35 Burst results for "Guy Walked"

Detroit Pistons Select Cade Cunningham 1st in 2021 NBA Draft

The Bill Simmons Podcast

00:48 sec | Last month

Detroit Pistons Select Cade Cunningham 1st in 2021 NBA Draft

"We're about to give picks they did something different. This time they had all the guys walk out with their families. I really liked it. All right so It looks like the pistons take cunningham. Kfc we okay with that great. That's the right decision. It's kinda. I wouldn't call it a no brainer but 'cause that's speaks to evan moberly and jalen green how talented they are But it's as close to a no brainer as it gets when you're talking about a guy who's six foot seven six four eight can play. Who can shoot off the dribble who can defend multiple positions. Who's a leader. Who works hard. Like for the pistons. Here with their current roster. You know as troy weaver said everybody's a fit Became cunningham is especially at fit next to their backcourt with killian hayes city bay in the front court and i say a stewart. I love their young core in the pistons finally have hoped

Evan Moberly Jalen Green Pistons Cunningham KFC Troy Weaver Killian Hayes Stewart
New 'Stranger Things' Teaser Is Eleven-Out-of-Ten Creepy

Donna and Steve

02:13 min | 4 months ago

New 'Stranger Things' Teaser Is Eleven-Out-of-Ten Creepy

"I believe we have A P, sir. A teaser for over this stranger things. I like it a lot to you because I like the kids. Are they going to be adults? By the time we see them? They're 40 years old. When was the last time that we had stranger thing two years ago. Then that there's so many questions I have with this. All right, you guys, I'm ready to go on here. Stranger things and then After what? Felt like an eternity of waiting, my lady? No. Here we go. Ladies. No. Here we go. They gave me two of them in the article. I think we have the correct one right here. Yeah. Hey, the clock is on three. It's crawling around on the floor. Playing Klink. Oh, and chest. I don't like that. Educate ball. Mm. Are some spikes really like it here, like in a mental hospital and subject. I'm sorry. His little kids crawling around in a cold room. The creepy guy walking. We just see his back. Good morning, Children. Good morning, Popeye. How are you today? Good. Glad to hear you because today I have something very special planned for you when the doors has a number 11 on it. Mm hmm. You're listening. Oh, that's where she came from. Cool. Yes, quick. I also remember last year we got to go last year. They did after this using a stranger things. From Russia with love, and it was this Russian hillside, snow covered. They're all working on a train track. And then you realize that what's his face? Hopper? Yep. Is there that's good? That's good. Be good. I don't think that I will. I will figure it out. This is his

Klink Popeye Russia Hopper
Che Guevara as an Icon

teikirisi

02:00 min | 5 months ago

Che Guevara as an Icon

"What is one of the most popular images symbolizing revolutionary and radical politics. That you can even think of for me. It's definitely that image of che guevara wearing a beret looking off into the distance. Are we going into this topic of il-chang give out so the year is two thousand nine and met my very first college party and i'm sherlyn you know relaxing all cool not playing some bebo and some guy walks in with t shirt and immediately. It caught my eye because number one. Cuban and number two. It's gigolo at number three. it's a white guy wearing a chicken. I don t shirt and it wasn't very different from any of the times that i saw ceva anywhere else but suddenly some white kid walking into a party wearing a t shirt had me feeling things that i had never felt before when it had seen shale at his image that grew up seeing china's image almost everywhere growing up in miami. You not really presented with people who are very different from your upbringing so growing up with a bunch of cubans. It never occurred to anybody to put j. o. On a t shirt and walk around with it carmen. And i were both raised. Cuban americans in miami where the perspective of tshuva i would say is generally that. This man was very violent figure in the revolution. It's the very first time. I think that i was confronted. With the fact that somebody else might have a different idea of what this image stands for. So get into the image. The image i'm talking about. I'm sure you've seen countless amount of times. It has been said that it is the most reproduced photograph of the twentieth century. And it is the image of chiang about looking off into the distance very serious. He's got long hair and he's wearing a beret with a single star in the middle. The image is called gabrielle at equal or heroic warrior. Yup well i have never translated that. And now as i'm saying it in english it's even

Che Guevara Bebo Chang Tshuva Miami Carmen China Chiang Gabrielle
Fixing What We Broke With Former White Supremacist Christian Picciolini

Alyssa Milano: Sorry Not Sorry

02:04 min | 5 months ago

Fixing What We Broke With Former White Supremacist Christian Picciolini

"Christian. I'm really glad that you're here. Because it feels like. We are at a precipice in america right now. Where one misstep will send us plummeting into generations of racial hate and violence. And i think it is so very important to understand how people enter hate groups and white supremacist organizations so in order to get a better understanding. Can you tell us a little bit about your story in particular. Yeah thanks for having me. It's an honor to be here but it's also a privilege. I want to acknowledge that. Oftentimes people that look like me Second chances and we still live in world. Where black and brown folks aren't getting even first chances many cases so i wanted to point that out too. But thanks for having me. I was recruited at nineteen eighty-seven was fourteen years. Old into america's first neo nazi skinhead group. I spent eight years as a member of that. Until i was almost twenty three years old but before that the take a step further. I wasn't raised to be a racist. My parents are italian. Immigrants who came to the united states in the mid nineteen sixties and. When they came over they were often the victims of prejudice. They also had friends from all over the world different religions and backgrounds and it was always exposed to that so it wasn't a matter of my parents rearing that in me but because my parents are telling immigrants they also had to work extremely hard when it came over and they started a small business. They were gone seven days a week sometimes fourteen or sixteen hours a day so i didn't really see them a lot and i knew that they loved me. I was surrounded by a lot of love grandparents. Aunts and uncles. But i never saw my parents and i always wondered where they were and why they weren't around than it always came back to. Maybe i wasn't good enough. So i never really voiced that so i went looking for that elsewhere looking for that sense of family and when i was fourteen years old in nineteen eighty seven. I was standing in an alley and was smoking joint and a guy with shaped head came up to me and it was eighty seven so nobody really knew what skinhead was. I certainly and this guy walked up to me. And he pulled the joint from my mouth and he looked me in the eyes and he said that's what the communists and jews want to keep dessel

America Dessel
A Sketch for the Street Cops

The Doodler

02:11 min | 5 months ago

A Sketch for the Street Cops

"I had a picture in my mind of the doodle. There was a flyer out with him. This is james andrei bowls officer blue suit driving a black and white with my partner. In november of nineteen. Seventy five bowls was just off a short stint in homicide but still on the force and still in touch. Well san francisco outside. You know we thought it was best homicide unit on earth. They were working on the dude alert at that time. And so i talked to everybody who is a very very Topic of discussion. Five people have been killed two more assaulted and now that there was a composite. Sketch felt like only a matter of time until someone found this guy. Like a lot of cops james bulls wanted that someone to be him. I knew what he looked like. And so i was working alone one night and show. I told my lieutenant. I said I'm gonna go look for this this homicide suspect and i don't remember call do. I'm going to go look for this homicide suspect. I'm gonna go down on foot. And see if i can spot them. So i went to eighteenth and castro and i spent the evening. Their bowls walked around in the castro. Trying to envision the dude a black man about six feet tall slight build route twenty years old and matching the composite. Police sketch well about nine thirty. I saw this guy walking down the street and he fit the description fairly well. He was bought the right height build and me looked really heiki. His right arm was straight. It didn't bend at the elbow. And he's wearing a long peacoat bowls jumped into action without another thought. This was his chance.

James Andrei James Bulls Castro San Francisco
Interview With YouTube Influencer And Comedian, Bob The Drag Queen

QUEERY with Cameron Esposito

05:09 min | 7 months ago

Interview With YouTube Influencer And Comedian, Bob The Drag Queen

"High cameron. How are you honestly. Though worst headache hungover no no. No no no i you know what i can't i i can't figure out what's going on it just always over my left i would do. I find him right. That's part of what's going on. This is well this. This is what doctors appointments are like these days like he. Just put your asshole the camera. Now i'll do a couple a command shift for looking at the screen. Grab of your of your amos. He sent me some dick pic to your doctor at kaiser permanente dot absolutely how how well first of all let me. Just start by. By the way i would love to include all of that. I think that was that was gold and it will train our listeners. To what we're expecting for your bob directly but would you would you introduce yourself. I always have guests introduce themselves. Name is bob the drag on as a he him. She her hers. I am a drag comedian. I m youtuber. I am one of the hosts of hbo's where ear. And i am a living icon. Okay out. that feels true to me. That's how i'm experiencing toby weird. I love it eventually becomes true. Yes that's right absolutely well. What an honor for me to be recording here. Yeah you've had a you've had a big couple of years. It feels like i know you. You've been working in drag for a long time. But it feels like for you know from where i'm positioned at home perpetually possessed by the way i'm in west hollywood right. Now i live in pasadena. You're apologizing forward pasadena but we'll feel important because like there's a part of pasadena that's the cheesecake factory. But i live at the base of the mountains. So i just want to be very clear. I'm a mountain lesbian. These days not a cheesecake factory godless man. This is worth noting. But you're in west hollywood. What is actually that. That is a great place to start. Because i haven't been there during the pandemic and what an interesting place to be hanging out because it's usually somewhere that is so lively and terms of nightlife and in terms of foot traffic on the street for la. It's a different kind of a place. Was it like over there right now. Very blake lively blake. Lively matters But right now it is. The pandemic has changed a lot. It's actually a straight neighborhood. Now could you imagine it is now just a full on straight neighbor. Okay so i have been. I moved here during the pandemic. And i have some context for west hollywood. But it's very limited either in this apartment where i've been renting for a little over a year now or i'll be on the gay bars strip There was never any in between. I mean they're still you know people other walk into. I actually saw the two people today. Who really look like their dogs. It was wild like stock. He'd like dad body type guy walking a little like french bulldog and then there's like Yoga looking white lady with white hair with just like a skinny little completely white dog and these people look like their dogs. You look like my dog. That's true. Yes i have like. Just a teeny dog with like hair under ears that comes out to the side and it just it does feel like we're meant to be a little bit of blonde the tip whereas grown out highlight. That's actually like seriously that is what my shirts all the time. Yeah very you can't tell what size she is because she's proportionate but she's smaller than you think. Actually i have a dog that looked like me out. A black labrador in those jet black was a little. Floppy there was a chow mix. And he's always like my dog and he used to drive me crazy because my dog was jet black tie that feels but it was other black people so it felt a little upsetting. I thank god. I really grew up running the white people. I didn't even know y'all existence a couple of years ago. Where did you grow up. I grew up in georgia groping them all over georgia all of the south really but mostly georgia small town big town in columbus georgia which is This home of the infantry. So if you're if you ever were airborne ranger you probably learned it at for banning And then i moved to atlanta.

High Cameron Dick Pic Pasadena West Hollywood BOB Kaiser Permanente Headache Blake HBO Toby LA Georgia Columbus Atlanta
Interview With Maz Saleem

TMV Podcast

05:54 min | 7 months ago

Interview With Maz Saleem

"Salama's like like you very much. Thank you both for for for joining me today. so like i was. We just said we recorded this. Podcast like two three years ago and we had some technical issues so we lost the entirety of the recording. Unfortunately so we're back for round two trying to do this again So thank you again. I guess for agreement comeback. We've had a few of these kinds of who issues in a few weeks and it's frustrating. You know we we get by right. So i guess to kick off with. I think the for context. When i came across your personal story and your father story specifically I was quite alarmed. The fact that this was like going back a few years. But i was alarmed at the fact that i hadn't come across it sooner. It wasn't more prominent in the kind of mainstream And there wasn't talk of this reference of this as a particular case of anti muslim terrorism that had taken place on uk soil. And i think what's again quite alarming is that i only stumbled across it because i was kind of researching and i was trying to prove a point in an article or something that was putting together and i saw this and then i kind of went down the rabbit hole of finding out more and it was just astonishing that i there was no prominence to this so i guess i assumed that a lot of people. Listen this may not have come across yourself or your father story. So would you be able to very briefly. Kind of recap what happened. And how your family's life change in two thousand and thirteen yes of course On the twenty. Nine april twenty thirteen. That's is going to a eight years This year My father mohammed. Salim was eighty two years old at the time and he praised at the local moisture which is green mustard which is at the end of our street. And he's done that most of his life any praise at five times a day to day one so that dodge the mice jed back involve To read always press on this particular night He went to read his issue press and when he left the mosquera roundabout. Tim poston pm on this particular. Actually dad wasn't feeling great. Normally my uncle would does with him to the mosque and comes back and not nine. My uncle had some relatives so he basically said oh. I have to go home with you. Go don't worry i'll walk. You know because he's just not far as just at the end of our road and On this night my phone was followed home and know on the cc tv at one who lives on a street. Not many people will have double glazing. They can hear dot because he's not normally walking in the middle of the road because he's a quiet coup de sac area on these guys walking steak and he's normally hitting a code cannell something on the street and this particular night you can notice on the tv's walking quite fast. And then he crosses over the road to the school gate and he was basically funded home By a neo. Nazi called pablo up shane. Who'd only been in the country for five days and who got british sponsorship. He shook behind. Firstly of the british ambassador. In ukraine then go sponsorships small eve the predominantly muslim area and lived on the premises of dell com-. He followed my father home and this nine stabbed him to death from behind And then he went on a three month bombing campaign air and bombs side now bombed that saw three mosques in also over rampton tipton. This was one of the biggest oxyde terrorism on uk. So yet today your board explained now. Many people have heard the media have played down you know. At the time you know a doug's stanford they. We were prime suspects. That's how how disgusting. A was west midlands. Police say they treated our family. The came to our house and they told his record italian descent. A racist tunc. A we said you know. How can you tell us. It's not racist attack. You know tried to. They look to every other motivated by hate. Crime was never possible motive and you know we were suspects in this case as well and was quite disgusting because he had they not called pablo and we're ready to pin this on one of one of my family members. That's how reporting west midlands. Police were the way they treated us. than they were suspects united muslim household when doing source. You know when you'll pay no respects. Men and women are segregated. They had a male Family liaison officer. Googly is just standing there staring. All of us are looking at us. Like it was us and i do understand. The case is quite high number cases where certain cases off family related. When this particular circumstances they weren't and we made that playoffs and Yeah we had a very challenging time with west midlands police and yeah. We went back to taking complaints seriously. And prior to this six months earlier die My brothers jim who's got jim. Montcalm derided was receiving frightening letters from the house. If you don't close your terrorist jim. Because predominant muslims go there You just wait. What would happen and a lot of these letters. Were going out in the area. We showed those to the place. Could it be linked. But they didn't take any seriously and then six months later for the was murdered and this neo nazi was known neo nazi in ukraine. He's dip retort which add and again. He was making open pound bombs air in the forest. So no neo. Nazi get to british sponsorship counterterrorism. How degree allow these nazis into the country.

