21 Burst results for "HBR"

Creating Psychological Safety in the Workplace

HBR IdeaCast

09:58 min | 2 years ago

Creating Psychological Safety in the Workplace

"It was the late nineteen ninety s medical mistakes at hospitals were a big problem and researcher Amy Edmonson had a moment of panic. She had been studying different teams in the same hospital. She wanted to know do better teams make fewer mistakes. But what she found was the opposite of what she expected turns out the most cohesive hospital teams reported making the most mistakes, not fewer that surprised her until she realized maybe the better teams weren't making more mistakes. Maybe they were more able and willing to talk about their mistakes this became Edmund since influential nineteen ninety nine paper, titled psychological, safety and learning behavior in were teams since then the research has piled on showing that psychological safety can make nut just teams, but entire organizations perform better it's been ten years since Amy Edmonson was a guest on the HBO idea cast and she's back on the show today. She's. Is a professor at Harvard Business School, and our new book is the fearless organization, creating psychological safety in the workplace from learning innovation and growth, Amy. Thanks so much for coming back on the show. Thank you for having. It's great have you here because psychological safety. I can't tell you the number of times it has come up in each cast interviews in it's fun to talk about it. Now. Also with hindsight of what you've learned over the last couple of decades. Now, this term psychological safety, you say, it's not it's not the best term. Why not you know, the term implies to people a sense of coziness. You know? Oh, I'm just everything's gonna be great that we're all going to be nice to each other. And that's not what it's really about. What it's about his candor what it's about as being direct taking risks being willing to say I screwed that up being willing to ask for help. When you're in over your head. Why is it that probably more people would say that they don't feel psychologically safe at work than than others? I mean, it it still seems like it's not the norm. It is not the norm at all. In fact, I think it's it's. Unusual which is what makes it potentially a competitive advantage. The reason why psychological safety is rare has to do with aspects of human nature human instinct, for example. It is an instinct to want to look good in front of others. It's an instinct to divert blame in. It's an instinct to agree with the boss and hierarchies or places where these instincts are even more exaggerated. We really wanna look good. And we especially wanna look good in a hierarchy and the spontaneous way to try to chief. That goal is to kind of be quiet on less. I'm sure that what I have to say will be very well received especially by the higher ups, and these are like phrases, we we know in real life too. Like better to be safe than sorry. Right. Don't rock the boat. Don't rock the boat. You know, no one ever got fired for silence. Right. And you know, I think we tend to. To play not to lose. Right. We stay safe. I wanna look good. I wanna perform well learning is great. But it will not in front of people. I don't wanna have the part of learning that involves me to fail along the way. I wanna learn from when that other person it carry us learn, yeah. Yeah, they have to learn firsthand that this doesn't work and have everybody. See my failure. I'd rather not. Yeah. Let's talk about a disaster to where psychological safety has not been present. And it led to financial ruin it led to colossal business failures. So one of the best examples recently is Wells Fargo, which in two thousand fifteen was considered one of the world's most admired companies. It was the shining star of banking for anybody who doesn't know at this is a US Bank with a long history, right and very much kind of customer oriented, Bank, household oriented Bank. And their strategy, which I think was a good strategy was to really push on cross selling course once you've made a customer relationship. It's easier to leverage that relationship sell that that customer more products rather than you know, the extra cost of building new relationships made sense to really emphasize cross selling by the men if somebody has a savings and data count a car loan, and maybe get a home loan credit card. And in fact, they had a slogan going for great where it's GR eight read the idea was I should be able to sell you eight different financial services products. So nice idea and soon this idea runs up against the reality of customers limited wallets, but rather than the the executives getting the feedback from those, you know, boots on the ground. Instead the message just kept coming top down. You must do this. You know, people had the sense that they'd be fired if they didn't achieve the targets that they were set the managers were very tough and present. And so rich goal stretch goals. I love stretch goals. Right. I'm a big fan of struggles. But if you wanna have stretch goals, you better have open ears. So I think of the Wells Fargo story as a recipe for failure is stretch goals plus closed ears. So what ultimately happened was? Of course, the sales folks started crossing an ethical line. They started making up fake customers. They lied to customers saying if you buy this product, you also have to buy this product, right? I mean, they did dozen little things that were just inappropriate and wrong. And ultimately as is always the case this comes to light. So the beautiful success of Wells Fargo proves itself to be an allusion of success. Why do you see this as a? As an absence of psychological safety, rather than like, an incentives problem or or an ethics problems. There is an incentive story here. But in I could give you in your job a poor incentive. And you could give me feedback that you could tell me, you know, this actually doesn't work, and in fact, it's encouraging if you think about it, it's an courage in some behaviors you really don't want to encourage. And then I'd say, hey, that's really interesting. You're right. Let's let's tweak. Let's talk together about what would be the best incentive to optimize our performance. And and that's not what happened. So it's a psychological safety story. Because from what I learned people really did not feel it was safe to push back to say, this isn't working. It can't be done. So lovely strategy. But the strategy in execution is discovering some some new and important things about the. Reality of the market and in a in a well, run organization managers middle managers, senior managers executives would be quite interested in those data. And they would not automatically say these people just aren't trying hard enough. Let's push hard. Or what about an example of a company that has mastered psychological safety in the in the workplace and has gained that competitive advantage that that you referenced at the beginning the one industry that is a very challenging industry to succeed in and particularly to succeed in consistently is the movie industry. Most movie producers most movie houses will have an occasional hit. And then a few, you know bombs. So Pixar is a company that has had seventeen in a row. Major box office successes that evolve also been critically acclaimed. It's an unheard of success out. Size. It's outsized. Right. It's way it's way beyond the sort of just pretty good. And at cap mill co founder and longtime leader has gone out of his way and very deliberately to create and keep creating psychologically safe environment. Where candor is expected possible it critical feedback and they do this in two fundamental ways. You know, one is behavioral the other structural and the behavioral is that. That cat mill will often say things like, you know, he'll say, here's a mistake. I made right because leaders have to go first leaders have to show that they know that they're fallible human beings. He shows up with humility with curiosity with interest with fallibility, and then the other structural in a setting up meetings and sessions where they're designed in in thoughtful ways to make it easier for us to give each other candid feedback or to to really critique the movie and. And he'll say things like early on all of our movies are bad in their terrible. And he says that not because that's, you know, necessarily good news. But because he wants everyone to know that's just part of the journey. There's no way to get to magnificent unless we go through bad and inadequate and sappy and boring along the way, and we just keep pushing back, and we keep making it better in this film that I'm making his my baby. I don't want you to criticize my baby. But I have to kind of realize no, I do want you to because I'd much rather get it from you now, then get it in the box office later.

Wells Fargo Amy Edmonson Harvard Business School HBO Researcher Edmund Professor United States Cap Mill Co Founder Pixar Mill Ten Years
Use Your Money to Buy Happier Time

