5 Burst results for "Gutty Fuda"

"gutty fuda" Discussed on Latino Rebels Radio

Latino Rebels Radio

08:00 min | 8 months ago

"gutty fuda" Discussed on Latino Rebels Radio

"An African American movement which you know there's a particular history and reasoning of why how black lives matter came in to being. particularly in the US. but it was it was just very interesting to see how mostly folks from Latin America. Caribbean. Europe other places. Outside saw that as distance from what was going on in their particular countries. So. In the case, of Central, America you know black lives have always mattered. There's always been struggles of On, the ground with black people fighting again, know the colonial administration and anti-black midst especially what's going on with Garifuna communities across central? America. So that's what I was thinking about. That's what I had in mind when I, came up with this article and it was just kind of talk about it later too because it's kind of like this long history of exclusion in the region and the region and how people conceptualize Central America so I thought in order for us to. Even. Delve into what You, know black lives. Matter Movement Looks Central America certainly have to acknowledge. Black Communities and black histories in the region I. so that's kind of where I was getting at and I'm a fan of history off it's kind of like a title things together. Absolutely we just had a show last week on the Gutty Funez on Duras and in a large way they play a central role. Belize as well. So we'll get to them once again during the course of the conversation. But with that said, there are other groups that make Belize very complex as far as this community is concerned, there's some other groups that need to be recognized. So I wonder if you could also explain the complexity of the Afro Belizian community in believes because not every black person in Belize is necessarily a Gutty Fuda, their other complexities and needs to be addressed here. Correct. Yes for sure. And that's even including myself I'm not guarantee now I'm what you would consider creole. So depending on. The vantage point, but you look at central. America play believes etc. Gua. Even think accent complaints with endurance creole just like black. Identity of black population mixture of blackness feeding back to the enslavement of large populations in the business. So thinking about that identity in believes to historic. Black Group are black creoles. And the Afrin Vision is getting food and I say black correal's because it's. It's common to meet somebody blond-haired blue-eyed of like, who visually looks why to also call themselves. And it's also the language that they also speak in believe. So there's a lot of complexity there and fusion So I really like to say black creoles because also like the history of creoles and believe ties back to kind of that enslavement period. And of course. When I was there last full for feel work you have legal whole bunch of other. black groups that are that have been in believe for quite some time you have like a very Pan Caribbean. migration and group within believe. So you can meet somebody from Jamaica. You can meet somebody from Barbados Trinidad. So that's also present there. and then recently you have a lot of immigrants from. The continent diamond a few people from Nigeria I. Think someone someone from Ghana, and then of course, from Haiti as well. considering migration Haitians to central. So there's like different levels of that. But in terms of like historic, it's black KRILL and offering digits Garifuna and I do like to. Talk about them within the compass of affable believers because there has been like a mixture between two. It's not unusual to meet somebody with a creole mother and A. Father vice versa So it kind of intertwined throughout but the cultures are very distinct and that's important to note they have a different history different time line of you know. Experience within the country which kind of work to conceptualize how they're viewed within beliefs but I think that's very important to also considering language racial formations. So yeah. And to add further complexity to the community in Belize we did a show earlier this year on Latinos identity as it pertains to Belize and guess at the time we. Have a belief in of Chinese descent. So there is an Asian. Community on top of all the other communities that you just mentioned as well. So. Will among other things that you mentioned is that? According you here is that erasure is a violent process of exclusion, and this is something that you mentioned as it pertains to to blackness and central Americanism one if you elaborate on this a little bit further. So. Nick Harnessing Rasiah like violent process of exclusion. Just kinda speaking to like every day. kind of Muendane ways, but the eraser takes place especially in the daily lived experience. I. Think you can eat find. Anybody within the Belizean Diaspora who can always speak to this and always have stories about being excluded both in like. In a rare case like Caribbean circles and then also heavily in central Americans their full. Some. Also thinking about this in terms of like at a national level speaking about Central America as a whole right there the call constituting central Americans by Maritza Kardinia. And she kind of explained what I've always felt for whatever always thought in terms of like questions about you know why is believed always excluded from you know histories and literature about Central America and just speaking about. You know Central America as an identity that's kind of already borne out of as you're. Thinking about like the lack of indigenous representation, the lack of blackness representation kind of like some of the things. That, you have to sacrifice in order to create this kind of homogenous identity. So thinking about that in terms of like the you know the macro level, but also thinking about it in terms of absence in literature for me as a first generation. Who always wanted to see myself represented in? Central. American texts. Growing up I tell the story all the time. But like growing up I was always aware of other Central American countries because. growing up in Los Angeles. There's actually substantial population of blacks and show Americans like my mom. had. Friends that were from Costa Rica from Nicaragua and Guatemala Honduras. Who are black so I never kind of thought about. That particular type of a razor before 'cause I'm just like, Oh, I have this experience. And.

