline of many years that the pharmaceutical industry is used to Yeah, And in the

Johnson Moderna Peter Thanks Fizer The Wall Street Journal Ebola Astrazeneca University Of Oxford Conjunctivitis Colds Crew Cell Edna Peter Enrica Ebola's Cade West Africa Congo European Commission Africa
What if we vaccinated everyone in poorer countries first?

Coronacast

03:31 min | 2 months ago

What if we vaccinated everyone in poorer countries first?

"Hello this is corona cost a daily podcast all about the coronavirus. I'm health reported teigen. Thailand and opposition journalist alter norman swan is tuesday the ninth of march two thousand and twenty one. So let's talk today about who gets vaccines when and let's talk about it from a global perspective because we've been talking a lot in australia about phase one a phase one b and all that sort of thing but really we have virtually no virus. It'll in australia. And it's running rampant around the globe and as we were saying yesterday when the virus running rampant in poorer countries. there's a high likelihood of variants popping up. That could cause problems with vaccines that we've got so ruth is ask us. Would it be betta for australia to vaccinate ourselves first and then turn our attentions to helping. Poor countries get vaccinated all to prioritize vaccinating people in poor countries first and then vaccinating australians. Second well there is a way through this but it's politically fraught one is that you could really go and make sure that all workers. That's everybody airport. Workers airport catering workers airline crews etc and their families and households are all unionized and preferably with the pfizer. Vaccines works quickly and his high performance. Hopefully against the variance and higher performance than astra. Also if you were to immunize. Australians before they come back home harder much harder to do then serious pretty well protected with our contact tracing and so on. And we've got time and therefore you could in theory divert two countries around us at an earlier. Stage the problem there is we would have to actually go into those countries and help them implement. It's not enough just to jump. Fis are at their door and hope that it actually gets there. We would have to devote resources to helping like we did with hiv by the way to helping. Those countries implement prevention and implement immunization campaigns. Many of them are pretty good at it but the probably need help to do that. So it's not just. The vaccine is the services in order to do it and the cold chain which is quite considerable so the issue could and it makes public health sense internationally if you could suppress this in countries where it's running rampant and have fewer variants being thrown off. Then you would actually make a big difference. But if you think of indonesia it's a huge country with a vast population and it would require concerted international effort to make sure indonesia it's enough doses and implements them and then you've got the pacific islands some of which are very competent. Doing this sort of thing and some of which might have problems. It's not straightforward australia's a rich country. But it's not particularly be country on the global scale would estimating vaccines really make that much of a difference. Mchugh difference to the pacific islands where the populations are small and we could certainly deliver enough vaccine to really get great coverage and places like fiji to value solomon islands and so on because the small populations and we can certainly devote enough vaccine there to get really great coverage the issues indonesia which is going too fast population as i said and chaotic health system in some parts and some of the islands massive cappella ago. So the question is what do you do. But indonesia howdy helping to nesia the sort of those. We could give would be a little bit of a drop in the ocean which require other nations to help out am and other suppliers to help heart.

Teigen Norman Swan Australia Thailand Ruth Astra Indonesia Pfizer Pacific Islands Mchugh Solomon Islands Fiji
The COVID-19 social media infodemic

Marketplace Tech with Molly Wood

04:31 min | 2 months ago

The COVID-19 social media infodemic

"Now the covid. Nineteen vaccines are pretty close to mass production in the us it is even more crucial to fight misinformation about them. That battle is going. O k twitter. This week said it will ban its users if they spread covid nineteen vaccine misinformation but only after like five strikes facebook last month said it would remove misleading posts on both facebook and instagram including removing accounts. Youtube has also said it banned covert misinformation but in all these cases enforcement is spotty at best topic for quality assurance where we take a second look at a big tech story. Sara frier is a senior technology reporter for bloomberg she says. These efforts are complicated. By the fact that some social media influencers are finding that vaccine. Hesitancy is a great way to make a little cash. It is not only profitable it is a means of selling products is profitable in terms of boosting a following. Getting people really interested in what you have to say but if you tell people you know. I don't think that you need to social distance. I think we just need to boost our immune systems so don't wear a mask instead. You should buy my proprietary supplements that will boost your immune system or instead i will charge you a limited time offer for what vaccine consultation and these people are not doctors and then we have to think as consumers of that information. Who are we listening to. Are we really thinking critically about what we're being told. And also how much harder does it make this problem. It's one thing to sort of be playing whack a mole with various types of misinformation. But you're talking about creators that have tons of followers that people really are attached if they disappear from these platforms then. There's a lot of backlash there is that i think there's also just a lot of coded language that gets used on youtube facebook's groups instagram wireless community i've seen when we're talking about vaccines especially in one of the big hashtags informed consent. That's not necessarily a controversial thing to say but it's a wink wink dear own research. Don't let anyone tell you what to think. Essentially don't listen to your doctor. A listen to me more than one hundred medical professionals simmons open letter to facebook saying that covid nineteen misinformation is prolonging the pandemic and costing lives. Is there a point at which you know. This is such a big problem for society for even facebook zone employees coming back to work for the economy that it actually does become impossible to ignore. I think we are approaching that point in twenty nine thousand nine hundred say. The world health organization already listed vaccine. Hesitancy is top ten thing on their radar for giant global public health problems like hiv nabala but now cove it has taken this conversation beyond just the normal set of people who think about vaccination is parents of very young children in into the mainstream into adults decision making about our own lives. You know this letter came out. People have been frustrated with the slow pace of enforcement of these policies facebook and instagram particular expanded. The type of disinformation that that the company would take down about a month ago. Have we seen any improvement. We've seen some high profile account removals at some of the biggest names who are spreading most obvious misinformation. Like i said this is now pervasive. It's not just about the group that was you know. Many thousands of members strong that was promoting an anti vaccine gender. It's about the local neighbourhood group where people are sharing tips about what babysitter to hire. But then they're also sharing their opinion on the vaccine in in. That is how this information is spreading now because it has become a little bit more of a mainstream topic of conversation. Everyone's thinking about the vaccine. Everyone's thinking about covid everyone's having these conversations now so. It's not just become something that you see as blatant medical misinformation channels which is what facebook and twitter are working to take down. It has really become something that is part of part of dinner. Table conversation part of Conversations among friend groups sends groups about various

Facebook Sara Frier Instagram Youtube Bloomberg Twitter Simmons World Health Organization United States
Chopsticks and Grass Skirts: The racist imagery causing a stir for Dr. Seuss

News O'Clock

00:37 sec | 2 months ago

Chopsticks and Grass Skirts: The racist imagery causing a stir for Dr. Seuss

"Dr seuss. Books will stopping published because of racist and insensitive imagery among those books are and into. I saw a mobile street in. Asian person is portrayed wearing a conical hat holding chopsticks in eating from a bowl if i ran. The zoo includes a drawing of two barefooted african men wearing what appeared to be grass skirts in their hair tied above their heads. Dr seuss enterprises put out a statement. Saying he's booked portray people in ways. That are hurtful and wrong. They followed up by noting. Dr seuss enterprises listened and feedback from our audiences including teachers academics and specialists in the field as part of our review process. We then worked with a panel of experts including educators to review catalog of

Dr Seuss
Australian PM is vaccinated as rollout begins

Coronacast

09:50 min | 3 months ago

Australian PM is vaccinated as rollout begins

"Today is the day that vaccination start to roll out across australia but we got a little preview of that yesterday with the with the prime minister and world war two survivor and a couple of other people getting the vaccine yesterday. Yes they go to i. Those of the pfizer vaccine which also followed a day on saturday of anti xers demonstrating and being talked to list in one city by pete evans. Some people criticizing the prime minister. Full so-called jumping the queue to get the vaccine before anyone else does but maybe leading by example. I just don't think you can criticize our leaders for having the it's not as if whole parliament skating it. It's really just showing their confidence in the vaccine. I think it's really important. Thing down the track. You'll see the health minister leader of the opposition getting the astra vaccine or the chief medical officer. Getting the astra vaccine to show that the our leaders are. You do have trust in this. And do you do believe in science. And i mean it's like laser immune to getting the virus either. Pay dutton got covid early. Jia by tribe and you you want your leadership cupboard and there's tens of thousands of accents that are gonna roll at in just the next couple of weeks. So i suppose people sort of is on the horizon going cool vaccine zahia. That's a really big comfort in a time of pandemic. When do we start to see things going back to normal. That's the critical question. And it depends what you call going back to normal because in most parts of australia. Things are pretty normal. We've got very little if any covid. Nineteen virus around in australia and new south wales is going weeks so has so have other jurisdictions so available around so we're back to normal internally back to normal means opening the borders having international travellers and tourists coming to australia us being able to go overseas listening. You'll becoming part of the world again. I think that's what we mean by becoming not becoming normal and covered that on tonight's Seven thirty program by talking to a mortar spoke to chris. Murray who heads the institute for health metrics and evaluation and he's of the he runs one of the world's leading modeling groups and covered on the health report back in november. He predicted the dr the global downturn in cases of covid nineteen that. We're seeing now he. He predicted almost to the week and his was. That was going to be nothing to do with. Thanks to nation and everything to do with season. -ality that really. It would have itself out in terms of the winter surge in covid nineteen. Because it's so seasonal. So i decided to go back to him. Seen other vaccinations going out. What what what's your modeling moving forward and it was quite sobering. He says he's not as bullish. Nah as he was back in november the variables that he's taking into consideration people's behavior. Now remember we're talking about the northern hemisphere not stralia new zealand but of almost no virus. And we've got close borders visit. If people's behavior goes back to normal before you get down to very low levels of virus transmission then you. He believes that you could. Well see a third wave evolving at the end of the northern summer. Pretty much like you saw in in twenty twenty and what could make that. Which is the second variable that he's worried about our vaccine resistant. Very variants of the virus escaped the vaccine and that they could really muddle the muddy the water considerably. How does that fit with other data that seeing coming out saying that the vaccines are reducing transmission in places like i and that's a place where the at least the uk variant is very prevalent on the uk very sensitive to the vaccine it's african variant and other variants than meyer is including the brazilian variant. We're not much is known. And you'll remember that. We spoke some days ago. About the brazilian city minnows. Seventy six percent of people had been infected with the virus. There were only five hundred admissions to hospital in the beginning of december beginning of january first nineteen days of january. Three thousand five hundred hospitalizations in so vaccine trials a very high percentage of people where had had covid nineteen when they were into the trial and in the placebo group they got reinfected with the south african variant so these vaccine escape variants are really worrying in terms of reinfection. Saw the vaccine does is turns covered one thousand nine hundred common core. Which is why. I'm gonna take the astra and we're five. We'll take whatever is given to me. Because i don't want to die of covid. Nineteen but if what we are looking for an opening of the borders and international normalization at least in australia. According to chris murray. We've made the wrong bet with the astro vaccine. He says you really do need to be immunizing with pfizer or madeira. Or perhaps even novak so that still to be proved in the real world. We're much higher. Degrees of efficacy and reduction in transmission and remember the other issue reduction in transmission is that these new variants emerge in countries. Where there's a lot of spread where the virus is multiplying and replicating all the time. And that's where these new variants are being thrown off. They won't be thrown off in austria. Where there's no virus around they'll be thrown off in low income countries like sight words middle income countries like south africa. They'll be thrown off in the united states in britain and other places if the virus keeps on circulating. So what we've got to do is get to very high levels of immunization very very quickly with highly effective vaccines and hope that that minimizes these of virus. Which is resistant to the vaccines. And then what we gotta do. And it's got to be done right now actually getting vaccines op through visor. Moderna novak's which are designed to cope with the resistant variants. That are around. Perhaps the brazilian one certainly the south african one and within a few months star boosting with them. This is really demoralizing. When with sort of on the cusp of vaccine. Roll out of here in australia woman. And if i'm just an average person sitting at home listening to corona 'cause what should i take away from these. Iud urging people from getting vaccine that they often no. Because i think it's really important that we all get covered so that shoots so first of all we're going to have a layer of protection. The international evidence is increasingly by the pfizer vaccine prevents transmission. So that means with hotel. Workers bar workers being immunized and hopefully their families to and that's a really important part of the story. We are creating a ring of confidence around the hotel borders. We've also got to institute with the pfizer vaccine. Not the astros vaccine ring vaccination around outbreaks so that we are controlling this any outbreaks there and everybody else immunized with the astra vaccine so that we are turns it into the common colds. We create a very safe situation. The problem is wayne. Do we open up to international travel and windy relax on hotel quarantine and with a country. That's largely covered with the extra astro vaccine. Which is not very effective somewhere doggy. Effective at all against the south african variant certainly in terms of transmission. Then it becomes a very nerve wracking decision to make. So that's why we've got to be planning in twenty twenty one for a booster. Does of vaccine resistant covid nineteen. That's actually a question that we had from john who's in australia who leaves in the us. And he's basically asking now. The australian vaccination program is rolling out. Do we expect. When do we expect the quarantine might be lifted. And what kind of factors go into that decision making so you could be quite cool about it if you think that we are all. We've turned effectively. Destroyed population susceptibility to covid nineteen into the common cold. And it does look as though the it's pretty effective at doing that with you're talking about african variant or indeed other variants. So we're pretty protected so you could say well maybe sooner rather than later but you know. It's just a very nerve wracking theme because we variants from all over the world and we are not donating vaccine to low-income countries. At the rate which will get van covered quickly enough and they will be throwing off variants and those variance will come to look at hiv hiv started around contrast saw in zaire and then you tens of millions of people have been infected with. Its an died. It doesn't matter where these variants arise from. They will spread to other parts of the world. So we've got to get the globe immunized as quickly as possible otherwise. It's very hard to relax just when you thought you had this thing pinned down at escapes again. Norman so so becomes really does become a bit like flu where the first vaccination does protect us to very significant extinct in terms of dying and serious disease. That's why i'm lining up. For whatever vaccine i get and i would urge other people to do the same. But it means that the government has got to not be complacent about this any shape or form and has to star ordering what's called multi vaillant vaccines are trying to ranging them now so that by spring summer of this year. We're getting boosting booster shots with multi valent vaccines that will covers against the current range of resistant. Variants around the world and that swing will open up borders.

