36 Burst results for "HBO"

Fresh update on "hbo" discussed on Eyewitness Beauty

Eyewitness Beauty

01:05 min | 15 hrs ago

Fresh update on "hbo" discussed on Eyewitness Beauty

"Because the other thing with Keith raniere is like, none of what he's saying makes sense. You can't follow one of his thoughts. It's like, it's gobbledygook. It's like, what is it like word salad? Word soup or whatever, where it's like, it doesn't make any sense. And people are nodding as if he's saying the most profound thing. Yeah, he's like, he just uses like the perception of your reality is the cognitive. Yeah, yeah. It's like the perception of your reality is all you have. But if you perceive reality differently without the perception, that's happiness. Then what do you have? And then people are like, exactly. But, you know, 18,000 people went through NXIVM and there still is one of the guys in the documentary who says that cured his Tourette's. Still is like a supporter of Keith, even now knowing everything that's come out in the trial, all of the very sinister sex and. All of the horrible sex crimes that he was convicted of, it's bad. But it is must see TV on HBO. Personally, it's very interesting. I'm interested to hear from any readers that were in sorority as it is interesting how often they describe the dos, which is the internal all women cult as a sorority. We think it's all women. What do you mean you think it's all women? You're led to believe the women who enter dos are led to believe that it's only women involved. Oh, it's not only women? I haven't gotten to watch. Oh, I don't want to. I don't want to. I just find him so irritating to look at. He looks like a younger version of, if you watch the Harry Potter movies, you know the guy that's like a rat, but who's also a human sometimes? No, I have no idea. He looks like he looks like the younger version of him. I mean, it just show it is so bizarre. This was the reason why I even wanted to highlight the vowel is because if any readers of this podcast have any experience with NXIVM, it's all I want to talk about. DM me. Please, I will, I will happily have any and all conversations about NXIVM in the DMs. There's 17,000 people out there. I know, and someone must have an aunt or someone who was in it and has a story about it. I want to hear stories. It's my primary passion as hearing about NXIVM right now. The other thing I'll say is that Claire bromfman, who is one of the kids of Edgar bronfman, the seagram's air. Anyway, billions of dollars, bankrolled. She's a NEPA baby. She bang girl NXIVM. It's believed that she spent like over a $100 million in various ways like funding NXIVM funding lawsuits for funding. She was also funding the research into their work with people with Tourette's Tourette's. Yeah. But it was like, that stuff was very dangerous because it was being the practitioners were not licensed to be doing Tourette's work. I get really worked up about NXIVM, but anyway, if anyone has any experiences, please let me know. Were you in a fraternity, Nick? Yeah, my freshman year, I went to Johns Hopkins. I was in AE pie, which is the Jewish fraternity. Yeah.

Keith Raniere Tourette's HBO Keith Claire Bromfman Harry Potter Nxivm Edgar Bronfman Seagram Tourette's Tourette's Tourette Nick Johns Hopkins
HBO Max Is Cutting Smoking From Old Movies

AJ Benza: Fame is a Bitch

02:05 min | 2 months ago

HBO Max Is Cutting Smoking From Old Movies

"To see this new thing, HBO is cutting back on costs. Okay, HBO Max. Try to save some money. So get this, they're taking cigarettes out of old movie posters. It's such a ridiculous move. They've been censoring cigarettes from certain really famous iconic movie posters that they display on their streaming site. Now I thought it was on a couple of years ago when I started to see. This movie contains graphic language just moving contains sex and smoking. I thought smoking. Why do we need them? Why don't we need that? Oh, warning people are smoking in this movie. All right. I don't know why that suddenly became the thing we have to warn people about. As if it's as bad as sex or so now not only are they warning you that smoking takes place in a movie, now they've gone and just taken the cigarettes or cigars out of actors hands on movie posters. Some people were on Twitter and they noticed, hey, you scrubbing cigarettes out of some very famous movie posters. Robert Altman's mccabe and misses Miller. The life and times of judge Roy bean, you got these Photoshop posters, you know, Warren Beatty and Paul Newman no longer hold cigarettes between their fingers, but instead they're just posing bizarrely with their hands in a certain position with the digits raised up in the air, staring off in a distance. That's better. You see they show the photo before and after? And it's outraging people. It's so stupid. It's ridiculous. 90% of the people who work at Warner Brothers are discovery. I bet they vape at their desk, a small snort Coke at lunch, and now we can't see a cigarette in someone's hand. I hate smoking, but it's part of the movie.

HBO Roy Bean Robert Altman Mccabe Warren Beatty Paul Newman Miller Twitter Warner Brothers
Robert DeNiro to Play Two Separate Mafiosa in 'Wise Guys'

AJ Benza: Fame is a Bitch

02:27 min | 3 months ago

Robert DeNiro to Play Two Separate Mafiosa in 'Wise Guys'

"But wise guys, this movie is going to make De Niro. It's a period of peace. He's going to tell the story of Vito Genovese and Frank Costello. Who are a pair of Italians running two separate crime families during the mid 20th century, Genovese tried and failed to assassinate Costello in 1957. But then, well, it's a great story. The in Costello got his revenge. And De Niro, you ready for this? Is playing both roles? What are we doing? I love De Niro. In my mind, he can play anything. I'd watch De Niro play an Uber driver. I don't care. He's the best, and I know he's done some roles in the last 20 years, which are embarrassing. You know, yeah, I have to remember. When actors get to a certain age and their grandpas or daddies, they tend to do things that their kids are grandkids want to see. So you can't get up there and ask too much. De Niro did a rock in bullwinkle. He knows it was a piece of shit, but he wanted his grandkid to see him in the movie, or hear him in a movie. You know, you can't. But De Niro's playing both these roles, Genovese and Costello. Nick pileggi has written this script pileggi wrote Goodfellas. He's the best in the business. And he wrote the book wise guy, but that's not what this movie is based on. Unfortunately, the producers Irwin Winkler, he's the fuck face who keeps squeezing Sylvester Stallone, and won't give him a percentage point of the rocky movies, so Winkler is producing this which sucks. Barry Levinson is the best. He'd made movies toys, bugsy, rain man, good morning, Vietnam, ten men, and diner among others. He also did the HBO Emmy nominated series, the survivor, he did two episodes of dope sick with Michael Keaton. This guy, I mean, look, you can't get better people. But De Niro playing both roles, I wonder what that's gonna look like, you know?

De Niro Costello Vito Genovese Frank Costello Genovese Nick Pileggi Pileggi Irwin Winkler Goodfellas Sylvester Stallone Barry Levinson Winkler Vietnam Emmy HBO Michael Keaton
Actor and comedian Teddy Ray dies in Southern California

AP News Radio

00:28 sec | 3 months ago

Actor and comedian Teddy Ray dies in Southern California

"Actor and comedian teddy ray has died at the age of 32 according to authorities in California I'm Marc czar led a with the latest The Los Angeles Times report sheriff's responded to a call about a death at a private residence in Rancho mirage California on Friday A sheriff's spokeswoman and the county coroner confirmed the death of teddy ray but the cause of death is unknown Ray played the bailiff on the HBO Max series pause with Sam Jay He also appeared on the digital series cancel court and did stand up

Teddy Ray Marc Czar The Los Angeles Times California Rancho Mirage Sam Jay RAY HBO
Warner Brothers' 'Bean Counters' Scrap Batgirl

AJ Benza: Fame is a Bitch

01:53 min | 4 months ago

Warner Brothers' 'Bean Counters' Scrap Batgirl

"Warner Brothers scrapped batgirl and the Scooby-Doo movie Scoob!. Holiday haunt. Which, I don't know who the hell's gonna see that movie outside of your young kids, but this cancellation by Warner Brothers, these were made for HBO Max streaming movies and they were both scrapped. And that came as a shock to the town. Then there are several schools of thought here, but this move announced to a big rejection of WarnerMedia's strategy to make original $70 million live action and animated films directly for HBO Max. So the makers of batgirl, live action batgirl, and the animated Scoob!, they found out the other day that those films were being stopped in their tracks, the timing is really weird and awkward for batgirl that directors ideal are being Bilal fala, both in Morocco for one of their weddings. How's that for a wedding gift? Your movie's not gonna be aired with scrapping, it's done. Forget all the work that you did the last year and a half. And they are expected to return to the cutting room and continue to work on this film, but no, so them Leslie grace the star, J. K. Simmons, Brandon Fraser, and Michael Keaton as Batman, all that work down the tubes. They got paid, but still. Initially, there were cries that the scrapping of batgirl was bad optics because the title role is played by a Latina. Doesn't look that when you scrap a movie with a Latina in the lead. But there were reasons for the move and in both cases the filmmakers would tell that it came down to a purchasing accounting maneuver available to Warner Brothers discovery because the company had changed hands and also changed strategies from the previous regime. This always happens. It's a pain in the ass. I hate when creativity is killed off by the bean counters upstairs.