America Central America Belize Black Group Caribbean Latin America Europe US. Gutty Funez Duras Los Angeles Jamaica Barbados Trinidad Belizean Diaspora Gutty Fuda Nick Harnessing Rasiah A. Father Haiti Ghana
"gutty fuda" Discussed on Latino Rebels Radio

Latino Rebels Radio

07:03 min | 8 months ago

"gutty fuda" Discussed on Latino Rebels Radio

"Once again, , this is Oscar Fernandez today on the show we put the spotlight on Belize and how the black lives matter movement shines a light on how believes is history has been excluded from Central American history, , and so we're joined today by Nicole Ramsey who's a Candidate in a Department of African. . American and African Diaspora studies at UC Berkeley she has an article that came out last month in medium entitled as Remind Central America to think outside the box she joins us today over the phone. . Welcome to show Nicole Ramsey. . Thank you for having me. . Excited to be here is good to have you with us. . I couldn't my introduction brief because actually pulled it from your article regards to Belize Central America. . Once again, , the Arctic was entitled Belise Remind Central America to think outside the box and when the central arguments you make in your article is that the black lives matter movement and I took this directly from your article shines a light on how belise history has been excluded from Central America. . So, with , that in mind, let , me just go right there to the beginning and ask if you could elaborate and state your argument by what you mean by the black lives matter as pertains to beliefs which in turn pertains to Central America. . Yeah for sure. . So what envisioning <hes> what I was in? ? When I came up with the article title <hes> you know those with everything that's going on. . There's been a lot of discussion and in terms of black lives matter and what that means for black population living outside the US <hes> I find a lot of conversations especially. . I'm really interested in like conversations that happen online. . I was really I guess interested in how people were conceptualizing black lives matter as mostly <hes> an African American movement <hes>, , which you know there's a particular history and reasoning of why how black lives matter came in to being. . particularly in the US. . <hes> but it was it was just very interesting to see how mostly folks from Latin America. . Caribbean. . <hes> Europe other places. . Outside <hes> saw that as distance from what was going on in their particular countries. . <hes>. . So. . In the case, of , Central, , America <hes> you know black lives have always mattered. . There's always been struggles of <hes>. . On, the , ground with black people fighting again, , know the colonial administration and anti-black midst especially <hes> what's going on with Garifuna communities across central? ? America. . <hes>. . So that's what I was thinking about. . That's what I had in mind when I, , came up with this article <hes> and it was just kind of talk about it later too because it's kind of like this long <hes> history of exclusion in the region and the region and how people conceptualize Central America so I thought in order for us to. . Even. Delve . into <hes> what You, , know black lives. . Matter Movement Looks Central America certainly have to acknowledge. . Black Communities and black histories in the region I. . so that's kind of where I was getting at and I'm a fan of history off it's kind of like a title things together. . Absolutely we just had a show last week on the Gutty Funez on Duras and in a large way they play a central role. . Belize as well. . So we'll get to them once again during the course of the conversation. . But with that said, , there are other groups that make Belize very complex as far as this community is concerned, , there's some other groups that need to be recognized. . So I wonder if you could also explain the complexity of the Afro Belizian community in believes because not every black person in Belize is necessarily a Gutty Fuda, , their other complexities and needs to be addressed here. . Correct. . Yes for sure. . And that's even including myself <hes>. . I'm not guarantee now I'm what you would consider creole. . So depending on. . The vantage point, , but you look at central. . America play believes etc. . Gua. . Even think accent complaints with endurance creole just like black. . Identity of black population mixture of blackness feeding back to the enslavement of large populations in the business. . <hes>. . So thinking about that identity <hes> in believes to historic. . Black Group <HES> are black creoles. . And the Afrin Vision is getting food and I say black correal's because it's. . It's <hes> common to meet somebody blond-haired blue-eyed of like, , who visually looks why to also call themselves. . And it's also the language that they also speak in believe. . So there's a lot of complexity there and fusion <hes>. . So I really like to say black creoles because also like the history of creoles and believe ties back to kind of that enslavement period. . And of course. . When I was there last full for feel work you have legal whole bunch of other. . <hes> black groups that are that have been in believe for quite some time you have like a very Pan Caribbean. . <hes> migration and group within believe. . So you can meet somebody from Jamaica. . You can meet somebody from Barbados Trinidad. . So that's also present there. . <hes>, , and then recently you have a lot of immigrants <hes> from. . The continent diamond a few people from Nigeria I. . Think someone someone from Ghana, , and then of course, , <hes> from Haiti as well. . <hes> considering migration Haitians to central. . So there's like different levels of that. . But in terms of like historic, , it's black KRILL and offering digits Garifuna and I do like to. . Talk about them within the compass of affable believers because there has been like a mixture between two. . It's not unusual to meet somebody with a creole mother and A. . Father vice versa <hes>. . So it kind of intertwined throughout but the cultures are very distinct <hes> and that's important to note they have a different history different time line of you know. . Experience within the country <hes>. . which kind of <hes> work to conceptualize <hes> how they're viewed within beliefs but I think that's very important <hes> to also considering language racial formations. . So yeah. .