HBR IdeaCast

09:45 min | 2 years ago

Use Your Money to Buy Happier Time

"I keep thinking about something that guests said recently on the show we have been living for several decades is kind of a tenant of life structure that are orgnization has created for us. We know where we're going to be at nine AM Monday through Friday. Our weekends are also structured around that because you know, maybe one day or part of days the day that we do all the chores. We didn't have a chance for that was Theresa a mob lay on episode sixty five she was saying it in reference to her research on retirement, but what really struck me is this idea that your job dictates your weekends, even dictates. How you spend your time off. And that's why I'm excited for today's episode. Our guest today believes people would be happier. If they spent more of the money, they earn at work to get back more of their time when they're not working Ashley Willens researches. The tradeoffs we make between time and money and says we often get those wrong. She says, we should spend more money. Not just on things we like, but to get us out of the things we don't enjoy say yard, work cooking or commuting. Ashley Willens is an assistant professor at Harvard Business School. She's also the author of the HP are article time for happiness. Ashley, thanks for coming on the show. Thanks so much for having me. Your research concluded that the happiest people use their money to buy time. And there's that phrase, you know, money can't buy you happiness. But you're basically saying that if more people used money to buy time that they could use that time to be more happy. Yeah. So we really liked to flip this Benjamin Franklin's adage on its head and say, well, if time has money, maybe also we can think that money can buy happier time, my research really focuses on using money to buy cells out of negative experiences. So subtracting negative minutes from our day subtracting time that we spend stuck in traffic subtracting extra work hours were were just spinning our wheels. And really, we should go home subtracting housecleaning, but really any way that we spend money in a way that might save us time such as also buying ourselves into positive experiences has reliable and positive effects on on the happiness that we. Get from our days or weeks or months and our lives. Even though people feel like the world is busier than ever, you know, you point out in your research that the average American for instance, has more time for leisure than they did forty years ago. And so it sounds like you're saying that now that people have more time, they just spend it earning more money or taking jobs that make them busier rather than using the time. Yeah, I think it's really interesting that, you know, work hours have gone down. But people are feeling more stress than I think, it's exactly that's we think that business is a status symbol, we focus. Our attention on getting ahead, especially in North American culture. So I think there's this element. One of the fact that even though we have more free time, we might fill it more with work or commuting really far away. Because we want to have this really nice house that we don't get to spend any of our time. And we don't get to enjoy because we're always commuting to work. Really, far and ubiquitous connection to the internet. Also means that we experienced what's some researchers have called time confetti, so not only maybe a retrying to filler time with more work in being more productive. But also, our time is more fragmented were more distracted, and that also contributes to these higher feelings of time stress, but also time is very hard to track. And so if we have windfalls of time, we often fritter them away. So it's interesting is that in one of our my clobbered or an ice studies. We find that buying time or spending money on time-saving services predicts greater happiness, reduces stress. Not because of the objective amount of time that we saved just to the simple act of thinking about giving up money to have more free time seems to make people plan their time a little bit better. If I'm going to incur this cost to have this free time, then I'm going to make sure I really enjoy the free time that I have. What do you make the argument though, that that future's uncertain and financial security or your financial future is often uncertain too? And so I guess some of the way we've been trained to think about time versus money as that like if you have time now and can make money you need to save. So that in the future when you're not working you have money to spend. Yeah. And I mean people who feel uncertain about their financial future or more likely to value money, and they get more thought his faction out of having that value. And that makes a lot of sense. If you're not sure what you're next five. Six seven years are your overarching goal in life should be Develey money. So that you can feel like your future is secure and safe much to what you're saying. And and I don't argue that that doesn't mean we shouldn't also be thinking around the margins of whether within our discretionary income bucket within the set of money that we spend in in ways that in. Enable us to enjoy our life that we shouldn't also be thinking about saving time. So that's why make the point. And my clobbered resign often argue that we need to be thinking about every time we open our wallet. What is to make a purchase discretionary income purchase? Is this money? Changing the way that I spend my time. What's one way that you have trained yourself to spend money on other things where maybe was counterintuitive of I, but really makes make sense when you value time correctly, you know, going through grad school, you have no time and no money, and you're constantly trying to cut corners in every way that you can and one thing that I did throw all of graduate school was live really far away from my place of employment. I would spend hours on the bus every single day for five years because it was cheaper. I could live in an of slightly bigger apartment with my partner. And I you save money that way. You know? And so when I moved for my my job, I had this intuition. This really strong sense that I should do the same thing should live in the most economical place, even if it's a little bit further away, and I really had to push against sort of every instinct that was saying, but think about how much money you can save in rent like just written his massive dissertation on the fact that we should value time over money, but we always get it wrong. When making major minor life decisions that I was like, okay. Actually like, you can do it. You can pay a lot of money in rent and live really close to work. So you can walk there. You're going to be new. It's going to be stressful. You have a million things to do. And that was one thing that I did recently. And I think it's added a lot of happiness to my life and really reduce stress. I walked to the office. I can walk. Everything's walking distance to my house. I feel like a lot of my behavior. Does come from. How I you know, I lived coming out of school. From a time when I had more time than money, and then just got used to doing everything myself. And there's also the kind of the American self reliance thing just being able to take care of household chores do things without having to hire somebody to do it. I think I know I I think this is part of the reason we see the effects that we see. So I have a another line of research with Laura park at the university of buffalo, and we look at how experiences in childhood around how much money you had and how how much income inequality. There wasn't an a place where you grew up shapes the way that adults think about their finances and make decisions, you know, fifteen twenty years later, and we do see that growing up in a more uncertain financial environment carries all the way through to adult hood. You know, doesn't Volvo a little bit of retraining again. I really want to return to this idea. That's about taking small act. Actions not doing anything to drastic but just sitting down and thinking about whether there's anything you can outsource that. You really don't like that stresses you out a lot that you can afford. And if there's anything on a daily basis that the answer to that question is yes, you should try it out try spending, some discretionary income that way, you know, other small ways I can be more efficient that I can give up some of my money to have more time direct flights grocery deliveries to my house. Not all the time. Not outsource everything. We show in our data that people who outsource too much experienced the lowest levels of happiness in part, probably because again, they feel like their their life must be so out of control. If they can't you know, if they can't even do one load of laundry on the weekend. So I think you also raise an important point. And we find this in our data. We wanna seem self sufficient one reason that we don't ask for help enough that we don't outsource enough even. When we're paying our hard earned money for someone else's time. As we want to feel like we can do it all especially in North American culture. We have this idea that we're a failure. If somehow we can't have their perfect home

Ashley Willens Theresa Harvard Business School Benjamin Franklin HP Volvo Assistant Professor Partner Laura Park University Of Buffalo Fifteen Twenty Years Six Seven Years Forty Years Five Years One Day
"hbr" Discussed on HBR IdeaCast

HBR IdeaCast

01:45 min | 2 years ago

"hbr" Discussed on HBR IdeaCast

"That's not for the workplace. You know, it would it would have to be a pretty seriously broken Boston try and tamp down any of those kind of things. And so you can start bringing this stuff to work. I tell that story in the book about might get McDonald's in Detroit metro airport who's just like hustling around, and you know, in cleaning up the tables after all the busy travelers are moving through. And every time. I saw me he walked up to me. And he said how you doing? You need an app Giner anything like now. I'm okay mic. He says, well, I have a safe flight. And I thought that moment when I saw there I thought wow. How does he do that? And then every time I went through the same thing. And I'm like, what are you doing? I mean, you're in one of the most relation Lewis places on the planet. People are just buzzing in and out in and there, you are giving them a smile gay asking them if they need something simple. And and wishing them a safe flight or a good day thought if Mike can do that inside a McDonald's, we can all do that side of where we work rich. This has been a real pleasure and a real joy to talk to you. Thanks so much for coming on the cast. Can thanks so much for having me here? That's Richard Sheridan. He's the CEO and co founder of Menlo innovations is new book is chief joy officer. How great leaders elevate human energy and eliminate fear. This episode was produced by Mary. Do we got technical help from Robert Adam Buckholtz our audio product manager? Thanks for listening to the cast. I'm curt curtness.

McDonald Richard Sheridan Boston Robert Adam Buckholtz curt curtness officer Detroit Menlo innovations Lewis product manager Mike CEO co founder
How One CEO Creates Joy at Work

HBR IdeaCast

03:15 min | 2 years ago

How One CEO Creates Joy at Work

"What's the first thing leader should do if they want to do this at their own organization? The first place change. Needs to occur in the heart of the leader. I needed to become a different kind of leader for so mine. Courage -ment to your listeners just simply to two. I turn inward that that will saying how can I be the change? I wanna see in the world. And I think that's really an important place to start a few other things. I would encourage them to think about is moved to an action orientation away from contemplation orientational. And other words, you know, we have a famous phrase at men, the let's run the experiment, which basically says, you know, what we're not going to spend a lot of time thinking about this. We're gonna go try it and see what happens because if we spent too much time thinking about it, we'll defeat every idea we have. When you move to action. It actually increases human energy people feel the excitement, even if it doesn't work say thank God, we tried it. Now, we know it doesn't work. What's what's one of the best actions? You can take the signal to your team that this is going to be done differently in that you're taking it to heart yell out of top leaders. Come to me and ask me kind of the simple practical things they could do. I did send a signal that changes in the works. And I smile I look him move out of your office. Turn your office into a conference room. Move yourself out in new space where the rest of the team is that will send the signal and they'll look at me and say, well, we'll where would I go for private conversations? And I say about what? And they realized that in that moment, I'm asking them to change and they're not comfortable with it. And they shouldn't be. I mean, if you're gonna make important change, I think any important change that occurs anywhere. Life is going to start with discomfort. Think of it is like, you know, that workout routine. We're all going to start next January for kind of the other end of the career spectrum here. What would you tell the twenty something rich or the thirtysomething rich? You know, what would you tell somebody who's at a job now where they don't feel joy in the workplace. They're not manager of team. They're hating their job. What can they do? Mine. Courage meant to the young people in the world that are just starting out in their careers may be experiencing some version of disillusionment. I experienced I is there a lot of things you can do individually to lead truly lead, and they don't cost anything. You don't have to quit your job to do them. You can smile and say good morning to everybody you walk into you can be that kind of positive energy. You can start to experiment with misery and and lead. Maybe just another person alongside of you to make some change inside of your organization. Something simple, something quick, something inexpensive and something that isn't so earthshaking that management above USA. Hey, wait a minute. What's going on? Here. We get these people. Come and visit us and they're wondering if their bosses would let them do anything like we're doing. And so, you know, I don't think there's a boss out there. Typically. That would say, hey Huckabee, you're bringing so much energy to work today. Where's that smile? Coming from. Why do you seem to have a bigger spring in your step today?