Tim Poston Salama Salim Rampton Tipton Pablo JED UK Mohammed West Midlands Shane Ukraine Dell Doug Googly JIM West Midlands Police Montcalm
Street Photography in New York City, with Gerard Exupery

This Week in Photo

06:36 min | 7 months ago

Street Photography in New York City, with Gerard Exupery

"Back to another episode of this week and photo. I'm your host frederik van johnson today on the show got gerard exupery. He's a veteran new york city based street photographer. That knows more about street photography than than or has forgotten more about it than i probably will ever know about street photography. We're gonna dive into that a little bit as well as what. It's like shooting in and around new york city now and before pandemic all that stuff going to talk about gear all this stuff so gerard. Welcome to the show man. How's it going very well. Glad to be here. Yeah it is good to hear man. I'm excited to chat. So we've got you know. The the john mara of photography. And then this genre of let's call it of photojournalism or that that world of shooting. What's the difference. What's the difference between street photography. And that i think that in journey with photo journalism you tend to think in terms of projects. Not just one image. You know a a series of images that tell a complete story and i think with straight photography. is generally just one image. Okay okay has got to tell the story one at a time. So let let's rewind back to the time to. Let's let's do origin story thing so cue. The flashback so the origin story of girard. Where what was that moment where you knew that. Okay i feel like. I need to be taking pictures of this. This amazing city. I live in well on my planet. We didn't really have photography. And when i came to earth. And i'm sorry all right more and you know it's funny. It's the only thing i've ever wanted to do since As far back as i can remember one of my earliest memories of my father staying his role affleck's in my hand. While i took the first picture took and which was a ship underneath the verrazano bridge and it just stuck in my mind. He passed away about a year after that. And you know. I it just all these feelings about photography and loss. Let's say i don't know all came together. And i just knew that this is the direction i wanted to go. Yeah yeah and it's a good direction. It's the world photography from my standpoint on of you agree with this but it's it's equal parts. Geeky ray is we like the technology and all that stuff and then it psychology you when you're dealing with the public and trying to get the right shot or get the shot or permission to do the shot and the you know the all of this stuff in between psychology science physics wrapped up into the time machine that we call a camera to fast forward to now the president or the recent the recent present. Let's call it like this last this past five five or so years me decade your adventures in and around new york city. The i can't imagine being a street photographer. There for just an extended period of time when i'm there is overload. It's just like what. Do i take pictures of two months. It's too much going on you get analysis paralysis. What would have been some of the standout experiences you've had in city over the past decade or so that you like okay. I got to tell this bar story. Wow pick were got to pick one. I think defining Well this is. It's further back than ten years but sure for for the finding event was i was involved in a robbery and a camera store. And it's a long story but rather traumatic thing. Somebody was killed and and i got roughed up a little bit and it was it was. It wasn't pleasant. But it was. After that i i realized well putting yourself out there making yourself vulnerable and taking pictures strangers asking or you know. I don't think covertly taking pictures of people is for me. It's just not right so if you're going to ask or you're just going to be obvious bat it you've got to put yourself out and up until that point I didn't know what i was expecting to happen but After that i figured well. What's the worst that can happen. I already found out what the worst that can happen. And it really It helped me in. Maybe be taught me to be very aware of my surroundings almost in a comfortable way though. So that okay. Let's not ever forget. I've gone into situations where drug dealers on a corner. And i was taking a picture of this house that was closed and abandoned actually in patterson not beard city paterson new jersey which is really exciting. We've got a water tower waterfall. There you go and a crappy movie was made by. Jim jarmusch bad it. It lasts two years ago and any case so i am standing there taking pictures and You know. I hear this guy walking up to me and it was interesting because there were like three. Get two or three guys on each corner but not the corner i was on the house was and i'm i'm taking pictures and i hit. This guy comes up behind the camera up to my eye. And i can hear him. I'm aware of him and he said. Hey what are you doing. I told them flat out. I'm taking pictures of buildings that have been foreclosed on You know and properties that have been abandoned families that have gone kicked out. And what have you. And he goes off and you know then he goes How much do you think they want that house i should. Oh i don't know but whatever it is going to be pretty cheap

Frederik Van Johnson Gerard Exupery John Mara New York City Geeky Ray Gerard Girard Affleck Paralysis Jim Jarmusch Paterson Patterson New Jersey
Stop with the Cam Newton nonsense

Greg Bedard Patriots Podcast with Nick Cattles

05:37 min | 7 months ago

Stop with the Cam Newton nonsense

"Season officially upon us. We've got a lot of lot of stories a lot of rumors lot of things floating out there that may not make people happy. It's the long dark Patriots podcast. We're going to talk about everything and anything related to the Patriots particularly their quarterback situation, of course always rate review subscribe all that good stuff regarding Patriots podcast with Nick cattles nickel be back for another episode later on this week. I'm John zanis filling in and the story du jour or do week or whatever you want to say here appears to be a Cam Newton wage. His name is resurfacing and the Patriots quarterback starch and Greg. I can't I can't think of Anything worse to happen right now if you're a Patriots fan right now and and all you want is New Hope. Okay. This is a new hope the possibilities are endless blank canvas money draft picks Capital. Theoretically the Patriots could do a lot of different things some of which could be very exciting and interesting and I can't think of one thing that would just throw a wet blanket all over over all over that any more than bringing back Cam Newton. Yeah John, it's it's weird. I I started hearing the chatter on all the Sports Talk radio station a week and I'm like what the hell is going on? Like it's basically like Cam Newton's become it's similar to some of the debates that you hear in politics like where they just like Stoke fear in people to generate interest in their shows and things like that. It's like, ooh now Cam Newton's the boogeyman that like who they might be bringing Cam Newton back just to get people to react like people people need to settle down and this is why you suck. Had to be SJ this why you listen to this podcast because you know things like how last offseason when everybody was going nuts about Saddam was a guy in Cherry stem is going to be this and Jerry system is going to be that and he's going to be the next guy. You know, what did I tell you from January of last year over a year ago. I told you that he was not be the starter that there was going to be some sort of Veteran competition. So, you know, welcome to coming here where you where you get well informed you don't have to worry about the hysteria. You just get straight facts and and what's going on. So here's where we are. We Cam Newton and this is something that I've been talking about since the end of his Patriots season, which is it's always been a possibly that Cam Newton could come back here. It all depends on what happens with the market and who they end up with the quarterback and this and that but for anyone to suggest the Cam Newton month Is going to be re-signed being the definite number one. That's what we want starter here next year. That's not going to happen. It just it just isn't in and here's why. We've also sort of touched on this but just to sort of reinforce the point. I think what happened this past season is the Patriots realized and and look we've talked about it that there wasn't really a plan back to check understood that there weren't enough chairs for the quarterbacks and somebody was going to be left could have been Jameis Winston could have been Cam Newton could have been Andy Dalton could have been anybody. It happened to be Cam Newton and they said they'd make it work. It did not work and what I think John what happened was and actually I know this happened the Patriots realized after the Cam Newton experiment that not every quarterback can work in the system and that's not to say Cam Newton still not capable of playing good football. I think that he is do I think it could be better with a better Supporting Cast absolutely I do and do I think God Part of the problem last year. Yes, but at its basis in this scheme, you need a quarterback who sees the totality of what's going on in the field. You need someone who's going to win before the snap. You need somebody who's going to see something on the defense say that's this is about to be a bad play here. We're checking to this and Cam Newton outside of you know, he might he might have alerted a few plays here and there but not even close to what we've seen in and look I'm not going to compare him to Tom Brady. Nobody's going to be Tom Brady, but The Baseline Jimmy Garoppolo would have been a lot better. Jarrett Stidham probably would have been a lot better in terms of what he could even when Jarrett Stidham got in John. We saw things like Palm Coast him would change things that the line that's the Baseline in this offense. And that's where it starts. The number one tenant in this offense is don't run any bad place when the quarterback is incapable of doing that for whatever reason that's that's strike. Number one strike. Number two is understanding after the snap. What's going to happen? What is the defense going to do? What is that going to mean in in reaction time? Like if I see the if I see the free safety all of a sudden rotate from too deep to single single life safety. I should know like that who's going to be open, but great. Let me ask you real quick. Cuz everything you're saying makes perfect sense, but did you need a year of did the Patriots need a year of Cam Newton to know that he wasn't that guy? Is it did you think he was that guy walking through the door? Is there anybody really smart Personnel people out there who thought? Oh can't might be able to adapt to this Patriots dial offense. It didn't seem sensible fit. Anyway. This is a guy who's always had accuracy problems who who plays a totally different style of ball. I mean, I don't know why you would have brought him in the first place. If your idea was to offer a patriot style offense

Cam Newton Patriots Nick Cattles John Zanis Jarrett Stidham Jameis Winston John Greg Saddam Andy Dalton Tom Brady Jerry Jimmy Garoppolo Palm Coast Football
It's Never Too Late To Start Doing What You Love With Paul E. Kandarian

"Diary of an Unemployed Actor"