America Central America Belize Black Group Caribbean Latin America Europe US. Gutty Funez Duras Los Angeles Jamaica Barbados Trinidad Belizean Diaspora Gutty Fuda Nick Harnessing Rasiah A. Father Haiti Ghana
Black Lives Matter In Belize

Latino Rebels Radio

07:03 min | 8 months ago

Black Lives Matter In Belize

"Once again, this is Oscar Fernandez today on the show we put the spotlight on Belize and how the black lives matter movement shines a light on how believes is history has been excluded from Central American history, and so we're joined today by Nicole Ramsey who's a Candidate in a Department of African. American and African Diaspora studies at UC Berkeley she has an article that came out last month in medium entitled as Remind Central America to think outside the box she joins us today over the phone. Welcome to show Nicole Ramsey. Thank you for having me. Excited to be here is good to have you with us. I couldn't my introduction brief because actually pulled it from your article regards to Belize Central America. Once again, the Arctic was entitled Belise Remind Central America to think outside the box and when the central arguments you make in your article is that the black lives matter movement and I took this directly from your article shines a light on how belise history has been excluded from Central America. So, with that in mind, let me just go right there to the beginning and ask if you could elaborate and state your argument by what you mean by the black lives matter as pertains to beliefs which in turn pertains to Central America. Yeah for sure. So what envisioning what I was in? When I came up with the article title you know those with everything that's going on. There's been a lot of discussion and in terms of black lives matter and what that means for black population living outside the US I find a lot of conversations especially. I'm really interested in like conversations that happen online. I was really I guess interested in how people were conceptualizing black lives matter as mostly an African American movement which you know there's a particular history and reasoning of why how black lives matter came in to being. particularly in the US. but it was it was just very interesting to see how mostly folks from Latin America. Caribbean. Europe other places. Outside saw that as distance from what was going on in their particular countries. So. In the case, of Central, America you know black lives have always mattered. There's always been struggles of On, the ground with black people fighting again, know the colonial administration and anti-black midst especially what's going on with Garifuna communities across central? America. So that's what I was thinking about. That's what I had in mind when I, came up with this article and it was just kind of talk about it later too because it's kind of like this long history of exclusion in the region and the region and how people conceptualize Central America so I thought in order for us to. Even. Delve into what You, know black lives. Matter Movement Looks Central America certainly have to acknowledge. Black Communities and black histories in the region I. so that's kind of where I was getting at and I'm a fan of history off it's kind of like a title things together. Absolutely we just had a show last week on the Gutty Funez on Duras and in a large way they play a central role. Belize as well. So we'll get to them once again during the course of the conversation. But with that said, there are other groups that make Belize very complex as far as this community is concerned, there's some other groups that need to be recognized. So I wonder if you could also explain the complexity of the Afro Belizian community in believes because not every black person in Belize is necessarily a Gutty Fuda, their other complexities and needs to be addressed here. Correct. Yes for sure. And that's even including myself I'm not guarantee now I'm what you would consider creole. So depending on. The vantage point, but you look at central. America play believes etc. Gua. Even think accent complaints with endurance creole just like black. Identity of black population mixture of blackness feeding back to the enslavement of large populations in the business. So thinking about that identity in believes to historic. Black Group are black creoles. And the Afrin Vision is getting food and I say black correal's because it's. It's common to meet somebody blond-haired blue-eyed of like, who visually looks why to also call themselves. And it's also the language that they also speak in believe. So there's a lot of complexity there and fusion So I really like to say black creoles because also like the history of creoles and believe ties back to kind of that enslavement period. And of course. When I was there last full for feel work you have legal whole bunch of other. black groups that are that have been in believe for quite some time you have like a very Pan Caribbean. migration and group within believe. So you can meet somebody from Jamaica. You can meet somebody from Barbados Trinidad. So that's also present there. and then recently you have a lot of immigrants from. The continent diamond a few people from Nigeria I. Think someone someone from Ghana, and then of course, from Haiti as well. considering migration Haitians to central. So there's like different levels of that. But in terms of like historic, it's black KRILL and offering digits Garifuna and I do like to. Talk about them within the compass of affable believers because there has been like a mixture between two. It's not unusual to meet somebody with a creole mother and A. Father vice versa So it kind of intertwined throughout but the cultures are very distinct and that's important to note they have a different history different time line of you know. Experience within the country which kind of work to conceptualize how they're viewed within beliefs but I think that's very important to also considering language racial formations. So yeah.