Warner Brothers Warnermedia HBO Bilal Fala Leslie Grace J. K. Simmons Brandon Fraser Morocco Michael Keaton Batgirl Batman
Danielle D'Souza Gill and Dinesh Discuss the Cancelled 'Batgirl' Movie

The Dinesh D'Souza Podcast

02:19 min | 4 months ago

Danielle D'Souza Gill and Dinesh Discuss the Cancelled 'Batgirl' Movie

"I'm back with my daughter Danielle de Souza gill author of the book the choice and also a merchandise store and we were talking about abortion we want to now talk about Hollywood and I was kind of chuckling because I'm reading in the rap, which is a website that covers entertainment. It says batgirl won't fly. Warner Brothers discovery has no plans to release a nearly finished $90 million film. So evidently, they thought we have Batman. We gotta do bat girl. And so they commissioned this filmmaking duo, a guy, one guy named RB, and another guy named fala to make this bat girl. And these guys seem to be like your classic woke producers. And so they make this bad girl evidently they look at it and they just go, this is super boring. Not only can we not put this in the theater, but they're saying we can't even put it on HBO Max. So they were initially thinking if we don't do a theatrical we can at least do home box office, they've decided to just basically throw the movie into the trash. Now, some leftists are little up in arms because I think they see this as like it's sending a negative message to marginalized groups that batgirl is being taken off the shelf. What's your reading on this as a kind of both in and of itself, but as a metaphor for wool Hollywood? I don't know what marginalized groups would be offended other than bats because I mean, I don't know who else this would possibly offend. But I would just say that I think the movie I haven't seen it because they're not releasing it, but it's probably much worse than we've been thinking. It's probably not just boring because then yeah, why wouldn't you sell it and put it on a streaming platform if it's just a boring movie? Maybe you can make something, but it probably they're worried about lawsuits or that it's going to offend people or even cause a bigger uproar than they would have thought maybe cost them more money because they've had other films come out that they've been sued over and I have issues like that and so they're probably saying this is just a loss for us because it's just not even worth it even if the movie doesn't have much popularity. It's just not worth it because of some kind of maybe pushback there worried about. I don't know what else is that they could possibly leave it to throw away the $90 million film.

Danielle De Souza Gill Fala Batgirl Hollywood Warner Brothers Batman HBO
Warner Bros. axes 'Batgirl,' won’t release $90M HBO Max film

AP News Radio

00:41 sec | 4 months ago

Warner Bros. axes 'Batgirl,' won’t release $90M HBO Max film

"What if they made a Hollywood movie but decided not to let anyone see it Think of it as a potential blockbuster that won't ever make it to a block near you Warner Brothers has decided to spike the batgirl movie was planning for HBO Max That means instead of releasing it on streaming or in theaters Warner will simply eat the cost of the $90 million movie It was to star in the heights star Leslie grace as batgirl and costar Michael Keaton as Batman This is an almost unheard of move in Hollywood Look at it this way Consider the worst movie you ever saw And then think how bad studio exits felt that batgirl must be for them to decide that it should never see the light of day I'm Oscar wells Gabriel

Hollywood Leslie Grace Warner Brothers Batgirl HBO Michael Keaton Warner Oscar Gabriel
Did the White House Make an Error in Shinzo Abe's Name?

Mike Gallagher Podcast

01:27 min | 5 months ago

Did the White House Make an Error in Shinzo Abe's Name?

"Does anybody know if you're Japanese or you're fluent in Japanese affairs? Is it shenzhou Abe or Abe Shinzo? Did the Japanese have that tradition of kind of inverting the names? Because some cultures and languages do that. But Biden's statement calls him abbe Abe Shinzo. Everywhere I've always known him to be shin so Abe. Tell me The White House didn't make that kind of an error. Please tell me that they aren't so incompetent that they don't know the proper usage of the former Japanese prime minister's name. I mean, honest to goodness, you can't make this crap up. It's like that we're living through an episode of veep nonstop. It's on a loop. And if you don't believe me, warning language warning, lots of adult language, but it's one of the funniest TV shows in the history of TV. And it's called veep starting the brilliantly funny Julia Louis-Dreyfus on HBO. And that's what this is like. Kamala Harris babbling? Joe Biden's wife telling him say God bless America. Say God bless America. God bless America. It's like the scene from Christmas vacation.

Shenzhou Abe Abe Shinzo Abbe Abe Shinzo Biden ABE White House Julia Louis Dreyfus Kamala Harris HBO Joe Biden America
Kellyanne Conway Reminds Bill Maher What Americans Actually Care About

Mike Gallagher Podcast

01:47 min | 6 months ago

Kellyanne Conway Reminds Bill Maher What Americans Actually Care About

"But listen to Bill Maher. Friday night, he had Kellyanne Conway as a guest. She's Hawking a book. She's got a new book out and I want to read it. I'm interested in her. I think she's a smart many people say Donald Trump is not president in 2016 without Kellyanne Conway. Brilliant pollster, smart lady. She's got a mess of a family life with that buffoon husband or hers who hates Trump. But here's HBO's real time with Bill Maher, a journalist Josh barrow and Kellyanne Conway. I want to play this for you and get your reaction to it. So I don't know whether they'll prosecute him or not. I mean, the difficulty as Kellyanne points out is that you have to convince the jury that he knew that he was not entitled to the thing that he was looking for. And it's always difficult with Donald Trump to demonstrate what his mental state was. He could believe anything, basically. But it's also it's a question for a jury. They could bring they could bring the indictment or would be up for it. I just remember clear. These hearings are not about that. They hired a Hollywood a news producer to make it a production. And that's okay. But that's not pretend that it wasn't valid. That's the footage is the footage. Right. Footage is appealing. I said that for a year and a half. I know. But every day on my calendar doesn't say January 6th, people are trying to pay their mortgages by gas. Here we go. Back to the gas prices, which has nothing to do with this. It is spinning. It's promised you will get it. If I promise super unheard of. I know. But if I promise you one more time that we will get to talking about gas prices. Can we do that in a courtroom? I don't want to mislead people who are watching thinking that somehow you're saying he committed crimes. If you take the crimes and somebody will have to prosecute that. But that's not what these hearings are.

Kellyanne Conway Bill Maher Donald Trump Josh Barrow Kellyanne HBO Hollywood
Why Mindy Kaling's South Asian Velma Won't Hit Home

AJ Benza: Fame is a Bitch

01:53 min | 6 months ago

Why Mindy Kaling's South Asian Velma Won't Hit Home

"Mindy Kaling. The actress who won't tell us who the father of her baby is, but we all know it's a former costar. B. J. Novak, she has created a Scooby-Doo animated spin off velma for HBO Max and she's making velma a South Asian brown skin girl. And she doesn't give a shit. Who doesn't like the idea? She said, if a dog can solve crimes and thelma can be brown. Hopefully you'll notice my velma is South Asian, she said, and the people freak out, I just don't care. You know what make you freak out? Mindy, your purple gums. I don't like your purple gums. That make me a bad guy? Just being honest. Well, good. I'm glad you don't care because not many people are going to care for your show. Velma, which will be animated and for adults. HBO Max is going to expand their adult animated programming. Velma tells the origin story of velma dinkley. Not really a name for a South Asian, but whatever. Velma dinkley, the unsung and underappreciated brains of the Scooby-Doo mystery ink Yang. And after the animated show was announced, Twitter blew up with openly racist complaints about caving new project and some people pointed out how making velma into a studious Asian nerd also plays into stereotypes. Listen, this is the thing. I hate that it has to be a race thing. I really do. I just, I don't like them changing characters from what they are in the first place and have been for decades, to me it's very off putting. You can't make a new character. There's Popeye have to be Latino going down the road. What are we doing?

Velma B. J. Novak Mindy Kaling Velma Dinkley Thelma HBO Mindy Brown Yang Twitter
What Director John Woo Got Wrong in 'Windtalkers'

Key Battles of American History

01:49 min | 6 months ago

What Director John Woo Got Wrong in 'Windtalkers'

"Where there's negatives is these combat scenes are filmed like action sequences in action movies. And I personally don't like that. Because I feel like it cheapens the combat. I prefer a cinema verite style. So if you watch, if you watch Saving Private Ryan, if you watch full metal jacket, if you watch Black Hawk down a little bit, but really the first two films, if you watched 1917, where it's a very flat documentary type style of filmmaking where you're and although chance Malik was stylized in what he did, he doesn't use slow motions. He doesn't use tracking sequences in these elaborate elaborate, the guys are jumping around and flying through the air. It's a very realistic form, even though it's a very stylized film in thin red line. But Saving Private Ryan is one of the better films Spielberg doesn't use those slow motion sequences except when you're showing disorientation and things like that. He doesn't use the her sweeping heroic music and the leaping and the jumping. The band and brothers series on the HBO and the Pacific as well, which is the companion series. There's a very good job of capturing combat from a realistic perspective. And I think that is more appropriate for a war film. I think that John whoo is a great action director, but he films these sequences as action sequences. And we'll talk some more about what he intended from the film and what we got. From the studio later, but I think that's the real problem with this. One of the real problems. There's a couple, but that's one of the real problems is this very cliched. It's very action cliche film techniques and it doesn't help the