Australia Astra Pete Evans Pfizer Institute For Health Metrics A Stralia JIA Dutton Moderna Novak New South Wales Chris Murray UK Murray Meyer Madeira Chris Novak New Zealand Austria
How the San Francisco Comunity Music Center is thriving in the pandemic

Voices of the Community

07:16 min | 3 months ago

How the San Francisco Comunity Music Center is thriving in the pandemic

"Of our counters died from complications due to hiv and aids. I'm the remaining survivor. There are many who supported a stirring that time but having navigated losing dancers choreographers audience members weekly similar to what we're seeing now and yet the differences so many people were unaware and didn't care you can tell. The pain still sits with me the trauma and i think that we are in that now. We will be in that period of time. I would say decades of time where we will be sitting with. What wasn't done. What was left unsaid. What was not attempted for the safety of people over profit. This is the co founder and executive director of dancers group wayne hazard. The dancer group was born in the middle of the aids crisis and has over the decades into a service organization providing wrap around fiscal sponsorship programs and services to incubate and support artists and the dance community as well as their historical roots at presenting unique grassroots base. Dance to the san francisco bay area. I'm joined remotely via zoom by wayne hazard the executive director of dancers group. Thanks for being here win. Thanks george it's my pleasure on martin luther king junior day twenty twenty one yes quite a solemn day and quite a powerful day so segue to our first question. Which is i think. The audience probably doesn't know dance group which is an interesting can of service group model. So if you could give us a little background on the dancers group and some of the really unique the of eighteen programs while it's my favorite topic obviously vance's group has been around since nineteen eighty two and we were founded in san francisco's mission district. We really started out. As a collective of choreographers of dance makers looking to have support space and camaraderie and ways to be in relationship to one. Another and really. That hasn't changed thirty nine years later. I like to call us now. Hybrid organization. Because i think it kind of clicks with people one and two. It's kind of what we do in terms of providing direct services to dance makers dancers those interested in dance and we also present dance at timmy's and i say that in that way because we do commissioning of work but we also have large programs of the your leg bay area dance week where pretty The pandemic we had twenty two thousand people in the spring. Take free dance. Classes all over the bay area from hip hop to who led to back to tap to beginning movement classes. Were children to adults. Dance for people with parkinson's you name it. We probably haven't morale-booster over the years so the services we do really are about you know supporting people where they are classes. Discounts performance information discounts on those and. Then we provide direct services to dance makers through our fiscal sponsorship program. We have over one hundred and twenty five dance companies dance projects that fundraise under us so each year close to one point. Five million raised less than we redistribute through expenses back to those entities where over generally pandemic times of three hundred thousand people attend those company and artists activities classes and performances though this last going on ten months with covid nineteen and so much of obviously performing arts and dance especially is a personal experience. How has the dance group dealt with the covid nineteen and economic meltdown. And then how do you feel like. It's impacted all of the dozens of dance. Performance groups that you incubate and work with big question. I'll start by saying that. Dancers groups founders along with myself win through the aids pandemic in the early eighties. All the way into the nineties and still continuing today as a worldwide pandemic beget really not seeing that way. Because of i think broadly and it's changed a bit but seeing as a gay male disease. Two of our founders died from complications hiv and aids. I'm the remaining survivor. There are many who supported a stirring that time but having navigated losing dancers choreographers audience members weekly similar to what we're seeing now and yet the differences so many people were unaware and didn't care you can tell. The pain still sits with me the trauma and i think that we are in that now. We will be in that period of time. I would say decades of time where we will be sitting with what was done what was left unsaid. What was not attempted for the safety of people over prophet so specifically to your question. I think one of the first things we did as an organization is aboard said. Are you okay and we. We talked a lot. We said to staff your job is there. We like many organizations applied for support both private foundations and others to help us navigate this time. We are very fortunate in the bay area to have major foundations. Like the hewlett some rain ins and haase's and fly checkers Really step forward and then we just looked at getting information out early on also. Many organizations were creating cove relief funds and the area had going. i and i was approached by a donor. Saying here's a large took money. Let's get this out to dancers. And i said well what if we join forces with theatre bay area would if we not created just one more fun but just was able to get more money to one fund and so the funder liked that the donor like that theatre bay area. Love that inter music. Sf joined as well and so there's a performing arts workers relief fund on theatre bay area dot org site it's also on dancers

Wayne Hazard Aids Dancers Group Parkinson's HIV San Francisco Bay Martin Luther King Vance Timmy George San Francisco Haase Hewlett
Keeping Up The Fight For Women's Health Care

The Brown Girls Guide to Politics

05:04 min | 3 months ago

Keeping Up The Fight For Women's Health Care

"Walker matt brown girls to never episode of the brown roles to politics and today we are joined by dr mirage shaw with plan. Parenthood and we are going to talk about women's health. Care something that is important to all of us and something that's going to be even more important. Under the biden harris administration. We're going to dive into some of the things that we can expect over the first one hundred days so let's get started. Dr shaw thank you so much for joining us. Yeah thank you so much for having me excited to be here so i just want to know a little bit more about you. You're a fancy. Dr which is wonderful. What made you wanna go into this field. So i am a family medicine physician so i am trained to care for the basic needs. The healthcare needs of all people so women men trans nonbinary community so all people. I really narrowed my focus in to sexual and reproductive healthcare as well as gender affirming care for the trans. The nonbinary community. I'm currently the chief medical officer of planned parenthood economic where oversee ten of the health centers. That are just right outside of new york city Also on the board of women's health alliance from which is an independent abortion clinic where they have health centers in indiana in virginia. Men the few other places that are that are under served when it comes to abortion care though a lot of hats. Play a lot of roles But that is actually where i am. Most and most happy is providing direct patient. Care as well as on lending my voice in a broader in the broader narrative. Around these issues. Thank you so much for everything that you do. We know it so important in. Was there anything in particular that really drew you to want to work for planned parenthood I mean it is an organization that i have always looked up to. It's actually where. I trained in abortion care when i was a resident and i was always so drawn to the idea. This organization not only provide care. Without apology i really just love. The this organization provides not only abortion care but prenatal care and full spectrum sexual reproductive healthcare contraception sti screening for hiv prevention the full spectrum end because the work that the planned. Parenthood does is unfortunately so politicized Planned parenthood has a large part of the organization is to do advocacy to fight for access and support around this work. Which which i you know. I just love in so like i said earlier. Not only do. I provide healthcare services. I also advocate as much as i can i love that advocacy piece. Because i feel it's so important when you're doing this work and is just already comes through from talking to you in the first few minutes just how dedicated you are to the work into the patients and been so politicized and we are entering the biden harris administration. And there's a lot of good food. That i personally feel that can be done for women's health care in on his first day. We saw a stack of executive orders on an president. Biden's desk just absolutely loves saying that and for me it was just a reminder about how so many people can change our lives with a swipe of a pen and how it does matter who we have in office by the people like you who we have you know behind the scenes who are making sure that the knowledge is out there that they're advocating properly. So what are some of the things that with them ministration. Would you like to see especially just coming off of the past. Four years where we're seeing that women are the hardest hit by the economy the pandemic there's just so much at stake for women right now yes women and you know other people with the uterus are definitely the ones who feel the most oppression when it comes to their their basic needs whether it be childcare whether it be accessing contraception rather be building are planning their families and we saw this firsthand in the last four years so i agree i mean i think that a lot of people have a lot of hope for what's to come with this new administration and feeling like you know we can finally take a deep breath the end just signed relief. I will say we have a lot of work to do.

Biden Harris Administration Walker Matt Brown Dr Mirage Shaw Dr Shaw Board Of Women's Health Allian New York City Indiana Virginia HIV Biden
Vaccines, Trust, and the Global Pandemic

The Brown Girls Guide to Politics

07:11 min | 3 months ago

Vaccines, Trust, and the Global Pandemic

"Welcome back brown roles. this is a shanty. The host of the brown rose guy to politics podcast anti day. We are continuing our conversations with planned parenthood about the first one hundred days of the biden harris administration and we are joined by another amazing woman. Who's a part of the planned parenthood. It's family doctor krishna. Hadja who is the vice president of quality care and health equity doctor. Thank you so much for joining us. Today i'm super glad to be here. Ashanti thank you. I love having doctors on the podcast. Thank you planned parenthood. It makes me feel so fancy. Can you tell us a little bit about your career path. Went you wanna be a doctor. What made you wanna focus on women's healthcare. And what brought you to planned. parenthood sure. I am an adolescent medicine. Doctor cells start with that. Which means that. I am a person who specializes in taking care of teenagers. And i think i was drawn to that because first of all teenagers are fascinating there. At a very interesting time in life we know with so many things going on socially emotionally and physically and they think i. i'm also very drawn to the intersections. Between people's health and other aspects of their life and in adolescent medicine those things are just really at the forefront and those include things like education and policies that impact on the people's access to care and information. Those are all the same things that i that really drew me to planned. Parenthood as an organization because our organization has those pillars of care education research and advocacy. And so for me. You can't have health without any of those four in so just a tremendous opportunity to work for an organization that that really leans into all of those. You agree organization. Let's get to talking about the first one hundred days of the biden harris administration is only been a couple of days but they have been doing a what we saw the huge stack of executive orders. That president biden signed. And even before they took office they talked a lot about how cove it and the pandemic. And we know that it's absolutely in the forefront of what are going to be focusing on the first one hundred days and we've seen so much activity on it in the first days it's really hard to keep up. So can you tell us a little bit about where we are at with the federal rollout of a vaccine. And what are the things that you think will see within the next few weeks. Yes there really has been a lot of activity and as someone who is a clinician and a public health person. I am just so thankful. I'm an and as a scientist. I'm just so grateful that they are coming in to this. Knowing how critical this is to everything that's going on in our country and really leading with experts and really bringing science to bear. I think the fact that they have had to do so much in the few days that they've had shows how much was not done before. That should have been done over this past year. And i think as someone who has worked on our response to covid as an organization both at our national office as well as across our affiliates. I can say that this this year has just been extremely disappointing in terms of the support. That people have had for what was needed in this pandemic in terms of the vaccine. You know one of the things is obviously. We are all very excited to have a vaccine for this this disease. And it's vitally important because so many people have died and we need to provide more people from dying at the same time. This pandemic has clearly shown us that you know health is going beyond what is happening in clinical care and so many inequities in our society show up in health outcomes in how this pandemic has really affected. People in that same thing is true with regard to how this vaccine is rolling out and how people are going to accept it. And so i think there's a lot of promise in still a lot of work to come with regard to the vaccine rollout. India mentioned your work with helping planned parenthood by the pandemic. It was just so important last year. We're now entering the second year of the pandemic to have organizations like planned parenthood that we could trust because you cannot trust anything unfortunately that was coming out of the administration. So what are some ways that planned. Parenthood has worked and will work to help. Come at the pandemic. thank you for that. I think i mentioned earlier about why. I was drawn to the organization of planned parenthood because of the multiple aspects of our mission. And i think at the foundation. We truly believe that people need to have the best evidence based scientific information and care and access in order to be able to live their healthiest lives and that is really how we have approached the pandemic as well. Certainly we know that the care that is provided at planned. Parenthood health centres is essential to people and is time sensitive and so from the beginning. We have worked really hard to make sure that all of our affiliates have access to the highest quality of information to make decisions all of our affiliates have taken steps to ensure that their health centers are safe places to work in to come in to be seen as a patient. We also had a lot of work to support our affiliates to transition care where possible to virtual care. This was work that had started. Before the pandemic in really the pandemic made it a necessity to accelerate that work and so we have affiliates that have really leaned in and just even more built out their capacity to meet people where they are in ways during this time because we know that people still need their birth control people still need abortions people still need to get tested for media or hiv. The can't be put off for a pandemic when this whole situation started. I don't think any of us thought that we would be here a yearly. Either still at home. And that's extremely disappointing. But regardless of people's healthcare couldn't wait and so our affiliates i. it's just been amazing to see how hard they have worked to make sure that their patients could continue to get the care. They need during this really difficult time.