America Central America Belize Belize Central America Black Group Nicole Ramsey Latin America United States Uc Berkeley Department Of African Oscar Fernandez Caribbean Europe Gutty Funez Duras A. Father Haiti Ghana Jamaica
"gutty fuda" Discussed on Black Agenda Radio

Black Agenda Radio

18:03 min | 1 year ago

"gutty fuda" Discussed on Black Agenda Radio

"Healthcare facility not far from you and yet you don't qualify for Medicaid in your state because your state hammers past Medicaid and the state haven't Medicaid expansion. Many of them are located in the southeast where we see a lot of a world black community and of course that is no coincidence. A denial of access to services to those targeted groups. It's no coincidence at all and I think too often we look at healthcare in its own silo and we think healthcare is one issue and then we look at an issue voting rights and political representation and assume that that's a separate issue but they're one in the same and so in the same communities where people have been disenfranchised kept out of the vote kept out of being able to participate in the political system where people are not represented in political leadership in proportional way. We see that people aren't treated fairly and it's no coincidence at all that people are not getting equitable access to healthcare when we're seeing that people are also about getting equitable access to political. Power policymakers and political leaders who make these decisions about expanding Medicaid for one but also how we allocate resources and. It's important that people have a voice in the process and tell us about the particular difficulties faced by native Americans and Alaskan Natives. And these are especially heightened in the moment of coveted night. He and we are seeing quite a bit of attention on the Navajo nation which is largely in Arizona but spills over little into a few other states were seen incredibly high rates of Cova. Head of mortality devastation. In the communities it's not unique to Navajo nation. This is true of tribal lands across the country. These are places where people have been systematically kept out of a lot of economic opportunity access to healthcare is often not as good as in other communities and then access to basic resources. I think people are crying recognizing the fact that some people living on tribal land don't have access to things that a lot of us take for granted like operational plumbing within your household running waters so that you can wash your hands and access to decent healthy food. All of those things are disproportionately harder to come by on tribal lands in our own work. We found that folks who live in majority native communities in rural areas for those are usually people living on tribal lands and reservation face among the highest mortality rates in the entire country compared with urban places compared with any other rural places these people faced some of the highest mortality rate and this is related to underlying health conditions. It's related access to healthcare but again it's also related to access to economic opportunity access to safe housing access to decent lands. Also nautical incidents where tribal lands and reservations have ended up. These were not always fertile. Lands not always places that were particularly desirable or attractive. And that's why we moved people to those places we see that in our history books I think sometimes people assume that history and yet we're seeing it play out today not just history. This is real life in fact just this morning I find that said in New Mexico. Native folks make up eleven percent of the population and as of today they make up fifty percent of new. Mexico's Cova did fatalities. That's just in conscionable and we can do better. That was Dr Kerry Hemming Smith at the University of Minnesota School of Public Health Reparations for historical wrongs has emerged as a political issue and genetic science. Now tells us more than we've ever known about our ancestors but can genetics become a useful tool for reparations? We spoke with Dr Jada Ben Torres of Vanderbilt University. She's author of a recent paper titled Reputational Genetics. Genomic data and the case for reparations. In the Caribbean this is a question. Actually that's been explored by a number of researchers in much more depth. But my take on this. Genetics is a tool. It's one that should use appropriately. Depending on the context there may or may not be a place for genetics. In some cases genetics might be useful for showing continuity that the people who were harmed or indeed ancestors of those who are living today in other cases. Dna might be divisive. It would be my largest sort of fear or concern. Genetics used in a way to suggest who is a member of this group. Who a member of that group. That's I don't think that's an appropriate use of genetic genetic ancestry genetic tools so you would look forward to genetic tools being used not to exclude people but to include votes. Yes specifically in the case of just showing that there is continuity that the things that occurred in the past are actually indeed connected to people not only biologically but also socially culturally etc specifically. It's was widely held until rather recently about the indigenous populations of most of the Caribbean islands. Had been virtually wiped out by fifteen fifty that they didn't exist as organized communities anyway. But in more recent years there's been discussion of the actual living indigenous