Huckabee Usa.
Improving Civility in the Workplace

HBR IdeaCast

04:05 min | 2 years ago

Improving Civility in the Workplace

"I mean, I think the other conversation that we're having culturally and inside industries and companies and nonprofits is what is our metric for success and. Yeah. I think we're moving away from of course, depending on what the businesses were moving away from necessarily that the measure. Of success is greater greater productivity, greater and greater profit. Which is not say that we don't value productivity and profit. Right. But that's that's also this other interesting reflection, and perhaps reframing that is flowing out of human beings. Twenty-first-century human beings. Wanting to their work to be more integrated with their life with their life in the world with who they want to be with the world. They went to inhabit with the world, we're creating for our children. What you tell individuals who are wrestling with the same problems. But just from a different position in the organizational hierarchy, what would you suggest to somebody who's in individual contributor or an aspiring manager? What would you tell them to be thinking about if they want to help shape, you know, with the future organization looks like I think one thing I would say. Is taken what a remarkable and wonderful thing. It is to be living in a moment where we're asking that question. So seriously, and to take in that as you, and I've been discussing we're kind of on this frontier with no maps, which is also very exciting and creative and also, you know, maddening and difficult. I don't know if this sounds soft, you know, in the context of the world of business. But I think one thing that's happening is we are. We are kind of redefining what is hard and what is off strike the hard skills are are easy in the soft skills are are. And so so this this notion of real co of living the questions and other turn of century person that their questions we have to live because can't live into answers yet. And I think with this. You know, there are in fact. Great leaders innovative organizations all over the place, not necessarily the ones that get all the attention writing you have to look around and if find your teachers, and you've defined your mentors, and you have to think so important to have your community of of people of friends, you know, leaders if that our managers if if that's what you're doing. We have to accompany each other right now because we are making this up, but I'd say hold the questions because one of the ways we've acted in lived that that has gotten us into this place where now and one of the things that that goes wrong is that we're so quick leap to answers and solutions or opinions. Right. As you're saying like just going to blurt it all out, we're these are really civilizational reframing. So we're going through and I do believe I and I believe this. And you know, again, I don't feel soft. I feel this is hard that you formulate a better question. We know that in science IQ hold the best question you can and that will yield the better discoveries. So even as you're having to walk, whatever, you know, is the everyday work, you're holding this big civilization question and looking for the wisdom that's out there and letting it be okay that we don't have all the answers yet. Because we we all know this also if you rush to the answers on hard things, you often waste time, you know, in the end in the end, you waste time. And that's you know, sometimes innovation innovation. Sometimes it's it's something that you're gonna spend a lot of money in time rolling back. So again, these these civilizational questions this this beautiful question of how we create not just whole people that whole organizations

"hbr" Discussed on Dear HBR:

Dear HBR:

02:11 min | 3 years ago

"hbr" Discussed on Dear HBR:

"And this is somewhat of an impression management kind of thing. And can she nudge that in the other direction? So at the end of the letter, she does ask is it time to move on. Do we think that she should even consider that possibility? I think it's possible. The question would be has she given up her because if she has given up she's not going to be affective anymore, and she might as well go and look for the next organization. The the one worry I would have is be wary of expecting the perfect organization to show up it won't. There will always be conflict resistant bosses. The lowest be colleagues whose behavioral think is ineffective all of us have to learn how to manage these as well as we can so Elson, what's our advice. So we think that first needs to try to take a step back understand whether her perceptions of our colleague and her boss are totally accurate one way, she can investigate this. Is by engaging with the colleague, I ask questions about her intent why she's behaving with the clients the way she is. And then give specific feedback about why she's worried what she thinks the potential impact to the team and the performance will be. If she's considering other organizations after she's tried engagement. She just really needs to understand that she'll have these problems in most organizations, and so she needs to think carefully about making a quick switch, Amy. Thanks for coming on the show. It was a pleasure to be here. Let's Amy Edmonson. She's a professor at Harvard Business School her new book is titled the fearless organization. Thanks to the listeners who wrote us with their questions. Now, we wanna know your questions send us an Email with your workplace challenge and how we can help. The Email address is dear H B R at H B R dot org on our next episode. We're going to be talking to Dory. Clark about rebranding yourself. It's a human condition that we want something that's a little bit out of grasp. Right. We want to advance. We want to do more to get that up automatically. Please subscribe. I'm Dan McGinn and I'm Elson beard. Thanks for listening to deer h VR.

Amy Edmonson Elson beard Dan McGinn Harvard Business School Dory Clark
"hbr" Discussed on Dear HBR:

Dear HBR:

02:14 min | 3 years ago

"hbr" Discussed on Dear HBR:

"So I would also encourage her to ask more questions like often. The communication breakdown as part of the issue is that the employer feels like they gave enough information, but employers are left with oughta questions and they might not be asking them. That's great. I think there's a thread that runs through all three of these questions, which is most companies are still not doing a good enough job of teaching their managers how to talk about compensation. I mean, it's possible that all three of these organizations have perfectly fine compensation strategies program salary ranges, but the managers have not been quipped to talk about those lots of dotting at that as well. So seems like seems like a lot of the audience agrees with that sentiment as well. We should be wrapping up, so Alison, I'll just sum up our advice. So I we think that are active as director should understand that wage freezes are fact of organizational life, and it might be for a limited time. So she really needs to understand what. Going on at the company and how long it will last at the same time she could start an external investigation. What is her market value? How much might be able to make elsewhere? And then she should talk to her manager and explore whether it would be possible for her to get a promotion that would give her higher pay, whether there might be other perks like vacation development opportunities, they should focus that coversation on the skills that she brings to the table and hopefully work out a solution together. Susan, thanks for helping us find some answers for these people. It's been a pleasure that Susan hauling said, she's the chief people officer at van dean. Thanks to the listeners who wrote us with their questions. If you in this crowd or out there, listening have a workplace dilemma. Please Email us and we will do our best to help the Email addresses. Dear HP are at h. b. r. dot org. And if you've been joy, today's episode, please subscribe on your podcast app and police review the show on. Thanks for listening. Everybody you a great audience. Thanks, thanks what a great comments. We really appreciate it. I'm Dan McGinn and I'm Elson beard. Thanks for listening to dear HBO.