Biden Harris Administration Hadja President Biden Krishna Organization Of Planned Parent India HIV
Dating with Herpes: Disclosure, Stigma & Healing

Sex with Dr. Jess

05:26 min | 3 months ago

Dating with Herpes: Disclosure, Stigma & Healing

"Welcome back courtney. How're you doing doing almost like guilty. Well despite how things going for a lot of people at this point right now There is a lot of overwhelm on my end in a positive way so Just this past week was two weeks ago While something positive positive people now is a nonprofit organization in a met with my board about me paying myself salary in being able to partner working to raise more money so that we can extend the services that we provide which were providing mental health related services for people who have experienced sexual trauma. That's what i want to eventually be able to say but right now for where we are. I'm basically paying for people to get their if he if they needed so Where we are right now. I got that approved in now. I mean conversations with some sexual health related organizations about partnering with them on their grant applications in getting funding. So things suddenly got very real for me. That that's great. Congratulations congrats on some needed support because with a herpes diagnosis. Oftentimes your medical practitioner will focus on the physical side but not necessarily the mental health side. And one of the things that i've learned throughout just doing this work and recording the podcasts and all of the different conversations. I've had with people not only with hiv but also have hiv or who've experienced a media gonorrhea. Syphilis diagnosis is that there is a direct connection between sexual health and mental health. And i think that that intersection is really wear stigma resides and until that gets addressed from that perspective. Like i think there's an over emphasis on the fact that someone has. Sei being Just like oh. This is sex related when it's also so mental related and then that part is completely goes unnoticed. Oftentimes like winds. Someone's being given a diagnosis well. Let's back up just a moment For folks who haven't listened to your podcast yet. But i know they will i. Can you tell us your story and why you started something positive for positive people. I will keep this as brief as possible. Because it's such a long story but The most important things that i've been positive for general. Hse to which is the virus that causes herpes outbreaks. For about eight years. Now and for the first four to five years of my diagnosis. I just kind of was doing things away that i knew to do them with. Just take care of abidi manage my stress And just keeping my immune system of his best i could. It was year four. Five into my diagnosis that i began to come across different communities of people. With herbie's in this is a in various social platforms as well as dating websites. And once. i got there. Like i was excited to be there because there were so many other people who were living with this when i get your diagnosis despite what the statistics say you're the only person you know who has virus unless someone has opened up to you pass or less than one opens up to you recently. After your experience you know for many of us were the only person that we know. And so i got into these communities in start socializing. I'm dating in. Life is great for me. But here and there i would find it. There was someone who expressed wanting to end their live after their diagnosis. So suicide idea even suicide attempts and after seeing that a few times it wasn't just like a one off thing was pretty calm and so i began to reach out to these people go. Hey you know it's not that bad and this is probably the worst thing you can say to someone who is having suicide at the asian. So what i started to do was a lot of these. People didn't look like means they didn't have my life experiences so to speak. So for instance like me saying that to a younger white woman or an older hispanic man or someone of a different ethnicity or age range or geographical location didn't really carry the same way as it would from someone may have looked like them or had like similar cultural background so i began just recording conversations with people that perhaps we otherwise wouldn't hear from These are people who are okay with their diagnosis. There's good days and bad days due to the stigma but these people who would probably never hear from about their experience were willing to just converse with me on a recorded platform for me to send to these people directly after a while To give you an idea like there's so many people that this was happening for that. I got overwhelmed with just sending emails and butchering the email address. Having the recent making sure they got it in all of that. So i decided to put all of these recordings up into one place which turned into something positive for positive people podcast platform

Syphilis Diagnosis Abidi Courtney Herbie
5 Steps to Jump Start Your Diet

Living Healthy Podcast

22:58 min | 4 months ago

5 Steps to Jump Start Your Diet

"Your diet or what you tend to eat every day can play a major role in how you feel and how you handle the pressures of everyday life so to get you back on track with your nutrition. Our guest today is gonna share five steps to jumpstart your diet and of course our virtual guests today is none other than registered. Dietitian debbie james. Welcome back to the show. Debbie thank you again and what a wonderful time to think about something new in this new year absolutely yes gonna jump. Start those diets for everyone. Okay we had. We just made it through the holidays. So let's get back on track here Like i mentioned a lot of us got off track last year. Probably with our diets. So as we were kinda lamenting this fact. Debbie good idea to come up with some simple steps to right the ship get back on track and create some good eating habits. So you kind of came up with these five steps What's the first step to getting back to a healthy diet. Or you said good eating habits and so i actually put them together in the acronym habit h. A. b. i. T. so the age is for healthy diet. Define what eating healthy means to you. 'cause it's not the same for everybody. It could be smaller portions to be calorie controlled. It could be more plant-based maybe it's low fat to deal with your cholesterol. Maybe it's unprocessed so whatever healthy diet means to you or healthy eating means to you frame it like it out. What does that mean for each type of food group or eating situation or meal so that you're actually defining that healthy diet that h okay so once you define what eating healthy means to you. What would be the next up that you would suggest taking. So you're a your age. Abt your ace step would be ask yourself. What's in the way of you. Achieving that healthy diet so is it. Circumstances is the situation is a bad routine. You can't say the healthy diet is this. And i want to get there. You have to say what ask yourself what is in the way. What are my obstacles. So that i can address those. You know. it's interesting with the obstacle thing. it's kind of like when we write narratives like in the film television world. You're always trying to put obstacles in your characters way so that they have to overcome them which leads to some meaningful narrative arc changing their characters. So i suppose in this way you just need to you know kind of creative writer and discover in your own life. What are those obstacles that right. Like a speed bump Sort of yeah. You need to self reflect. Basically this is your assessment. The a could also be assessment Right agree so once you've honestly assessed what your pitfalls are. What do you think you do next to avoid those. So then the b of the h. a. b. It is behaviors so rather than thinking about the individual foods. You actually have to look. Habit is behavior. it's a matter of choices of what we do. So what behaviors. What actions do you need to change. What are the ones that you're doing poorly or that you're willing to shift. And then you have to identify the alternatives of what it is you want to do. So there's a behavior change specialist. Bj fog he's a phd from stanford and he's author of tiny habits. He says that you have to identify the ones that you want to do. You can do. That are impactful to be effective because it wouldn't make sense. Let's say if i just said oh. A healthy diet means eating more fiber. And i don't get enough salad so therefore i'm going to eat more coleslaw right. Why would i choose that. If i don't like cabbage that would be that would be like making myself. Gag it down. It's not one i want to do. You have to identify the ones that you're willing to do the our chief -able that you can do and that are live as a replacement. It's not enough just to say. I need to stop doing acts. You need to identify what actions you are going to do to to implement. So what what what. What would an example of that be perhaps like in. Maybe someone that you've done this with or someone you know that's gone through this with the behavior change. What's an example of that okay so first. Let's say that someone is looking at getting more calorie control diet so a healthy diet to them energy balance and they've identified They've asked themselves what's in the way that eat too big large portion. They drink sweetened beverages. Maybe they're mindlessly eating between meals so that mindlessly eating between meals are going to address and their behavior instead of randomly grabbing something from the kitchen to snack on instead they're going to choose to drink water or chew gum if they're not really hungry so they've said this is what i'm going to do instead. This is the behavior the alternative. I'm willing to implement so. Is that like when you think when you catch yourself doing that behavior that you want to get rid of you catch yourself doing that and then you go okay. Here's what i'm going to do instead of you try and build that in your mind your mind so exactly. That's the that's the eye of the of the habit is the implementing that change. And it's deliberate choice that you consciously have to make repeatedly like practice makes perfect until it's it becomes unconscious. I was trying to explain it as a brand new drive like a brand new student driver. You have to tell them. Okay you're gonna pull into the parking space and that your foot got to be depressed on the brake pedal all the way then. You're going to shift the car into park. Then you can turn off the ignition right and so there's like this process and they have to think about it because they're not used to it and for me to do that. It's like half a second. I can do all of those and i haven't even thought about it. I've done it so so so many times. So making those alternative actions is a deliberate choice repeatedly until it becomes second nature interesting all right well before we get too much further into the final steps here we just remind people that they can subscribe. If they aren't already subscriber always got a break in here with us subscribe message. You know me But it's the best way to get new episodes delivered straight to your phone as soon as they come out which is every other monday. We always bring on nutrition. Experts fitness expert general health experts to talk about variety of topics. That will keep you motivated. Keep you healthy so hit. That subscribe button. Not really sure if it's bud and it might be a drop down whatever it is. Whatever the case subscribe to the show if you like what you hear and join the living healthy army. Do you think that brittany. That's a little thing. I'm trying to get going here. Got a name our podcast listeners. Living healthy army. You you you with that or dig it way if you the la che all right cool. I like our army living army. All right well great. Well welcome to the platoon. everyone Thank you for subscribing. Now let's get back to the so so we covered the ha be but now we need to find out about it. The it right so you kind of touched on the i a little bit. You said that was implementation. Is that right. Yeah implementing change so the swapping of the when. Poor behavior for the improved. Okay so real quick just to recap so we'd first of all you got to define what health healthy diet means to you because it's it's different for everyone. It probably shouldn't be ep pizza. All the time probably shouldn't be Then you gotta ask yourself. What's in your way of achieving. That kind of diet you know. What are your obstacles. Be honest about that. And then he got to address those obstacles by figuring out what behaviors you need. A change can or what actions he needed to take So you know that you've got to implement it. What are some of the most. I guess i think you mentioned. Maybe that there's with implementations you deal with triggers. But what are some of the more common triggers. You know that gives us the urge to eat Like you mentioned mindless eating for example. Like you just kind of get up and you want to the kitchen and now that you there you open the fridge and grab a snack you know. So how do we kind of some of the most common triggers that lead to that kind of stuff. Oh man we're we're so easily tempted to eat. It could be the smell of something it could be that you. You hear the little chime of the ice cream truck. It could be a sound on serious. What so true britain. Let's let's let's do a quick one brittany. What do you think is a trigger for you like do you do. Have you identified any triggers for you. I can tell you you think of one. I'll tell you what. I think i think of mine. One of mine is definitely like just watching television. Which is i assume. Maybe a big one for people but watching tv like in the evening. If i like just put on family guy or something where it's like. I don't even really have to be paying attention. I literally sometimes like turn the show on started. And i will walk. Divide kitchen to go. Get a snack while the show plays. It's like what am i doing. Not even watching it. So is it the act of watching tv and at the same time. You're by the tv. No it's not because fans guys like a snack now. I don't see something delicious. And you're like oh i wanna go eat that like no no no. I don't think it's that it's not so you've already paired those two associated them. From the moment you click the remote. Exactly it's literally. Yeah its relationship with food. i know it does. a little bit are true. They're all kind of connected. But that is one that i've discovered i'm like i need to like stay active and not watching television because it like it literally is so paired. Now that i it's hard for me to fight it. It's very sold so so. Yeah we're talking about that. That few pairing. Oh britney came up with one. Okay go ahead. No i could just think of a few like naturally. When i'm at the movie theaters popcorn i mean you smell it everywhere and instinctively when i'm there i just feel like okay. It's time treat yourself. Get some candidates and popcorn. Enjoy you know. Enjoy the show that guy taking a. That's a silver lining for me. When you're you have. Hey when you're at home. And i'm sitting on instagram. I follow a lot of food accounts. And whenever i'm looking at it long enough it always causes need to go downstairs and get a snack or makes them eat. I'm always hungry after. I mean i guess that's and looking at food. Obviously so then you'll have to pare. Pare the action that you want to do something. So in the example. I gave before of the person that's mindlessly eating between meals and they said okay instead of my Wandering into the kitchen that they're going to drink water gum instead will. They're they're triggered. wanna pair. That with is every time they change room. So if i get up from the desk and i'm leaving my home office i'm gonna grab my water bottle to take with me. It's already in my hand and easy. You know to get up to my mouth or pull the chewing gum out of my pocket or something. so that's an example of pairing it with an action so andrew. I'm gonna ask you in yours of turning the tv on and wondering to the kitchen for some people that staying on the sofa all night because you said be more active instead. So are you in your. I'll say comfy clothes kind of your house pants pajamas. Whatever when you watch tv or you wearing workout gear. I that's rapidly in lounge. Wear it's i now. I've done more. My workouts are now more in the morning so yeah probably lounge. Yes that is that is true accent. Why do you break that me. Very comfy chair lazy blades. Put your feet up. It has yeah. I know about that thing. As long as it doesn't have like a food tray. That would the food trade. That i do not have that but yeah that is interesting so i wonder i do need to figure out like i've also found like i almost like if i just don't go in my kitchen i can get over it but like if i go in my kitchen it's all over and so i'm like just don't go in my kitchen. Sometimes we need a distraction. That's actually helps get in the way so for example if this is an after dinner time that you're talking about and brush teeth. Maybe than if you did teeth whitener or you did your dental rants or you put on your retainer or any of those things that really you know your mouth has to be fresh and pure clean for all the things to work so if if you do those as an interruption before you sit down that might help you break that association. That's interesting do have a night guard. So maybe i get in bed do yeah. That's not a bad idea. Yeah that's that's bright. That's that's really interesting Yeah maybe. I will definitely have to try that. That's definitely one that stood out to me that i'm like. This is a trigger for me. That i don't even almost realize it just creates this like urge and i almost feel like you know if children sit down and eat a meal in front of the tv. They start to develop that kind of Connection you know to where it becomes like this like you said paired thing and it's you've got to really work a little bit hard to break that perisher or like or like the expectation of dessert like since when since when did we have a desert following every single meal like excuse me it's supposed to be a precious treat to enjoy not okay lunches over piece of cake. Dinners over ice cream lunch over cookies. Dinners over pot now. That was awesome. that was almost. I feel like that's like a song. That's getting ready to start to there. You go that's awesome okay. This is a little bit of a side note on dessert. But i thought about it. And i thought i now when we order food and bring it back home. We eat the desert. If we get it we eat the desert. I hear me okay. And the reason is as it's like Nutrition is probably tear body but it has ice cream so it's like a position okay. Love that so we eat a first because my thinking is look that thing's gonna it's gonna melt. It's not gonna last. You can't really save it. It's not going to be the same so eat it now and the food your main dish you can save half of it for tomorrow or the next day so like i've kind of restructured my eating hierarchy. I guess when it comes to take just totally random. I'd desert i i. We don't have a dessert after every meal. Or here's my question. Would you do that with every type of dessert. Or is it only because ice. Cream's going to melt as i was saying i was thinking about that. I think it's just all about. Will it be okay if i save it for tomorrow. If i can't right the ki won't be the same hours you put it in the freezer for an hour while you eat the cookie cookies. Not warm anymore zelina. Reheat it all of a. You're using like energy. You know you gotta like pay. Your bill. And i don't know goes into making having that desert. Yeah but this side because we need to get back to habit but as there there is some justification to At least children to have whatever we would consider the dessert item to be served with dinner. So that it's not regarded separately. It's not a reward. it's not You have to eat your vegetables in order to get axed that when i worked for head start and that's a preschool program It was it was done at the same time. So if you serve the tacos and you serve the orange slices and you serve the little sugar cookies and you had the milk out and you did it all at the same time family style. The kids didn't down all the cookies before they ate the rest of you know. They chose the tacos and they had some carrots and they really places. Yeah hi brian. I'm sorry but i'm going through. This live right now and i cannot stand by listen to this perfect world situation. I honestly that's amazing for those kids. And maybe kid is just wild but because because they they knew that it was there that it was available that it was part of the meal and they would each get one well that i think that was in no matter. What exactly they just didn't put it on either. Played a few right. I've seen my niece and nephew. Though were they know they're going to get dessert at the end but half to finished their meal too. I mean i guess that's not quite sent them all at once but but here. Here's why i think we've gone to the desert comes after you finish your meal because you put it on theoretically it makes sense to me but in practice you put everything there and the kid eats the desert right off the bat and then they don't finish the important protein on their dish. And then you're in this big battle like you need to finish all of it. I give you the option you went there. I fine because we're trying to be all good like everything's available and then but then you didn't finish and now you didn't eat which you needed to announce a big argument about it and now you don't sleep well. Something's going on here time. Did it take time for the kids to create a behavior like that or was it something that they initially did the first time that you put it all out there also key also keeping cookie end of this is this is a a small portion controlled item. It's not like an eighth of a cheesecake. That has like a whopping five hundred calories than just plays the meal. I'm talking about the size of an oriole. i'm talking right. It's something modest. I can see that over time. Okay if i eat my food. It'll still be there. So i'll do both or or not but yet battling to finish the plate. Have you ever seen the little psychology films where they put kids in room with a secret camera and they left them with a slice of chocolate cake or and they said if you don't touch it you can have twice as much after ten minutes and the patients chance right. Yes watch all the mom. And dad's go through during quarantine with can't some of these kids amazed me others them going back to the habit thing that wasn't so much an intervention that that or behavior that the children chose but that was presented to them and like we talk about getting kids to eat right role modeling presenting it to them in a very neutral way but repeated multiple times. And that's what i was talking about the the implementing. The new behavior is repeated multiple times so that it becomes that becomes the second nature. It becomes the expectation of not sitting down and stuffing your face when you watch tv but maybe popping in that that night guard right right. Yeah exactly yeah and that's where it takes. I think practice with these things. Implementation is okay. Now you have to exert some discipline in sticking to your plan of how you created the plan with hiv. Basically you're implementing the plan and that's where it takes that discipline to follow your plan and not deviate too much from that. I imagine exactly okay. So that's that's h we gotta get to the t. Step five and the last step in the process t is tailoring the plan so that means you can tweak What triggered youth parented with or the alternate behavior to overcome. Whatever obstacles might come in the and so you have to monitor and evaluate to get there. So i'm going to give an example of Another h t a whole nother scenario. So let's say the healthy diet. This person says okay. I need something high in fiber and low in saturated fat to help lower cholesterol. that's their healthy diets. There a is. Why can't i get that done. Well i'm asking myself i'm assessing. I don't have time to cook. I end up eating out and frozen meals etc. So be they say. Okay the behaviors. I'm going to do instead of fried foods and heavily cheesy items instead of ordering those a water you know salad and vegetable side dishes and things without dairy so they plan that intervention. They said okay so now. I'm trying to order those things and i find myself when i'm scanning the menu trying to get lean select us leaner selections and get more fruits and veggies I'm out of time. it's. I'm i'm actually getting to my meal so late that i'm ordering quickly can't find them blah blah blah so then they have to tweak their plan and say okay well if the menus too overwhelming alternate now they need to maybe download apps that they can save favorites on the. You know the preorder menu or identify the pdf menus for sit down restaurants of of what they're going to get once they get there and so maybe it's not at the moment of ordering but they're making their decisions ahead of time and that's their tweak is they have to be able to do something a little different but still follow the same Objectives