history in the inhabitants of those islands. And this resurgence movement indigenous resurgence movement. It looks different on different. Islands A lot of it has to do with numbers and smaller. Islands tends to just be smaller populations. In general and individuals identifying as indigenous in the very recent past would not have done that being seen as native or indigenous was not a positive thing only now with people are seeing that. This is okay that there's pride in their past despite the horrors of it are people beginning to self identify or at least identify. Partial ancestry read among indigenous population. And you mentioned the Garifuna earlier in your remarks explained who they are so these are indigenous persons of Mammalian Saint Vincent. There's actually a very large community now kind of in Central America. There's another community Now in New York well and I imagine in another part of the world but the Garifuna are descendants of indigenous peoples of Saint Vincent and they actually waged a series of wars with colonizers with the English. Some battles they want others. They did not in the end. A large segment of the indigenous population was exiled. And it's actually kind of important to mention that the Gutty foon ah kind of originate as a descendant group of both African and indigenous people. There's a an origin story regarding Wrecked slave ship. That landed somewhere. Outside of statements in enslaved Africans were able to get to shore and then we're incorporated into the community from there. You see the emergence of study for communities so in you know my own work which that project is kind of comes to a close for now but while I was doing the field work. There were some really interesting things happening with these conferences. So there's a Gutty Fuda Organization very after organization in Saint Vincent and generally annually. They'll hold conferences and some really interesting. Things happened during these conferences. In the sense that the descendants of those who were exiled those who landed in Honduras and then spread throughout Central America and into the United States. They actually make a journey home. Back to Saint Vincent and you get to see these reunions and it's probably one of the most powerful things that I've seen where people kind of come back and they recognize each other in each other's faces they see family. And in some instances the language that was definitely not lost but limited on Saint Vincent. It's being taught by those who are the descendants of those who were were exiled for this really interesting dynamic in resurgence. That's happening on the island. Now the title of your pieces reparations genetics. The audience for this program is mostly in the United States when people in the. Us look at reparations. Many of them think of getting a check in the mail made out to them personally. But when we're talking about reparations in the Caribbean and the uses of genetics. We're not talking about using genetic tools to decide who as individuals or families get. Jack's that's correct. That's not at all how I'd imagine. Genetic Technologies would be used so for that paper entitled Reputational Genetics. It's actually a play on words with recreational genetics right so these are direct to consumer genetic ancestry tests that you can purchase online send in your DNA and then learn something about your genetic ancestry because it's supposed to be for fun and sort of general title. They've been dubbed recreational genetics. So sitting at this conference I was thinking about the ways in which genetic technologies may or may not use and then it occurred to me. It's like Oh reputational genetics. So again what? It's looking like in in the Caribbean. Is that reparations. Has More to do with an investment in the island's infrastructure their ability to access global resources. So that they can improve their own communities. That's kind of more of the level. Rather than individual checks the genetic aspect if it were to be incorporated at all it would have more to do with showing continuity that those individuals who were harmed in the past actually have descendants and this would again be just one line of evidence among other ways of knowing about the past whether it be archaeology or family history or various texts or records and again the question largely revolves around these indigenous peoples who many thought were extinct right. And it's it's actually pretty dangerous. It's not the best idea to rely solely on genetics to identify indigenous ancestry again. Genetic Ancestry is in indeed always indicative. Of how a person self identifies. If we look back in people's family trees you likely specifically in the Caribbean. You'll likely find that there are people in everyone's family who would self identify a very different way than let's say that individual test taker people have ancestry from Africa from Europe from the Americas from other parts of the world so those ancestors would have identified in different ways and that may or may not have some bearing on how you present day self identify with these genetic ancestry tests depending on the part of the genome. That you're looking at. You may or may not detect indigenous ancestry. Even though a person might actually have indigenous ancestry. It's really dependent on where you're looking at. You know as well as the quality of your ancestry tests. Are you looking at enough places across the you know? Do you have the appropriate reference groups to compare