07:00 min | 9 months ago

It's Never Too Late To Start Doing What You Love With Paul E. Kandarian

"What's interesting about you. Is you start got into acting a bit later than most which is an interesting story so You went down. And we're doing something with the play then decided audition. Is that what it was. Yeah i was doing a story on This he was the then new artistic director. Trinity rep company in providence. Which is one of the few if not the only rep company left in the country but he came from steppenwolf in chicago and i always wanted to be an actor in so i started hanging around with him going to shows and just watching people. Just the mac nations of theater and i. so what am i waiting for. What the hell am i waiting for. This never had the courage to try it. And that debt gave me the courage to try it in in the bug. Bit hard and i've been just been ever since. What was that night. The play. I saw their addition for sorry took. That was later life. So you didn't audition for that play. You were interviewing him. And then that motivated addition for another play for another play calendar life in the then i want to see like the cherry orchard at trinity rep in one of the actors the came in from the sides on the the the lobby area one of the actors were standing right next to me and i could see like the hair on his arms his nahshon flaring and i swear almost cried because it was so electric and so immediate a what. What power this. This medium has to on people to vote that kind of response and offices. I've got to try this. I've just got to do it. I don't know why. I denied myself all those years. I think i just feared failure. And i don't like doing things unless i'm good at it. You know a a so. I just tried it in a fairly good at it and it's been a great ride ever since. I'm curious what that first audition was like. When you just kind of went down there no having no experience in then handing me a script and basically he. Oh hey read this. Yeah and i never forget it. Because i was sitting in a group of other people including a couple of guys it was competing with and it just felt real in in good in normal. It just reading somebody else's words pretending to be this character. The characters name was austin in the play austin from boston. Oddly enough and it's just reading it and it just felt if folic completion of some sort pretend to be somebody else my whole life of always pretended to be other people's joking around making people laugh. Or whatever just being a class clown sort of thing and then when i was reading this it the legitimacy to to acting out i mean all those years is a goofball it just gave that sense of like you said legitimacy said so this is this is what it feels like to be someone else in in a setting where you have permission to be someone someone else and i loved it so it absolutely loved it and they gave me the part the lead and it was phenomenal. I got on stage and it was like i think lewd to an in the email The lady who was going out ahead of me said my heart's in my throat is at normal. Because i don't think so. And she smiled and went out and i laughed and it just got out there. All nerves went away. It just felt like this is the place. I've been my whole life but you know you come to things when you come to them so i've been making. Yeah that's beautiful because it's true too because you you might be off stage in your heart's racing but as soon as you're out there in that zone how yet none of that matters. You're just you're so focused on what you're doing it's exactly yeah off. If you're an actor too right yeah yeah. Yeah yeah so you know let me. Just what a feeling he asked in. It's an honor privilege to do that. To take some take people somewhere else just to get them out of their own world for a little while and take them into yours it is. It's a privilege that we don't take lightly. Was it stressful being. That's your first play in your in a major role in your first play and you don't have the experience so i'm just thinking even stage directions right. So if the directors like okay. I needed to go stage left. And you're like okay. Is that way exactly because we started rehearsing. And they said we're going to go of blocking like tomorrow and what's blocking this where they tell you where to stand said. Oh that'd be helpful because if you're not used at the film even and you just see people walking and now i really obnoxious points. My girlfriend us to see that guy walking. He's just wasn't walking randomly. They told them where to go. And the so many moving parts to play in film yet and it was all new to me and it still feels new in so many ways. Even though i've done till dozens of films and bunches of place this just a newness to it and there's an earnest embrace of the entire process. I love reader player hill. Says i don't like film rehearsal so much i think it kinda rob's spot and eighty but you know just referrals to play rehill so i like to go to rehearsal sometimes. I'm not even needed off just to watch other people do it so hopefully hopefully at newness and a new hobby you just want to devour. Everything still feels that way. That's been twelve years now so it's great yeah Just from my experience as well like it doesn't go away because you've got a new production and cast that you're working with and in a lot of ways it's new even though you might be doing the same show night after night for a while. It's still that you ever hersal process. And in that excitement of that opening night and in i've always said this i mean an audience is a living breathing organism in it changes when you change. Do it's different every night. You know this. I mean some nights she deliver line and raucous laughter in the next night since crickets. How does that happen. It's the same joke. It's the same way just two different different organisms out there taking it all in you ever had a situation where you like blanked online or tripped over a stage prop or something like that during a show. Oh yeah it's balked on the few lines here and there and i think one time you know. He skipped an entire page in it. You just kinda pick up the pieces and go on but as you know this. The they'll say latest the audience know unless they know the place specifically the scene by scene or whatever they don't know and i and i've been to place of dead i didn't know and i could tell i think is an actor. You just kinda know. I know something screwed up there. No they did something but the covering so you know you. Just pull inform form at that point. Sure yeah think we've all gone up One of the funniest things. I've seen was at trinity rep in angeles korea. Thicker name is just a legendary axe actress. In the new england area. She stopped and she was like kind of looking around and then she gave the line as she just looked. The crisis thought forgotten. She's totally brooke character. Brook in fourth wall. But she's a riot so she got away. Everybody laughs hilarious.

Trinity Rep Company Trinity Rep Steppenwolf Austin Providence Chicago Boston ROB Korea Angeles New England Brooke
Man 'adjusting his pants' causes gun to go off inside Atlanta mall, police say

The Weekly Check Up

00:29 sec | 10 months ago

Man 'adjusting his pants' causes gun to go off inside Atlanta mall, police say

"Briefly disrupted by accidental gunfire at Lenox Mall yesterday, Atlanta Police say the gunfire inside Neiman Marcus turned out to be from a guy walking through the store and adjusting his pants when the gun in his waistband discharged, apparently accidentally, the arguing witnesses heard before that unrelated Department does add. This kind of thing is unacceptable, and they expect more from gun owners because that's not a responsibility to be taken lightly. WSB is Veronica Waters, reports that the Atlanta police believe the man behind the accidental shooting ran away. WSB

Lenox Mall Neiman Marcus Atlanta Veronica Waters WSB
Man ‘adjusting his pants’ causes gun to go off inside Neiman Marcus in Atlanta, sends shoppers running

WSB programming

00:46 sec | 10 months ago

Man ‘adjusting his pants’ causes gun to go off inside Neiman Marcus in Atlanta, sends shoppers running

"When his gun goes off over at Lenox Square Square Mall, Mall, scaring scaring the the heck heck out out of of shoppers shoppers over over and and even even Marcus Marcus W. W. SP's SP's Belinda Belinda Skelton Skelton at at the the mall mall last last night. night. When When this this all all goes goes down down doors doors were were quickly quickly closing their storefronts and putting down the areas People were running, and it was chaotic. BSP's Veronica Waters with more from police Atlanta police say the gunfire inside Neiman Marcus turned out to be from a guy walking through the store and adjusting his pin. That's when the gun in his waistband discharged, apparently accidentally, the arguing witnesses heard before that unrelated, the department does add. This kind of thing is unacceptable, and they expect more from gun owners because that's not a responsibility to be taken lightly. Business absolutely booming at Christmas tree farms across

Lenox Square Square Mall Marcus Marcus W. W. Sp Belinda Belinda Skelton Skelto Mall Mall Veronica Waters BSP Neiman Marcus Atlanta
It's official: Clare Crawley exits The Bachelorette — and gets engaged!

Jason and Alexis

02:27 min | 11 months ago

It's official: Clare Crawley exits The Bachelorette — and gets engaged!

"That Claire Crawley walked away into the sunset with her choice, Dale Moss in the middle of the bachelorette season. This has never happened before. This is 1/16 season of the Bachelorette because she fell in love in the middle of the season, she thought it was not worth the other guy's time. To waste their time. She's like I already know who I want. We are into each other, and we are going to be together until the day we die. Like all bachelor and bachelorette contestants are no. But she left the show very unprecedented. And so they brought in a new bachelorette. Her name is Tasha. Adams. She is a flat bottom miss and she, which means she takes people's blood. If you don't know that she's a nurse, and so the guys were braced for her entrance. He was a little bit concerned about blindsiding the suitors, Claire's former suitors, and she said, I just know that this process moves very quickly and you start to invest a lot of feelings Early on. I don't know if that's the case for some of them. On def, So I'm more than happy to have that conversation with them, and if they don't feel like this is the right time for them, or I'm not right for them. They can walk away at this point. She's not going to get her feelings hurt. S so you know, that's that's good of her. She is absolutely gorgeous. I think this is going to be great. In August, she was seen in Palm Springs wearing a teal bikini. And then there was a teaser for Theo episode that she was in season and bikinis a lot basically. It's like when they show the bachelors coming out of the pool or showering. It's like OK, thank you. We know they shower. Ah, and so there's was a to be continued at the end of the show. Next week's Caesar promised. Possible cases of cold feet of some of the guys walking away from this, plus some more answers from Claire and Dale. So they're gonna have a portion of the show. That's like, all right. Well, how did this happen? How did you you know, because there was also talk that during the pandemic when they had to stop filming that they were still in contact with each other. So that's sort of how their relationship blossomed. And, Yeah, I mean, I give a tour. You know why drag it out? If you know you're going to pick and well, she is getting a lot of hate. Oh, it's like this is real life. It's not just a TV show, you know. She

Claire Crawley Dale Moss Bachelorette Tasha Claire Adams Palm Springs Caesar Dale
Behind the Book: Nine Lives Over the North Atlantic with Kerry McCauley

Stuck Mic AvCast – An Aviation Podcast About Learning to Fly, Living to Fly, & Loving to Fly

05:10 min | 11 months ago

Behind the Book: Nine Lives Over the North Atlantic with Kerry McCauley

"You must be somebody who really really loves adrenaline jockey that's for. Sure. Yeah, I sure do got to keep the heart going. So you talk about in this book single engine over the Ocean. Boy Really. Sure. Sure. They gotta they gotta get. There's someplace and you gotta find somebody stupid enough to do it so. that. It takes a lot of skill to do that, and so a lot of times people ask though. I know we talk about faring airplanes, 'cause people, purchase planes. There's a lot of reasons to do it I. I'm in a building here where we have a ferry company downstairs. I always think of putting a small plane in a container and shipping it would probably be the best way. So so why would you ferry a plane over the water when you could ship it in a container? Well in a word money I mean it's expensive to take him apart. Shipping is not that expensive expensive to put it back together. But you know last time to play I've heard lots of stories of people doing that and they get there and there's a couple of vital parts missing from the plane and. Becomes a problem. So then they would go toward someone like you that can actually has first of all the knowledge. To fly an airplane, the water and also has more than that has the guts to do. I I'd have to say when you're preparing for this, there's got to be two things involved. I would think there's a psychological aspect and there's also the the whole part of preparing from paperwork and more of a knowledge aspects. So it's talk first about the the knowledge you know what type of things do you need to not do this type of a trip? Well number one you've got to figure out, can the play make the trip? You know what route are you gonNA take you get find fuel stops you need any overflight permits arguments, put ferry tanks in the plane that's kind of the big one. On a few need to make some really long legs over the ocean, most planes can't do it on their standard fuel. So you've got to put very tanks of the plane. So ferry tanks. What are those? Are they metal or a rubber? I freeze the metal ones. They do make rubber ferry tanks at collapses there being used, but the metal ones are more reliable. You take the seats out of the back the out of the back of the plane and put them in the tail basically in. Put the ferry tanks as far forward as you can for CG and. There you go. Extra. When you're when you do that, that's going to be a bit of a cost to the person right to that's part of the cost of doing the first flight. Yeah Yeah. But usually if you've got very tanks in their lifetimes, you can make up the cost or that by skipping stops especially these days a lot of times landing permits and especially foreign countries get to be really expensive. But when you have fourteen hours a range you can. Literally make half the stops that you normally would end if you didn't tanks. So it's Kinda Nice. So each of those stops assuming there are some costs involved in and that type of thing as far as like land permits I'll a definite landing permits these days in foreign countries are getting to be really ridiculous plus these days. Almost every foreign airport requires you to have a handler. Which is adding extra costs me back when I first started three years ago we did everything ourselves you shop at a foreign airport that you'd never been to that. You don't speak the language you just have to dive in fine landing fees get fuel weather food if you got time and do it yourself now they make you hire handler which is nice but expensive. So. Do you really need the handler? No Dan was really bothered me most of the time they're not. They're not very helpful first of all, and it's just the money's right off. You know right off the top every time you spend on your on the road is coming right out of your pocket. So it's It's going to shell out a few hundred dollars or more on a stop just had some guy walk alongside you. Yeah. How did you learn to do all this? I started back in one, thousand, nine, hundred, ninety for flying for a company called Orient Air out of Saint Paul Minnesota. and. My friend's father owned the company. We were army recruits together in the National Guard. and. They needed a pilot ninety job actually was a actually spent a few years trying to get this enough hours to get this job. And got. Hired. Off on the road I went. So yeah. It's some mentors that could help you out Is that something that you would suggest if someone was thinking again, getting into this get was somebody I. Oh, definitely there's so many things that you don't think about when you're getting ready to make especially along ocean crossing. The the weather considerations are. Paramount I. Mean you run unexpected headwinds? Don't leave yourself enough reserve. You might come up short nets usually considered inconvenient

Orient Air DAN Saint Paul National Guard Minnesota Paramount
Oakland Athletics get a playoff shot at the Houston Astros

Smart Money with Doug Horne

00:27 sec | 1 year ago

Oakland Athletics get a playoff shot at the Houston Astros

"A's in the division series this week, Esther's manager, Dusty Baker, on what makes the essay so tough guys walk and what stands out is the thing that they have an outstanding Bulls fan. Good starters as well. Well, you can catch the game on sports Talk. 7 90 beginning tomorrow at three. You can hear all the pre game inside as well. That starts it, too. And in Texas college football

Dusty Baker Esther Bulls Texas Football
Phil - Growing up gay in South Africa

Coming Out Stories

04:14 min | 1 year ago

Phil - Growing up gay in South Africa

"It can tell from Phil now. He grew up in South Africa where he knew from a very early age that he was gay, and he got bullied for it from the age of eight I think I always knew from a young age, but for me it was different levels of awareness so when I was really young I found myself getting those butterflies in that shy feeling by looking at old is so you know when you see little schoolgirls and they all shy when they see their friends older brothers Zoll. Things like that! That's how I felt and it felt. Different to looking at my other male straight friends, who would get the same feelings for girls? So I had the awareness that they was a difference there I was getting that feeling by looking at guys, but they were getting that feeling looking at girls, and what's certain Cevennes near young mind that there was anything wrong with that, or did you just sort of acknowledging and and run with it I think as I got older Changed the way I. I thought because the majority of the people I was hanging around with were attracted to the opposite sex so I then thought okay. There must be something wrong with me because I didn't know anybody else. Who has in the same situation as me? Let's put this in a setting. Then how old were you? Where were you growing up? I think the awareness really started when I was four five and I grew up in South Africa. That's young, isn't it? Yeah, well I mean the thing is i. that's why I had different levels of awareness as about myself as I was growing up. So I mean yes, I had like kiss catch with girls, but then I had the feeling. Oh, I want to play catch with boys. You Know I. think that would be a little bit more exciting. And then I got a little bit older and. It was. Should I be having these feelings and I think you are actually the first person on the podcast from South Africa. Yes, so I don't really have much of a sense of what it's like growing up being gay part the Elliott Bay Community in South Africa what what was it like south? Africa I find is a little bit more. Conservative than here in the UK. And at that time it was quite homophobic. Very traditional men do this woman do this. That really affected me and I found it quite difficult. There were slows thrown about about being gay I can remember being a kid, and for those the listeners who have some experience in South Africa the word was more fee, which was fag basically and Offie Molefi. So. I was called that a lot I didn't even know what it meant. My mom tells me about the story. When I was young, I must've been eight or nine, and and I would go to my mom in our say mom, how do gay guys? And she said to me I know Philip. How do gay guys walk and I said I don't know, but the people at school are are teasing me because they say that I'm gay because I walk in a certain way and I didn't even have a label for it, but it was really really hard, even for my mom and Dad. They never really had any experience in lgbtq stuff and they've learned a lot through me. Yeah. It's a similar story with a lot of people are told to. Kind of like a lot of parents learn as they go on, which is why sometimes their first reaction isn't always the best one because they literally done what to say, they have gotten a reference point. They haven't met any other LGBT people until that child comes out. This is what it was like with my mom and dad because they grew up in Rhodesia and Zimbabwe. and. It was a lot more conservative than over in the UK, so they didn't have a reference. They didn't have any friends and relatives that were comfortable in coming out and saying who they really