Alison chief people officer Dan McGinn Susan hauling HBO Elson beard director HP van dean
"hbr" Discussed on HBR IdeaCast

HBR IdeaCast

04:28 min | 3 years ago

"hbr" Discussed on HBR IdeaCast

"It was difficult and they were understanding all of them. We worked seven days a week. We would come into the office at seven, and we'd leave there at eleven at night. We were taking meetings around the clock in nineteen seventy four and five, just to try to sign a client list because we had nothing to sell, and it was hard. Now. I was fortunate six years into I had Chris Ovitz my for sun, and that was a game changer for me. But for the five years took to establish the business, I didn't have any children responsibilities, and you couldn't be more correct. Having children is a game changer. It is a giant responsibility and I just worked at around. I cannot tell you how many times I would leave CA at three o'clock beyond the phone in the car till I got to the. Thomas dis school at three fifteen. Watch one of my three kids play in a sporting event while I was on the phone and watching them multitasking going up to them and congratulating them whether they won or lost afterwards and then getting right back on the phone in the car right back to the office. It was just a way of life for twenty five years. I also wanted to ask you about cultivating this team environment with very different agents, all of whom have very different personalities and also very different personal ambitions and their own client bases. How did you get all of those people to to work together as one United force? I had a choice and it wasn't just me all of us who started the business. We worked together at William Morris, and we watched the ways that management could proceed. It was very clear that you could manage a business by creating competition between the employee's, have cutthroat environment and try to go very Charles Darwin survival of the fittest and hope that those that were the fittest would produce the most and would balance off what you'd lose from those that might have talent, but they weren't fit. Where you could go the way to create a combination of American team sports with a little bit of Japanese philosophy in at the time seventies eighties, Japan's production lines were just beating everyone else in the world. And it was done with a very simple basis called Nema washy, which was management by consensus from the bottom up. And if you took an American team sport like football or basketball, where people played together and you added the management from the bottom and you had people invested in each other and when you went to hire someone, you didn't hire from the top. But you had the people on the line that we're going to work with the individual. You hired go interview that person and bring them in as a recommendation to the business. And if you hit nothing in meetings and you were open with each other and you had people at volunteer jump in and help each other others would help them. And that's how we ran the business. Sit in a staff meeting in our company Wednesday morning, eight thirty, and we started an hour ahead of every other company. So the by the time we got out and they were starting, we could call their clients with information, but we would sit there and I could say we have John Mellencamp who's a fine singer and wants to do a film. He's got an idea. It really sounds interesting. It's a stretch, but let's see if we can do it. Ran wholesome would raise his hand was literally agent said, I'll help. Now. He had no reason to help. He was literally nothing to do with any of this, but he did and we got a movie made. I remember the same thing with prince was a client of ours, yet an idea you want to do a movie based on an album, purple rain. Again, ran jumped in. He said, we, we can do this. He and a half a dozen other agents, raised our hands. Let's try and do this. And my God we did at purple rain was a huge hit and was a great piece of creative work for prince. No one thought he could act newly did until he did. You knew so much of Hollywood intimately. I have to ask in this particular moment, you know how aware you were of the rampant, sexual harassment and abuse problem that was happening..

Chris Ovitz prince John Mellencamp Charles Darwin Nema washy United force harassment William Morris Hollywood Japan basketball football twenty five years five years seven days six years
"hbr" Discussed on HBR IdeaCast

HBR IdeaCast

01:46 min | 3 years ago

"hbr" Discussed on HBR IdeaCast

"I don't know that I was. I know that I would eat breathe and live the entertainment business from the time. I was seventeen years old when I got my first job at Universal Studios as a tour guide, and I watched everything that came out on the screen. The big screen I watched every television show. I read every top ten book that was nonfiction. I read every script that came out. I read notes on the scripts. I couldn't read. I had subscriptions to several hundred magazines month that I would skim through to get a sense of popular culture because art directors and writers would be planning things that would come out six months later. So they had some edge on popular culture, and I was a student of popular culture. And then I had one unique common denominator. I tried to do things that I wanted to see. I was the ultimate. Fan. Boy, I love TV and movies, and books and records. Just love him to this day. I got a sense of what I liked, and I let that translate into what I thought other people might like. You talk about all this researcher during your obviously working night and day for your clients, you say in the book that service organizations live or die by time management, but when there are so many things to do, how do you or how did you and how did see a more broadly get that aspect of the job? Right. So time management is one of the key things that I actually spent a lot of time with the entrepreneurs up north talking about. It's the same in any business you're in. You could be a doctor, a lawyer, a writer, and interviewer entrepreneur, starting.

writer Universal Studios researcher seventeen years six months
"hbr" Discussed on HBR IdeaCast

HBR IdeaCast

03:33 min | 3 years ago

"hbr" Discussed on HBR IdeaCast

"If you literally just said, hey, I want to know more about this department and whether to can I just drop it on this meeting volunteer to take notes like you'd be amazed how many meetings that you probably weren't supposed to go to that you could just say volunteer to take notes, and a lot of people will let you in. Thankfully, a lot of organizations are realizing this and starting to sort of develop programs where people can volunteer a little bit of time helping a different department, different. Committee, but if that's not in your company, you may be the one that has to be proactive about that and over the long term and nothing's going to magically appear in the short term. But over the long term, you'll start developing connections in a lot of other branches. A lot of other silos. You'll become that Lynch pin by honestly, having the mindset of a misfit. So if you are trying to reach out specific people in your organization and get to know them better, what is a good way to do that? I think the default often is like, oh, do you want to get coffee or doing it lunch? And that that can be kind of vague. And then the person doesn't know why. Why should I make time for this other person? I've, I don't know what is it better way to go about doing that? So I know we all go to way too many meetings even now, but this is actually one thing that I like about meetings normally escape. There's one or two people in a different department that are you want to get to know better. It's usually in the meetings where a lot of people don't feel awkward that there's other person there, right? If there's twelve people that are supposed to be there, thirteen doesn't seem like there's this awkward person who doesn't fit. Now, you might feel a spotlight effect on you like the course. They're gonna know me on the only person who works in marketing that doesn't in this legal department. As you built that relationship, you're actually going to be the one that can translate to the marketing department, why they can't do a certain thing, which is what legal often feels like their job. Is to do. So I recommend these meetings rather than the one on one things. And again that the absolute best are these shared activities which exist inside a company to. I know that we think that that certain party or this company outing or this day that we're all going to run the five k. I know these things seem trite, but they're Representative of what in a in a network is of referred to as multi plex at different context for connecting to someone that builds a relationship and a little bit other facet little other perspective, but that relationship then has organizational benefits. So these become the reasons for wanting to go to those types of vents because you network accidentally. And again, it feels less awkward, but more importantly, it gets you connected to people you wouldn't normally meet in the course of just doing your job. I think for people in a large company, one of the awkward things is if you have worked with a group of folks for while cannot remember other people's names. And so I think one of the impediments to the inside the company networking is we don't wanna finally, like walk up to someone we've worked with for. Long enough that we should know their name and just say, hey, I know we've worked together a long time. What actually is your name? So are there ways around this that you have uncovered? Okay. So I have absolutely no data for this one. I have no research on this. This is my own anecdotal experimental evidence. What I find this happening to me often as I go about my life as a speaker as a writer, etc. And I've actually tapped my wife for this, but you could use a partner in crime inside the organization to and it works like this when she sees me interacting with somebody and she comes over, there's one of two things that go on all either say, Sarah, have you met my wife, right? Which is a clue that I know your name. Yes, or I'll just say, hey, by the way, have you met my wife and she knows that if I say your name, she doesn't need to do it. But if I just introduce you without the name, she needs to go. Tell me your name and then I get to hear it again..