your data to these are the sorts of patients that exists in terms of interpreting ancestry tests and then I'll reiterate that genetic or biological ancestry is only one way that people build families and build relationships. There are certainly many examples that you and I can both think of where there are groups of people who describe themselves think of themselves themselves to be family but they don't actually share DNA. It's is one way of knowing about the past. In the northeast United States many native American groups that had been said to the extinct actually lived on Butt. Visually looks very much like African Americans when they began demanding their rights right so this is really really interesting. Both in the United States North America and throughout the Caribbean I was actually listening to twitter conference. Last week was about decolonizing. Dna and I learned about instances where individuals are taking these DNA ancestry tests from duty companies and these dubious companies are reporting back indigenous ancestry. And then these people getting these results are trying to use these results to say that their indigenous and to use some of the policies that were put in place for indigenous actual indigenous people and this is a direct affront right to ideas of sovereignty about having the power to say who our group is who our community and then you know other individuals trying to use DNA in ways that have not been sanctioned or approved or thought of as appropriate for deciding who is part of the community in the Caribbean. My concern would be these ancestry tests. We'll show that people are very mixed ethics. And that's just what happened in the it was a crossroads people coming and going and leaving their DNA in the process so there is already a historical narrative of mixing within the Caribbean. We also kind of need to keep in mind. The ideas that we have about race and identity they change over time so ways in which people identify now might not have been the ways that they were identified in the past so by using genetic ancestry and then sort of imprinting or imposing. A better word imposing. Today's ideas about identity. It can be really difficult to interpret. Who assuming what was what and again you know genetic ancestor. It's definitely serves a purpose. But it is highly dependent on individuals personal agendas the political context of the time in terms of how you make sense of that in my own research particularly not only among the gutter but in the first peoples community ever. Reema the genetic ancestry has been particularly useful for community empowerment because many of the indigenous groups in the Caribbean they were basically got that first. Wave of colonialism so languages cultures populations were decimated not completely eliminated but just decimated. So it's been helpful for some individuals to see that genetically biologically it still is in people despite the fact that the language and some cultural traditions are kind of lost to the past again. That's sort of situation doesn't apply everywhere but in the Caribbean in the English speaking Caribbean specifically. It's a bit of a different situation. I'm aware that in Puerto Rico. Genetic testing has become all the rage and that lots of folks are very eager to find out that they have made American backgrounds. Although some folks who worry that some of these Regan's are hoping to have native American background so that they can downplay African genealogy. Yeah that's certainly a concern. I have no doubt that that is definitely a a very real concern. I've had the good fortune of being able to start a project in Puerto Rico. I'm working with various community Afro Puerto Rican communities and the folks that I work with. They're actually very interested in learning more about their African ancestry. Only in the sense that oftentimes information about African Peoples African ancestry specifically. It's been downplayed. It's not been seen as important so they want some more details about you know genetically who they connect with within Africa because it's Puerto Rico. And it's got the sort of again kind of crossroads in the Caribbean when I look at the genetic ancestry among Afro Puerto Ricans. There of course is a very strong. African component more so than you see sort of the general populace but we also do see indigenous ancestry. And we see it. Showing up at Afro Puerto Ricans in ways that it doesn't necessarily show up in the general populace. This is something that I'm just now finding out so I have to do a lot more research to fully explain some of the patterns that I'm seeing but it is interesting in the ways in which the histories of different peoples come together in and is reflected in contemporary genetics. The African component of the population into Dominican Republic is even more prominent but many dominicans have a problem with that. Some genetic testing might be in order. Actually been some studies already that have been done and they actually just pretty much reiterate what you've just said that there's a high amount of African ancestry and again. It's really important to consider the history. Recent history political history of the Dominican Republic and its relationship with Haiti. Some of that We'll work to explain why there are individuals who hope to explain away their African ancestry. So it's kind of this very deep very uncomfortable on some levels history but it. It kind of makes sense as to how people are reacting to these tests..