South Africa Phil UK Philip Cevennes Rhodesia Elliott Bay Community Offie Molefi Zimbabwe.
"guy walked" Discussed on Talking Sopranos

Talking Sopranos

08:08 min | 1 year ago

"guy walked" Discussed on Talking Sopranos

"'cause he's saying my my last. Therapist you know used to work out of. Work out of out of his house. You know she gets the phone call. It's okay to go home now and she's paranoid. You Watch me, blah, Blah Blah. It's Tony Soprano calling from a cellphone a payphone You could go back now. It's all over and she's frantic. and. He has been watching her obviously. I. Lorraine's very good in this episode also brought exceptionally good the trading office KRISTOF is nodding off at his desk. Adria Christopher's not into this job. At all? It's not as it's not his wheelhouse. This whole being does any is any job Christopher's job. Showbiz. I guess he. He likes the day-to-day mob stuff this. This is not for him. Adrianus proud of him. She! E F listening like that. Al-Majd e AF hearten because to stock the hope member that commercial. They don't. That was right, if hunting right She she says let's go down to the shore. You're the boss You told Matthews played by Leila Bronco That You know I'm going I. got to the point of Blah Blah Blah Blah, Blah and Sean says I. Got You covered? He's in charge now. Right and Lilo is in that pilot that idiot I did that. We spoke about call firehouse. Leila was a fireman that, and of course everyone knows them from bronx tale with t He grew up in the town next month him him. My brother friends teenagers and hung out a lot right right around when he got that On Jones Beach. By the casting, people have a bronx. Tale is like one of those Hollywood. You know. One and he worked along. He worked a lot. So, Chris Cardio plays It's Matt and Sean Sean Chris was in the movie that I directed you start in hungry ghosts and a good guy and a good attitude. Good stuff and then so they over here. One of the after after Kris leaves they over here, one of the stockbrokers kind of pushing other stocks, mutual funds acting like a real stockbroker, not pushing will sticks with districts, and they just work them over man. They pour hot coffee on his neck I mean and they give him a B and and kind of send a message to the office. With pushing. That's it. You're better, do it and that's played by Kevin Sussman. Who? has had a great career and he was out either a series regular certainly did almost hundred episodes of the Big Bang theory. And he's. A good scene I mean abby paused at hot coffee right in the back of his neck. Jesus Christ see related to our producer. executive suggests Usman. I Know Jeff. Do you ever illegitimate son? Maybe he's got one running around from the DOT. No, no relation. Okay, let's take a little break. This is based on. This is based on real stuff that the mob was doing and stocks. This is a pump and dump up and dump all this. Boiler, room stuff is based on real a New York mob stuff by the way, so they push this. Christopher doesn't know really what's going on deeper into his drug use. And he's bored with this. Yeah, it's not it's you know it's one thing to be at the bottom being and being on the street and making collections or dealing with you know at the pork store being in on meetings and discussions, but this being in an office and you know stocks. It's just not. It's not glamorous enough for him I don't. He's got to two wild men working for him. These kids are cowboys. They are absolutely okay. We're. Being Tony's working at the desk making Hash. Come in, you! mink Tony's attorney. Who's played by the Great David Margulis? He passed away a few years ago. Yeah, good guy, great actor, did a whole bunch of stuff I mean he was in East vittore ghostbusters made off a big Broadway guy also I'd like to very much used to talk to him. Whenever I saw him I liked him. He was a good guy. Good, really good New York character actor. And he'd been hash arrive. Thanks Tony for the tip on mystics He sold his Disney stock. which is makes these little things like got? That's what makes the show so great. It's not just thanks for the stock tip. I sold my Disney stock. The BIWA mystics specificity. Detail that is what separates the sopranos from just about every other show. Yeah, nothing is ever Arba charrier generic or just you know everything's specific on the nose. You know get A. Phone call from Comilla Sisters. Here Janice. He asked Barbara Janice Tony Soprano has two sisters. Barbara, who was a younger sister and Janet? Who is the oldest sister? Only fifty says Camilla's Barbara's coming down from Brewster Bob and Tom with the kids from Bruce. Bruce I lived in brewster. When I was a high school. I went to high school there. That's in New York about fifty miles outside the city north of the city. What is that like? It's kind of a when I lived. There was a rural suburb, still a lot of reservoirs and even stuff you know in the country. It's kind of the country, yeah! They that girl. That's the only thing I. Nobody came down for Brucie could take the train taller. That's showing my age there. And Barbara's the younger sister and The older. Has Been going on for many years, she's left. She was in A. Commune she's taken Indian Name Vodka, which is the God goddess of love and fertility, and you know. She's takes you. She went through all these phases. As a Hippie and a Hindu whatever she's been doing. He, says we'll make a family reunion out of it. No Livia of course and he tells Haitian me kind of want A. You're trying to get out medical leave and he may. Stay away. Let's not do anything with the Rico case you know. Don't do anything silly here you know and Tony says you only way to run. A family is from a bunker through a slot or slip, or whatever you know, you know. You gotta stay hidden. At the bottom being and has says that. Mom's IRS, which is a mumbles it almost in, it's not it's that which means pastors and Yiddish, actually referring. I guess they didn't catch that yeah yeah. Silvio arrives. He gives the guys over to the back of the bodybuilding so we arrived. He Hooks Pussy GDP. Is there poorly as Ray Curto? Is there What's his name again? Don Laurels. Georgia alerts. Curto Sylvia's doing his godfather oppression and he pinches big pussies cheeks, and he's doing you know the Pacino stuff, Michael Kolia on and the guys..

Tony Soprano Barbara Janice Tony Soprano Adria Christopher New York Sean Sean Chris Leila Bronco Disney I. Lorraine Kevin Sussman KRISTOF Hollywood Ray Curto Jones Beach Curto Sylvia Comilla Sisters IRS Bruce Don Laurels abby Georgia
"guy walked" Discussed on Talking Sopranos

Talking Sopranos

09:59 min | 1 year ago

"guy walked" Discussed on Talking Sopranos

"Maybe Maybe that does check out like tone like Syria Holy. Walnut, says later on and Vinnie's acting in this episode. Yeah. He's he's agreed sees great. You really well done. This seeded the basement. They continue to talk Tony. Saying. WHO's your boss? Tony's pissed. It was a broader Puerto Rico. She's twenty six and acupunctures You didn't tell you. Let me. Know Somehow someway that you were there. Tony's very reluctant to believe anything he said. You know very reluctant, but it'd be you. Do see that conflict that here's a guy that he does love. To believe he wants to believe even when he goes into the hug to pat him down, there is a part of him that does WanNa hug him that I want to turn the clock back before any of these suspicions came. You know he really it's A. It's a great. Element of Tony Soprano and Jim you know is brilliant, and how he plays those things, those conflicting emotions you know they. They both pissed off at each other, just pissed in general. He Hits Pussy a few times under. If you notice it in the back, like little little little swats, you notice that like what? They're arguing Tony wants to know. Why did you come? Come back now. He needs the money as kids. Age, take Percocet Juju beach. which that's a candy I. Don't know if people to do beans. I don't know if people know what that is everywhere kind of candy. You know it's taunt. Even explain what it is, it's it's like A. Good and plenty or something like that like no, not really, it's It's hard to explain, but it was popular at one point. I don't know anymore and saying you take. You guys you poorly. You taking the word of a degenerate cop over me so he? He's playing that you. He's pissed that everyone turned on them. You're supposed to be my friends. I was supposed to reach out to you. Tell you where I was gonNA. Kill me, so that's what this is all about, and he's flat out lying flat out lie. Tony Pushes away. Don't ever try that shit again it. Not, why at this point Tony you know checked his back now down in posted a big. Pushes him away. Thing I don't know what you're doing. He says grabbed this soprano Living Tony and pussy. Talk so your your other who stepped into run his crew, a his pissed boy philly Parisi. Philly Parisi is played by Dan Grimaldi. He is one of only three characters to. He comes back as his brother Patchy in a later vote on and phillies in a dream sequence later on onto. So it! COMES BACK I? Mean Dangle Moldy comes back as Patsy so philly and Patsy twins I knew Dan before I even knew when I was a teenager. Me and my friends used to. We like to watch horror movies you know when we were like thirteen fourteen and there was one. Me I'll never forget it. We will watching. My Buddy's house sales house. Don't go in the basement. That was the name of the movie. Don't go in the basement and remember. It was starring Dan Grimaldi and we all were like. You know we never heard of him. As was way before this or anything like that, but the name always stuck in our. It was a horrible. Really cheap low budget horror movies just terrible in one of those bad ones and you know. Laugh you know we like to get watch scary movies. This wasn't scary and it was horrible, but. So I knew him, and then the first professional acting, Gig I ever had was a play, and he played my father. So. Will you like all nervous around them? This is a big star. I was around him. I was I was But I thought it was kind of ironic that my first job I'd be with this guy. He had to be very nice guy, a really good guy and he. He was on the show the whole way Now we're at the airport. Poorly. Drums gee-gee off. She played by John Fury. WHO's actually from Boston is that? Boston yeah, he's for Boston. He's He's not a lot of stuff. He was in more. For years for years and then Patriots Day and now he. He's done a whole lot of work. He was just in Chappaquiddick he had a really nice world. Good actor he sticks around for a few seasons and make it look like he just got off the plane for Boston. Paulie throws them a small suitcase. Don't lose it. It's one of my favorites. It gets in the car with Philly. HOW'S BOSTON? It's like Scranton with clams. He throws a little Zinger I love Boston. Do you like Boston I do? Yeah, we. We were up there a few times. We a lot of fun updates. We had some appearances up their. Charity events another well executed plan here. Family You know a hit. It's just like very well done very thought out. You know orchestrated and. They bring the guy in from out of town. Philippe picks them up like he just got off the plane. and he starts bed wrapping Tony Soprano. Sauce tell them about. It's all true what he's saying. He's he's. Crazy. But do you notice though this hit is very reminiscent and. Is An march to the Godfather and away his. PATSIES, wife or visit Philly Patsy. PHILLY PHILLY's wife says don't forget the pay, station So, we're talking about cleanses hit on Paulie in the Godfather car and this had happened in the car as well so there's a definite. reference to that it's it's a really good seen driving him. Pull it off. Also was was great, also was John, fury, when he gets out of the companies dealing with his ear. Details would be like across. And he's really playing that it's it was right on really good detail. and. You, know he saying your big mouth fuck before he kills them and. But basically he's just really in the story. Would philly saying is true. They may not want to hear. The truer and this is Tony Soprano's way of. Staying in control of the family. Absolutely so it gets the call from Silvio, you see the bridge in the background once again once again, the symbol of death, the bridge between life and Death Tony Getting this call about death by the bridge has been repeating a lot since the beginning of the show here. Middle fee if we go back to Silvio, let's from though it's done. The Melfi talks a patient in a hotel room. It's a sleazy motel. The same one it's Terry Winter. She's talking to Terry Winter and I'll tell you a story about this. Terry winters is a fantastic writer. He was nominated for an Oscar. He's going to. He's going to be a guest. Coming up on our show wrote a lot lot of the Sopranos episode of the Sopranos He created Boardwalk. Empire Created Vinyl nominated for an Oscar for Wolf of wall. Street terrific guy from Brooklyn was an attorney. Didn't like being an attorney went to got a hell of a story and he'll tell us about, but. Wanted to get into television writing, he worked his way up to the Sopranos spoke when I. Learned for the show. There was. I don't know. People in the Hallway at cup. It was a long hallway and. I just happened to. You know I walked in there was so many people were lined up the skinny hallway and I said to a guy. Hey wins the signing sheet. 'cause you know when you go into audition as you know, you gotta sign in and put your agent's name and you know what time your appointment was. kind of like a doctor's office right and. The Guy that I talked to happen to be Terry with. I didn't know from about. Was He auditioning? He was waiting in the hallway. That's where I'm getting so us. Waiting in the hallway is where decided he down there. I went all the way to the end sided sat in my chair, working on the stuff, so all kinds of people around guys girls. It was at the beginning of season two. Now. When I go into read I'm looking around is about fifteen people in the room. The guy that I asked. Where's the signing sheet? which turned out to be Terry with is in the room. And producer writer by then I didn't know that I'm all. What do you do your? Then, they stay. I had no idea you didn't know what was going on. I didn't know what was going on. I said what the fuck is this? So what if you stay the judge? The other people I didn't know, but he was auditioning for this. He had auditioned for this role and he played. The patient of office did a great job. He. Even, though he was already on the staff is. Wow He also did stand up right at one time he did stand up at one time. He wrote for the PJ's. I mean row show called the restaurant. Of, stand up comic I mean. He worked his way soprano, a brilliant, brilliant guy and Terry's great, and she says you know the carpets of being done at the at the old office..