Lynch partner Representative Sarah writer five k
"hbr" Discussed on HBR IdeaCast

HBR IdeaCast

03:39 min | 3 years ago

"hbr" Discussed on HBR IdeaCast

"Next request an introduction is much easier. What if your goal is to diversify your network? Like, say, you only know people in the town where you live and you want to meet people from further away or so, you only know people in your industry and you want to expand your network or say, you only know people that are really your own demographic group. How can you be proactive about breaking out of that bubble? So the first thing you really need to do is audit your network and see in my, let's say the top two dozen people that I interact with from day to day how many of them are really similar to me and how many of them are different. And then when you find that list of different for most people, it's probably only gonna be about twenty five percent, which is a little depressing because most of us know we want a more diverse network, but what happens is organically, the network serves people that are self similar, but now that you have that list identified, you can be exactly what you said. Much more proactive about interacting with them, getting to know them better making a point to have more conversations and deeper conversations with them so that when you ask for an introduction, you're going to get people that are more similar to them not more similar to you. You because you've identified who those introduction should be coming through. So this whole friend of a friend keeping in touch with old friends approach is much more comfortable for me than like going to a networking event, but I am wondering, are there times when you should just suck it up and go to one of these events, even if you find them uncomfortable, are they in some ways useful and something that we should just force ourselves to do? So it depends on the type of it. Generally events that draw ever set of people where there's something other than connecting with people on the agenda. What in the research literature is often referred to as a shared activity, those tend to make for better connections. So this would be instead of going to the meet up for that industry or that sector that that industry group. For example, you go to the charity night where they're all going to work at this kitchen, or they're going to raise money for work on a habitat for humanity house or something like that, or even if it's just like a bowling night aiming at corneas. That sounds those things where there's some other purpose tend to. Create conversations where you get to know somebody from a broader set. So I want to ask you a little bit more about not meeting strangers or connecting with old friends, but expanding your network inside your organization. Because for a lot of this is actually where we really need to focus our time and effort. How can you start to do that? Especially if you don't have a lot of success going things like the company holiday party or the company summer outing, how can you get to know some other people in your company? So one of my favorite studies that we talked about in front of refund was completed by Dartmouth researcher Klein bomb, and it's this study about what he calls organizational misfits, people who kind of bounce around in the organization in the beginning of their career, and then actually go up the corporate ladder. If you wanna use that term but make career progress faster. They get better performance evaluations. They get promoted more often. They make more money, which is weird because originally they were bouncing around laterally from project to project. And the reason is is exactly what we've been talking about. They have a more. Verse network, they plug what researcher Ronald, Burt would refer to as structural holes, though sort of natural gaps in an organization's network that create silos that create turf wars, etc. These organizational misfits do that. Now you might not wanna stall your career out in the beginning, but it's a good comfort for some of us who feel like our careers going nowhere as long as it's going laterally in the long term, maybe it's okay, but I think you can still develop that kind of mentality of an organizational misfit by figuring out what are things I can. I can volunteer force. So there's usually in a large organization, there are external events that you can start volunteering to be on this committee for that or planning this event, but also a lot of meetings..

researcher Klein Ronald Burt twenty five percent
"hbr" Discussed on HBR IdeaCast

HBR IdeaCast

03:55 min | 3 years ago

"hbr" Discussed on HBR IdeaCast

"You would imagine of that of voters you know are eventually they act out of selfinterest now india is a unique country in society it is a complex one but there are lessons here probably four other countries like what would you tell people in other places that are more especially countries that are more cash dependent or countries where they're trying to transition more towards digital payments what recommendations do you have for those places i guess the first recommendation i would have is that countries like india and countries around the word where is prevalent we should be using less cash for number reasons and some of the most significant reasons being the cash does impose effect on society and it imposes costs consumers impose costs on businesses and most significantly it imposes costs on government and does cost half to do not just with printing cash and transporting cash and keeping cash and banks and vaults and so on it's also the fact that a cash based economy goes under the radar and there is essentially a tax gap that is created by the presence of cash in society and attacks gap means lure revenues that the government can use for public services so there are number reasons why we should be you know utilizing the variety different alternatives digital electronic you know credit cards whatever the alternatives are which help you keep a paper trail of you know payment transactions that are happening in the economy so the first is you know recognize that one of the motives behind this move to to move towards more digital payments was a very good one absolutely so the second lesson is that as we transitioned from cash do digital payments we have to understand the context in which people make payments and that context has to do with the infrastructure context you know if people have to make payments on their phones they has to be a reliable digital infrastructure so i feel that the payment to secure that it laxly go through my phone is sophisticated enough to manage that people in many cases have to have bank accounts tied to the payments so you need the financial infrastructure to be in place as well you also need a certain degree of education and financial sophistication for people to feel comfortable in dealing with a virtual transaction because the whole thing about caches it's physical i can feel it i can see it and i know that i have received the money or have given the money but when something is virtual you know it it does require a degree of trust in this invisible system that is working behind the scenes and behalf we'd respectful of that whenever we plan for transition from physical to virtual busker thank you for talking through this whole thing with great thanks for having me i enjoyed it that's busker chuck rewarded he's the dean of global business at the fletcher school at tufts university and he's the author of the article one year after india killed off cash here's what other countries should learn from it you can read it at hp art dot org this episode was produced by ramsey kabbah's adam buckholtz is our audio product manager and we get technical and production help from rob eckhardt thanks for listening to the hp cast i'm curt nick

one year
"hbr" Discussed on HBR IdeaCast

HBR IdeaCast

01:51 min | 3 years ago

"hbr" Discussed on HBR IdeaCast

"Conversation. Thanks to the listeners who wrote us with their questions. Now we want to know your questions, send us an email with your workplace challenge and how we can help the email addresses. Dear HB are at H P R dot work. And you can keep listening right now. Our next episode is that it's on office romance biological anthropologist. Helen Fisher tells us what to do when someone catches your eye or asks you out. You guys are terrified You got guys, This is a this is one of the great fall outs of what's going on right now. I mean, I'm very concerned about these sexual harassment issues, but this is bleeding into everybody being terrified. Certainly, in my generation, We knew how to handle a guy who came over and asked us for a cup of coffee. That's on our next episode. Dan McGinn. And I mouse and beard. Thanks for listening to Dear HVO Thanks so much for listening to the very first episode of dear HB are from Harvard Business Review. There are more episodes up right now, So go listen to more Just go to your favorite podcast app or use whatever you're listening to you right now and subscribe to dear each it. I'm Sierra green Carmichael. Thank you for listening to this bonus episode of each bear idiot.

Sierra green Carmichael Dan McGinn Helen Fisher Harvard Business Review harassment
"hbr" Discussed on HBR IdeaCast