Caribbean United States Saint Vincent Genetic Technologies Cova Medicaid Puerto Rico Africa Arizona Afro Puerto Ricans University of Minnesota School Dominican Republic Central America
"gutty fuda" Discussed on Black Agenda Radio

Black Agenda Radio

15:14 min | 1 year ago

"gutty fuda" Discussed on Black Agenda Radio

"To decent healthy food. All of those things are disproportionately harder to come by on tribal lands in our own work. We found that folks who live in majority native communities in rural areas. Those are usually people living on tribal lands and reservation face among the highest mortality rates in the entire country compared with urban places compared with any other rural places these people faced some of the highest mortality rate and this is related to underlying health conditions. It's related access to healthcare but again it's also related to access to economic opportunity access to safe housing access to decent land. Also nautical incidents where tribal lands and reservations have ended up. These were not always fertile. Lands not always places that were particularly desirable or attractive. And that's why we moved people to those places we see that in our history books I think sometimes people assume that about history and yet we're seeing it play out today not just history. This is real life in fact just this morning I find that said in New Mexico. Native folks eleven percent of the population and as of today they make up fifty percent of new. Mexico's Cova did fatalities. That's just in conscionable and we can do better. That was Dr Kerry Hemming Smith at the University of Minnesota School of Public Health Reparations for historical wrongs has emerged as a political issue and genetic science. Now tells us more than we've ever known about our ancestors but can genetics become a useful tool for reparations? We spoke with Dr Jada Ben Torres of Vanderbilt University. She's author of a recent paper titled Reputational Genetics. Genomic data and the case for reparations. In the Caribbean this is a question. Actually that's been explored by a number of researchers in much more depth. But my take on this. Genetics is a tool. It's one that should use appropriately. Depending on the context there may or may not be a place for genetics. In some cases genetics might be useful for showing continuity that the people who were harmed or deed ancestors of those who are living today in other cases. Dna might be divisive. It would be my largest sort of fear or concern. Genetics used in a way to suggest who is a member of this group. Who a member of that group. That's I don't think that's an appropriate use of genetic genetic ancestry genetic tools so you would look forward to genetic tools being used not to exclude people but to include votes. Yes specifically in the case of just showing that there is continuity that the things that occurred in the past are actually indeed connected to people not only biologically but also socially culturally etc specifically. Its was widely held until rather recently about the indigenous populations of most of the Caribbean islands. Had been virtually wiped out by fifteen fifty that they didn't exist as organized communities anyway. But in more recent years there's been discussion of the actual living indigenous history in the inhabitants of those islands. And this resurgence movement indigenous resurgence movement. It looks different on different. Islands A lot of it has to do with numbers and smaller. Islands tends to just be smaller populations. In general and individuals identifying as indigenous in the very recent past would not have done that being seen as native or indigenous was not a positive thing. Only now people are seeing that this is okay that there's pride in their past despite the horrors of it are people beginning to self identify or at least identify. Partial ancestry read among indigenous population. And you mentioned the Garifuna earlier in your remarks explained who they are so these are indigenous persons of Mammalian Saint Vincent. There's actually a very large community now kind of in Central America. There's another community Now in New York well and I imagine in another part of the world but the Garifuna are descendants of indigenous peoples of Saint Vincent and they actually waged a series of wars with colonizers with the English. Some battles they want others. They did not in the end. A large segment of the indigenous population was exiled. And it's actually kind of important to mention that the Gutty Fuda kind of originate as a descendant group of both African and indigenous people. There's a an origin story regarding Wrecked slave ship. That landed somewhere. Outside of statements in enslaved Africans were able to get to shore and then we're incorporated into the community from there. You see the emergence of scurry communities so in you know my own work which that project is kind of comes to a close for now but while I was doing the field work. There were some really interesting things happening with these conferences. So there's a Gutty Fuda Organization very after organization in Saint Vincent and generally annually. They'll hold conferences and some really interesting. Things happened during these conferences. In the sense that the descendants of those who were exiled those who landed in Honduras and then spread throughout Central America and into the United States. They actually make a journey home. Back to Saint Vincent and you get to see these reunions and it's probably one of the most powerful things that I've seen where people kind of come back and they recognize each other in each other's faces they see family. And in some instances the language that was definitely not lost but limited on Saint Vincent. It's being taught by those who are the descendants of those who were were exiled for this really interesting dynamic in resurgence. That's happening on the island. Now the title of your pieces reparations genetics. The audience for this program is mostly in the United States when people in the. Us look at reparations. Many of them think of getting a check in the mail made out to them personally. But when we're talking about reparations in the Caribbean and the uses of genetics. We're not talking about using genetic tools to decide who as individuals or families get. Jack's that's correct. That's not at all how I'd imagine. Genetic Technologies would be used so for that paper entitled Reputational Genetics. It's actually a play on words with recreational genetics right so these are direct to consumer genetic ancestry tests that you can purchase online send in your DNA and then learn something about your genetic ancestry because it's supposed to be for fun and sort of general title. They've been dubbed recreational genetics. So sitting at this conference I was thinking about the ways in which genetic technologies may or may not use and then it occurred to me. It's like Oh reputational genetics. So what it's looking like in in the Caribbean is that reparations has more to do with an investment in the island's infrastructure their ability to access global resources so that they can improve their own communities. That's kind of more of the level. Rather than