Debbie James Debbie Stanford Brittany Britney Army LA Britain Andrew Brian HIV
Embracing sexuality as a person of faith with Pastor Alex Pittaway

The Gays Are Revolting

04:19 min | 4 months ago

Embracing sexuality as a person of faith with Pastor Alex Pittaway

"We're joined by alex piece away. Who is a gay passer from. He's been alex welcome. Thanks so much. I wanna ask you now. You are a reverend. what do we call you. Is it like the queen. Reverend i after all look just postures just alex titles such ranks so called. Alex lit for the lord. Sure what god one bless you. I've never heard that you discover the podcast through gay christian bible study. I think there has to be the first time anyone had about the gays revolting through a christian bible. Study that you know of in a positive It was actually It was the first month that i moved to brisbane and someone who's a really great Sort of leader in our church. He was running a group. A bible study for gay christians and he affectionately called homo group and he invited me along one night because a lot of people in my church go there. And so we We're looking at a pace of scripture which talks about being counter cultural as a reference point. It was this podcast And people were discussing. What gaza garage in the vein of being sort of counter cultural. And they're sort of version of counter. Cultural will being counter cultural by being quia by being gay by being lgbt. I and Being christian being spiritual at the same time And so yeah it was. it was through here that That i i had it Gosh that would have been way back in two thousand eighteen. I think july august. And how long have we been doing show by we've shed a lot of biblical moments on. It's not a surprise to me that they might be studying your trips to wait on. Wellington dotting the alex. You're the possible for church. Made up mostly of lgbt on people who've been rejected from mainstream churches yes so Mcc has been around in brisbane for forty five years And you know we've been cold at the church For gay people We've been cold especially during the eighties and nineties. The the church that has aids We have an aids quilt by sydney congregation in brisbane congregation. And for a while we were the only people who would do funerals for people who died of aids in nineteen eighty s and ninety s And we lost about one third of all of pastas globally. hiv aids. Yes so we're very much a church run by the people. It's called dumb. If you're a church history node like me then Congregational model of church. Which means that the church decides the pasta is the church decides what direction even what beliefs the church has is very much a grassroots organization. And it's not so much sort of top heavy pasta decides everything Organizations is much more much more grassroots than that overall. Unfortunately in australia the landscape spiritually is very very tough for gay people. I think melbourne is probably the most a gay affirming city in terms of church. Wise there are just many many more gay affirming congregations. When i say affirming it means you don't just have to sit at the back and we'll take your money but don't you think that you can get married or anything else. It's people know we will do your marriage. We will Support your relationships we. We're not trying to secretly ten. You straight we don't think you're going to hell. And we fully welcome you. So there's many of those In melbourne including mcc melbourne including several anglican churches several uniting churches in sydney. This probably about five or six in brisbane. There's just three out of hundreds and hundreds and hundreds of churches. And it's it's sad because you know in america despite america being a much more conservative place in indianapolis the city that i studied in to be a pasta. There are something like thirty five. Well affirming churches

Alex Piece Alex Lit Brisbane Hiv Aids Sydney Congregation Alex Gaza MCC Wellington Mcc Melbourne Including Severa Melbourne Australia Sydney America Indianapolis
Vaccines are rolling out - so when will cases drop?

Coronacast

04:28 min | 4 months ago

Vaccines are rolling out - so when will cases drop?

"Now the vaccine rollouts have begun globally. How soon do we expect to see a corresponding drop in cases of covid and also in deaths. Well fun issued save at overnight yesterday. Israel at the moment is just newspaper reports but it comes from the israeli ministry of health and large health provider. One called cloudy another one called mcabe healthcare. And what they're doing in. Israel is that there are electrically recording. All the vaccines as we will do in australia but it's integrated into people's medical records. So they really do have very good integrated electronic medical records and in fact one of the reasons. They're getting so much vaccine from pfizer is that they've done a deal with they. Give the data back to pfizer. So they've got what's called post marketing surveillance in. They get dot back on the performance of the vaccine. So what they've shown on and what they're saying it hasn't been published yet. Is that after the first. Does i think it's roughly in about two hundred thousand people aged over sixty five. But in those people compares to members of the health funds who have not yet had the vaccine. They've seen a significant reduction. Perhaps a fifty percent reduction in covid nineteen infection not disease but infection so this people specifically yes because they're rolling it out in priorities so older people in federal people are giving it first before others get it as well and so. This is their first data. It's a bit like. I don't know if you remember meghan. But near the beginning of the pandemic britain used their coordinated electronic records centralized electronic medical records in hospitals to be able to huge randomized control trials on a vast scale during the first wave. They were able to show that hydroxychloroquine didn't work. The anti retrovirals for hiv didn't work but that dixon methods to steroid did work and the turned around incredibly quickly during that first wave and is this huge advantage when you have a population willing to accept electronic medical records and that's what the israelis are doing. So they've got records of people who have not yet had the vaccine versus people have so if you like it's a real world not quite randomized but it's a real world trial and again not published in any scientific journal. Yet the early indications are that pfizer vaccine after the first does is showing reduced transmission to a significant extent which is really great. Yeah because the focus when we're talking about vaccines is so about a moving herd immunity which is obviously something that lots of people very keen for for all sorts of reasons but this is a really fast positive outcome where you literally saving people's lives. Yeah it's early could be wrong. Still got to run the ruler over it scientifically but it is a good early sign and presumably reflects the daughter. they're handing back to pfizer. So israel is getting the fires a shot and we've also had reports over the last few days that a man in the us who got the a shot has died shortly afterwards. And i think some question marks around whether or not it was anything to do with the shot or chance. What do we know about that. All we know about his newspaper reports from the new york times of luton to it. So it's really impossible to be absolutely sure what's going on if the newspaper and it's an issue. If the newspaper report is accurate then this is a doctor who got it. And three days after the vaccine started to develop little red spots on his skin cope tiki and these are assigned that. Your blood isn't clotting very well. He recognized that presented and his platelets had dropped precipitously and they find it very hard to raise his platelet levels. They thought this was an immune reaction which was reducing. His platelets platelets the little fragments. Which are essential for blood clotting and it does occur to drugs and it has occurred with covid nineteen by the way so covid nineteen disease itself can cause a precipitous. Drop to your platelets and serious hemorrhage and they were about to again. According to the newspaper report remove his spleen. Which is where they presume that the platelets were being broken down but he died of a cerebral hemorrhage beforehand. So the question here is causing effect. Is it the vaccine or is it a