Ryan Malik Spielberg John Whoo HBO
Netflix Tanks 37% On Massive Subscriber Loss

The Charlie Kirk Show

02:01 min | 7 months ago

Netflix Tanks 37% On Massive Subscriber Loss

"Netflix is now down by 30 7% their stock. Down 37% in trading. Now it came out yesterday that Netflix reported a loss of 200 thousand monthly paying subscribers during the first quarter of this year. Netflix has embraced the woke agenda completely and totally. Now there's still some good content on Netflix. I canceled my Netflix subscription. Because after they publish cuties, which I believe was very close to child pornography and other people agree, it's hard to not come to that conclusion. There are some fine content on Netflix, their show on Elon Musk is fine. Their World War II documentaries are okay. Sure. But Netflix has gone all in on the diversity equity, agenda. In fact, Netflix has become a mouthpiece for the political correct regime. They've entire categories dedicated to trans content. Entire categories dedicated to fighting racism. Netflix, of course, is now coming up against other competitors, a big push from Disney, the grooming network, big push, which is Hulu, of course. Hulu is owned by Disney, a big push by discovery plus HBO Max and Netflix is now up against the wall. Now you might say Charlie, what's the importance so what if Netflix is cratering? I don't think you quite understand the cultural impact that Netflix has. Over young people and how they view the world. If 200,000 people are divesting from Netflix, they are doing the exact same type of behavior that people do when they say, I'm a little bit overweight, get me some celery juice, get me a gym membership. I'm going to stop going out to the bar every evening and I got to get myself into shape. What you are seeing is an entire country or culture start to kind of sit up straight with their shoulders back and say, that's not making me a happier or better person.

Netflix Elon Musk Hulu Disney HBO Charlie
CNN+ Looks Doomed as Public's Anti-Woke Appetite Grows

The Charlie Kirk Show

01:52 min | 7 months ago

CNN+ Looks Doomed as Public's Anti-Woke Appetite Grows

"So many of you have heard about this story of CNN plus. A CNN plus had the ambitious idea of trying to become some form of a Netflix for news. What a dumb idea. Axios dot com has come out and said that CNN plus looks doomed. CNN plus has roughly a 150,000 subscribers so far. We have more subscribers than CNN plus. Warner Bros. discovery wants to eventually bring all of them under one giant service around HBO Max, and CNN plus original plan was for CN plus to become profitable in four years by investing $1 billion into the service. Executives believe that if the service wasn't being kneecapped, its growth rate would have rivaled other print news outlets like The Wall Street Journal, The Washington Post, which have about 2.9 to 2.7 million digital subscribers, respectively. However, no one really wants to watch CNN plus. It's not just the fact that no one's subscribing to it, it's at the content itself, is going horribly. But it's not just on CNN plus, it's also Jon Stewart's new show. The post millennial dot com reports that Jon Stewart's new woke TV show tanks and loses 80% of viewers after first episode. It's on Apple TV. This is not sustainable at all. While shows like ours are flourishing and we're hiring and we're adding staff. And we are strengthening our entire program, our podcast is growing and our radio program is growing. And those things are doing on rumble is growing on YouTube. It's growing. Jon Stewart is floundering. No one wants that information. In fact, the shows like Bill Maher and Joe Rogan and ours and the people at the daily wire, the great folks of the daily wire, they're doing very well. There is kind of this anti woke appetite that is growing amongst the people.

CNN Warner Bros. Discovery Hbo Max Jon Stewart Netflix The Wall Street Journal The Washington Post The Post Apple Joe Rogan Bill Maher Youtube
"hbo" Discussed on Origins with James Andrew Miller

Origins with James Andrew Miller

04:19 min | 8 months ago

"hbo" Discussed on Origins with James Andrew Miller

"The people? How do you triage? You know, you get to a certain age and you start thinking about sort of the state of the world and what you want to put out there and you're like, oh God, you know, what am I putting out there? And I think, you know, for instance, with somebody somewhere, which is on HBO. Now, I think we made a real sort of considered attempt to be very intentional in what we were doing and how we were putting something out there. And I think, you know, Bridget was very much in lockstep with that idea. And I think being able to work with people like Bridget and Hannah and Paul and the team there, it has just been a godsend. And I think the same with people at sister that I'm working with is like, we look at a piece of material and go, do we have passion for this? Do we want to work with the person who's doing it? You know, in the best of all possible worlds, that's how you make your decision. With David's aslav and discovery set to take over the company this spring. A lot of big question marks await answers. Let's talk about present day Casey. If David zaslav were to say to you, listen, there was a decision made a couple years ago to call her streaming brand HBO Max. But I've decided you can call the service anything you want. What would you tell them? That's a hard question to answer. I think the question you're asking is, is the HBO Max title going to stay or should it stay? And I will say it's obviously been a challenge to have the name of the platform be within it. That has led obviously to some confusion. But it's hard to answer because we haven't been able to talk in any way with discovery. So I have no idea if it's going to be one big service, or if it's going to be bundled or what? But having the name HBO in the programming service, it has been a well chronicled challenge, but even despite that, I think we're doing really well. Do you feel like you're well positioned for success against Netflix, Disney+, and those other competitors for the next couple of years? Or do you think you'll need a whole hell of a lot more money to survive? Well, what I say, more money is always nice. I will say, there's lots of different metrics and you can kind of bat down any one of these is well, what about this? What about that? But one just most recently, because January, we just went through the best of lists. And I think between HBO and HBO Max, we dominated the top ten best shows list, depending on the publication. But I think we had more than anybody else. More than any other platform. The fact that we can do that at the budget level we're at, I think it's pretty good. So more money is always nice. It's not everything. You know, because you still have to make shows that connect with people. But I think we're doing pretty well. Coming up on episode two of our origins HBO chapter, you'll meet three important women running key parts of the HBO ecosystem. Amy gravid and Francesca orsi, who oversee comedy and drama respectively, and Nina Rosenstein, whose domain is late night, specials, and unscripted content. Thank you for listening to origins. A presentation of C 13 originals, a cadence 13 studio. His podcast is executive produced by myself and Chris corcoran. Chief content officer and founding partner of C 13. It's produced and edited by my brother in arms. Chris basil, who always delivers. Many thanks extend to Terrence malagon, who provides much appreciated production assistance in the trenches and our terrific KD 13 gang. Production coordination by Kelly rafferty, marketing, PR, and graphic design for more current, Josephine and Francis, Hillary shelf, and Kurt Courtney..

HBO Bridget David zaslav Hannah Casey Paul confusion David Netflix Amy gravid Francesca orsi Nina Rosenstein Disney Chris corcoran Chris basil Terrence malagon Kelly rafferty Hillary shelf Josephine
Richard Plepler Explains HBO's Financial Tightrope

Origins with James Andrew Miller

01:59 min | 8 months ago

Richard Plepler Explains HBO's Financial Tightrope

"Richard, was it difficult to run HBO when so much change was being contemplated at the corporate level? Well, remember the opportunity to say yes to what we as a team wanted to say yes to. Was just up against the reality of being a division of apparent company that had its own demands and requirements about our earnings and what we needed to deliver. So that was just an honorable tension between, as I would always say, you know, what in Pennsylvania avenue? Are you sitting on? Jeff's end to Pennsylvania avenue he has, earnings that he has to deliver to the street. He has a multiple which he has to be able to justify. He's thinking about different permutations of the company. If you're on my independence avenue, you know, look, you'd like to be able to charge a little bit less to your distribution partners because you know that that's going to result in more subscribers and you'd like all the resources for marketing that you could possibly get both for the show as themselves and for the brand. We didn't have that much money. Relative to what Netflix was spending and what others were spending. We had very little money. So we had to figure out creative ways to break through the noise of popular culture through free media, through events, through social eventually, and I think our guys did a very brilliant job in that. So would have liked my marketing money. We would have liked more programming money. And we would have liked, of course, the ability to adjust the price because the number one complaint of our partners are distributors was not that HBO isn't great. But it's expensive, right? So if we could have taken the price down a little bit, had more money for marketing, more money, that would have been terrific. But perfect wasn't on the menu. We had to deliver what we had to deliver. And that's just running a business.