HBR IdeaCast

08:23 min | 3 years ago

"hbr" Discussed on HBR IdeaCast

"For women to be in these high-power possessions. I would prefer not to take this in a sort of gender direction because Dan and I are great examples when we sit together forever moment We have been reporters, writers editors, our entire career. Why? Yes suit. So why do we wanna do this? So I go back to the motivated behaviour, Dan, pink, You know so autonomy, we control what we do. We decide what we're going to write about. We M have mastery, which them very bragging but you know we're we've done it for really long were good it what we do and then we derive meaning from our work. And so I know plenty of people, men and women who wouldn't find those three things in a management job. Lots of people do managing people, managing teams, managing organizations like those are very noble causes. You do have more control. All of those things. There are personalities who, just that's not what they want, They they want to produce. And I also think that organizations are sort of almost built on the assumption that everybody has this desire to move up yet. I used to work at a place where every year in the performance of. All EU-Asian they would have you fill out, where do you hope to be in five years? And it really felt like it was unacceptable to say, I want to be doing exactly what I'm doing now. It's almost like this gravitational force that organizations are built on that. Everybody's looking to move up. Especially Startups have a tendency to push people up the chain, And one of the things that companies need to do as they get bigger is realized that not everybody is going to go up the chain And that there are some people who wanna be that designer that engineer, who sits at their desk in, doesn't manage other people, the amount of value those people can add in that position. It makes sense not to push them to move out of it. So it's sort of always been possible at a publishing company or a law firm. The minute certainly happens in media. I honestly think though that if she knows that she wants to stay in individual contributor and she's working for a company that won't accept that, Then I think she should start looking for another job. I don't think she's other a company. We ran on a spirit at ORGA blog post by an Kramer who is an executive at Nickelodeon, and she found that. She got to management and exactly like this woman when she was in the position that she realized she wasn't right for. She said, I miss creating. I don't want to oversee the creators. I wanna be making shows. And I think unfortunately, she couldn't go back in her own organization, so she ended up leaving. Absolutely. This is is starting to highlight something that I think about as the yes, no paradox. The ideal employee, the ideal colleague says yes to every thing because we like when people say yes, to us, companies like when people say us to them via companies don't like to be told, no, they look at you as a widget. That's going to move into the SWAT and solve a lot of problems. And if the widget says, no, they need to go out and make by build, uh, something complicated. There's risks associated with that unknown person, their search costs. There's the loss in productivity while the job is open. So saying No has costs and complications to not just your boss on a personal level, but the company, You need to be aware that accompanies gonna view that. As a negative in and they're not gonna like it, We have stat seventy six percent of people don't want their bosses job 34 percent of workers aspire to leadership positions. That's not a lot. So then we have this challenge of what do we say no to and how do we say it in a way that keeps as many options open and optimizes on our goals and what we want to be doing day to day. If this woman does work in a company as Dan said that has paths for individual contributors, she should quite clearly say that she wants to be on that path. If the company doesn't have that path and sort of everyone has to go up to management. She needs to figure out whether she can negotiate a carve-out and be the first one be a trailblazer. Yeah, this is definitely a negotiation question ya. Um, it might be the case that she doesn't need to take on the job that they have in their minds for her, but there might be bits and pieces of it that she would enjoy doing, And she could get a better title and more money like she said, she wants you to. Here's one question I had on this. Let's say that she decides flat out. She. Does not want to do this? Is sheep better off giving them a no, with an honest answer or is better off giving some sort of an alterior answer? You know, it's just not a good time right now. I think I'll be ready to do that in three years. Who, If you're asked if you ever want to be president near politician? He tried to not say no, because you want to keep your options open. Is there something she needs to do here to keep her options open or to keep her as a high potential in the company not cut herself off? Yeah. Um, you don't want the scenario where they're not gonna come to you and ask, right? Being asked puts you in the higher power position because then you'll get to choose. You don't want that choice cut off and taken away from you'll altogether. I think she also needs to emphasize not just sort of why personally she doesn't want to do the job, But why the organization will benefit from her staying where she is the I think that's a fine line though. You don't want to imply that. You wouldn't be good at the job. Yeah, I think you need to be careful and saying No, that you don't say anything, the diminishes your skills or makes you sound less competent than you want your bosses too. Thank you. Are the yeah, The other solution that might come into play here is sort of the in between which is I'm happy to step up and do the job temporarily during the search. But I don't want to be a accounting for the long term position on that shows. You can do the job. It shows your team player. You're willing to make a sacrifice, but are also doesn't put you on a path. You don't wanna be long-term. I think the other difficult dynamic in the situation is that if this person had a good relationship with their own boss there now negotiating with the bosses bus, I would have no problem having that sort of conversation with my immediate manager. But I don't know that I would have that conversation with the next level up. Why not? I don't know. I think my boss understands me best and sort of understands my knowledge and skills ability, You know, the fact that I get my job done best and so. The people higher up would judge you on different things, and one of those will definitely be will. Why doesn't she want to rise to my level or the level below me? Um, and they don't know your work as well or your personal situation. It sounds like we all recognize the idea that even a far level of ambition isn't sky high, that there is some benefit in kind of faking it a little bit and making our boss think that we might be more ambitious than we really are with the idea that there's more upside to downside than doing that. Yeah. I mean, that's right. And it maybe isn't faking it, right? Like maybe that feeling internalize that and make it feel authentic as well. Life is long, careers are long. You never know how you're gonna feel in five, ten, fifteen years when your goals and your values and what you want to be doing changes in my last job, I was offered a series of promotions, and I was convinced that I'd never wanna take the job that they were offering me. Six, seven years later. I did, Yeah. So you. You don't know what your future self is gonna want because you don't know your future self. So it sounds like we're telling this person who doesn't want to step up that she should think very carefully about why she doesn't want to And what that will mean for her at the company, if she says now, and be very honest about two of what her aspirations are and how she thinks she can contribute to the company and possibly give a temporary us, which is the new all all do it for a time. But I don't want to do it long-term, or also suggest that in the future it might be something she would consider, but it's not something she's going to consider now. Yeah, I think a hard, no, as is. Definitely not the right thing to do here. We often talk about shades of yes and shades of no. And in this case saying, no, but coming from a place of yes, uh, feels like the rate scenario. You don't want the scenario where they're not gonna come to you and ask could. So That'll wrap it up for this episode. El. Sinn, Thanks for being on the show to work through these questions with us. Thank you so much for having me. Allison would Brooks is an assistant professor at Harvard Business School. She researches emotions and the psychology of conversation.

Dan engineer Harvard Business School Sinn Nickelodeon Kramer president executive assistant professor Allison Brooks seventy six percent fifteen years seven years three years 34 percent five years
"hbr" Discussed on HBR IdeaCast

HBR IdeaCast

06:10 min | 3 years ago

"hbr" Discussed on HBR IdeaCast

"To work beautifully said. Thank you. You were talking about these possible selves. It makes me think personally at has been. Very empowering to embrace the idea of having multiple selves. I am not going to be the same person when I'm in front of executive education students at the Harvard Business School teaching as I am When I'm at home, interacting with my two and a half year old and my eight-month-old and I'm not going to be the same person when I met somebody's bachelorette party in Las Vegas, right? Those are very different selves. They are all authentically me. It has been very comforting to come from a place of accepting that and embracing it rather than feeling like, Oh my gosh, I'm being an authentic. I'm not being a consistent single human across all these different contexts. The idea of bosses worrying multiple how truly rose Newt's with me during my career of worked mostly for women managers. And if I were to meet with my boss later this afternoon. I guarantee that for the first four or five minutes we would talk about, you know, what's going on in our lives. Pets children, home, run of Asians, what we watched on television. The first part of the conversation will be very warm and. The message would be that she cares about me as a person, but once we get past that it's all about, Am I delivering is the quality there? It becomes you take no prisoners all business. And I think Code shifting women in particular need to find not one fixed spot on this continuum, but the ability to move back and forth in a way that shows you people that you care for them as people, but that you demand results at the same time. I agree. I often think about the ratio of any conversation. Where is the emphasis on warmth versus competence? And I've experimented myself with the ratio of time, So let's say you have a half-hour meeting and you think about, Okay, How many minutes at the beginning of the conversation should we talk about his each other's children are like, what's going on in your life for? But he's struggling with that right now personally. And then there is this like inflection point where you turn to talk about substantive things. One of my boss' that in meetings we'd start she'd have her notebook closed in front. We talk for a few minutes, and then at a certain point, the note Oakwood open up in the message was, okay, Now it's time to get down to business and the mood would change the climate in the atmosphere in the room which he change. And you know, it was clear that at that point it was all about competence. And importantly, when you reaches inflection point, It's not like you're moving from warmth to competence over all your decision to smile or not. When someone comes up with an original idea verses saying like, that's a good idea. Terrible idea, We're not going to talk about this, those micro-moments matter to. So when you get to the substantive part warmth versus competence still matters. But even thinking broadly about the structure of the whole conversation is actually really smart to do ahead of time, said, sounds like retelling are female leader that she needs to push herself and experiment more to show a little bit more emotion when she can. I would say also that I find almost all people to be overly serious. Um, so don't hesitate to be a little bit silly are a little bit more fun, A little bit funny air. I think a lot of women hold back on leading that side of them show because it feels unprofessional or or incompetent in some way, But people love it. Bill Want to interact with you more to discuss fourth. Terrific to the conclusion. It sounds like we agree that sh needs to dial up the warmth. Understand the risks of going too far in that direction. But understanding that a stoic professional is probably going to be disliked in that, that's going to inhibit her career much more in the long-term. Yeah. Good summary onto our last listener question Dear HB are my boss just quit. I've been asked to step up and fill the leadership vacuum. I'm flattered and it would be nice to get a better title and more money, but I'm just not interested. I've served in a similar role at another company and I didn't enjoy it. That's not where I wanna go professionally bid. Even though I wanna remain an individual contributor, I'm afraid I'll hurt my career by saying, No to this opportunity. How do I say no and not hurt my career? Allison, any research on it. I I I have a question first. Can you clarify what they mean by? I'm afraid I'll hurt my career by saying No to this opportunity. So the first thing I thought about what this question was, Is this a company where there's a lot of pressure to move up, where individual contributors are not considered a a long term position? The fact that she is anxious about this suggests that she doesn't feel like she can just spend her career in the Royal. She's a now a disaster ELP. Yes, yes. One thinking about whether to accept a promotion or not. Uh, we have a bit of data that I collected with my colleague Francesca Gino, And we asked people to just right down the things that you care about, the things you hope to achieve, and the things that are on your mind on a daily basis. These might be things that are really long term and heavy and important Like, I want to have four children or I'd like to make sure I keep my family healthy or they could be really trivial things like I wanna stop biting my nails. I want to lose three pounds. I want to buy a shell jacket. So uh, this is a long preamble to say that this goal structure ends up influencing many of our life choices. And so what we found is when you offer a promotion to men and women, Women are less likely to accept it. Then our men because they understand the trade off, they understand the trade us women, a men predict the same levels of the positive stuff. So like, they know that this job is going to bring them more money, more power, more prestige, all of the good stuff. But when. In predict more of the negative stuff, They anticipate more stress more trade-offs, more burden, and being more tired possible that women are over predicting the negative things that come with promotions. It's possible that men are under predicting the negative things that come with promotion or it's possible that they're getting it completely right. That it actually is more stressful for