Pfizer Israeli Ministry Of Health And Israel Meghan Australia Dixon Britain HIV Luton The New York Times United States
"hiv" Discussed on The Naked Scientists

The Naked Scientists

08:51 min | 5 months ago

"hiv" Discussed on The Naked Scientists

"And they by twenty seven two thousand twelve. I was diagnosed with cancer very different sentence but always cornered challenging both times other time now. A struggle quad lot until twenty fifteen. My chemotherapy jeans enforcement they were all successful time after time. my only choice was to have a stem cell transplant. But the problem is and i think it's important to people to understand as if complex when you are. Hiv person to able to go for the stem cell transplant. So a hub. A paternity on. I would be turning grateful for it. By the teen. Honest meet and together. We gupta to offer me the possibility to have standard transplant for own related. Honor in two thousand sixteen for me. I i won the lottery. Accumulated i will be able to cure on only mccown sir. Only my and the come out to south seventeen would say. I decided. i'm together a guitar. Medical team to stop different environment occasion was professor was playing and earlier. And how complex. This fires eighth. So i by seventeen. I stopped medication and we took very cautiously approach to wait because our here mentioned a bow. My ethical in my big brother to monterey brown with salad passed away this year you know. We have to be cautious about rebounds of many happy for me we were able to buy twelve month. We were able to say. Oh i think he's a very promising Is like is not going to rebound by early to sell two nineteen. We defied it was time to show. The world is not only timothy brown it can be replicated in twenty twenty. I decided to to rebuild money to share my story. Hope and it's it's such an incredible story. How are you. how are you doing now undo. Okay i try my best to co with us. you know. A post transplant life as well with the kobe. Nine team so you have to keep kind. No extra cautious or careful about things. I'm keep bu- i always remained. Keeping my said positive and sinful full will happened to me and tried to help and start to keep the opportunity feel like being positive helping me to cope life and i think that was one of its tragedies today and last time on keeping these way keeping going that way. Brilliant and it's such a great story we've still got ravi gupta. Who was the doctor who treated him. So how do we know. That item is actually cured. Be entrepreneurs is a difficult one because his absence of hiv has been determined by looking very deep into blood cells. Full integrate today try v or even signs of hiv genetic material all tests came back negative but it was interesting after some exploration. We did find fossils of hiv genetic material. The material wasn't a capable of making viruses. It was little fragments that that's not unexpected impact and it was also found with the berlin patient so we used very sensitive methods both in blood and in tissues to explore the possibilities Hiv left behind. But as i said we couldn't find any evidence that there was any bars capable making new copies of itself and then is this something that could be rolled out on a wider scale. Of course the big problem here is number one that a two kills. We've described required a kema therapeutic regimens in order to destroy hiv infected cells and so those drugs come with side effects and they make you vulnerable to confections so there a risk attached to them. The second problem of course is you have to find a tissue match the donor who has the five deletion. And that's the second problem. Because says i said it's very rare and it's only in northern europeans in general so there are two major barriers to this the safety of using therapeutic drugs and transplant and secondly the donor matching. So what we believe. Is this proof of principle that really we can cure patients and that was a really important thing because the bell and patients happened and for ten years. We are not able to replicate it so the good news is that this is a real thing. The next step is finding ways to get back safely and cca five gene. Therapy is one avenue that started being exploited to modify. Ccf five in individuals who have hiv in order to explore whether that can help in this or induce remission and kill ravi gupta. Thank you so much. I'm before him on play. Thank you as well this week. We are considering the story of hiv in case it has managed to escape. You'll notice we are living in pandemic and we've gone from knowing nothing whatsoever about nineteen to having a vaccine against it in under year but we've been much less lucky with hiv decades on their stone. No vaccine why is that well. An maria jetty is from the university of liverpool. And she's with us hopefully to shed some light. So do you think anna maria that actually vaccines even theoretically possible given for decades of fruitless effort. So far yes indeed. I think that We have been these appointed believe the first vaccine study was done in one thousand nine hundred eighty six and it's been quite a long time and put up one hundred and fifty studies that have given us disappointing results. So he's a possible we continue to believe it is is it needed. Think we should perhaps remember that in two thousand and nineteen alone the word about one point seven million new infections in the world and if we really want to be successfully limiting the number of new infections we need to develop ineffective. A vaccine is biologically plausible. Is it possible to achieve a vaccine. What certainly through this three decades and more of studies we have learned a lot about hiv. The biology how the body responds to the infection. And yes. we've had setbacks but we also had some breakthroughs. I think that we mentioned for example. How difficulties to control the virus. Because of continues to change and escapes body responses to the immune responses that are also authored mechanisms that the vardis uses to evade the control and a major breakthrough. I will say as being the understanding of the fact that the virus uses sort of a decoy triggers the immune system in chasing after the wrong type of parts of the virus protecting away the through vulnerable part of the virus and this has been a recent relatively reason to understanding that gives us hope that we may be able to really direct immune responses towards the right part of the virus the right and then the right component of the barrow certain is need boulder pastor device and we discovered this response is being brodry affective against against the virus other sort of any bits of evidence you can point to that would reassure us that it is possible to make an immune response against the business end of the virus so that even despite its best efforts to decoy our immune system in the way you've just been describing we can nile it nonetheless. Well i think it's important to remember that we have some individuals to the tar exposed to hiv but not infected and we've also gain a lot of understanding about the interaction between the virus and immune system from studying people that are called elite controllers. These are people that are infectivity with a heather evidence of infection. Whipper day do not ashore progression of the disease. Somehow they found a way of keeping the virus at bay keeping the virus under control and that is a without the need the four ish treatment without the need for antiviral. And how many how. Many of those people that i didn't that many ram lineage and indeed is not a common occurrence about. We have learned a lot from studying this..

ravi gupta timothy brown mccown gupta hiv monterey kobe cancer Ccf berlin university of liverpool anna maria boulder
"hiv" Discussed on The Naked Scientists

The Naked Scientists

05:23 min | 5 months ago

"hiv" Discussed on The Naked Scientists

"Can impel your company at spitfire dot co dot uk now. The first of december was world aids day. And so this week we're going to take a look at hiv. The virus that causes aids to find out what we've learned over the four decades since it was discovered an also why we can make a covid nineteen vaccine in just ten months but not one for hiv but first a little quick roundup of what h- hiv aids actually halevi stands for human immunodeficiency virus. It's transmitted sexually and through contact with infected blood when it gets into the body. Hiv targets a specific white. Blood cell type could a cd for t lymphocyte and it inserts a copy of its genetic code into the dna of those cells. It can hide like this in an inactive state for years masked from the immune system before firing of its genes to produce new hiv particles in other instances rather than remaining hidden. The virus replicates rapidly making thousands of copies of itself and killing the cell in the process these viruses than leave to sell and move around the bloodstream and other bodily fluids to infect other susceptible cells or other people but critically when virus copies itself rather like a schoolboy making a shoddy job of copying down from the blackboard. Hiv makes large numbers of mistakes when it copies. It's genetic code is mutations and they caused the virus to change its appearance and it structure. This presents a moving target the immune system making it extremely hard to control and as a result. Hiv causes a progressive relentless destruction of the body cd. Four cell count now. These cells ability to fight off other infections is compromised and eventually after about ten years or so. Even trivial illnesses can't fought off and they can become life threatening when that happens. A person is said to have developed aids the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome. And this is often when people die so hiv is arguably one of the worst pandemics that we've ever encountered so far more than thirty two million people have died and right now about forty million people living with the infection. So what is the history of the virus. H- hiv was covered by the paris pasteur institute. Scientists francois's barry sanussi and luke montana in nineteen eighty three but it had been circulating in humans for almost a century by then. But how do we know that. And where did hey chevy come from in the first place to shed some light on this from the foundation for aids. Research in new york is director of research. Rowena johnston serena what was the origin of hiv well. Hiv really is the story of the bad things that happened when a virus jumps from one species to another in the case of hiv chimpanzees that live in central west africa and they have a virus cold simian immunodeficiency virus obviously related to human immunodeficiency virus. And the most likely scenario is the back during the early and mid twentieth century. There was a lot of building of infrastructure there in central west africa mainly railways and there was a law that stated that workers on the railways had to be fed meat so the europeans in charge decided that the easiest way to accomplish that was to hunt chimpanzees. And i'm guessing. They made the laborers to that. In the course of ordering those animals that chimpanzees the blood might have made its way into cuts into the labor's hands and so the virus was able to make that jump. Then how did it spread to be the epidemic and pandemic. We know it today so we are talking about the colonial. An upheaval fill time history in africa. So we have a lot of these workers who may have acquired the infection. There was probably a lot of forced movement of many people in the country. There was poverty. There was sex work. They were vaccination campaigns most likely Needles were at least occasionally reused so there was probably some fairly dramatic spread of the virus. For let's say a couple of decades that twenty through the nineteen forties and fifties you have expansion of the roads railways. Virus was able to travel out in all directions from central west africa. Then certainly it headed southwards towards south africa which we know has the highest concentration of hiv cases. Today it made its way east north through africa and then in the late nineteen fifties and early nineteen sixties when for example the belgian. Congo's going through a really rough time. Getting independence on the virus was able to spread across. The oceans have made its way to the caribbean and from there to the united states. And then it gets a little bit. More speculative it's thought that it spread from the united states to europe and asia and australia. Although there probably direct introductions from africa to asia as well there's a close connection between south africa india on certainly we know that it was in the united states by the nineteen sixties ultimately identified in nineteen ninety-three while by the early eighties h. Anti had spread to enough people around the united states. That doctors noted that there was a cluster of mysterious medical cases in los angeles and new york.

hiv aids halevi paris pasteur institute barry sanussi luke montana west africa spitfire Rowena johnston cold simian immunodeficiency francois uk serena africa new york south africa united states
"hiv" Discussed on Talking Biotech Podcast

Talking Biotech Podcast

05:50 min | 8 months ago

"hiv" Discussed on Talking Biotech Podcast

"Extensively started an engineered the decision five. To the point that we have extremely important. Tees that act in the in the range of the? Of the become all our. Concentration. Also, important is the fact that there is the possibility to reach these. Against from agonists into antagonist by modifying their interviews. Finally. Another Tanqueray of drugs or vows are also very promising are antibodies. These are very difficult to obtain basically very difficult to obtain an antibody to bind five. As an antagonist. And also to compete with Jimmy One twenty in order to we need each of angry there are three such the bodies. which are ingredient tires one is called pro one hundred and forty or Noorani mob, and the other one is called. CR Five Mahboob zero zero four. And then there's another one that is called air all ABC fifteen. are extremely interesting because you other to the inhibition of. And the blocking of this after. All the extra functions that are brought about by the body. For instance from the seaport and the possibility to bind to receptors. See that's been pretty exciting to think about all the different ways in which drugs have been targeting these molecules that are required for. HIV, propagation. Well what about other targets and other drugs? So what other drugs are being developed to potentially decrease viral tigers? As a sent before the therapy for HIV is very. Effective one. So whenever you want hub in new drive, you have to you know develop develops affinities really special because the draws available already super bowl. But. There is a sanctuary over new. Drugs emerging that are really very promising for a number of reasons I already mentioned that before but they would like to stress it more now, and these are broadly neutralizing antibodies because basically these antibodies are very potent. They can target. Most of the virus trains. And they can act as drugs they can. Provide passive immunization and they're extremist rental for boxing element. So. On one hand, you want to cure infected people from Asia the but on the other hand, you really want to prevent new infections. Do something that a tend to do on the podcast and maybe as a little bit hazardous but. You mentioned that some of these are in clinical trials. Are there any hints of success or any really mystic findings that could be of interest to those who have HIV? So. In terms overseas five diners as I said before we have Moravian drug. In that we have to one of. These. In clinical trials. Other than that the. River tees. Not. It's more difficult to put forward campaign here with this because you know. When you go for? You have. To face much higher level to the difficulty. And more. Although wants us to see penny. Propping. Dr Luke. Evangelista thank you very much for joining me on the PODCAST. Thank you very much. An was a big pleasure for me. And as always, thank you for listening to the talking biotech podcast. Really appreciate your reviews. On itunes or any place where you consume media, your sister patriots helping us advertise the podcast in our listenership is growing so even. A dollar. A month is a really big deal. So thank you very much for all of that assistance. This is the biotech podcast.