Tony Soprano PHILLY BOSTON Boston Terry Dan Grimaldi Philly Parisi John Fury Terry Winter Paulie Philly Puerto Rico phillies attorney Terry winters Walnut writer Vinnie Silvio Patsy
"guy walked" Discussed on Talking Sopranos

Talking Sopranos

06:49 min | 1 year ago

"guy walked" Discussed on Talking Sopranos

"I got a text from either right before we started this. Tour she wants to do the show. and I told her I'll give her a call tomorrow so We'll be seeing the great. I eat A who we see Janice for the first time, the wonderful and evil. Chanice. Yeah. What a mess! He just she comes in and immediately just causes chaos. It's just like she's like. Evil in. The Devil case. We open up the stockbroker training center. They're taking the test. The were they call it. The class seven I think. He's going to be. Compliance offices for the Securities and Exchange Commission to. Establish. Pan. To go off medical order. It is an Asian guy. Who Has Christopher Malta Sandy? He was not Christopher Multi Sante wasn't a coincidence. He's refusing us. There's no way Christopher was going to a put in the time to study for that test and be pass it either. It's very difficult I. Think even even people that study for a long time. It's seven. It's a hard hard. A stockbroker. It's a series seven exam. Joe Attention toward you know it's a even. Guys that went to school. They gotTA pass this test. It's very difficult so this degree montage. which is phenomenal and a really incredible way to show a the passage of time and reintroduced the characters. Bring everybody back up to speed. very good year Frank Sinatra Great Song, you know it was a very good year for the show in a weird. On one level, right and very good for the characters and for US Tony. Tony was You know he was the boss again. I. Mean you know everybody did okay? Everything. Smack in order. You see AJ's grown up. He cares about his appearance. He's no longer the Chubby little kid. He's looking different and and the kids you know kids grow up faster obviously going through changes and even Jamie Lynn is more mature in this. Episode! It's great starts with Livia of course in the hospital and Tony's playing. Solitaire at the bottom of being, and they deliver the money with Tony Paulie walnuts his there Carmella cooks. You see her twice in this montage. kind of just a hub Johm. She was a real housewife before they were real housewives. Show in some ways was off. Absolutely was, and I would assume. He also was the first real housewives in New Jersey the first. Orange County. Orange County real housewives, but that was way later on. But this this montage really establishes. The car is an epic feeling to characters at the even even though as just one season. We've been through with them coming back like this. There's like it's almost like everything's larger than life. In a way I mean the. In terms of how the success of this show affected. The audiences relationship to the characters is what I'm trying to say. The it's really. Tactically done this Montas. Well listen the people at this point were really waiting for this next season, right? They fell in love with the show HBO played. Constantly the word out to really you know between seasons really hit a frenzy. People waiting in anticipation for this season to you know you see junior? He's in prison You know AJ combs hair police. Haven't sex when a stripper, so Silvio is actually buying wingtips. I don't know if that's a subliminal reference to Tony's hair, the wings it could. Not Moving even while he's having sex. They got. What they probably ask them or the might take your shirt off something and he'd probably said no I. Bet He refused. He's fully clothed. Because he didn't want to mess up his hair maybe. Probably rise all right. We gotta take a break before we take a break on remind everybody out there. Please subscribe to our podcast wherever you're able to do that. Just! Click on the button where it says subscribe. That'll that'll help us out. Thank you. Don't Michalek took your advice and I got the private Internet access. I know you had got it a few weeks ago a month ago and I finally I've been on my phone and computer. I've signed on it I got it on my computer. My phone I have a flip phone still as you know. But. It is really I'm really glad I. Took your advice. Honestly, so talk. US arouses supported by private Internet access, said today I wanNa tell you about something. It's been bothering me a lot lately and Probably affected you too especially during the quarantine. Did you notice that sometimes when you try to watch a video on Youtube Stream a movie and four K. or play something online, the speed and the quality suddenly dropped. Even though you could still load some websites and everything seems fine. Does that happen to you a lot? It happens not anymore so well. That's your Internet service provider deliberately slowing down your connection, they all come back. Yeah, they doing on purposing sucks. The process is called Bandwidth throttling and it's happening because you're at the mercy of your ISP. They see everything you do online all the time and they get to decide which website deserve were kind of speeds, but that's not great for you now is. The simplest solution to this problem is a VPN provider here talking Sopranos. We use private Internet access. We've been telling you about them. For the past few weeks exactly well. Here's the deal with private Internet access all your Internet. Traffic goes to a secure VPN server and your data or data is encrypted. Your ISP no longer knows which website you're accessing, so they can't slow down anymore. Now more than thirty million people downloaded private Internet access, and we encourage you guys to do the same. You can use private Internet access for a lot of things. From hiding your Ip address the keeping.

Tony Paulie AJ combs Christopher Multi Sante Christopher Malta Sandy Janice Orange County Frank Sinatra Securities and Exchange Commis HBO Christopher New Jersey Joe Attention Jamie Lynn US Silvio Michalek
"guy walked" Discussed on Talking Sopranos

Talking Sopranos

06:57 min | 1 year ago

"guy walked" Discussed on Talking Sopranos

"I didn't know how to cook eggs or Omelettes or anything he's like no, it's really easy. You know you crack. The a showed me a little bit on Mike Okay. Nine o'clock ten o'clock Saturday morning I go to do brunch. Brunch everybody comes at the same time, so immediately places full. I've got nine tickets. And it's all eggs and Omelettes and pancakes and I'm just I'm like Lucy with the chocolates. Couldn't keep manager. Horrible the managers back there. Helping me I'm threatening to Wa- I'm I'm just GONNA walk out of here I. don't care who I'm sending out broken. You know sunny side up eggs broken. That look like you know Vom Imos. It seemed like I was there for three days those three hours brunch. Terrible I worked in a lot of restaurants my early twenties. In eighties I, May I was making a lot of money in restaurants like between one hundred and two hundred tonight cash. Yeah for twenty one years old. You Go, you know you're making six seven hundred dollars a week. That's a lot. It's a lot of money. Hash money, I moved furniture for while I hung lights at Loma off off Broadway theatre in the East village. The worst job I ever had was arket research. Where you'd have to cold, call people and get them to do surveys about products. And the only way you would get paid as if you kept him on the phone for like a half an hour. One survey was about liqueurs like you had to now tell me which is, do you drink on a regular basis? Cream demands often often not at all moretto in it was, and people didn't want to the only people who wanted to stay on for half an hour or just wanted to to you. About their life, because they were lonely, and there were guys in the other Cuba crying, begging people to stay on the line with them because of. This terrible job we're ever. And so mostly the restaurant business and you did well you never. You never did a nine to five besides like the marketing. Was a messenger I, did that in a daytime, a foot messenger, not a buy in Manhattan a lot of jobs to a ton. was kind of a fun job wandering around the city unless it rained, it was freezing cold. Yeah, in the Nice weather has mostly at my my. My route was midtown like from fifty ninth to forty second. From West side to a Third Avenue which is a lot to cover on foot? Take the boss Cross town because you go. Off. A Lot, you kill time you walk. Learn the city. Did the chimneys I clean Jim Henson's. Townhouse I cleaned his chimney. In Manhattan Manhattan whether muppets all over the. No, because if there was a mop and I'm not joking I. said that I would snatch one. I would snatch them up and put it in Kosovo like big tins. You know your vacuum the thing, but not a muppet to be had you would have never known as Jim Henson's and Kitty Carlisle I cleaned fireplaces. Remember, we're going way back. Wow, kitty, carlisle I think. She was married to Moss harder from mistake. Kitty Carlisle. She was online. Before then high-society Broadway Dame. You know yeah, yeah, yeah, it's funny. I had other all bunch of other ones basketball camps, of course I work for Paul Anka as about and his club that I met a lot of celebrities. There you know and all that Shit but. Hey. Acting best job I ever had I. Guess You soon, you also at how it's much better than the alternatives. Let's put it. Could've been with acting. I could have been a cubicle I was a worst. Season Two of the Sopranos this. This first episode aired. January two thousand and now the show. Show is hit. You know I remember. Get Gun on the subway. Around the holidays because it was a few weeks before the premiere, there was A. Istat across from this big picture of myself, they did individual ads of the characters. It was a little bit freaky. That was too big. Show is a hit the ads on the subways. People were talking about it so those. And I feel this episode. Lived up to that like coming back out of this big success and reintroducing the show like I think they really had really did. Succeed that and we had the. Were you at the season two premiere? Yeah Yeah Yeah Yeah. Where what was it the Ziegfeld? Field I was her season premiere was at a theater in Times Square movie theater that used to be on forty four, th, and Broadway, and then we had the after party John's pizza in Times Square now. The show's a hit. We have the premiere at the Ziegfeld. which was at the time, the best movie theater in Manhattan, if not in the world, a huge I went there as a kid was a huge single screen theater and I think the party was that it was the part of World Center maybe the Sea Grill. Wasn't a Rockefeller. Center, it wasn't that update yet. I think late or a little later on wasn't there yet, but I remember they didn't invite me me. My wife went. We didn't I didn't know a whole lot of people you know. I knew some who I worked with Jim and Toni and a few people, but everybody was doing their thing now the first time someone recognized you. You remember that moment. From the Sopranos or in general while no because. They knew you're from spider. A lot of people yeah. People started recognizing me then. I don't remember the first time then happened. Soup Browse Yeah. So! This was a guy walks into a psychiatrist's office. Beginning of a joke a classic old. Borsch Belt Joke right guy walks in a psychiatrist office and says. Trying to worry sixteen, two thousand. Introduce, a lot of new characters is, we'll talk about as we go along Jason Hill. This was his third and last episode. He wrote Allen Coulter. who was with us the whole way? Terrific guy, terrific actor even POPs up in a little cameo here. Oh does he? I didn't even notice that. when we get to it, it's a scene he's walking into the motel to talk to Melfi. Okay. Know. This was Kathy Scorsese was a prop girl. This was yeah, apartment props. Yes, she was grace I haven't seen her in a long time..

Jim Henson Manhattan Kitty Carlisle Mike Okay Manhattan Manhattan Wa Lucy Vom Imos Paul Anka Kathy Scorsese Cuba Melfi Kosovo Jason Hill Times Square Moss Allen Coulter. A. Istat
"guy walked" Discussed on Talking Sopranos

Talking Sopranos

04:09 min | 1 year ago

"guy walked" Discussed on Talking Sopranos

"We made its season too about. I know. I can tell you need a Tan. As is a big pussy has attained. I need a ten. When do you? When does Bokola make his grand episode to hear next? The coming out party is the next episode. It's GonNa be and then this episode. There's a lot of new characters. They introduced a lot of new characters. It's getting bigger to shows getting much bigger. Yeah, as you could see many new characters and and. There's more to combat I enjoyed it immensely. It was good she's into. People seem to be really like an issue. People thank you out there for listening in. Listening to my bullshit and I hope you're enjoying it now Y- before we get into the service thinking. You know like I've had a whole lot of jobs in my life before I was an actor. You know what about you? What How well this episode is the beginning of your transition out of your former life and into your life is inactive full-time, and that's it pretty much right except for the next episode, Yeah. But I mean I've had you know even as a kid back in Brooklyn in my family had no money. I grew up on welfare I mean my father worked for thirty years. He sat on the couch. You know But I had all kinds of jobs. I mean off the wall stuff I mean. I was there was a place as buffy pancake house. We were like fourteen. We all would hang around in front of it got burnt down and we were hanging around. We would go in the steal stuff Blah Blah Blah? is about ten of us in front and the guy. Took guy comes up and we had heard it was going to be an a birtles clam house. The infamous Umberto's which was rum, literally little Italy with that killed Joe Gala. You know and they show it in the Irishman. But that was the one in little Italy now they opened one in Brooklyn, which was right down the block from where I grew up, and we were hanging around. You know getting into trouble beads still been one day. A guy comes up and he says. What are you fucking kids doing here? And, you know Blah Blah Blah pulls out a wad like a big. Water. Money gives me a hundred dollars. He said. Why don't you get off the corner or go to movies? And I said. Listen we don't you know? I don't want two hundred dollars. Just give me a job when you open. And he gave me a job that he was Joe iannello. Who Was Matty the Horse? You could look them up. One of the biggest mob guys have a nice guy for to me anyway and Matty the horse. His brothers was a bunch of brothers, day birtles and. I worked in a birtles clam house for quite a while when I was in high school. In Brooklyn was one of Brooklyn. was. I was a clam opener. I used to be really good opening the clams. You Know Open An. Open, clams. Are you still good it opening clips? It's hard. It's hard. You know I've done. I could still do it without killing the clan. It's a whole saints to it, but I was failing. You don't like them, guys you. Don't you're at a clam bargain? They're open. Like that I was like that clamps have beards, don't they? I don't know, do they? That's what they call. Those like seaweed like attachments to clams bearded a beard. Sure I thought no indication I think it does as well, but I think. They also have feet. You know climbs. Rally well I eight defeat and everything. It was one for them one for me I also. In College, I was a chimney sweep and. Soon as your chimney sweeps, you wear a top hat. No I didn't go that.