Harvard Business School executive Las Vegas rose Newt Francesca Gino Bill Allison five minutes three pounds eight-month
"hbr" Discussed on HBR IdeaCast

HBR IdeaCast

13:51 min | 3 years ago

"hbr" Discussed on HBR IdeaCast

"An and Welcome to the aides. Ver idea cast from Harvard Business Review. I'm Sierra green army. Are you not independently Wealthy? Do you have to go to work from time to time? Well, today I've got a bonus real. It's a new podcast from Harvard Business Review called Dear each We are. And that applies to you because it's a workplace advice show. The truth is, everyone needs help at work from the newest employee to the CEO. Dear each beer is here to help you with that maddening coworker that unapproachable boss or your unmotivated team. The show is hosted by two Greek colleagues of mine each beer, senior editors, Dan McGinn, and Alison beard detox, talked through your questions with an expert and with fresh insights from the latest management research. Each episode They take on a theme like being a boss for the first time, toxic coworkers and office romances today as a bonus on this podcast, I'm playing you the very first episode of dear HB are Enjoy. Welcome to dear. HB are from Harvard Business Review. Dan McGinn and I mouse and beard. Work can be frustrating, but it doesn't have to be the truth is that we don't have to let the tension conflicts and misunderstandings get us down. We can do something about them. that toward dear each VR comes in. We take your questions about workplace dilemmas, and with the help of experts and insights from academic research. We help you move forward. So Dan, when you suggested that we might start co-hosting this podcast together and then it would be an official I thought that was a great idea because you are always on giving me advice about what to do it work. Well, that makes it sound like a window at all. And I just finished grisly give advice all the time. No, that's true. But I think we we talk to each other before we go into our annual reviews A lot of times and we can burn Bernard afterward. Yeah. I started to weeks before you at each PR, and we've sat next to each other the entire time that we've worked for the company. We give each other advice back and forth. Yeah. Why this appeals to me is work has gotten more complicated and just flat out crazy onward lesions. If somebody's a weekly two o'clock in the morning obsessing over something work is probably a big chunk of the pie chart. Anything we can do to help people with those issues. And especially when there's research you in particular. Or the research nerd, and Have you always bring the science to this? Um, that's doing them a surf. Then we all need help. Everyone needs it from the youngest manager to the CEO. Shower early know again. Okay. Today, we're going to answer questions about First time bosses, people who are brand new managers, whether they like it or not. Joining us now is Ellison would Brooks she's an assistant professor at Harvard Business School where she researches emotions and the psychology of conversations Allison. Thanks so much for being on the show. Thanks for having me. I'm thrilled to be here. Here's our first listener question. Dear HB are after three years at my company, I was recently promoted to director of operations a new position, and the youngest manager in my department Emma's now supervised to former peers. Both of whom are older than me. One has already been quite vocal about her frustration with this reorganize from my leadership training. I knew that I should meet with her one on one and get all these issues out on the table. I did. And I thought I asked all the right questions, encouraged her to share her concerns and ask for advice on how we could best work together. But she was completely closed off. She said that it seemed unproductive to talk about her feelings and that she preferred to just focus on work. How can I get her to open? Up and trust me. So professor Allison, What do you think like that at Lake when you call me press Allison? Um, the the questioner asked, how can I get her to open up and trust me? My question is why, why do you want to be having this conversation with her? I think it's important to think about what, what are you trying to talk about with your It? Isn't that all the advice that you get from Lynda Hill becoming a Vaas all the advice you've got? Is that the first thing you should do is meet with your direct reports, one on one and talk about your leadership style and talk about how you like to work and ask them how they want you to work with them. And that's all the advice you've got right yet. Absolutely. Right. And it sounds like this manager has has done that And it was, you know, not that fruitful. This person doesn't wanna talk about what we're going to do. It sounds like they just want to do it. This manager should should just let them run with it. Just let them go and see if they are performing well. If at some point you feel like this relationship is holding you back or holding the other person back than maybe it's were sitting down and revisiting and trying to to works through some things. But we don't need to talk and talk. And talk to try and figure things out all the time and But what about if this person is feeling sensitive resentful of being passed over for promotion or Jellison or insecure because you know, hasn't gotten the promotion and this young manager is now, you know, on top of them. So to speak. This are a lot of emotions sort of going around in this office. So how should this new boss deal with it said This scenario is sort of the perfect storm for feeling envious because you are similar people who are at the same level very recently, and then one person is promoted. That's the perfect recipe for interpersonal Andy. There are two different forms of envy. There's malicious envy where they have something that you want And you wish they didn't have it, and you want to sort of tear them down. And then there's benign envy, uh, where you realize they have something that you want, but instead of trying to tear them down, you want to lift yourself up as managers at sort of our job is to try and inspire people. To lift themselves up rather than tearing others down. One way that we've identified that you can do this is by very openly An explicitly talking about the failures that you've encountered on your path to success. Wouldn't that be hard though for this sort of new young boss to do to sort of walk in talking about things that he's done wrong? It feels very counter-intuitive in every professional setting and on all of our resumes, N C vis and on social media, we have this really strong intuition to reveal only positive things about ourselves, especially for this person who feels like they probably need to prove themselves as of new manager. But those are exactly the situations were revealing failures can be most profound. It's funny because I like to do my research before egg. I go into these things. So while I'm one of the pieces that I read was, why should anyone be led by you? It was a study of leaders and what the best leaders do, And one of the first ones was reveal weaknesses. Zing nine now M Linda Hills becoming. Bassem citing again, Man, you'd had lit up. Um, but uh, she talks about demonstrating character that you have the right intentions, which circles back around the benign envy sort of. I know you wanted this job, but could we all work together to get to this goal? That is what we all one. And then showing that you have the competence, the knowledge to sort of get that person there, And then also that you have influence to maybe that's what this employee needs. His sort of a demonstration of those three things sort of. If you want to focus on work, That's totally cool. Here's how it can help you focus on work and get us both higher in the sorghum as Asian. Yep. I wonder if we're missing one of the key points this question, which is that the new boss is really, really young and the subordinates more older. There's an age gap here on the oldest in the room right now you tourist ago isn't going to laying Tab I'm probably the only one here who remembers the TV show Dugi Hauser of. The film your. We remember, It'll both, But Yukiho there is when we were like five. All right. All right And I always older. Five. But Allison, You're he became a professor at Harvard in your twenty I did you routinely are in a executive classroom with much older executives. Is there anything you've done to try to minimize that perception that she's too young to be doing this? He asked, Yes. When I started at a hover business call, I was twenty eight and the average age of MBA students as twenty nine or thirty I think so even by MBA, students were on average older than me how I know this feeling very, very well of being sensitive about age. And I do think there is a dramatic ageism in the workplace that are people tend to be resent fall f a younger person has higher than them in status or just in general ageism where we've kind of view expertise or knowledge to correlate perfectly with age, which is definitely not true. So long story short, I I can imagine how this manager is feeling self-conscious about his or her age. And maybe that's part of this as the resentment. That he or she is send saying that the older person is resentful that a younger person was promoted in any social situation like this, where things are sensitive, my go-to strategy. And one that I advocate to others is to ask questions. Are you bothered that I'm you know, younger than you. That's direct, super Dry. I know shockingly direct said, but you know, they'll probably say no, but you can read their reaction based on non-verbal queues to Realty. I would go in exactly the opposite direction there because you're an old guy But I would actively take steps to try to minimize the perceived age gap mean imagine if you know because on the old guy in the room, imagine if I was working for you. And I said, Send me that a slide deck on email. And he said, no, all Snapchat, ah, to you. On that night. Unhappy on, That's gonna make me feel older. You know, if I see you on a Monday morning and said Alison, how is your weekend? And you say, Oh, I went to see Justin Bieber on Saturday night. Not a good thing. You're emphasizing the fact that there's this cavern between our ages, and I think you do this yourself FINA your focused on the highfalutin psychological techniques here at you know, You dress very professionally. I've actually always done that too. Like from the moment I started at the Financial Times and I was pretty young in my 20th people dead wear jeans and whatnot, but all the senior reporters Where suits and so I was like, I'm coming to work and had not a suit. But you know, address every day. They always say if the dress for the job you want to have, right? Not the one that you have. Yeah. Actually, one thing is like when my hair started. Corning gray I was like, I'm not even gonna diet because I just don't want to look like I'm 28 I want to look a little bit older and I'm not gonna talk about, you know, the latest leg top forty song, because I want to feel like I'm in the same group in speaking the same language as my older colleagues flip the script there, The older person does probably worrying that there are a little bit too old. You're not going to be 28 forever. Tell me about it. Senate, You know, you have an asset in a lot of ways, And I'm don't focus on this liability. Uh, because the person who's older is probably feeling that age is a weakness for them as much as you're filling it for yourself. Do you think the asking questions well exacerbate the age difference are just get to a place of more mutual understanding. I know for me, if I was uncomfortable reporting to somebody who was younger and they asked me delight father, yep. It would make the situation worse IAEA And I also think that this employee has demonstrated that she does not want to talk. I mean, I feel like that he added across really clearly out. She does not wanna talk yet. Um, and so I feel like the path forward is to do what she wants focus on work. As you said, if she's underperforming asserted need had started having more conversations with our fine, but small things, um, making a personal connection which you know doesn't have to be sort of an in-depth emotional conversation. But talk about restaurants are sports or something that you can find that you have in common, which might be more difficult when you're young and old. But it's not impossible. And maybe what you have in common is just the work that you're doing. What's interesting is that we also publishes are I think, Dan, you publish this piece and it was research basically showing that low status bosses suit of be whether it's because of their age or experience. Her education level actually should be Bossi and it's more effective which struck me. Is so odd? Yeah, It was definitely the opposite of what you would expect. The study looked at situations where a younger boss was very directive or was more accommodating, a little bit softer, and and found the opposite of what you would expect that the directive boss, even though it seems like it would be off-putting to be bossed her on by this baby at that actually worked really wealth. It's like a movie exotic. So what's the take away? What are we telling this person to do? I think we're telling this person to stop, be laboring this change and the differences between you and you are a direct reports and maybe just try and get on with your work focus on the work like your subordinate wants to do and see how things go. Another thing is you can just tried to be delightful. Of course, focusing on the work and being competent as important, but being the delightful colleague and a delightful bosses difficult to argue with Toyko the life on