Pennsylvania HBO Richard Jeff Netflix
'Insecure' Showrunner Prentice Penny on How the Show Changed Him

Origins with James Andrew Miller

02:15 min | 8 months ago

'Insecure' Showrunner Prentice Penny on How the Show Changed Him

"How did insecure change you? I think it changed me as a creator profoundly I started on girlfriends with primarily in African American show but certainly feeling like we were a marginalized and UPM CW not taken seriously by our peers and I think after having gone to network shows where I was the only person of color in the room. You sort of get used to like accepting things as they are, right? And going to do a secure with Easter Molina, but that energy of a young energy wanting to come in and take over as I did too, but you're also feeling like you're on the island all the time. Off of that experience was just like, no, we're not asking for permission anymore. We're just going to do the thing and speak up for what we want to do, how we want to build our crews, right? Saying that we're not going to 50% has to be people of color on women. And saying we're doing this or we're not doing this, right? And I just think it made me be much more vocal about the types of things that I would want going forward as a producer, like any other person, right? Like any other white creator gets to say, I want to do this. I want to do that. But sometimes when you're the only one you don't feel empowered to do that because you have to justify or explain why it just gets kind of tiring. So it definitely made me much more assertive in terms of what I would expect and what I want to do going forward. And I think as a writer, I would say insecure reminded me why I wanted to write in the first place was when I read that script, it just felt super fun. And it reminded me when you're in the network world or just the business a long time, you can kind of get hammered or drill. This is the way we do things, right? Or don't do it like this, or do do it like this. We're kind of getting this copycat formula and it really just reminded me when you're a kid and you're like coloring a picture and you might call it a cactus pink. You might cover the sun purple, and nobody tells a 5 year old, don't make the sound purple. You just let them create. And I was like, that's what this experience reminded me of. Like just create. Remember to have fun. That's why we're doing it. As opposed to being afraid to fail or not thinking about the business part. Then I went to go make insecure. It didn't make sense to be financially to go to a secure. It wasn't my material. I was losing money, but it was something in the tuning fork of it felt like the right thing to do creatively. So from that place, it has made me a better writer. It just freed me from the anxiety or the insecurity of a fear of what the business can kind of put into

Easter Molina UPM
Sheila Nevens Opens up About the Pain of Life After HBO

Origins with James Andrew Miller

01:29 min | 8 months ago

Sheila Nevens Opens up About the Pain of Life After HBO

"It was a tough time leaving HBO. When I was alone and no one answered my phone calls, no more flowers, no more. Oh, you have a headache. Let me get you an aspirin. No more anything. No more lunch dates. I didn't have HBO anymore. I was just an old person without a job. The main thing I remember is looking at my cell phone and not seeing any polls. I remember that. I used to come home and there were 50 calls, you know? You don't have the job. You don't have the power, you don't have the muscle, you're zero. But you were able to gather yourself nevertheless. Yeah, but I didn't get a job. I called everybody I knew everybody had given jobs to. All the Netflix people that I knew. Everybody, everybody. Everybody know nobody wanted me. Nobody called me back. Nobody answered my emails. I was old. I was out, and I was refuge the next step was a terminal illness, possibly. And death, that was what I was guess headed for, but I don't have either. I'm still alive. And I don't have an illness. Well, I have a lot of illnesses, but they're not terminal. I could have been dead. And I was rescued by MTV. I'm the same bitch I always was now. Just a smaller arena to be a bitch in.

HBO Headache Netflix MTV
Sheila Nevens Opens up About the Pain of Losing HBO

Origins with James Andrew Miller

00:38 sec | 8 months ago

Sheila Nevens Opens up About the Pain of Losing HBO

"It was a tough time leaving HBO. When I was alone and no one answered my phone calls, no more flowers, no more. Oh, you have a headache. Let me get you an aspirin. No more anything. No more lunch dates. I didn't have HBO anymore. I was just an old person without a job. The main thing I remember is looking at my cell phone and not seeing any polls. I remember that. I used to come home and there were 50 calls, you know? You don't have the job. You don't have the power, you don't have the muscle, you're zero.

HBO Headache
Jeff Bewkes on Legacy Media's Weakness

Origins with James Andrew Miller

01:02 min | 8 months ago

Jeff Bewkes on Legacy Media's Weakness

"The problem for legacy media is basically it's fragmented. And if you asked Reed Hastings, what his main advantage besides the brilliance of what they did at Netflix was is that he understood that the media business was going to have trouble coming together for some kind of effect of solution to the replacement disruption that broadband direct delivery or video was going to bring. There's no sympathy for the CEOs, but it's pretty frustrating because you can't lie to anybody and you can't fail to tell material truths, but if you go around and say that we have a strategic, you know, we're coming into a box canyon here because of what Netflix Amazon digital world is going to do to legacy media. If you go out and start pounding the table about that, you're going to cause severe dislocation for your stock, your shareholders. And God knows ours have been through a lot of

Reed Hastings Netflix Amazon
The Unvarnished Truth Behind Sheila Nevens's Departure From HBO

Origins with James Andrew Miller

01:55 min | 8 months ago

The Unvarnished Truth Behind Sheila Nevens's Departure From HBO

"In 2018, Sheila Evans left HBO two as she put it at the time, pursue the rest of my life. Now you're going to hear the unvarnished and totally transparent version of her departure. I remember reading that Maureen dowd column about your departure from HBO. It was a beautiful tribute, and you had lovely things to say about HBO. But as I got to know you further, I think we're in your office. I said to you one day, it just wasn't buying that whole narrative that you decided you had had enough. And then you came clean. Oh, I was fired. Let's just let me tell you what your book did, okay? And this is not fire you up, a pat on the back. I didn't know till I read this book that I was truly fired. So what marine got for me was what I believed at that time. I never figured out why I was leaving HBO. I am fucking 82 years old. I am an old lady. Okay? I am still working. I'm really good at what I do as good as the next guy, but there was something in your book, somebody says, I couldn't believe it. Somebody says, how old is she now? Well, you know, I've done everything you possibly can not look 82 years old. Okay, good, fine. But I knew something was wrong. And I didn't know what it was. It never occurred to me I didn't fucking good. Because I was pretty from the time I was three years old as far as I knew. And age was something that crawled up on me. I never knew anybody who was as old as I was, who had as much Botox or face lifts, or whatever the fucking word is. But I knew something was wrong at HBO, because I didn't understand why I couldn't die there and put my ashes in a box and put it on a shelf. There, why did they just have my awards everywhere? Why couldn't they keep me? Why? When I read your book, I realized I was too old, I was too old.

HBO Sheila Evans Maureen Dowd
"hbo" Discussed on Origins with James Andrew Miller

Origins with James Andrew Miller

01:31 min | 8 months ago

"hbo" Discussed on Origins with James Andrew Miller

"And better, I feel like we're maturing. And if that collapses, that's more on us than on the network. The other part is if the network just decides, you know what? We need impact. We need numbers. You know, I mean, that's what happened to the future industry. Dragons. Yeah, we need dragons. Then we're doomed that way. And then I think I should throw it to you 'cause she's got her own dynamic with HBO and she's got her own vibe. Well, just from my perspective, oddly, our other shows are becoming more like us. In the old days, we were the outliers for always integrating what are popular concepts now diversity and inclusion and equity into our productions. It was just sort of part of our workflow. And so now just recently is the first time that people are actually starting to look at all this stuff we've done in that area and wanting to become more like that just in terms of staffing in terms of how people are treated. And so I'm tremendously proud of our history in that area. I'm not sure I would do a good job working anywhere. We took the money we had, we executed as we did. But it's not like we ever brought it in an audience. So I'm not sure I would be working anywhere. With that track record, I mean, I think in some respects the appointment television that premium cable offered as opposed to the Nielsen's. That was a window that we were able to crawl for. When we return, we'll go inside HBO's acclaimed cultural juggernaut insecure.

HBO Nielsen
"hbo" Discussed on Planet Money

Planet Money

03:34 min | 11 months ago

"hbo" Discussed on Planet Money

"Time I heard that static, you know, my brain subconsciously prepared itself to escape for an hour or so. I kind of just holds a special place in my heart. We've done a lot of consumer research and we see the emotional connection that it creates to the content. At one point, Jason and his team were testing some new sounds and animations to use in place of the static angel. The focus group didn't seem that impressed. But then, the static sound came on. All of a sudden, the nostalgia and the positivity and the recall of all the warmth they had.

"hbo" Discussed on Planet Money

Planet Money

05:39 min | 11 months ago

"hbo" Discussed on Planet Money

"Little beats on the network. By breaking the theme into these tiny pieces, HBO took this long nostalgic track that people used to hear maybe once a week and made it something that they'd hear multiple times a day. But they did it in a way where you wouldn't get sick of it. They've done a really great job at being subtle and creating this memory trigger with it across the network across their properties. And so this melody really defines HBO as a brand. When people hear the three note melody under, say, an up next promo. They might not even realize where that music came from, but slowly subconsciously, they start to build associations with that melody, associations that get triggered every single time they hear it. And that's what great sonic branding is all about. When we're working on branding or thematic music, the first thing to consider is,.

HBO
"hbo" Discussed on Planet Money

Planet Money

05:40 min | 11 months ago

"hbo" Discussed on Planet Money

"Sound a little bit more contemporary? To answer these questions, Jason reached out to a sonic branding agency. We got approached in late 2016 to refresh this for a new era of HBO. That's Mickey Alexander for made music studio. We just jumped at the opportunity. Why wouldn't we want to work on this iconic piece that's been around for almost four decades now? The first thing they knew they wanted to do was update the musical style. The original is very of the time. It's very disco Y, you've got this sort of pop 70s 80s orchestra on it, and we wanted to take that and make it relevant again. But even if they changed the style, they didn't want to mess with Ferdinand's original melody. This theme in this melody, it's been around so long because it's so memorable and iconic on its own. So it was really important to keep that intact. Mickey and his team wanted this music to evoke the feeling of sitting down for an awesome movie. So they started experimenting with different styles inspired by movie soundtracks. We came up with about half a dozen demos that referenced different genres of film. And so we had things that were a little more mysterious. The little more dramatic. A little more optimistic. Some things that are maybe percussion driven, some things that are more of a.