Joe iannello Brooklyn Matty Bokola Italy Joe Gala buffy Umberto
Detecting Emotion Through Gait  with Aniket Bera

AI Today Podcast: Artificial Intelligence Insights, Experts, and Opinion

07:14 min | 1 year ago

Detecting Emotion Through Gait with Aniket Bera

"Hello and welcome to the AI. Today podcast I'm your host Kathleen Mall I'm your host modeled Schmeltzer our guest. Today is unaccounted. Berra is the research professor in computer science at the University of Maryland at the Gamma Lab. Thank you so much for joining us today. Thank you so much. Thank you for inviting. Yeah thanks so much for joining us today. We'd like to start by having you introduce yourself to our listeners. Tell them a little bit about your background. And your current role at the University of Maryland. Sure I've been with him for a little under a year so for this was at. Unc Chapel Hill for a year and had mcbean St at UNC in robotics so a hermit research over the last few years has been trying to work on the social aspect of our bodies whether from the computer vision side where we look different objects after we as humans when we look at different objects. How do we perceive them? So my research has always been about. Data perception for robots and robot can understand the world around us like as humans. It's what research has been over the last six seven years might Rowlatt you. Md has enough research faculty. I advise about seven students now from vision. Applications to robotic applications the psychology driven. Ai Applications on McLennan field of research is something affective computing affective computing. What it means is that we're trying to gauge emotions on Detroit's you in aggressive Shy said figured out different cues from your visual appearance like your facial expressions the way you speak things the way you walk from all of that. Can I figure out your emotions and then do something? According you follow. What specific here. That was something that we found really interesting. You know part of the reason why we reached out to you and hang you join us on their today podcasts. As we wrote an article for our today podcast listeners. He may or may not know that Kathleen and I are also contributing writers to Forbes and tech target and one of the articles that wrote in Forbes was how systems might be able to detect your emotion. Just by taking a look at how you walk and other sort of non maybe visual facial visual or verbal cues and that's part of what being socially intelligent is. I guess we as humans can read things like body language. But there's a lot more to it. So maybe you can explain some of the concepts of socially intelligent robots and why this idea of social intelligence is important yes oh the concept of socially intelligent robots is essentially making robots understanding humans. Better so we. As humans are not objective to be tend to evaluate unheard of things based on out upbringing aquaculture in all these different rates. And then associate all those things in everyday life so In this research which you mentioned the phobic mad we did when research way we could figure out how people walk and then have a garden new. Somebody's side we could mechanize that person sadness just by looking at his a her. Buster is a hub body language and maybe the robot can walk up to that person and ask questions. You look sad today. Can I help you like some help if somebody is Chris excessively angry? I might want to talk to that person and maybe even avoid that person together. Assembly looks confused. The robot co that Bush announce something that you look lost here. Do you need help been something. Do you need to some place? So all these different we inherently as humans. Do which usually doing tend to do those things so go. The last Jedi as robotics has always been about solving problems accurately and objectively so. Let's say you know the goal for about is go from point eight in be and the robot will try to figure out the shortest are the most efficient go from point eight point what via bringing in is also being associated vendor most socially aware the. Somebody's walking. I want that other person to have his hub Robot I do not want to enjoy on. Somebody's face so having all the social norms social events bring it back to robotics is what the concept of socially intelligent robot as unwise. This idea important I think has become more primetime and as they become more available among says I think they should try to attempt to understand humans and be Understand humans but go beyond that and be part of the human society He not interesting because we talk about commonsense emotional Iq and that's incredibly hard for robots and artificial intelligence to actually have been a lot harder than I think. Maybe some people realize although there has been some discussion around it and at COG Melika for the past two years we've actually done voice assistant benchmark and commonsense and emotional. Iq were too of the categories of questions that we asked because supposingly the systems were not very good at that but this idea of AI systems that can detect emotion based on gate is a really unique idea. So where did this concept come about? So we started this. Actually I think about skate years ago. I mean I know. Eight years ago IAE wasn't the we'd know now things were different back then but we started with the concept of can't be figured out somebody's personality just the like just looking at how they walk back. Then we started the representing every human being every industry as a single entity as a single dot on the screen so used to look at videos. And how this guy is trying to avoid somebody to cut across people to figure. Oh his guys aggressive. This guy's got shy guy walks around all these other guys look from that and now we figured out so from the dot aspect of figuring out the entire body leg rewrite now have around twenty two points Bush and so all our lake from your leg from your hand gestures your shoulder through your slaughtering head so all these things. All these different cues which we observe. That wasn't really being studied before there's a lot of research on the emotional especially from faces. You know somebody's happy. Somebody said there's a lot of research in this field especially from speech in the way I see something. Let's say I'm happy? I'm very happy today. I'm okay I'm happy but also the way you say. The sentence is the content of the sentence is one thing but also to the way you was at so all these different cues were being studied in different fees realized that the body language is something which really people studying. We look at people a lot. We look when they walk in the talking when they're driving but we don't we we know what they're going to but we don't really like we haven't understood how gives how walking body language relates to emotion so our on this hatred emotion is kind of it could be added all these facial cues with speed with other were. Hughes from the human so I researched

Kathleen Mall University Of Maryland Bush AI Unc Chapel Hill MD Detroit Berra Professor Gamma Lab Mclennan SHY Cog Melika Buster Forbes Hughes Chris
Sony Clarifies PS5 Backward Compatibility

Beyond!

03:56 min | 1 year ago

Sony Clarifies PS5 Backward Compatibility

"Did mention sort of the one substantial actual bit of PS Five News. We got inbetween shows of course covered Mark Sunnis in-depth tech talk about the PS five. From last week that was originally meant to be. Gd Talk so if you didn't check out that episode you go listen to last week's to figure our thoughts on that a very complex discussion but after the fact. Sony updated their playstation blog. Post about this not once but twice to clarify some of the backward compatibility confusion that stemmed from was unclear about mark. Sunni's fifty minute long explanation. What could possibly leave room for clarification? Of course no. It was very buttoned up into the point and nothing uncertain for fans know there was some Scuttlebutt even having Turnley about whether or not cerny was discussing the fact that all of the library would be backward compatible and only one hundred games would be available launch or if only one hundred games would be available in the PS fives boost mood from ps four or some other combination of. Maybe we'll only actually get to play. Twenty Games backward compatible The update that the playstation blog actually put out was with all of the amazing games. Npr's catalog we've devoted significant efforts to enable our fans to play their favorites NPS five. We believe that the Omer overwhelming majority of the four thousand. Ps Four titles will be playable. Ps fought were expecting backward compatible. Titles will run any boosted frequency on. Ps five so that they can benefit from higher or more stable frame rates and potentially higher resolutions were currently evaluating Games on a title by title basis to spot any issues that need adjustment from the original software developers in his presentation. Mark Cerny provided a snapshot into the top one hundred most played ps four titles demonstrating. How well are backward? Compatibility efforts are going. We are have already tested. Hundreds of titles are preparing to thousands more as we move toward launch. We will provide updates on backward compatibility along with much more news in the months ahead. Stay tuned. So that's kind of worrisome. Honestly we dug into it a little bit last week but it it sort of makes me think that That fans are going to be finding problems in these games that weren't caught initially by Sony's in house developers and testers because the if they're going through on a case by case basis. I don't know if that's how the xbox hard works because their message was very clear of just like all the old games work here now whereas playstation they're like what we it seems like they basically prioritized that most played once the most popular ones Which is good. It's a good start Indefinitely better than the complete lack of backwards compatibility. We've had them. Ps Four but It makes it seemed like to me. You're going to play some like you know. Sort of niche game two years from now and find a bunch of technical hiccups in it. And then you're GONNA ask them the patch amount and they're going to say we don't. We can't justify the time and resources to do that. Like I have the playstation now APP. I don't know where I might have stuck that in the folder that might be just like pushed all the way down the train from other games of playing before it Because it's something I don't really use a lot but it's also like they. They've changed up the languaging on that a little bit when it started it was just like a streaming thing and now you can download some games and so I think they really need to scream from the rooftop sue and not just for people like awesome people listen to show but like you know con. Consumer Carl or whatever like the guy walks into a store. Yeah I mean like right now. You can download. Ps Four NPS Games and play them off line. And that's not really the thing that I think they're shouting about enough because I've thought about man. I would love to revisit some. Ps Two games. I don't have the chance to. I can download these re masters of the final fantasy games. When they're on sale but game passes get literally every remastered final fantasy game from the past like two generations. So why wouldn't I just wait to play

PS Mark Cerny Sony Turnley NPR Carl
"guy walked" Discussed on Overthinking It Podcast

Overthinking It Podcast

03:31 min | 2 years ago

"guy walked" Discussed on Overthinking It Podcast

"Right. It's like you have a self. And then you have kind of an animal self. Right. Is this sort of ego is saying that you want to do this, your values are saying, you want to do this, but your human being, and you can't stop the fact that you're absolutely terrified right? So you use the symbolism of religion as an anchor to remind you to focus, you know, the sniper. Right. Who repeats the sort of biblical versus to himself, while he kills people is about more than just kind of weird creepy? Take on religion. It's also about the effect of this guy is faith gives him the ability to focus in extreme situations. I mean, we see, I mean, the beautiful moment where VIN diesel hands. The rosary to the little French girl who reminds him of his niece, as he gives his life for her in equipped, sonic and bizarre exchange by like it does. Highlight that there are good intentions, and a lot of what's happening. I think that, you know, it's, it's not symmetrical right? But it's like what are the things that saving private? Ryan does is it shows people committing war-crimes, but also shows people being really nice and, and doing and make you taking action in work for the right reasons and movies tend to do all it wonder all of the other right? The war movies, either tend to do well, they tend to be either. The bad is so bad that, that none of the good is worth it or the bad is so like paved over that. Nobody notices it and it's excused or we cut off both ends of the intents spectrum, and everybody just sort of lives in the firefight. And there are no soft targets at all right? But it's like this is a movie where we see soldiers really go out of their way to try to save people who are in trouble and get killed for it, and give their lives in really this believe it's something really beautiful, and admirable in empowered by their religion and their belief in family to do that. Well, you know, I sort of wanted to say, like the reason that that, you know, VIN diesel saves this little girl that reminds his niece over the objection of all of his friends is because fin diesel doesn't have friends, he has family. All right. This has been the thinking on saving private. Ryan. Thank you very much for listening. And thank you very much to Pete, and Mark, for taking this track across Europe with me if you'd like to comment. Please go to the show notes on overthinking you'll find a place where you can comment there during the discussion about this movie. If you happen to have raw watched it recently. Or if you want to talk about your, you wanna talk about your memories of it, that's strangely appropriate for this particular film. We'll be back next week with moreover over thinking it no promises to whether you know, it's, it's a it's sixty five and pick him now, whether we're gonna do a classic film that we wanted to revisit, or if we're going to do the blockbuster of the week. So we're unpredictable like that. So you'll have to tune in next week when there's more overthinking at podcastone until then you can visit us on the web at overthinking dot com where we subject the popular culture to a level of scrutiny. It problem. Does. Hey, thanks greatest generation for allowing us to record that podcast. Your sacrifice vows worth is that I was being sarcastic Mark than about your existence. Is that what you are asking about the guys, we're gonna make up a whole war from a single suggestion? So what I need is a geographical location like the beaches of Normandy, and allowed Iraq. Oh. Is that is that what this is too soon?