HIV Evangelista Jimmy One ABC Dr Luke Moravian cure Asia
"hiv" Discussed on Talking Biotech Podcast

Talking Biotech Podcast

07:23 min | 8 months ago

"hiv" Discussed on Talking Biotech Podcast

"Of infection. Such an amazing story and it makes me so happy because to think that this was always a a terminal illness unless you managed it, and now there's people who are cured in opens the door for really direction of pharmacist, pharmacological drug design. And in other issues, but one other approach was taken in China. So is the CR five gene, the gene that was mutated in the Chinese twins by that one doctor. Yes Saadi. So yes. I would like to do odd south into the previous point of the of the barreling London patients though sure and that is that this had a very big rationales of course, and as you said, this was dusted because it opened a dollar for the cure of this very difficult infection but. That in some state head of states announced progress called zero eggs. But this became very soon avenue and that was not possible strategy for in adopted landscape because. In the standard bone marrow transplantations availing busy of a three treatment plus to find someone who are worse this mutation. So this was definitely not a realistic option although in those cases or effective. People who need marathons profession certainty the search for a data for to harbor donner is good strategy but you can see that this can be count probably in one hand in total in the planet and the more interesting. Opening Strategy. By these. Everything's is the gene editing. So gene anything is basically the way we engineer DNA in order to basically destroy this a Jean and basically. Reproduce the nature officer survived the two mutation. By human intervention. But. We need to keep in mind that this. Is Native. So once you do it, you're to destroy these gene and this is an important point in the case of the Chinese twins. Fortunately, this was done at the Ambien so. This two twins. Have Been Gene Eddie. From birth and they were these sify mutation in their gene. In their genome and all the offspring of this. Babies will inherit this plus the technology that. So this was definitely unethical because you cannot do this to just think that you might prevent aged infection. Randall. It's like shooting a fly with mizuko in other words. and. Also, the crisper cast technology was used to obtain these and the crisper Kostic -nology, although very hot and. Certainly fantastic. Is Not. Safe enough yet because we have the problem off targeting which we haven't understood the completely. That's very true and now these two twins are going to be living with presumably and potentially passing on this deletion NC CR five but do people who have the CR five mutation do they have any other incidents of unusual diseases or problems because what is what is? Typical Ligon as g protein coupled receptor. Yes. So the people that have this mutation leave a normal life basically, but we need to think that the system. Is a highly integrated system basically. Each camera sept or combined in different chemicals in each chemokine combined defer receptors. So, it might be that the people who have this genetic. Mutation have reorganized their chemokine system in order to deal with it. But if you intervene from outside with a genetic. You may actually create. A genetic situation which may lead to certain of holidays because these people are not ready to to to bear the knockout. The normal against officer five. The main nature alliance forces a five zero. Three zero four, zero, five, the CC, chemokines. CICI's days four to six things which are basically. Descent which other in the sequence of the of the campaign. And the families are subdivided into this. Arrangement these do things. Where we talk about chemokines chemokines system well, give me a good back of the envelope idea about what the key kind system is. Yes. So the system is very, very complex and Faster. I can tell you just to remain in the theme. And to be more simple that. Five. And mostly, it's access with Sierra five is. The most studied cam binds to the receptor are a Bryan flannery axis. So basically, seizure five is very important sector in a in a large number of situations because it is a. Healthy in orchestrating the response of the immune system particularly. Directing. Inflammatory response. Very. Good. So this is all starting to come together. We're talking about some of the cellular hardware that's required for HIV infection and one of the targets. One of the things required is CICI are five we're speaking with Dr Luca Evangelista. He's an associate professor in the School of Medicine in the Department of Biomedical Sciences at Nazarbayev University in the Republic of Kazakhstan. We'll be back with the talking biotech podcast in just a moment. For me being generated at an amazing right. It's critical that we be able to record is bad information when we hear it. and. possibly. Understand. The motivation of those that provided. I'm speaking with Dr. Katie Ryan shoop for bootle flying food lease. Club. What is misinformation? Well. In the literature, misinformation is referred to as inaccurate or incomplete. And it suggested that misinformation could mislead people through a number of reasons including negligence I'm conscious is or even an honest mistake. What you you? This information is qualitatively different because it is a.

CICI officer Gene Eddie HIV infection London China Bryan flannery donner Ligon Dr. Katie Ryan NC engineer Randall Dr Luca Evangelista Jean Sierra Kazakhstan
"hiv" Discussed on Medical Mysteries

Medical Mysteries

09:11 min | 1 year ago

"hiv" Discussed on Medical Mysteries

"Unfortunately this time they're optimism was misplaced Ryan died April Eighth Nineteen Ninety at eighteen years old. He was surrounded by his mother sister grandparents and even his most famous cheerleader. Elton John who had flown to Indianapolis just to be there. Ryan had passed away one month shy of graduating high school a few months later congress passed his namesake legistlation the Ryan white comprehensive AIDS resources. Emergency Act or care act in August nineteen ninety. The Care Act was a bipartisan measure. Signed into law by President George H W Bush. It provided two hundred twenty point five million dollars in federal funds for care and treatment including grants to help low income PEOPLE AFFORD EXPENSIVE. Aids medicine managed by the US Department of Health Resources and Services Administration. The first grants under the care. Act were distributed just a short time later in nineteen ninety one nineteen ninety one also saw finally another drug that could treat HIV and AIDS. Die Dancing an oral solution of powder and water when a person sells absorbed identity. Seen It. Slow down the HIV's ability to replicate and spread through the body. Unfortunately didanosine couldn't cure AIDS and it had dangerous side effects including potential neural damage however it was very effective at slowing the progression of AIDS in patients who previously used. Act if he'd lived long enough to see it hit the market Ryan. White might have responded to die dancing very well and thanks to people like Ryan who helps de Stigmatize AIDS researchers were able to raise funds and keep looking for better cures their efforts led the FDA to approve the use of highly active antiretroviral therapy heart in Nineteen ninety-six heart referred to any treatment regimen. That involved two or more prescription medications for example researchers found that didanosine could be more effective when used in combination with a C. T. Each form of heart is customize to an individual specific needs. It works best when patients can have honest conversations with their doctors about what is and isn't working conversations free of judgment or shame while Heart Camp Cure AIDS heart can help people manage their symptoms and it will slow the progression of HIV and related conditions after five years the care act was reauthorized in nineteen ninety-six including several additions to make the initiative more accessible part of the legislation introduced funding for the newly approved heart treatment the following year the health resources and Services Administration created the HIV AIDS Bureau responsible solely for overseeing an administering funds in relation to the Ryan White HIV AIDS program. In two thousand. The Care Act was reauthorized again. This time with new provisions for enhancing the health outcomes of patients with HIV and AIDS and in two thousand six it was renamed the Ryan White HIV AIDS treatment modernization. Act of two thousand six up until this point. Most AIDS breakthroughs had been about managing the disease in slowing its progress. But then something remarkable happened. Something that had never happened before Timothy Ray Brown was cured of AIDS. He didn't go public until two thousand ten until then he was simply known as the Berlin patient Brown tested positive for HIV in Nineteen ninety-five on February. Sixth Two thousand seven. He underwent a stem cell transplant to treat his leukemia within three months. Hiv couldn't be detected in his blood stem cell. Transplants are highly controversial and incredibly expensive. But another possible solution appeared in two thousand nineteen that year nature reported on an HIV patient in London. Who received a bone marrow transplant? He currently has no detectable. Hiv in his blood while the procedure is too expensive and risky for widespread use researchers view the London patient and the Berlin patient as proof that HIV can be cured meanwhile other strides are being made to prevent its spread in the past decade the FDA approved a more accessible drug that would prevent HIV transmission through sacs and drug use prep or pre exposure. Prophylaxis is a highly effective medication for HIV negative individuals who are at risk of contracting the disease. Thanks to prep. Scientists today have the tools to halt AIDS in its path but they still have to work around a lot of social stigma. Nearly forty million people live with the disease worldwide. One in seven are unaware that they're infected and may inadvertently spread it if they're too embarrassed or afraid to get tested. Information campaigns have helped a little as efforts to fix the mistakes of the past including the demonization of Gaetano. Duga or patient. Oh as we discussed last week. Duga was identified in the early days of the AIDS epidemic. He was dubbed Patient Zero by Randy shifts author of and the band played on the nineteen eighty-seven book and the Nineteen ninety-three movie adaptation on. Hbo depicted Duga as simply a bad guy. Somehow he got infected with the virus and then he continued to sleep around and spread the disease. It took more than thirty years but Gaetano Gaas name was finally cleared in a study published in nature in two thousand sixteen. It describe a new genetic analysis of stored blood samples from Duga it proved DIGOS. Specific strain of HIV was prevalent in the country long before he began globetrotting with Air Canada. In nineteen seventy four. In other words he wasn't responsible for the spread of AIDS. Since dugas name was cleared. Scientists have continued to search for solutions and for ways to right. The wrongs of the past. Nobody can bring back those individuals who died when AIDS was so hated. That officials refused to cooperate to find a cure. But there's still time to build a better future. New Breakthroughs are promising but only so long as doctors patients researchers in the federal government are willing to work together the history of AIDS and HIV is one of stigma government irresponsibility and unnecessary deaths with better education in open communication. The future can be one of hope. Thanks for listening to medical mysteries. We'll be back next week with another episode for more information on Ryan White amongst the many sources we used. We found the biography Ryan White my own story extremely helpful to our research. You can find all episodes of medical mysteries and all other park has originals for free on spotify. Not only to spotify already. Have all of your favorite music but now spotify is making it easy for you to enjoy all of your favorite podcast originals. Like medical mysteries for free from your phone. Desktop or smart speaker to stream medical mysteries on spotify. Just open the APP tap browse and type medical mysteries in the search bar. And don't forget to follow us on facebook and Instagram. At podcast and twitter at our cast network. We'll see you next time. Medical mysteries was created by Max Cutler. And disappear cast studios original executive producers include Max and Ron Cutler sound designed by Juan Boorda with production assistance by Ron Shapiro Carly Madden Freddie Beckley and Joel Stein. This episode of medical mysteries was written by Geno Lennon with writing assistance by Maggie Admire and stars Molly Brandenburg and Richard Rosner..

AIDS HIV Ryan White HIV AIDS Ryan White Ryan HIV AIDS Bureau Gaetano Gaas spotify President George H W Bush Duga FDA Elton John didanosine Indianapolis US Department of Health Resour congress Berlin facebook twitter
"hiv" Discussed on What Next | Daily News and Analysis

What Next | Daily News and Analysis

02:42 min | 1 year ago

"hiv" Discussed on What Next | Daily News and Analysis

"This map Tony was looking at and it had been released by the Centers for Disease Control the showed places the agency thought were most vulnerable to an HIV outbreak not big cities but rural counties including more than half of the counties in West Virginia. That's pretty ridiculous. Math easy about it and and I called her back and I was working on this stuff. This is crazy. Where's the money for this and was like There's no resources nobody's nobody's working on it and I guess you and on up the phone this map it almost perfectly flee matches up with a different map one that shows where the pharmaceutical companies sent most of their pain pills at the height of the OPIOID crisis. Tony says the understand. How the CDC decided that people in Appalachia were at risk for HIV? You've got to know what you're looking at here these counties. They're in trouble because of high levels unemployment low incomes and also because of their overdose rates that's where HIV comes from so it had to come because as you've got opioid use H- you've got poverty. You got low educational attainment so the only thing that can come next is HIV because you've All of these factors so when you look at that map you see Rachel the not there but it's the caboose of the train ever since she saw this map Tony's been waiting keeping an the health alerts she gets and then the spring cluster of HIV. Infections is now present in Campbell county the majority of the cases are attributed to the sharing area of needles among drugging. And that's when they found out holy Moly we have a problem. Human Services reveal that Cavalcante has had more HIV. It'd be cases in a single year than the entire state of West Virginia. Since two thousand eight in the last six months dozens of West Virginians have been diagnosed most with HIV many of them in a single county Tony says this HIV cluster might look like an outlier but she thinks thinks it's just the beginning. Nobody that's running health department in these Twenty eight vulnerable counties was was prepared for HIV outbreak..