Dan McGinn Allison Harvard Business Review CEO Alison beard professor Sierra green army Harvard Business School director of operations Justin Bieber Bernard Lynda Hill Financial Times Harvard Dugi Hauser Bassem Toyko Linda Hills
"hbr" Discussed on HBR IdeaCast

HBR IdeaCast

01:37 min | 4 years ago

"hbr" Discussed on HBR IdeaCast

"Right yeah i have a conversation with you and say well i just realized we're going in a direction that's really different than what matters to you and that you're good at and so let's not make each other miserable in the next six months let's figure out how you make an exit that you can walk away from here with some incredible experience and we can find somebody who's going to be really perfect at doing what we need to do what is the right way to fire someone if you have to well first of all we stop using words like fire malkay aging and firing right nobody wbz out a gun there's no blood and the thing i hate about using the word firing is that when someone says i was fired they feel ashamed right i mean why would we ever wanna make someone feel ashamed you know sometimes you hire somebody do a job and then they do it it's done you need up to keep doing it over and over again they did it great sometimes it takes years sometimes it takes months you know and so you can acknowledged that that happens i see it a lot in early startups or tech companies or companies where you're building something new so when you're building something new the people who are builders and get excited about doing that and you know run into walls of starting over again they're really really good at doing that and they tend to be not the best people to maintain it you know because they wanted you big stuff now of a sudden it's incremental it's detail oriented it's different job and so those are two different employees.

six months
"hbr" Discussed on HBR IdeaCast

HBR IdeaCast

19:02 min | 4 years ago

"hbr" Discussed on HBR IdeaCast

"hbr" Discussed on HBR IdeaCast

HBR IdeaCast

01:48 min | 4 years ago

"hbr" Discussed on HBR IdeaCast

"Welcome to the each we are idea cast from harvard business review unsealed green coming all there we were a group of friends driving through sicily in search of a hilltop village are gps guided us to turn left then rate then left again and the roads were getting smaller and smaller then suddenly the hillside fell away steeply there was just a track carved out by the hooves of greece and goats the gps said it was a road and we had trusted the technology nowadays though gps isn't the only technology people are figuring out how to trust for instance there's also a fast growing market of smart speakers like the amazon echo and it's artificial intelligence assistant alexa play each be our idea cast getting the latest episode of each biaro idea passed here it is from tuning so far about seven percent of households any with have smart speakers according to an npr edison research survey but if those who do have them fortytwo percent say they are essential to their everyday lives and those who don't often say they're worried about privacy from hackers or even at the government might be listening in devices are becoming so helpful it can be scary our guest today eight studies that tension between utility and fear and she joins me now to talk about how new technology is testing our trust rachel batsmen teaches at the university of oxford sayed business school her new book is who can you trust how technology brought us together and why it my travis apart rachel thank you for talking with us today it's good to be here so i wanted to disturb by asking you a little bit about an example that.

greece gps travis harvard business review sicily amazon artificial intelligence npr edison research rachel university of oxford sayed bus fortytwo percent seven percent
"hbr" Discussed on HBR IdeaCast

HBR IdeaCast

01:40 min | 4 years ago

"hbr" Discussed on HBR IdeaCast

"Attractive and that's obviously why we pivoted but it took us a while the kind of figure out like what kind of people do we need to hire in this new world how do we going to sell the customers what kind of infrastructure are we going to need to build what new capabilities do we have to create into the product and that was a very long list in a in a pretty tedious exercise there were lots of late night brainstorms lots of fighting at first i actually resisted the pivot my cofounder sort of almost forced me to do it and then eventually i i recognized all of the kind of exciting potential if we could retain again that consumer ethos and bring that into the enterprise and then i got on board and the sort of rest is history given that you were skeptic how did you really know when you had to deal it was just the fundamental economics of the consumer business we were making too little money off too few users which just was not going to pretend a good longterm business model so it was pretty obvious in our case as we pivoted and dealing with that change management fortunately we're at subscale so you know fifteen twenty people that that we had to communicate with that wasn't that difficult but will we had to do is get really clear and what our principles and ethos we're going to be as a company even though we were going after a slightly different market in with a different approach now we're at 1600 people and so we do deal with change a little bit more at a larger scale on a more global basis what we tend to find his you have to have a very very strong consistent norstar so you want to deeply understand where you're trying to go what are you trying to do for customers you really don't want back to change in any meaningful way what you're just going to be doing is you're going to change how your delivering that value proposition to customers so you know if you take a company like ford they're still going to be the company that helps you get around but the way they deliver that might move from selling you something through a dealer to delivering something as they serve.

ford
"hbr" Discussed on HBR IdeaCast

HBR IdeaCast

02:10 min | 4 years ago

"hbr" Discussed on HBR IdeaCast

"Why is it that women are always the ones who get these textile jobs part of the reason is that the factory owners many that i speak to you actually preferred to employ women particularly for jobs that require manual dexterity and so eat a clothing sowing these are in part because more women or larger proportion of women have some experience doing this at home the factory owners actually feel high women are just the come in having some sort of experience being better employee's at these sorts of jobs the other part of this is that you don't when we talk about an untapped labor pool in therefore a source of competitive vintage in a lot of these countries including in china back in the '80s '90s along with the untapped liverpool actually are women you know the men enlisted you are the ones that for generations have gone out to work in south african mines in so there's a sense in which if you need workers the biggest pool that don't already have jobs are actually women in so they end up being this new vanguard of the workforce and part of what i talk about in the book is how that actually sparks social change in these countries and so i tell the story of three women in lubutu who actually start is factory workers and then get involved in the union movement as a way to actually make a difference in the lives of themselves and their friends who all work in asian own factories masutu and then there now in middle management and they're starting to contemplate the possibility that they could take national leadership positions in the union which is hugely important in politics and that is unheard of enlist you extremely traditional maledominated societies or for these women to be imagining this it just shows how.

china liverpool lubutu south african