Mickey Alexander HBO Jason Ferdinand Mickey
"hbo" Discussed on Planet Money

Planet Money

05:21 min | 11 months ago

"hbo" Discussed on Planet Money

"You probably know a lot more of these than you realize. So for example. Intel? That's right. Ding ding ding. Oh, I got a little sweaty for a second because I really wanted to get the right answer. So I was like, oh, it's tech brand. Okay, Intel. So how about this sound? Oh, that is the sound of an incoming notification, right? From what place? I feel like I hear it 50 times a day. That's what's so brilliant about sonic branding. It's so familiar, you've heard a million times. But in this case, you can't quite put your finger on exactly where it came from. But what that is, is it's called the pop ding. And it's the sound of receiving a message in Facebook. Oh. Yes, yes. Okay, this sound. Oh, I do know that one. It's Netflix. Correct. How does it make you feel? It makes me feel like I am settling in to focus on something. I have this kind of thing when I'm watching Netflix. I don't like to be doing other stuff. So I feel like that sound sets me up for it because it's like, okay. Ladies and gentlemen, here is today's presentation. And then I try to be in a distraction free zone. And that's exactly why they created it. So you can see how these sonic IDs would be super, super valuable to a company. But what happens when the sound just isn't working anymore? Hello and welcome to planet money. Today on the show, we're passing the mic to Dallas Taylor of 20,000 hertz to tell us about HBO's quest for the perfect sonic ID. And what goes into making an iconic sound. That's coming up? After the break. This message comes from NPR sponsor, Wix. Where do you go when you want to create, manage and grow your business online? Wix, a leading website creation platform, create a site with designer made templates that can be customized for your business and looks great on all devices, reach new audiences with intelligent SEO tools designed to get you found on search engines and manage it all from one place. Join over 200 million people already doing it and head over to Wix dot com to get started. Before they built one of the biggest athlete driven businesses in the world, LeBron James and maverick Carter, which is two kids from Akron. I've never really talked about this, but his mom called me furious. You know, basically you two idiots don't know what the hell you're doing. I'm Jay Williams. How maverick Carter became the architect of LeBron James empire. Listen, on the limits, from NPR. Hey everyone, this is Stacy van eck Smith. If you heard our episode last week about naming the economic indicator of 2021, well, the votes are in. We at the indicator have crowned a winner. So who will it be? Will it be the supply chain? Inflation? Or will defending champion Mary child's reign supreme with her pick? The labor market. Listen to the indicator to find out. So a few years ago, HBO had a big sound problem. They had two sonic logos, the first was this epic theme song, they played before a movie came on. A lot of our listeners have great memories of it. Growing up, we would get really excited every time the HBO introduction would come on because we sort of had this ritual where every time it came on at the very end when they had that big trumpet fanfare. And the lasers that was going in some sort of circle, we would just spin around and around until we got so dissipated we fell on the floor. I mean, we do every single time it came on. I still get a little bit dizzy every time I hear that. But this full orchestral piece was dated. It was composed by Ferdinand J Smith back in the 80s, and nearly four decades later, this theme really didn't make sense for the modern age. But as the Internet took over the world, sitting down for a movie was no longer a special event that happened once or twice. It was something that people can now do anytime they want. And they probably didn't want to hear a bombastic 92nd intro every time they did. My name is Jason molder. I oversee brand marketing for HBO Max and HBO. In 2010, the network launched HBO go, which was their first entry into the world of streaming. By that point, though, the feature presentation theme wasn't being used all that much. For starters, it's over a minute long. It's really long. No one wants to watch something for a minute before you watch a movie. You want to watch it now very much on demand. But Jason and his team knew how important this music was to the brand, and they wanted to bring back that magic and excitement. However, they had to do it in a way that made sense in the age of streaming. We decided we want to get back to using more of these emotional triggers, enhance the emotional connection and how do we take all the great memories of HBO and package it up for a contemporary audience. For our audience today, how do we take this thing that existed in the past that we know has power.

HBO Intel Netflix Ding ding ding maverick Carter LeBron James NPR Stacy van eck Smith Mary child Jay Williams Ferdinand J Smith Akron Dallas Facebook Carter Jason molder HBO Max Jason
"hbo" Discussed on SI Boxing with Chris Mannix

SI Boxing with Chris Mannix

03:06 min | 1 year ago

"hbo" Discussed on SI Boxing with Chris Mannix

"When you're spending that kind of money on original programming, you just don't have the money to go after the acquisitions to have a portfolio of rights that HBO used to have. I mean, thank God HBO was able to get the rights that it did early in its history when the competition was in his fierce and the price tags weren't so high. But you can kind of start to see in 2000 the fact is a lot of this money is going to be shifting over to original programming. It's not going to be a priority for us. And as a result, I think you used the right word. I've said it myself and I think it's the subtext in what I write about it. It was sad to see it go, because HBO sports was a big deal. It was a unique creature. It wasn't as vast as ESPN. It wasn't as vast as ABC wilder sports. You know, they had a page from their playbook stolen from them about sports documentaries by 30 for 30. But you still kind of like wanted it around. You know, you still wanted to see what they would come up with. And so they have a much more limited agenda right now. They don't have the lampley's of the world. They don't have the Tyson's other world. They don't have, you know, a lot of things that they used to have. So. Sometimes progress sucks because you know it's just like you want those old days of innocence where you know they were like literally when HBO covered Wimbledon, Chris, they put the tapes on the freaking Concord to get it back in time. So they could show it before anybody else. We had coverage of weekdays at Wimbledon. I mean, I don't know, not to sound like somebody who's nostalgic, but I miss those days. I kind of do as well. And if HBO boxing has a legacy, it's that everything they did was taken and adopted by somebody else, you know, whether it is the 24/7 vehicle, all the stuff they did in the corners. You mentioned the documentaries inside the NFL. Inside the NFL was, I mean, look, no offense against Sunday countdown and all these other shows that are ubiquitous now, but they had that before anybody else. And that was, you know, that was a big deal as one of their longest running shows. In fact, Dave harman worked on it. His father worked on it. It was appointment television for a lot of football fans. And when that went away, that was also a heartbreaker. Well, Dave harman and avid listener this podcast will be happy to know that you approved of his work there. Well, he deserves it all, man. He does. The book is tinderbox, HBO's ruthless pursuit of new frontiers. We only covered a fraction of what's in there. Jim, tremendous stuff, always great to catch up with you and thanks for joining me. Thank you, man. Thank you. Thanks a lot. When we come back, my conversation with Regis program. Support for this podcast in the following message come.

HBO lampley Dave harman ESPN ABC Tyson NFL Concord Wimbledon Chris football Jim
"hbo" Discussed on SI Boxing with Chris Mannix

SI Boxing with Chris Mannix

03:29 min | 1 year ago

"hbo" Discussed on SI Boxing with Chris Mannix

"That I mean, he certainly was worth every single penny they paid him and probably more. And probably more. And it was, you know, for me, when lamps went, you know, off the grid, so to speak at HBO and HBO boxing, it was a real loss because he was just he was just as important to that night as the two fighters. You know, you couldn't wait to see him. He set the table at the beginning and the other thing was, again, like we were talking about commercials after the fight's over. The networks would be running to a commercial. After the flight's over at HBO, you go to the center of the ring. And merchant and lampley are there. And merchant may be doing as crazy thing with, you know, who knows who, but why is there and he is deconstructing that fight with a scalpel? I mean, he is exacting in his analysis of it. And it's a pretty it's pretty formidable. You really can't find a lot of people who can do that back then like he did. They built some talented boxers over the years, but I say this as a broadcaster as well, but their broadcasting crew was excellent. Whether it was lampley all throughout Larry for many years, max taking over. I thought Emmanuel Stewart turned into one of in addition to one of the great trainers of all time, became I thought one of the great broadcasts of all time. I mean, he was tremendous. I don't know how much you got into his life and time at HBO, but I thought he before his passing had he was probably as good a broadcast versus it was a trainer at that point. Well, I think the other thing that that shows, I agree with you. And I think the other thing that shows is that HPO was constantly trying to figure out new ways to cover the sport and new ways to create a narrative for the sport, both for the fight and for the larger context of boxing. I think they really cared about boxing as an institution, not just, you know, okay, let's throw this fight on. They were a big part of it. Some went might argue too big a part of it. But I think their dedication loyalty to sport was particularly in the late 70s in the 80s and early 90s was without beer. No question. Before I let you go, we talked about the beginning of HBO, the middle of HBO. The end was for lack of a better word kind of sad where they were relatively inactive over the last couple of years and they kind of quietly go off the air in December of 2018. What did you learn about kind of the end of HBO and what prompted them to get out of the business? Well, you know, the current leadership at HBO will always be correcting me because HBO sports technically hasn't died. There's real sports. There's hard knocks and there's still HBO sports documentaries. But I think that the HBO that you and I grew up around, I think that we started to see the warning signs at the end of last century because they had Wimbledon. They gave up Wimbledon, which was really painful for their employees of HBO sports. We talked about what happened with boxing. And they didn't have look when you're spending a $140 million on band of brothers and a season of Sopranos or let alone Game of Thrones. My gosh, the most expensive series HBO has ever done..