HIV Tony West Virginia Centers for Disease Control Infections Rachel Cavalcante CDC Appalachia Campbell county
"hiv" Discussed on Short Wave

Short Wave

09:05 min | 1 year ago

"hiv" Discussed on Short Wave

"Today we're talking about the progress that has been made in HIV treatment. Over the past three decades. Dr Maggie Hoffman. Terry has spent the past five years researching HIV and providing care to patients living with the virus once we started to understand you know the basics about HIV before we had any treatments. Tell me a little bit about what that time. Period was like I think very scary because initially we didn't know even how HIV have you were spread. My first exposure to it was as a pre medical student. I went over to a local hospital and worked with the infection. Doctor there but he he took me in to see two cousins who both had. HIV and held their hands without gloves. Because he said Is that I think it would be a terrible thing saying to be alone and to not be able to touch someone and to be the sick Because they were both dying and beyond that they just didn't know what to do except to keep people going as long as you could They used lots of different palliative kind of things things that we use said end of life to this day with cancer patients but that was all that was available to us and really so the first ray of hope was really. AZT The first drug. That was it was used to treat it. That is true. I remember the posters of vividly from my third year of medical school with an alarm clock on that said. If you're willing to get up every four hours and you have AIDS. We have a drug for you. I went to medical school and Temple North Philadelphia which was very hard hit area the AIDS epidemic even early on and people were lining up to get this magical drug even if it meant you got up every four hours to take at least a gave people finally some home before we talk about how. HIV drugs work. You need to know a couple of things. Our immune system is made up of all kinds of different cells. One type called T.. Cells specializes in protecting our bodies from viruses like HIV Maggie calls HIV a smart virus because it specifically attacks those t cells basically the virus kills the very cells that are trying to hunt them one way. HIV kills t cells is by hijacking genetic machinery Henry inside those cells forcing the cells to bake more and more copies of the virus eventually bursting out of the cell killing it so easy t- The first major drug targeted. HIV Pretty early on in its viral. Life cycle disrupting this process. The problem was that easy T- worked for a few months but in and of of itself as a single agent the virus was smart enough to get around it so it improved things for a few months but it never improved things in in the long run right that continued I did my infection fellowship. Nineteen Ninety two to one thousand nine hundred ninety four and it was still similar. At that time you were are uniformly telling young people time and again That they were going to die and that they should get their fares in order that they had children we would get them to meet with a case manager to figure out who was going to raise their children It was just a terrible. I can't I can't imagine what that was like. I think what often kept us going was the dream that better treatment would come along and we were fortunate enough in our fellowship to be involved in nearly nearly studies on protease inhibitors. So let's talk about that because that was another big Development and other big moment in this treatment was the development of heart and protease inhibitors. So talk to me a little bit about those so. HIV is like snowflakes in the body every time it divides it mutates at at least one spot and by doing so no to viruses in the body your body if you're infected with HIV. No two viruses viruses are alike in that way it is able to figure out how to get around easy T- so what we did was we developed drugs that hit hit from other targets and we're more potent So hard stands for highly active antiretroviral therapy And by combining signing three drugs that were working you know usually at least two different angles two different ways and the body We were able to finally finally get the virus. All the way controlled. Get it down to what we call. Undetectable but if we stopped the medicines it will come back but but having said that many of them were anywhere from ten to eighteen pills a day and they often cause side effects such as nausea vomiting meeting And leipold dystrophy which was this redistribution fat. But as these singled tablet regimens came out. They did not what caused these side effects. Right so that kind of brings us to the next big game changing moment around two thousand seven where you know a lot of those treatments that are a a lot of pills have become kind of one or two pills yes so the single pill once a day you know very much changed. The game from having to Rearrange Injured Day around two to three times having to ingest multiple pills so they were much better and much easier to take and greatly improve people's both compliance with the medicine the likelihood that they would take it every day and they're virus wouldn't develop resistance but improve their lifestyle also because because all they had to do was make sure they took that pill as they went to bed each night or with breakfast each morning Safer single tablet pills have come along now now containing integrase inhibitors and those are very easy and much much less toxic pills to take And I think we're really finally at the point in time That easy one pill a day combinations are here. Maggie says these treatments when used correctly and effectively also act as a form of prevention. When it comes to transmitting? HIV through sex treating HIV itself and getting that viral load down to undetectable undetectable prevents many many infections because even if patients sleeps with someone else so someone who has HIV if thyroid medication and they have unprotected sex. They are extremely unlikely to spread it to someone else If they are on medication so that's one. The type of prevention another form of prevention came in twenty twelve a strategy called pre exposure prophylaxis or prep in this case a daily pill. That's taken by people who don't have HIV and it prevents them from getting HIV from somebody else but when it comes to the latest treatments despite the real progress that's been made the issue of access is to these life. Changing medications is also very real. What what still needs to be done so that everybody that needs them has them well? The drugs need to be affordable because there have been states where the drugs have been waiting listed We have AIDS drug assistance programs and all of our states but they are federal dollars that have to be batch by state dollars and not every state matches them and Pennsylvania gene you were. I practice were very fortunate because we have a very very good extremely good program but there are many southern states where that's not the case And that has has been a problem for a while according to the US Department of Health and Human Services in twenty eighteen only sixty two percent of the worldwide HIV positive population were accessing assessing antiretroviral. Therapy and in some countries progress towards preventing new infections and increasing access to treatment is actually slowing down or getting worse but for those who do have access to care. The progress is undeniable. You know now that people that do have access to these like good. HIV drugs are living longer and healthier lives. Has that kind of shifted your role as a healthcare provider I in types of patients that you're seeing now The big pushes rushes looking at getting your patient into old age and Many of my patients I think our oldest patient currently is eighty seven But the average change our patients now is over fifty So we're looking at caring for later middle aged and geriatric population And that is much of what my care is pre you know in today's world So I admit early in that epidemic. I why it never thought I would be reading geriatric articles but that is much of what. HIV CARE is now a big. Thanks to both Maggie and and stash for talking with us. Today's episode was produced by Brett Hansen in edited by B at Les. I'm Anne Safai. Thanks for listening.

HIV Dr Maggie Hoffman access US Department of Health and Hu AIDS cancer Terry nausea Temple North Philadelphia Brett Hansen Anne Safai Pennsylvania
"hiv" Discussed on POLITICO's Pulse Check

POLITICO's Pulse Check

03:55 min | 2 years ago

"hiv" Discussed on POLITICO's Pulse Check

"And so the Trump administration is pushing this initiative, which I think is is really it's grounded in in public health scientific knowledge and the tools the same time the administration wants to and its budget request repeal the ACA in repeal Medicaid expansion and cut back on access and so that kind of works in the opposite direction. So it's gonna be interesting to see how this plays out. HIV doesn't exist in a vacuum. It works opposite direction because lots of patients who might need access or getting it through the ACA. And if that was to go away, they wouldn't be able to get the treatment and care that they need. Exactly. So the ACA has we've studied this at has expanded access for people with HIV in the US. They've gotten more coverage. They've got more access medications are available for free or low cost. And so, yeah, if you cut back on that it's going to create a situation where people just don't have access or or the other the other thing to think about it. Maybe coverage will be maintained, but interruptions, could happen. So what happens if someone with HIV is on is in care and then treatment? Gets interrupted while resistance could occur. They could become infectious if their viral load is suppressed on treatment, they're not infectious. But if they lose, you know, lose access to treatment, even if it's four period short period of time, it could have these incredible effects. So those dynamics really do work in the opposite direction here, and it will be really important to sort of see how that plays out. There's one other factor when it comes to administration HIV policy, and that's the global policy. So I wrote on the the this this week after the funding announcement, and you and I talked about it. And might take Jen was the Trump administration is saying to congress put America's HIV pedantic, I because it's looking to also cut international funding to programs like pep far. Right, which was the signature, George W Bush administration effort to deal with HIV and aids around the globe. The Trump administration is looking to take more than a billion dollars out of pep far. They're looking to take money out of the global fund which deals with HIV and aids. So there's actually more money total coming out. Than being put in to HIV efforts. Exactly it it. That is true. The Trump administration for the third year neuro is asking congress to dramatically cut, the global HIV program and global funds and prior to that point that had never happened before. I mean, George W Bush pushed this launch this incredible program that's been heralded by everybody as a success. Seventeen million lives around the globe cracked and really has changed the trajectory of what would have happened sub Saharan Africa real large because of this pedantic. So it's there's no one is not a question about its success. It's not a question about the reach that it's had, but there's still a huge gap in what's needed. So due to ask for these kinds of cuts. They're so dramatic than they first happened three years ago. People were kind of stunned. Congress rejected them happen. Again, second time. Congress rejected them happen again. Now, congress will likely reject them, but it's a very different stance than what we're seeing on the domestic side. And and you know, it's an epidemic and it's a virus. And so it's kind of a weird way to do that you make very important point, the Trump administration releases its budgets, this is widely seen in Washington DC as as a little bit of kabuki theatre it. It's a signal. It's important because this is what President Trump would do if he could get his way at the same time. This is not the way it's going to be congress controls the power. The purse, right. So pep far and these global funds we firmly expect to your point that those will largely be preserved. But that that raises the question for me wishes. So how should we feel about the domestic funding that the Trump administration wants to? Why would congress agree to some things and disagree with others? How do we know what they'll do? That's very good question. I've actually been thinking about this because yes in the case of the global side, congress, even when there is a Republican controlled house and Republican controlled Senate before the Twenty-eight teen election. They rejected the president's cuts on this on pet far. So they basically said, no, we're we don't share that vision..

congress Trump ACA HIV George W Bush president US Saharan Africa Washington Senate Jen America billion dollars three years
"hiv" Discussed on Sex Talk Podcast

Sex Talk Podcast

02:16 min | 2 years ago

"hiv" Discussed on Sex Talk Podcast

"But it's the stigma that makes it such a difference disease in the new way, you can get a stigma where you can address Dick Morris by talking about things and being open about things this should be in the school curriculum, and it's that ripple effect of a conversation starting so far. They haven't done another national campaign. I think they need to do one. And social media is a great platform in this is a great platform. So it's looking at every platform possible to to start those conversations we have we have one ask on our website of is like go. We'd when you've seen this go away and talk to ten of your friends about HIV. And then ask them to talk ten of their friends. The whole treatment makes HIV manageable has got a double edged sword to it because it does from a bio medical point of view. But you still got the stigma an intil is is addressed and reduces you'll still going to have people who are presenting late. You still gonna have people who dying, and you still going to have people who you know, if they were able to access access services without the fear of discrimination, all the stigma the then that's why we still got third of the population walking around not knowing about their HIV status third. Wow. I mean, Sophie, a love that practical step talk to ten of e people. And hopefully, they talk to another ten, you know, because that's exactly what needs to do needs to be done a news spreads and people have say much more access to the internet and stuff. And it's like there are some really good websites out. The you've got T H T, go aids map. Now, who I think you had here recently got the severe for a website. You've got the women in prep website. You've got the beaver website. And this loads of information on the around HIV that people can access and the national aids trust some really really really good information out there. It's getting better. But it can get a lot better. Yeah. Especially for women. Thank you. Thank you. Thank you. So faye. Faye sex tool. Unfortunately, we're out of time on today's edition of sex talk. If you need further advice or support on any of the issues raised in this episode of sex talk,.

HIV faye Dick Morris Sophie
"hiv" Discussed on Sex Talk Podcast

Sex Talk Podcast

02:16 min | 2 years ago

"hiv" Discussed on Sex Talk Podcast

"But it's the stigma that makes it such a difference disease in the new way, you can get a stigma where you can address Dick Morris by talking about things and being open about things this should be in the school curriculum, and it's that ripple effect of a conversation starting so far. They haven't done another national campaign. I think they need to do one. And social media is a great platform in this is a great platform. So it's looking at every platform possible to to start those conversations we have we have one ask on our website of is like go. We'd when you've seen this go away and talk to ten of your friends about HIV. And then ask them to talk ten of their friends. The whole treatment makes HIV manageable has got a double edged sword to it because it does from a bio medical point of view. But you still got the stigma an intil is is addressed and reduces you'll still going to have people who are presenting late. You still gonna have people who dying, and you still going to have people who you know, if they were able to access access services without the fear of discrimination, all the stigma the then that's why we still got third of the population walking around not knowing about their HIV status third. Wow. I mean, Sophie, a love that practical step talk to ten of e people. And hopefully, they talk to another ten, you know, because that's exactly what needs to do needs to be done a news spreads and people have say much more access to the internet and stuff. And it's like there are some really good websites out. The you've got T H T, go aids map. Now, who I think you had here recently got the severe for a website. You've got the women in prep website. You've got the beaver website. And this loads of information on the around HIV that people can access and the national aids trust some really really really good information out there. It's getting better. But it can get a lot better. Yeah. Especially for women. Thank you. Thank you. Thank you. So faye. Faye sex tool. Unfortunately, we're out of time on today's edition of sex talk. If you need further advice or support on any of the issues raised in this episode of sex talk,.