Mark Ryan Normandy Iraq Europe Pete
"guy walked" Discussed on Overthinking It Podcast

Overthinking It Podcast

03:04 min | 2 years ago

"guy walked" Discussed on Overthinking It Podcast

"It being worth, it is part of how the child can never really comprehend that their own life was worth everything that their parents went through, and that's sort of an honest kind of contradiction in part of growing up. And also, you know, feeling loved right. You can think. Yeah, it was. Worth it. But at the same time you have to appreciate on some level than other people sacrificed for you. And that's a hard thing for child to come to terms with you of you, even say unnecessary. You have to you, if you can understand that then you're not a child anymore. The full sense if you can really understand that other people had to make sacrifices in, and what that was like, in order for you to have what you have in your life. Then you're on your way of growing up. Now, you might know that as a fact, but you really understand it. Right. And then to think about it in Schindler's List. There's two examples that jump to mind, right? Who's the private Ryan and Schindler's List, the little girl with the red coat wends up in wheelbarrow carted off the crematorium, right? Like that's the child. That's Elliot from ET. Right. That's that's the that's the kid with the BF G right there and Schindler's List, and Spielberg is unflinching in his is accusations is his, his condemnation of the whole world for letting that child die. Right. Like that. That is a gross. Gross failure of the of the most profound degree of the common cause of humanity to be a parent for the future of humanity that, that kid got killed in that way and desecrated in that way. And that red and the thing is that Spielberg wields every ounce of sentimentality like a hammer in that moment with the red coat in the black and white movie like to make an entire black and white movie just you can have that one shot with that red code right? And that, and that's that's the disagreed with myself here. Right. Because I'm saying, well, you know, the, the complexity of the movie is at odds with sentimentality you, if you're smart, you ignore the sentimentality. But if people aren't smart, they only follow the sentimentality. No. Like it's also possible to make a movie in which the sentimentality like also is willing to articulate the problem that you're dealing with. But then the counters that is Liam Niessen, right with. Like, could I have sold my rain, could I have sold my car, you know, and so, so when I think Tom Hanks is saying? Was it worth it make it worth it to him? You know what is it worth? I'm thinking is it worth Liam Neeson's ring is at weren't Liam Neeson's car Riley, which is weird because it doesn't really work terms of stakes. But it all seems to fit together in terms of symbols. Right. And part of the question there, is that it's absurd, right. Because you could always get another ring, right? Like it's not question. Isn't like live on and get a ring that's worth the ring that Liam Easson sold to save you right. It's like it's like you can't really symmetrically MAC, make up for the sacrifices of these people. You could go on and have a whole bunch of cars and your car that you have in your life at your future isn't worth. Oscar Schindler's car in much the same way that whatever child, you have isn't a replacement for VIN diesel. Try to save the girl like his niece and getting killed. Right. Like like like he's trot..

Oscar Schindler Spielberg Liam Neeson Tom Hanks Liam Niessen Liam Easson Elliot Ryan Riley
"guy walked" Discussed on Overthinking It Podcast

Overthinking It Podcast

03:21 min | 2 years ago

"guy walked" Discussed on Overthinking It Podcast

"But you'll never really know what would have happened if you didn't do what you did. And I think that the movie is brave to ask that question because a lot of war movies. Don't ask that question. Right. That, that question of, like I guess they allow them do ask, if that's get a romantic way that makes it seem like it's a solved question, right? It's like, well, you know it much the same way that we know that the gliders are gonna. Take care of that bridge. And then, you know, John Wayne is going to take care of that German, embankment Ryan again. And Sean Connery is gonna take care of those Germans, right? Like we have faith that we know that it's all gonna work out. What we're not acknowledging is the leap of faith that you have to make to believe in kind of large scale evidence, evidence based strategy both ways, both John Wayne, and Sean Connery, or in the longest day. Yes, I watch longest gosh, I now. Now a little bit of the back end drama for all this is Ted I offered to the group that we could watch the longest day to commemorate d day and instead of saving private Ryan, I didn't even think of saving private Ryan, because the longest day is a much less fully developed kind of gritty realist movie, but was made with more younger actual day veterans who had a fresher memory of what happened and so it has a it's like a much much clunky or an old timey Hollywood version. But everybody's in that movie it's nut telly. Savalas is in that movie, right? Like it's but this will be is like that, too. It's like, oh, look, it's Walter white. Look, it's dumped hereto. Oh, look. It's fees brother. Right. Can be s- brother is bleeding out of his stomach. Oh, that was so horrible anyway, questions. You mark. Okay. Okay. What, what, what does the beating of all this is that kind of the big lesson? Let me throw it down. Because what we were talking about this movie. And yes, the longest day has a lot of hilarious old tiny Hollywood stars in it, and is sometimes theatrical. And sometimes tries to be painstakingly realistic, with, like, realistic depictions of battles around Normandy, butts, here's the question. Right. Is that we have gone through a couple of different microcosm. Macrocosm questions. Matt raise the existential question. How do you go on? Right. I'm going moment to moment. Here's how you went out in this moment. Here's how you went on this moment. The bigger question hanging over all. This is the question of the war. Right. And that, and I think this related movies relationship with quote, unquote, the question of the war, which in some ways, it's always one question in some ways, kind of infant, number of questions. But that's what I want to hand to you Mark, because that seemed to be the level of which you were connecting with this movie. I mean, I'll take a stab at it here. Right. We've I think we've been circling around it or you're talking about why we go on, like why Tom Hanks ascites with all orders. He's really talking about at least for Mr. spector as a upholding, like the entire superstructure of society. Right. And this to me, this ties back to in particular at the scene. Where the mother, I guess MRs Ryan is given the horrible news that three of her children are dead, right? You have the scene of dumbest dissident. She's watching the dishes, and I think that's not the first time this Steven Spielberg has shown a woman washing dishes to really drive home, this like homelife perspective is like this is pure and good. And this needs to be preserved. It happened with with light. That's coming right over the horizon. And like softly lighting her face. She dots it, right. Yeah. I mean, I think Matt was asking those this movie show the greatest generation in sepia tone and things like that in that scene..

MRs Ryan Sean Connery Tom Hanks Matt John Wayne Hollywood Normandy Savalas ascites Walter white Steven Spielberg Ted I Mr. spector
"guy walked" Discussed on Overthinking It Podcast

Overthinking It Podcast

03:34 min | 2 years ago

"guy walked" Discussed on Overthinking It Podcast

"But, but I think, in general, we're supposed to believe that the team that he starts out the mission with more or less gets wiped. Right. And it's like, and he doesn't end up with a lot of kids that are left, but he has taken on this mantle to be this leader for them. Right. So, you know, that was kind of arbitrary is it? What's the reason? Well, you know, otherwise you can't do the war in the first place. Jay gets is not really much of a reason, and maybe I need to put to Mark to answer that big question. But it's like each step of the way they are these kind of macro reasons for why things are the way they are that don't seem relevant to the people that are on the ground and, and you end up not protecting a particularly meaningful choice with regards the forces that are compelling you to face these kinds of situations. And you rebel against that, right? And you want to have a meaningful choice. You want to say that I don't wanna go on the mission, and I'm going, I'm leaving. Right. And then you realize that maybe that isn't really an option. Right. Is because either either you're going to destroy the unit because you guys are going to start shooting each other. Right. Or they have to figure out a way to work it out. Right. They can't just like let you do what you want. Otherwise, there's a full breakdown, and then that's worse. Although that also brings it maybe that's the big. That's because we get a rationalization, and we get identified as a rationalization by Tom Hanks is character right when he talks about the reason that he does the really he tells the guys, and this is another interesting situation where the movie is kind of Bayden switching on us, and leading you and putting you in the position of somebody who has limited information. Tom Hanks tells the boys right that the reason that he follows orders is because every time he follows orders. It gets one step closer to going home. You know that the music is very touching. The way he delivers it is very convincing. He has that social role where everybody trusts him. That's why he's the captain of this ranger company. But that's not he's not telling the truth. Hey, because we know that's a lie. Right. That going to get private Ryan is not. Gonna make it more likely that he goes home it. In fact, it's going to get killed. But also because he tells the boys that he doesn't tell them the truth. He doesn't complain to them. He complains to the other officers. And we have the where Tom Hanks complaints to the other officer and talks about how she makes decisions because he believes or he has rationalized that each decision that he makes seems more people than it kills. And so rebel senior NCO these talking to the sorry at the time. Right. And so he's he tells the boys that he likes he wants to complain up the ladder to the officers who give him orders. But he doesn't have that opportunity because the police, the phone got shot, and he's gonna be lines. But what he's talking to his NCO. That's what he says. Right. Is like we have to. We believe we were told this, and he doesn't say a lot of confidence. Right. He hasn't necessarily know. He just he, he uses that as the rationalization for why he does the things that he does he believes he's been led to believe. He's been told to believe that every time he makes one of these decisions. In it saves more lives than than than finishes. And if that's the reason that he keeps going right. Because he believes somehow like the mathematics is there. And I mean, I think you could make the case that, that's certainly true. I mean there's a problem, there of human perception where we cannot see the outcomes that don't happen. And as such, we can never really fully understand the consequences of our actions. We only see the things that happened we so you can you talk about, you know, past experience, and how in this situation, you know, somebody just something different it was really bad and a whole bunch people get killed..

Tom Hanks Ryan Jay officer Mark
"guy walked" Discussed on Overthinking It Podcast

Overthinking It Podcast

04:01 min | 2 years ago

"guy walked" Discussed on Overthinking It Podcast

"I mean I wouldn't bet that, like, I watched the first beach sequence and, and had enough when the rest of one thing that pizza that, that I think is, is, pretty interesting is like, when you see Tom Hanks you see him in a lot of situations where his thirties, being challenged or where's the thority seems suspect and the high water Mark of this is the. Taking out the machine gun position at the loss of life of, of, of Giovanni Ribisi. But which, by the way is underscored with music. Whereas whereas the whole. The whole day landing is not underscored with music, which I which I thought was, which I thought was good. So, so I think this, this can actually get us into something that I think is, is at the core of the movie, which is kind of the relationship between the movie and, and sentimentality, right? And the movie and. Kind of Google, whether it kind of glorifies whether this kind of sepia toned greatest generation glow. Around this film and around like what they're. What they're kind of saying about about these people and about this war, you know, the difference between the no underscoring when, when all kinds of people die on the beach, and the underscoring when Giovanni Ribisi dies, but then, you know, but then, like someone's about to desert and Tom Hanks calls him back with a story of like his life at home. You know. And it, it struck me that, that this whole thing of acres walking across France is held together with stories and fictions. Right. Like one of those being that you have to listen to Tom Hanks, you know that because they're, they're just eight guys walking across France. They're not, you know, in, in a larger they're not in, in a larger context of, of a much larger military org. Musician where there's a. A lot of stuff. There's, there's a whole apparatus of, of. You know people and, and stuff and, and. You don't have that big map where the generals push a little units across. I was even just thinking, like in a lot of places where you see a lot of soldiers together, there's, there's a level of organization and logistics, that sort of seems to encourage you to play your part. Right. When you're eight guys walking across France. You have to have internalized that whole superstructure in order to play your part, especially when you're, especially when you're risking your life, and that's like, and that, like, what struck me that the theme of the movie like the whole thing of like, how do you earn it? How do you earn the death of your comrades? They're not even your comrades, these these eight random strangers who sort of who came and saved you from certain death. The, the you know, because I think we're supposed to think that the defensive that bridge would not have gone as well. If Tom Hanks wasn't there, how, how do you do it like how do you go on after that? And, and a big question to me in this movie was. How do you go on? You know there were a lot of a lot of points at which it's like how in, in a lot of spaces in, in a lot of levels of, of kind of literal and metaphor. Registers. How do you go on? And the, the one at the end, you know, is when all Matt Damon says to his wife, tell me I'm a good man. You know. That's what it takes..

Tom Hanks Giovanni Ribisi France first beach Matt Damon Google
"guy walked" Discussed on Overthinking It Podcast

Overthinking It Podcast

05:06 min | 2 years ago

"guy walked" Discussed on Overthinking It Podcast

"So, so the experience of the of the first thing like I was kind of it was kind of braced for it, and yeah, Lada lot adrenaline lot of cortisol lot, a, you know, stress hormones coursing through the course in through the bloodstream. And, and actually. No, no music in that, like I appreciate it certain things certain things about it. I mean, I feel like as a big movie wimp kind of faced with something, you know faced with something that records, such a or at least represents such a historically important. Occurrence I sort of. I did give myself the like, hey, quit in a wimp like these people actually lived this, like you can watch highly artfully recreated version, starring and Academy Award winning movie star. Like you can sit through twenty seven minutes of of, of a movie, but I think like one of the one of the things that does. Well, I was sorry. I wanna go. I wanna go in a lot of directions. One of the great things, you know terrible sensations. But real things that, that. The first sequence did for me was give me a sense of claustrophobia, and almost unbearable sense of claustrophobia people being dragged down by their armaments and, and, you know, in into the water, the ocean, or being, like pinned down hemmed in pressed up against against people, you know, caught or trapped like these, these are for whatever reason in as I get older claustrophobia becomes more and more of a thing for me of things -iety producing thing. And like this definitely cre- created a sense of that, like it, it, this is a film that created the washing of the experience of watching it created physical sensations in my body like beyond just kind of regarding the regarding the artifact that the film was, it's sort of made something happened for me. That I was very. You know that was that was done that, that, that really occurred. So it kind of created rather than just kind of watching it, it kind of created an experience, a subjective experience in me, and like, you know, all the hand held the interesting question may be for later, when, when they go hand hell then when they go when the camera's on a tripod, you know, giving a still very often beautiful picture of something disorderly, and chaotic versus when the disorder and the chaos actually extends into the film, the film, making itself by kind of shaking the camera, you know, as the as the cameraman walks around kind of around the action. But anyway, I feel like I've, I've gone down five or six avenues, there would what, what should we pick up as, as retrench as we trudge across the thing that was that was the other thing I thought that was? A really good as we transition off the beach and into the more the rest of the movie the, the other thing that I thought was pretty good was the sense that, like, just like eight guys or something walking walking across France. You know, they're just they're just going. I'm sure someone that we compete, it could could could figure has told me how, how long actually the journey depicted in the film is. But, but you know how that let's start. Let's start there. Isn't that amazing just, you know, with very little with the, the gear that they're carrying on their back like a guys, walk across walk across France? You know, like I can't get in the car to drive to work without checking five or six times, whether I have. You know my, my, my air pods or something. And when I leave them my goodness, it's a disaster when I have to listen to podcasts over the. The ox Jack in the car, but the but these guys walked across France. These these imaginary fictional people. I mean in all seriousness. They, I'm sure they had a checklist before this walk. And and, and at least one of those guys probably forgot something important as important if not more important than your airports met. Yeah. Well, I mean let's not go crazy. And say more important. I mean like. About the journey, should we talk about like the instrument gauges that they have with the Germans all the way to the battle at the end. Yeah. Where should we go?.