HBO lampley Emmanuel Stewart boxing Larry max
"hbo" Discussed on SI Boxing with Chris Mannix

SI Boxing with Chris Mannix

03:45 min | 1 year ago

"hbo" Discussed on SI Boxing with Chris Mannix

"Thing I can say is that pay per view was like a grenade that just went off inside boxing. Because as a result, you didn't have that ability to kind of control the sport the way you used to. And I think a lot of promoters were very eager to get some of that pay per view dollars for themselves and for their fighters. And so as a result, I mean, HBO had TKO and it was important. And people like Lou de Bella and Mark Taffet and were doing incredible enterprising things at HBO sports. But it just was never the same like it was in the late 70s and early 80s. I mean, Friday night fights. I mean, look, ESPN went through a lot of this as well. But I think that it became harder and harder for the public to understand the sport. And for there to be personalities. I mean, Mayweather was a gift, Pacquiao, obviously, but they're just weren't those Marvin hangers at Thomas hearns of the world and sugary Leonard enticing, of course. I think a lot of the sport was built on those personalities. And you lose them sometimes. Yeah, no, there's no doubt about that. I think this century has seen the diminishing of a lot of personalities. Many personalities in box. And you mentioned Larry merchant HBO effectively created Jim lampley in a lot of ways. I mean he was doing things before. He was the first ever sideline reporter on football broadcasts. But when you were kind of addressing that part of it, like lampley's rise as the face of boxing. What did you kind of discover? I got to tell you, you know, I'm blown away by Jim Webley. This is a guy who you know those people that can remember every day their life. It's like this weird mental thing. Well, let me not like that about his life, but he's like that about boxing. Like, I would talk to him. I would call him. We'd be talking all of a sudden I mentioned a fight. He'd say, oh, yeah. He would give the date of the fight, then he'd say like, yeah, and in the fourth round, he had a left hook that really it's like, what the hell? Oh my God, the guy's memory. The guy's encyclopedic knowledge. His love of the sport and his his level of detail in terms of what he examined about the sport, the fighters, the promoters, the trainers, everybody. I mean, it's just incredible. And I think that HBO was, you can't talk about HBO's position in boxing without talking about how amazing Jim lampley was. Why was he so good in that role? He's a talented broadcast, no doubt. He'd have success in any medium, but he just seemed to it was round peg round hole when it came to Jim lampley and boxing. Yeah, I think that's true. I think that he had, look, he has, in addition to his incredible mind, an insight into the sport. He has dare I say a rather beautiful way of marrying what's actually happening in the ring with a larger context, which is the personality of this guy, the dynamic between the two fighters, the shakespearian drama that's lurking, but beneath it all. And I mean, he's so well spoken. And he's so incredibly vivid in his descriptions of things that you just get a level of detail and verisimilitude on a fight that lampley is a part of that you just don't get anyplace else..

Jim lampley boxing Lou de Bella Mark Taffet HBO Thomas hearns sugary Leonard Larry merchant lampley Jim Webley Mayweather Pacquiao ESPN Marvin football
"hbo" Discussed on SI Boxing with Chris Mannix

SI Boxing with Chris Mannix

05:05 min | 1 year ago

"hbo" Discussed on SI Boxing with Chris Mannix

"You get not only do you get thrill Manila, but then very quickly hearns hagler, you get you get the life after Ali and you're just there HBO was there in turn for a little guy named Mike Tyson. So it's like a Sugar Ray Leonard. I mean, all these people come through HBO's gateway. And it just blows up the sport again. Do you think it's surprised that the top executives at HBO just how big it became and how quickly it became such a big tent pole for what they do? Well, now you're talking about a different thing because now you're talking about hubris. And there were a lot of those guys at the company at the time. We were like, damn right, I knew it. I wasn't sure. Yeah. Michael fuchs, who was fearless about spending money on sports, got Wimbledon coverage during the week for the first time ever. He's been like $62 million on Mike Tyson at a time when nobody really knew what he was what he was capable of. So I think they have every right to kind of be boastful about it. Proud of it. I mean, herns, you go through all those big, big fights. They knew what they had. And they really transformed the sport for a long time until pay per view came along. If you could sort of elaborate on that point, you mentioned what boxing did for HBO. What do you think HBO did for boxing? Well, there's a couple things. And again, you know, I feel weird telling you this because you know how much better than I but here's one very easy thing to understand, which is that HBO didn't have commercials. And so what's going on is you're able to stay in the ring between rounds. If you're watching ABC world of sports in the 70s, the bell rings, they can't wait to get to a commercial to start getting money. HBO's got nowhere to go. And so as a result, we're like staying in the ring, we're seeing what it's like to be in that stool. We're seeing them talk to them. We're seeing them cut and we're seeing them all fix that up. And the other thing that they did, because production ecstasies were really important to HBO. They stick the mic there. So as a result, there's like two or three major moments where HBO is picking up there's two plastic jars, two plastic drinking containers. And you hear the trainer say to somebody, hand me that one..

HBO hearns hagler Mike Tyson Michael fuchs Sugar Ray Leonard Manila Ali boxing ABC
"hbo" Discussed on SI Boxing with Chris Mannix

SI Boxing with Chris Mannix

04:48 min | 1 year ago

"hbo" Discussed on SI Boxing with Chris Mannix

"This is boxing with Chris Manning are somebody punch him in the face. Anthony Joshua is a composed and ferocious finisher. Watch this. Ruiz is the heavyweight champion. Hosted by SI's Chris mannix. That was my moment. Now with interviews and analysis and everything going on in the world of boxing. When you have talent, you are given another chance here's Christmas. All right, welcome back to another episode of boxing with Chris mannix part of the volume sports podcast network. We have an amazing show for you this week. The demise of HBO has been a popular topic amongst boxing fans for some time now. James Andrew Miller, who is one of the great oral historians of our time has written terrific books on ESPN, Saturday Night Live. He did a deep dive book on HBO including the rise and fall of boxing at HBO. James joins me on the podcast to discuss that very topic. How HBO got into the business and how ultimately HBO quietly got out of the business. A little bit later on, Regis program, the former 140 pound champion, he has been relatively quiet in 2021. That is not a lot of fighters have been willing to step up and to fight him. I talked to Regis about that about his new deal with the fledgling promotional outfit and what he hopes to accomplish in 2022. As always, best way to support this podcast, get over to Apple podcasts, post a comment, leave a rating, it's simple, it's easy, it's free. It's the best way to make sure that we keep doing this podcast week after week. That's it. All right, onto the show. All right, there's no greater writer of oral histories, among other things, than James Andrew Miller. He's the author of books like powerhouse, live from New York, these guys have all the fun. His latest project is tinderbox, HBO's ruthless pursuit of new frontiers, which you can pick up everywhere that you buy books and Jim Carrey, because you want me here. On the show, Jim, let's just start before we get into the boxing part of this, which is obviously what I want to dive into. The name was interesting to me right off the bat. Why tinderbox, because I think that, you know, look for the past 49 years at different incarnations and different key inflection points in its history. HBO has been flammable. It's been one of these things that not only ignites change within the network itself..

Chris mannix boxing HBO James Andrew Miller Chris Manning Anthony Joshua James joins Regis Ruiz SI Saturday Night Live ESPN Apple Jim Carrey New York Jim
"hbo" Discussed on The Book Review