individual checks the genetic aspect if it were to be incorporated at all it would have more to do with showing continuity that those individuals who were harmed in the past actually have descendants. And this would again be just one line of evidence. Among other ways of knowing about the past whether it be archaeology or family history or various texts or records and again the question largely revolves around these indigenous peoples who many thought were extinct right. And it's it's actually pretty dangerous. It's not the best idea to rely solely on genetics to identify indigenous ancestry again. Genetic Ancestry is not always indicative. Of how a person self identifies. If we look back in people's family trees you likely specifically in the Caribbean. You'll likely find that there are people in everyone's family who would self identify a very different way than let's say that individual test taker people have ancestry from Africa from Europe from the Americas from other parts of the world so those ancestors would have identified in different ways and that may or may not have some bearing on how you present day self identify with these genetic ancestry tests depending on the part of the genome. That you're looking at. You may or may not detect indigenous ancestry. Even though a person might actually have indigenous ancestry. It's really dependent on where you're looking at. You know as well as the quality of your ancestry tests. Are you looking at enough places across the you know? Do you have the appropriate reference groups to compare your data to these are the sorts of limitations that exists in terms of interpreting ancestry tests and then I'll reiterate that genetic or biological ancestry is only one way that people build families and build relationships. There are certainly many examples that you and I can both think of where there are groups of people who describe themselves think of themselves themselves to be family but they don't actually share DNA. It's is one way of knowing about the past. In the northeast United States many native American groups that had been said to the extinct actually lived on Butt. Visually looks very much like African Americans when they began demanding their rights right so this is really really interesting. Both in the United States North America and throughout the Caribbean I was actually listening to twitter conference. Last week was about decolonizing. Dna and I learned about instances where individuals are taking these DNA ancestry tests from some companies and these dubious companies are reporting back indigenous ancestry. And then these people getting these results are trying to use these results to say that their indigenous and to use some of the policies that were put in place for indigenous actual indigenous people and this is a direct affront right to ideas of sovereignty about having the power to say who our group is who our community and then you know other individuals trying to use DNA in ways that have not been sanctioned or approved or thought of as appropriate for deciding who is part of the community in the Caribbean. My concern would be these ancestry tests. We'll show that people are very mixed ethics and that's just what happened in the Caribbean. It was a crossroads people were coming and going and leaving their DNA in the process so there is already a historical narrative of mixing within the Caribbean. We also kind of need to keep in mind. The ideas that we have about race and identity they change over time so ways in which people identify now might not have been the ways that they were identified in the past so by using genetic ancestry and then sort of imprinting or imposing is a better word imposing. Today's ideas about identity. It can be really difficult to interpret. Who assuming what was what and again you know genetic ancestor. It's definitely serves a purpose but it is highly dependent on individuals personal agendas the political context of the time in terms of how you make sense of that in my own research particularly not only among the flu now but in the first peoples community ever. Ariba the genetic ancestry has been particularly useful for community empowerment because many of the indigenous groups in the Caribbean they were basically got that first. Wave of colonialism so languages cultures populations were decimated not completely eliminated but just decimated. So it's been helpful for some individuals to see that genetically biologically it still is in people despite the fact that the language and some cultural traditions are kind of lost to the past again. That's sort of situation doesn't apply everywhere but in the Caribbean in the English speaking Caribbean specifically. It's a bit of a different situation. I'm aware that in Puerto Rico. Genetic testing has become all the rage and that lots of folks are very eager to find out that they have made American backgrounds. Although some folks who worry that some of these Regan's are hoping to have native American background so that they can downplay African genealogy. Yeah that's certainly a concern. I have no doubt that that is definitely a a very real concern. I've had the good fortune of being able to start a project in Puerto Rico. I'm working with various community Afro Puerto Rican communities and the folks that I work with. They're actually very interested in learning more about their African ancestry. Only in the sense that oftentimes information about African Peoples African ancestry specifically. It's been downplayed. It's not been seen as important so they want some details about you know genetically who they connect with within Africa because it's Puerto Rico. And it's got the sort of again kind of crossroads in the Caribbean when I look at the genetic ancestry among Afro Puerto Ricans. There of course is a very strong. African component more so than you see sort of the general populace but we also do see indigenous ancestry. And we see it. Showing up at Afro Puerto Ricans in ways that it doesn't necessarily show up in the general populace. This is something that I'm just now finding out so I have to do a lot more research to fully explain some of the patterns that I'm seeing but it is interesting in the ways in which the histories of different peoples come together in and is reflected in contemporary genetics. The African component of the population into Dominican Republic is even more prominent but many dominicans have a problem with that. Some genetic testing might be in order. Actually been some studies already that have been done and they actually just pretty much reiterate what you've just said that there's a high amount of African ancestry and again. It's really important to consider the history. Recent history political history of the Dominican Republic and its relationship with Haiti. Some of that We'll work to explain why there are individuals who hope to explain away their African ancestry. So it's kind of this very deep very uncomfortable on some levels history but it..

Caribbean Genetic Technologies Saint Vincent United States University of Minnesota School Puerto Rico Africa Afro Puerto Ricans New Mexico Dr Kerry Hemming Smith Dominican Republic conscionable Mexico Central America Cova