France cortisol Academy Award twenty seven minutes
"guy walked" Discussed on Overthinking It Podcast

Overthinking It Podcast

04:55 min | 2 years ago

"guy walked" Discussed on Overthinking It Podcast

"I didn't see it when it came out. It's just like, you know, violent stuff scary stuff, not really my Cup of tea, though. I guess, I liked John wick a lot, so, but John wick is, is Joan wick is the sort of John woo style Vic, hyper stylized, you know violence, as, as pure aesthetic experience. Whereas this does a couple things to, you know, to sort of make you feel. To, to sort of make you feel something like the subjective experience of the people who are going through it. Like I you know, it's it was a big this, this home movie was a big couch jumper for me because I had to jump off the couch with, with a lot of agitation, and it was a big positive for me. Because like I had to, you know, pause it and hyperventilate for, for a little while Steph nilly film, that, like got my got my body going a little bit. I'm really interesting. Really interested in, in what Pete said about the kind of what, what's happening the kind of grand sweep of history being. Being something that is, you know, not equaled by that has actually distinct from some sort of aggregate of the experience. Like, like, imagine as it thought experiment. Imagine you could get everyone together in a in a sort of living history, kind of museum thing where you like record. Everyone's individual narrative, suppose, they all had perfect recall of what their subjective experience was though. We know that that's not how the mind works with trauma, right? Like a lot of that. A lot of that for people just got it raced. You know. That a lot of it when people go through stuff. That's that's profoundly traumatic just gets blacked out as a way of surviving and actually stick that stick that question stick stick a pin in that question. But like. Sorry, I'm kind of lost in. I'm lost in my own. My own digressions here. Put the, the suppose you could add aggregate, all of these things together in some sort of, like Google scale, you know, set of. Set of data warehouses. Right. In suppose you could have a hitherto uninventive machine learning algorithm that could parse and correlate and somehow come to terms with understanding what how you know what happened to everyone individually and kind of add that up into the, the sum, total of all the subjective experience. What was going on is still more as something else than that. And I'm you know, the at the highest level, you know, at the kind of this sweep of history, level, or at the kind of the, the progress that or the prosecution of the war, right? Like what's happening goes beyond. Just what, what the, the individual people experienced in that, that's there. There are few things in life right where you participate subjectively in something that has that, that has that quality or maybe we all do all the time, and which is tone, actually, no. We just never will gain the perspective of what kind of sweep of history level significance of the of the things, we're doing our, as we suck the Jumba juice out of the poly styrene tub. We don't know what it's gonna. Was that a metaphor about time? Even an elaborate. What are you explaining quantum physics, and like a Brown breaking new way to think of space is a poly, styrene tub, and think of time as a Java juice, that fills the poly styrene right like, and it has the shape of the tub and it, but it also has its own consistency, which is distinct from the consistency of the top your experiences, a straw, this just, like I feel like I don't have that many strengths as a writer. But one of them is I can sometimes crystal thighs a whole thing with a with a particularly well, observed detail, you know. And there's there's mine for modern life. That's my that's my gloss on all modern life in the developed world. Anyway, the. Yeah..

John wick Joan wick John woo Google Steph Pete writer
"guy walked" Discussed on Overthinking It Podcast

Overthinking It Podcast

05:38 min | 2 years ago

"guy walked" Discussed on Overthinking It Podcast

"It's the overthinking at podcast episode five hundred seventy one eight guys walking across France. Welcome to over thinking it where we subject the popular culture to a level of scrutiny. It probably doesn't deserve the over thinkers are, are like a band of brothers are like a squadron of elite handpicked over thinkers, trudging across the terrain of the culture together, and it is an honor to serve alongside these these jet by now. I can't I can't. I'm sorry. It's. I can't even can't even land this bit. Hey, everybody. It's not rather. And I'm here with Peter Fenzl. Hey pete. Hey, Matt and Markley. How you doing? Mark reporting for duty sir. Hey, so the bit for still doing. Yeah. Okay. Yeah. I'm a captain to bars, baby. The so look that here's what here's what led to this podcast. Here's, here's the series of events that, that led to this situation with the she are empire. Archduke Franz Ferdinand fascinated the Archduke, the she are pyre was taken control of professor Xs mind. Sorry. No, let's talk about let's talk about appeasement as an international relations. No look, we didn't want to back a particular horse in the blockbuster stakes this weekend. And it turned out to be good, because apparently, no-one no-one went to see dark, Phoenix. We're very sorry for a census stark and her movie career, but because, you know, we are here. Yes. Queen Sansa the Queen in the north, but we were not super interested in seeing her. You know, in, in this latest X, men franchise. And, and we thought also, you know, we were standing looking staring down the barrel of the summer movie season. And we thought, hey, you know, let's only do the ones that were really excited about this summer, right? Like, let's, let's keep our, our love of film intact, and rather than a kind of joyless trudge across parts of France. You know, let's as though because I think, in many ways doing a podcast requires a level of bravery, not unlike that of a soldier in a war. In the sense that you sit around for long, periods of time completely terrified. There's a lot of hurry up and wait. No, but we thought like you know what? Let's only do the movies that were interested in Hobson Shaw, check Dirk Phoenix, and we consider it out and, and, and you know what? Let's take those weeks and watch something that we haven't gotten to, or a classic or you know, revisit something that we want to talk about again. Let's, let's find stuff that we really enjoy. Because we, we are never happier than when we are talking over together the stuff that we actually enjoy together. So we also realized that the anniversary of d day was just a couple days ago, the landing at Normandy, and that it actually might be interesting to talk about Steven Spielberg's nineteen ninety eight film. Saving private Ryan. And that's you know that's what we did. And like let's, let's let's like this was actually the first warm weekend in Los Angeles of this whole like late spring early summer kind of season. And so like everyone in west LA. Let's hit the beach. Oh no way not cheap. But sit the beach offensive just said or the movie x men, dark. The well, I'm glad that you don't know. So let's let's, let's start with the start of this film, which is one of the more famous openings of a movie. You know, of its timer anytime a twenty-seven minute. Recreation of the of the landing. At their at Omaha beach. Right. And that, that, that it's, it's notably realistic notably gory. Notably disorienting Mark, you, you had said when we had had. Slated this movie for the topic of this podcast, you had said that you were going to may be skipped the opening because you know how it ends and, and it's very challenging to watch. I to find a challenging to watch really violent or or gory stuff. However, beautifully wrought, the filmmaking is did you end up watching this sequence of the film? Yes, I really had every intention of fats working through it because it is it is good as brutal..

France Mark Archduke Franz Ferdinand Phoenix Peter Fenzl Hobson Shaw Steven Spielberg pete Los Angeles Omaha beach Dirk Phoenix professor Matt Normandy Markley Ryan west LA twenty-seven minute
"guy walked" Discussed on World Cafe

World Cafe

02:47 min | 3 years ago

"guy walked" Discussed on World Cafe

"Tom to san francisco and there was a group of protesters spitting on soldiers and at that that was really couldn't understand that go you know i was totally against the war but i don't release people take an hour on the on the guys that we're over there and just did with who sitting over there you know and so i wanted to song to explain the soldier and also have against the war the soldiers played and i would have thought that the song sam stone might have lasted four or five years wherever until vietnam was over with and it's even i don't do show without doing that zone and it's just a strong today up nut stronger when you when you still see vietnam veterans on the street homeless and having to ask for money and stuff and be drug addicts and it's just ridiculous no in the in as much wealth as we have to to treat our veterans like that it just is crazy where it is so sam stone is pro veteran antiwar i'd love to play it if that's okay with you thank you aren't nanna monkey on his bag there's a whole money jesus trying bad for nothing pitchers big ears to count that sam stone by john prying off his self titled debut album from nineteen seventy one i think you played that song at your first ever performance at an open mic night in chicago so wha what a song to introduce yourself to the world of of music fans with and by your account the crowd gave you sort of silence so how did you interpret the reaction my god this is so different or so bad the ninety like booing yeah they were just sitting there looking at me one woman was crying and couple of guys were getting up to leave during the song you know and you know with the about jesus christ died for nothing i suppose and it was really mixed thing but over sudden people started plugging after this on silence at the end.

Tom vietnam chicago san francisco five years
"guy walked" Discussed on World Cafe

World Cafe

01:33 min | 3 years ago

"guy walked" Discussed on World Cafe

"And and it tells the story of a man who served and i think it was such an interesting song to have written because i think of it as a protest song but as a very different kind of protests on than what was heard at the time like you've got blowing in the wind by bob dylan or fortunate son by creedence clearwater john lennon's imagine these are all you know warren piece on that are taking place somewhere else but you took us right into somebody's home into their living room and introduced us to the voice of their kid did you think of it as a protest song at that time i just recently got the army and luckily i served that they put me in the in the heat of the moment that there were so many troops in vietnam when i got called up they sent neater germany and i was really happy happy cat to be over in germany and sixty six and sixty seven because a lot of my buddies got really at phnom and we got out the army just those two years a huge difference back back home you know things were very very different when i got back as as i had friends has never thought of where in hair like the bills and everybody had hair down their shoulders home and they all had like the bottoms everything was groovy and they were protesting the war and i saw when i on the national news a film clip of some guys returning from vietnam.

bob dylan john lennon vietnam army warren germany two years
"guy walked" Discussed on World Cafe

World Cafe

02:37 min | 3 years ago

"guy walked" Discussed on World Cafe

"Oh roese bill that is egging daughter night lincoln nebraska nineteen sixty seven which we're calling crazy bone john fine live here at the world cafe off his new album called the tree of forgiveness john i gotta say that i have a lot of favorite lyrics of yours but but one of my new favorite lyrics might be skewed about i was just to show dave cobb the producer of where to put the horns and so that is nuts sketch they match my singing i do in front of the mirror wim shading skied out but you know it's somewhere between fred flintstone military may you know so i don't know what you thought he was going to replace that with some real actual horn players but he really liked that and just left it in the zone so perfect type things like that too and he's working den by the docks yeah mel torme popeye and fred flintstone together okay and horns yes that's perfect so jon i read that while you were writing this album you check into a hotel in nashville so that you can really hunker down and focus on writing the tree of forgiveness can you walk me through through a day in your life at that hotel happened was my wife who's managing now and our son jody who's when ovoid records for me and the two of them came to me and said it's time to make a record it really is get about four or five songs i really like and they've got me a hotel suite here nash though i live here but they figured i'd function better hotel so because i'm on the road most of that and they put me up in the omni hotel which is connected to country music hall of fame because they know to go down hoping but once i always got interesting exhibit down there and i so i was there for a week with ten boxes of unfinished lyrics three guitars and you lately and i mostly wrote at night you know during the day just going to goof off that's where do really good during the daytime and when midnight hits that's where i start thinking about stuff so i'd write mostly men three in the morning and i didn't really take too many of the unfinished lyrics.

nebraska dave cobb producer fred flintstone jody omni hotel nashville nash
"guy walked" Discussed on World Cafe

World Cafe

02:26 min | 3 years ago

"guy walked" Discussed on World Cafe

"Support for this podcast and the following message come from came in jack came in jack prepared a premium cocktail so you don't have to find it near you at cayman jack dot com please drink responsibly premium malt beverage american vintage beverage co chicago illinois hey you're listening to world cafe i'm talia slanger anyone who says you should never meet your heroes because they might disappoint you has never met john pine he is everything you love about his songs he's warm and funny he's wise ali you get the sense he's not trying to be cares about people and their smallest details and ss lyrics might suggest he'll find a way to work pork chops into the conversation on his new album john lays out a plan for the afterlife he'll get to heaven minimum that yeah i'm going to smoke a cigarette that nan maslo john spent his career writing with humor and heart about overlooked people and things like the elderly and downgraded planets current took me off ramp and a couple of scientists in rooms decided that said one day that pluto's not longer plan so i figured it was up to me the defendant we'll talk about john's early days as a mailman and his song about the plight of soldier sam stone john performed at his first gig over forty years ago and still performs it today the song sam stone mario lasted four or five years it's even just as strong today if not stronger so sam stone is pro veteran war john started his career in chicago spoke scene and released his debut album in nineteen seventy one john now lives in nashville with his wife yona who's also his manager and who helps run oh boy records a label john founded in nineteen eightyone with his late manager alpin neta oh boy is the second oldest independent label owned by an artist in the country now john prime doesn't have a beard but let's just say that means he was indie before indy was indie john is seventy one he survived to bouts with cancer right now his very full life includes following meatloaf specials around nashville and palling around okay really working with fixtures like dan our back pat mclaughlin andy ferguson who all helped on john's new album.

jack chicago talia slanger john pine john nashville alpin neta andy ferguson illinois john prime forty years five years one day