The Book Review

08:35 min | 1 year ago

"hbo" Discussed on The Book Review

"And HBO of course was almost canceled almost basically deleted by time Inc, its parent company, several times in its formative years. So all four of these are recognizable brands. They've all had a considerable impact on the culture, the technology and the world of media and television. And so I guess that's been my spine. I mean, you mentioned the impact on the culture. To what extent are these books and this book in particular, tinderbox on HBO, a business story, and to what extent is it about the culture and the art involved? Well, because I try and write quote books of record, they wind up being somewhat schizophrenic, right? Because there are several arteries that need to be served. You need to tell the story of the business story in all these cases. How is it decided that this was going to even begin? What were some of the shoots and ladders along the way? In the case of HBO, HBO was never on its own. I mean, there's never been a stock called HBO, right? Always been owned by Tai Inc and Time Warner than Time Warner AOL than AT&T and now discovery. So I have to kind of trace the pedigree of those parent organizations for the business story of it, right? You know, what were the financial exigencies involved? And then, of course, you have what I consider to be the cultural component. What was it like to work at these places? And it's one of my favorite parts of the book because you get to talk to employees. And what was it like when it was a very small organization? What were the inflection points when it became bigger? How did things change? What was it like to be at those meetings? And then you start to go into deeper things like the growth of female executives over this time or how certain people came and stayed there or got fired and all the things like that. And then, of course, then there's also the impact on the culture. And when in the case of HBO, when you're talking about, shows like The Sopranos and Sex and the City and the wire and it goes on and on and on, not to mention the documentary work and the work that they did in sports and late night shows. It just becomes a kind of a diverse and very chaotic road map. And that's another reason why the narrative has to be so clean because you need to make sure that the reader is able to follow along as you chart the course of his history. All right, let's talk a little bit about early days of HBO, home box office. Was it the first premium cable channel? Did it start out that way? What were its competitors at that time? Dating back to the late 1940s actually, there were various experiments with pay television. And they all kind of failed miserably. By the time HBO went on the air in 1972, even though it was only 345 subscribers and Wilkes Barre, Pennsylvania, it wound up being the first formidable attempt to do pay television in the 1950s there had been some attempts, but actually movie theater owners and the networks as you can imagine always tried to clamp them down. So it was a bad combination of enemies and poor technology that made it almost impossible for anything to survive. What made HBO different? How did it survive those early days? I think it survived because its parent time Inc, which at that point was one of the federal journalistic institutions and the home for all these incredible brands like People magazine and Time Magazine, of course, Sports Illustrated and others. There were people there who were very interested in diversification. They had dipped their toes into cable television by that time. And they were determined to see if this thing could go. One of the things that I was able to kind of track down though was how many times they almost hit the delete key on HBO. And in fact, one of the things that Jerry Levin shares, which was a lot of fun was that they had, they had a mandate to get 20,000 homes by July 1st of 1973. And if they hadn't done it, they were time Inc was going to cancel. And they started giving away free turkeys and stopped reporting a lot of the cancellations just so they could meet that threshold. If they had done it by the books, they wouldn't have made 20,000 and the thing would have been canceled. Today, HBO is known, of course, primarily as a venue for original programming, whether it's Sopranos or euphoria or Game of Thrones or curb your enthusiasm. Was it from its origins about original programming or was it primarily about re airing movies? And when did that transition occur? HBO goes on the air in 1972. And I would say that for the first ten years at least, it's value proposition what it was being sold on was the fact that you could get uncut movies uninterrupted at home. And there was also a kind of a great combination of some live sports, particularly boxing that people could get as well. And so there was no real original programming. In fact, if you go back and look at some of the titles, they didn't have the money to actually produce something so they were just buying some things like the polka festival in Pennsylvania was their first big event. Nothing that anybody was going to write home about. And then what happened was because of the advent of the VCR and the fact that people then could go to their corner blockbuster and get these tapes and watch these movies at home, they realized that they had to do more. And that's when they did that kind of paradigm shift to creating shows on their own and also doing movies. So it had to be more about just not having commercials. There had to be something else. Exactly. And they also started to do. I mean, look, the mandate was let's just do what the networks can't. And that manifested itself with basically three headlines. One, let's show the violence that they can't, but show the curse words that they can't. So George Carlin did his famous routine on HBO of the 7 words. He can't stand on television. And let's be sexual in nature in the way that networks can. So she'll and Evans, who was there in the early 80s, she did this late night show called Eros, which then was changed to real sex, which became a huge hit for the company. And again, you're coming back to things where you can't see it on the network and these were incredibly unique to HBO. By the time you have blockbuster video and you have VCRs and people are able to watch these kinds of things on their own time and not wait for it to come on HBO. You also have competing premium cable channels, right? Like showtime and stars, you didn't write this book about showtime. You didn't write it about stars. What made HBO different from those other premium primarily movie based channels? Was it the original programming? Showtime, stars, the movie channel. They never got the traction, particularly early on that HBO did because HBO was first to market. They had a lot of support from time Inc and they started doing Michael fuchs who's basically that George Washington of HBO was incredibly aggressive. And so he made sure that the company had incredible talent relations. So I think that I mentioned in the introduction that when HBO went on the air, there were probably like less than a dozen comedy clubs and big comedy clubs in the United States and ten years later there were hundreds. They went out and made all these deals with George Carlin and Billy Crystal and Whoopi Goldberg and everybody, and it became one of these things that created a moat around HBO. So they had a built in kind of talent pool that helped them even before they were doing original series. And the same thing with music. Huge concerts with Bette Midler and tons of other artists Whitney Houston and others that made sure that they had people coming back to them all the time. And spending money.

HBO time Inc Tai Inc Time Warner The Sopranos and Sex and the C Wilkes Barre Jerry Levin AOL Pennsylvania People magazine Time Magazine George Carlin boxing Michael fuchs AT Evans Showtime George Washington Billy Crystal
"hbo" Discussed on SI Media Podcast

SI Media Podcast

01:33 min | 1 year ago

"hbo" Discussed on SI Media Podcast

"Like I think in the book points out, like, you know, John ham could say, Jesus, and he gets a Christ, but I can't say Jesus Christ. HBO, anything goes, as you saw. So was that was that a sort of a turning point when mad men and breaking bend didn't Breaking Bad. We're not HBO shows, which everyone thought they would be based on what they are. I mean, look, first of all, you can't bout a thousand. The circumstances for each of those shows not beyond HBO were different. I would go to another example, which is particularly formidable in terms of House of Cards. So House of Cards, HBO was interested in, they're ready to do a pilot. And then all of a sudden, David Fincher gets a two year season commitment from Netflix. And that, I think, is the moment where you realize, okay, wait a second. The world is shaking under our feet. This is a whole new dynamic. We're not in Kansas anymore. And I think that that I think that was important. And I would add a fourth to the list, which is that the producers and the great Peter Morgan came to HBO first with The Crown. They thought that HBO was the natural place for it. They wanted to be there. It wound up being a disastrous meeting for a variety of reasons. That went to Netflix as well. So you start to see, I mean, look, Netflix is always had some advantages. They're going to spend a lot more money. They don't have to show profits like HBO does. But I think that when you start to look, can you imagine how House of Cards and The Crown not on Netflix but on HBO?.

HBO John ham House of Cards Netflix David Fincher Peter Morgan Kansas House of Cards and The Crown
"hbo" Discussed on SI Media Podcast

SI Media Podcast

05:14 min | 1 year ago

"hbo" Discussed on SI Media Podcast

"I mean, when you think about it, look at Succession. I mean, they're still doing it because there's two things about succession that scream out. One is there's no one that you fucking like. There's no one that you admire that you want to hang out with that you want to be. I mean, so much of television is aspirational, right? Yeah. But like, who on no offense against any of them, but who do you want to hang out with on a Sunday afternoon and have them over to brunch and just take a deep breath with? No one. And the second is that when they decided to do the show, Casey boys who runs content and is really smart. Says, we don't need a star. We believe in the material. We believe in the writing. We believe in this concept. We don't need to camouflage it or hedge our bets by trying to get Jennifer Aniston to play shit for, you know, whatever it might be. And both of those are two big power moves. Another thing I loved in the book about The Sopranos, you go into great detail about the pine barrens episode, which there was a lot of great, great information in there. And how about the fact I learned this in James book, they had not planned for the snow when they did all the rehearsals and the scout of the location. They were supposed to be in the Woods. And then there was a snowstorm and they had to incorporate it basically. And how much of a factor did the snow play ends up playing in that episode? That is an amazing twist of fate right there. It's just fantastic. You know, Jeffrey katzenberg, when he was at Disney, he said this rule that the audience doesn't like snow. And I think that for a long time, there weren't a lot of there weren't a lot of movies set in snow. He just, you know, he had his reasons. But I can't look at that episode and think, you know, what would have been like without. I mean, obviously it still would have been a great show. And it was written beautifully, Steve Buscemi, direct. I mean, you can go on and on. But the snow, each one of them talk about the fact that this is okay. And they weren't going to back down. In fact, I mean, it led to some of pi parents, obviously you know this, but you talk about the Sopranos ability, that shows ability to combine fear, drama, and humor. It's unbelievable. Yeah. Oh yeah. Yeah. And a great nugget too that I learned in the book. As a viewer, you think the whole episode is shot there in the Woods, but the scene where Pauly and Christopher and the van eat and the catch up, that's shot on a sound stage because they had to worry about lighting and darkness and all that. So I loved learning about that episode in the book with those. Now here's what's I find this interesting, the flip side of that. Sopranos tested poorly, HBO basically said screw the testing. We're putting it on. Many, many years later, Lisa Kudrow, after friends get to show called come back..