HIV faye Dick Morris Sophie
"hiv" Discussed on Sex Talk Podcast

Sex Talk Podcast

04:25 min | 2 years ago

"hiv" Discussed on Sex Talk Podcast

"You know, I've started talking to friends about it and stuff, and and then I'll call you in my off name women for Jewish their hours at work because of the impact of the menopause. You know, the hot flushes, you can kind of you know, you can do with not necessarily pleasant. But for me, they'd be one of the more minor ones. Will they've been getting worse recently. It's the insomnia, and when you're in the workplace, you the to work, so you can't really kind of be scenes be going in and out if you mood swings. If you're in a professional environment. So I think one of the issues with women living with HIV is that GP's get very scared about prescribing anything because they didn't feel like they have a handle on antiretroviral therapy. And it's true that there are. Lays of interactions with other drugs by think GP's, lack that specialist knowledge. So if a woman who's already have HIV and presents with menopausal symptoms. They get told because they're living with HIV. It's probably that say, they get told going speak to their HIV specialist and their HIV's specialist. Probably doesn't know anything about menopause, and because my women access hormone replacement therapy three that GP, and there's always that barrier thing with women living with HIV that you if you go and see oh GPO GP feels like they don't know enough about HIV. They kind of send you back to the hospital. I think women in general get flipped off with menopausal symptoms. Probably women living with HIV, even more. So because deep is reluctant to prescribe anything for them. So that's prime. Can we talk about your report it did invisible? No longer in regards to HIV prevention in women, what has been learned or gleaned from this report what could be done to. Improve HIV prevention in women. There was you know, historically, been little done in terms of helping women identify around the risk of HIV. We still don't necessarily know the whole picture of which women are at risk say getting the information in the education out there. You know, everyone accesses a GP. No, everyone accesses a sexual health clinic. So loss of the conversations that are going on at the moment is about engaging with the community organizations that are on the ground level. But but no even community. No, even just community organizations. It's about finding out where those communities meet the community spaces the communities are there, and it's going in and starting a conversation with them. So it's looking at how we can get the conversations happening beyond a sexual health connect because not everyone is going to access that. And then it's also about educating them. To the different forms of prevention methods that goes beyond a condom because that's not going to be everybody's choice in for some. Then not going to be able to negotiate that for example. So is there anything else in poll that was highlighted that? Perhaps you think needs to be spoken about. Every page. When it comes to the national response to HIV all women are by default seemed to be heterosexual. There is a lack of understanding of the diversity of sexualities of women living with an at risk of HIV as well as a lack of targeted information and interventions to support sexual health needs of lesbian, bisexual women and women if other sexualities, and that is absolutely true. Yeah. How can we include women will in this discussion around HIV? What can we do? Maybe we can just get one bit of advice from both of you. I think it's really challenging because I think as safety said women are much less able to perceive their risk of getting HIV. I think education is always going to be the key. I mean, I've started talking about to my children, they're five and t. Five. I mean, I pass me my hopeless fee of life is I start hooking synergy can. Nightstop king. And I think the thing that just permeates every conversation and every experiences stigma. It's a lifelong condition. That's really good treatments. We can prevent transmission. People living with HIV have every other choice. Everyone else does..

HIV GP menopause menopausal symptoms insomnia one bit
"hiv" Discussed on Sex Talk Podcast

Sex Talk Podcast

04:25 min | 2 years ago

"hiv" Discussed on Sex Talk Podcast

"You know, I've started talking to friends about it and stuff, and and then I'll call you in my off name women for Jewish their hours at work because of the impact of the menopause. You know, the hot flushes, you can kind of you know, you can do with not necessarily pleasant. But for me, they'd be one of the more minor ones. Will they've been getting worse recently. It's the insomnia, and when you're in the workplace, you the to work, so you can't really kind of be scenes be going in and out if you mood swings. If you're in a professional environment. So I think one of the issues with women living with HIV is that GP's get very scared about prescribing anything because they didn't feel like they have a handle on antiretroviral therapy. And it's true that there are. Lays of interactions with other drugs by think GP's, lack that specialist knowledge. So if a woman who's already have HIV and presents with menopausal symptoms. They get told because they're living with HIV. It's probably that say, they get told going speak to their HIV specialist and their HIV's specialist. Probably doesn't know anything about menopause, and because my women access hormone replacement therapy three that GP, and there's always that barrier thing with women living with HIV that you if you go and see oh GPO GP feels like they don't know enough about HIV. They kind of send you back to the hospital. I think women in general get flipped off with menopausal symptoms. Probably women living with HIV, even more. So because deep is reluctant to prescribe anything for them. So that's prime. Can we talk about your report it did invisible? No longer in regards to HIV prevention in women, what has been learned or gleaned from this report what could be done to. Improve HIV prevention in women. There was you know, historically, been little done in terms of helping women identify around the risk of HIV. We still don't necessarily know the whole picture of which women are at risk say getting the information in the education out there. You know, everyone accesses a GP. No, everyone accesses a sexual health clinic. So loss of the conversations that are going on at the moment is about engaging with the community organizations that are on the ground level. But but no even community. No, even just community organizations. It's about finding out where those communities meet the community spaces the communities are there, and it's going in and starting a conversation with them. So it's looking at how we can get the conversations happening beyond a sexual health connect because not everyone is going to access that. And then it's also about educating them. To the different forms of prevention methods that goes beyond a condom because that's not going to be everybody's choice in for some. Then not going to be able to negotiate that for example. So is there anything else in poll that was highlighted that? Perhaps you think needs to be spoken about. Every page. When it comes to the national response to HIV all women are by default seemed to be heterosexual. There is a lack of understanding of the diversity of sexualities of women living with an at risk of HIV as well as a lack of targeted information and interventions to support sexual health needs of lesbian, bisexual women and women if other sexualities, and that is absolutely true. Yeah. How can we include women will in this discussion around HIV? What can we do? Maybe we can just get one bit of advice from both of you. I think it's really challenging because I think as safety said women are much less able to perceive their risk of getting HIV. I think education is always going to be the key. I mean, I've started talking about to my children, they're five and t. Five. I mean, I pass me my hopeless fee of life is I start hooking synergy can. Nightstop king. And I think the thing that just permeates every conversation and every experiences stigma. It's a lifelong condition. That's really good treatments. We can prevent transmission. People living with HIV have every other choice. Everyone else does..

HIV GP menopause menopausal symptoms insomnia one bit
"hiv" Discussed on Sex Talk Podcast

Sex Talk Podcast

10:35 min | 2 years ago

"hiv" Discussed on Sex Talk Podcast

HIV Matthew Hodson UK Africa London Dr. Stewart Dr Stuart Flanagan Adele Bates Yvonne Saxe Dr shit Appeareance executive director Pank Kim Dr Stewart
"hiv" Discussed on This Podcast Will Kill You

This Podcast Will Kill You

01:37 min | 3 years ago

"hiv" Discussed on This Podcast Will Kill You

"Ninety five secs alarm for being the hateful hockey energetic 5yearolds you'll the lid you go to sing kid i'm in about of bounce my body done to break down and doctors started cut the ordinary misses you could even wherever intent on some other countries and conclusion they came seer says you know i know he's not out risk for hiv but that's happened for hiv result sending back and i was diagnosed with fullblown aids given five months to that by newsouth how got zero they put company on 23 on medication three ibn about a concealed gestion daily a majority of those were not available was chevron not the time five thirty bucks top five mark uh and other stand before you today what does it see my fix base that but come next month be celebrated much 27 faith that as we talked about last week a diagnosis of hiv or aids carried with it a stigma and a feeling some times of impending doom particularly during the height of the aids crisis from the mid '80s to the end of the nineties when treatment was hard to come by an ignorance of how the disease worked was rampant both in the scientific community and in the public hill l and brian discussed with us the emotional told that their diagnoses took on their lives were earth return our diagnosed workers jargon my body was drip the ryder ramalkilled her mother were reagan gone by bernebeu becoming widow and.

hiv hockey brian reagan Ninety five secs five months
"hiv" Discussed on This Podcast Will Kill You

This Podcast Will Kill You

02:05 min | 3 years ago

"hiv" Discussed on This Podcast Will Kill You

"Being alliance was founded now some thirty three or more years ago five two hiv positive guys remember this was the darkest days of the academic can they sounded this has a wage for hiv positive men and women she comes together and speak openly chore 'nother of our shearer's and and share the rumors her because our doctors were completely sell assured sure they formed the organization where a few good speech in an authentic voice because we were living in every region i give him the watch lots of money to the arrive find me it was my charge you put my put some skin in the game effective treatment for people with hiv didn't really emerge until the mid 1990s with the introduction of antiretroviral therapy all of a sudden aides diagnosis was no longer the death sentence in once was for a lot of people though frank remained hiv negative throughout the epidemic he lost countless friends and his partner at the time and hello had been diagnosed with hiv in 1987 we asked them both how things changed once these socalled miracle drugs came onto the scene were talking or gaurd lease ten years or so i'm guessing for murder memory uh when we first heard about aids up to that point where most recombination therapies came into play in old during those years just seeing the every week in words some other work or some other treatment that was coming in c play what was he in than there was this and than those that and so in retrospect when those drugs those therapies came out we did not know at that time obviously when a gamechanger in was born to be for you know so us it was just now.

shearer partner hiv frank murder ten years
"hiv" Discussed on TEDTalks (audio)

TEDTalks (audio)

01:33 min | 3 years ago

"hiv" Discussed on TEDTalks (audio)

"These are incredible advancements that we have made in fighting hiv yet they have not managed to dent the perception that most americans have of the virus and those living with it and i don't want you to think on downplaying the danger of this virus and i am not ignorant of the harrowing past of the aids epidemic i am trying to convey that there is hope for those infected and hiv is not the death sentence it was in the 80s and now you may ask and i asked this question myself initially where the stories where are these people living with hiv why haven't they been vocal how can i believe these successes are these statistics without seeing the successes and this is actually very easy question for me to answer fear stigma and shame these keep those living with hiv in the closet so to speak our sexual histories are his personal to us as our medical histories and when you overlap the too you can find yourself in a very sensitive space the fear of how others perceive us when we're honest keeps us from doing many things in life and this is the case for the hiv positive population to face social scrutiny and ridicule is the price that we pay for transparency and why become a martyr when you can effectively pass as someone without hiv after all there are no physical indications you have the virus there's no sign that you wear.

aids hiv
"hiv" Discussed on Throwing Shade

Throwing Shade

02:12 min | 3 years ago

"hiv" Discussed on Throwing Shade

"Cheer her scar pasqua by the way the number of people who came up to me on to rome is like it's cure skoro go jokes on you we don't care we don't care the director of hiv cheers grow for georgia department of health okay so betty price had this question for this idiot expert an asia expert were on their run where i'm pascal side yes representative betty price quoting or now my thinking sometimes goes in strains direction bush had neares which already it's like okay martian norman just my thinking sometimes goes in strange directions but before you proceed if you wouldn't mind commenting on the surveillance of partners tracking of contacts that sort of thing she's talking about partners of people actually they tracking contacts that sort of thing what are we legally able to do and i don't wanna see the quarantine word but i guess i just said it is the hunt ability since i would guess the public dollars or expended heavily in prophylaxis and treatment of this condition is their inability so that we have public interest in curtailing the spread are there any methods what would you advise are there any methods legally that we could do that would curtail the spread as though essentially what she has suggested is whether people diagnosed with hiv should be quarantined to stop the spread of hiv now i have a question did she say the word gay she did not i'm okay it doesn't matter but just all by the way everyone should know that is always the insinuation while we is an hiv epidemic in opioid regions of the united states theory and i by the way that are taking everybody sounds like you my for me but what i'm saying is that and it doesn't even really matter that she has it or not the idea that you would corn someone with a disease like hiv that has come such a long way and that you know.

director betty price bush norman hiv rome georgia department of health representative united states