Jennifer Aniston Casey Jeffrey katzenberg Steve Buscemi James Disney Pauly Christopher Sopranos HBO Lisa Kudrow
"hbo" Discussed on SI Media Podcast

SI Media Podcast

02:47 min | 1 year ago

"hbo" Discussed on SI Media Podcast

"On HBO and our lives. And so one of the things that I tried to do was try to explain who they are, tried to explain some of the chaos that was going on and some of the incredible, incredible, great moves that were going on behind the scenes at HBO. And especially with Game of Thrones and others and show people that it's an iceberg. You know, for what everything you see on a Sunday Night, there's a whole lot of shit going on underneath the water. Yeah. And it was a lot of shit with the Larry Sanders show. That's for sure. Well, that's the thing. I mean, Larry was crazy. I mean, you know, and it's great to have people like Peter toland who's a wonderful writer and obviously Judd Apatow and others talk about Gary's neuroses. Gary, Shannon himself didn't shy away from his talking about his neuroses. But I think it was important to try and place it in the context of the show. If you're trying to get a show out every single week, and this is who's at the center of it. And this is some of his demons. And this is some of his the way he's overextended and the way it's manifesting itself post in terms of the workload and his own health. You know, people talk about what he's kind of medicine he's taken in the kind of long days he's at. That to me is something I really want to dig into. It was interesting, too, because it was a thing in there about I guess someone was going to quote unquote expose Gary chant like drug problem, but it was ambien. And there is a whole thing in the book about James Gandolfini did have a drug and alcohol problem. There was an intervention. And it seemed for the two of them, the pressure of constantly having to do that show every year. Really got to them, especially for James Gandolfini, you had to get into the Tony Soprano character and it wore him down. Then you have the flip side, which is Larry David, which HBO basically told Larry, you do the show whenever you want. You want to take one year row of two years old, three years old, you know, it's the dichotomy there. I thought it was very interesting between Larry Gary Shannon and James Gandolfini and then Larry David in the sort of how they handled the shows. So the truth is, I mean, look, acting is difficult and great active is even harder. But you bring yourself with you. You know, you can't. It's not like when you go on a set, you're obviously becoming another character, but you're still the same human being inside. And one of the things I think that we saw with James Gandolfini was that he had a dark side to him that he knew about, even as a teenager and playing Tony Soprano, forced him to tap into that dark side. So it became incredibly debilitating for him. And it became very, very hard..

HBO Peter toland James Gandolfini Larry Sanders Gary Gary chant Judd Apatow Larry Larry David Shannon Tony Soprano Larry Gary Shannon
"hbo" Discussed on Yeah, That's Probably an Ad

Yeah, That's Probably an Ad

05:33 min | 1 year ago

"hbo" Discussed on Yeah, That's Probably an Ad

"But also when you couldn't do the shows that you wanted to do because we couldn't produce them because of cova nineteen but you know more than a year. And they are they have forty seven million subscribers domestically. So that's hbo max combined with hbo. And i think as we may have discussed on previous podcasts. If you had an hbo subscription you got hbo max out of that. So that number is sort of is big by design right because there is that sort of people who are grandfathered in sort of But then internationally. They have sixty seven point five million global subscribers And and just late last month. At and t. Which presently owns warner media. Which owns anfield max. They actually raised their forecast and they said they expect that by the end of the year. They're going to have between seventy million and seventy-three million global subscribers to h hbo combined which is between three and depending on how you look at it between three and six million more than they had previously sort of estimated and previously told investors. So all of that is good news and signs that. They're sort of finding the footing that that they really wanted to to find. Right out the gate but you know these things take time like you can't just some services. Disney plus is kind of a prime example is able to go out the gate and like immediately have this huge impact. What a lot of these other services it takes time because there's so many shows there's so many movies there's so many services people aren't necessarily going to run to a service. They're going to go seek out a show that they hear about. And so i think that the hbo and hbo max content even able to put out on the service. You know in a little over years time is really helping. Lift those numbers and get them. That footing bet is really sort of necessary in this space which is as you probably. All know as consumers is very very crowded and sometimes overwhelming. When you're sort of sitting down and going what am i gonna watch. Oh gosh how. Many services am i paying for. And which one is this. Show that i'm trying to find. Is it actually on will remind us of the so the obviously has mentioned when. Hbo go hbo. What was the other one was. Hbo and hbo. now right. yes that was actually one of the worst. I miss steps. I guess i mean was when atrium max launch people were like wait a second how i already have. Hbo go on my phone already have hbo. Now what is hbo. Max do i do i get it. What is what's the difference. And that's just sort of the growing pains of launching a new service. Because of course mac or hbo and hbo now.

hbo warner media Disney Hbo Max mac
"hbo" Discussed on Squawk Pod

Squawk Pod

06:52 min | 1 year ago

"hbo" Discussed on Squawk Pod

"Me. Katie kramer as. I take you inside the squawk box control room and beyond the headlines of tv broadcast with joe kernan becky quick and andrew. Ross sorkin every weekday. Subscribe to squawk pot on apple podcasts. Spotify stitcher or wherever you get your podcasts. Welcome back to squawk. At and t. reported quarterly earnings this morning and the adjusted quarterly profit came in at eighty nine cents per share beating estimates by ten cents with revenue also pretty much above forecasts and. At and t. Some better than expected customer editions in its wireless business phones and a lower-than-expected churn rate. At and t. has been shelling out billions of dollars to upgrade its networks to the five g. technology as demand for the faster service surges with people working from home and learning online. It also added nearly three million domestic subscribers to its various. Hbo services. mary's town got a lot of buzz for sure and raised forecast for global. Hbo max to more than seventy million by the end of the year so those numbers. The hbo numbers are interesting. Because in may at and t. said it would spin off its media content and create entirely new global entertainment company with discovery making. At and t. a. core communications company once again. Here's joe join us now to discuss more as sarah fisher axios media reporter we can. I guess it comes under your umbrella for a little while longer. I guess telecom is part of media. Sarah but sooner or later it's going to be when it's over. No i'm saying that. There's so many other things in media that sarah would be ready to talk about it's true like net flicks or like i don't know all these other things and one thing i think people forget won't eighteen key. Shareholders have have a stake. And how well zaslov runs those assets. I mean isn't that a potential upside at something. That's not pointed out very often ensure they will ask some upside until that point seven million subscribers if they add the water matters it also matters if they're lifting guide into base have seventy million subscribers to. Hbo and hbo. Max so yes. It's good but at the end of the day. At and t. The good news here is at the fundamentals are actually Place show for a long time. It was so distracted by these media. Assets that are now all being divested that we weren't hearing as much important motives about things like the post paid phone subscriber additions or their fiber additions. The lowest turn rate ever for q two in fiber this quarter. It's great for the first time we're hearing great things about the fundamentals. Were not being distracted by this media. Stuff that quite frankly is not going to be as important orange. Their business long-term then there's talk about spinning off or selling or somehow getting rid of of zander because it doesn't make sense anymore. No that makes sense. We had a report about that earlier this week. And what's sad about it is. They spent a lot of money. One point. Six billion dollars on Nexus two hundred million dollars on other investments. And they're probably gonna sell joe for. I'm hearing way less than a billion dollars. It's gonna be likely some sort of fire sale. They don't write it off in so that's been we're being about agency. They actually are doing well. In phone-in internet in there were business. But there's been so much distractions about all these other side things that they need to spin out in order to get back to five g. How about net flicks disappointing or about as expected given that we knew how the pandemic it affected of content the ability to produce a new content and and people leaving going to live sporting events or live venues instead of staying at home. So all those things factored been still you know still five hundred dollar stock that you know that that any media company could about five years ago for for tenth of that probably nothing. yeah no. I actually was disappointed. And i'll tell you why earlier this year. They said that lee forecast growth to come at the back end of this year. Twenty twenty one so q. three q. Four but the guidance for q three was pretty low. Three point five million. Ads is not that much. I think what made the street. Happy about netflix. Which is why you saw that. Stock whip saw after earnings was that they're starting to invest in new tricks. Obviously gaining is the big one but they're investing in things like outcasts merchandising. To make their franchises more disney light more steady so. I think that the street was excited about that. But ultimately i do think that subscriber growth is slowing down in. It's a problem for necklace. Talk about firehouse approach. I think they need to be more i need. I need really quality content. Not just you know you. Just don't roll out some crappy movie. And that's not working for me. And that's what they're doing to some extent you got anything. Good little which signifies a netflix original. I just lays right over it and that's the problem for now let's right. They need to ramp it up. That's more you've seen doctor death yet. Sara on peacock now but i'll add going good job. Only if you only have you can sit there and watch someone just totally butcher and operation with blood and guts and it's hard to watch but it's great christian slater alec baldwin. It's pretty good all right Sarah thanks more things change more. They say the same content wise then someone say content is king like fifty years ago. Is it ever been more true. Would you like to be a really talented creative writer. Type producer person right now. I mean i would like to twenty people begging throwing the ultimate buyer seller. Whatever whatever you call the writing team. It's a it's their time. It's their time all those dollars chasing because there are good people. Look at some of the things we've watched in recent years. They're amazing when you watch breaking didn't you weren't you blown away the greatest who came up with some of those gain scale again but that squawk pod for today let us know what you're watching on your favorite streaming platform tweet us reps or any comments at squawk. Cnbc squawk box is hosted by joe. Kernan that quick and andrew. Ross sorkin tune in weekday mornings on. Cnbc at six eastern to get the smartest takes and analysis from our tv. Show right into your ears. Listen and follow. Squawk thaad wherever you get your podcasts. We'll be back here tomorrow. We are clear thanks guys..

Ross sorkin Katie kramer joe kernan becky quick Hbo services joe join axios media Hbo hbo sarah fisher andrew Sarah zander apple mary