20 Episode results for "Gulf Of Mexico"

Deepwater Horizon Pt. 1

Conspiracy Theories

41:30 min | Last month

Deepwater Horizon Pt. 1

"Deepwater horizon for nearly a decade. This offshore oil rig was the pride of the industry. Not only did it drill the deepest well in history at one time but it set seven years safety record. Impressive in such a hazardous business on april twentieth. Two thousand ten. All of that acclaimed disappeared in the span of a single night. The first sign that something was wrong came at nine forty pm. On a hissing noise echoed through the rig below deck crew members discovered rising pressure in the central drilling pipe. Launched into action is heavy drilling. Fluid also called mud float up from the well and poured onto the station's deck despite the mounting danger. The rest of the rigs crew wasn't alerted because the automatic alarms failed to go off nine minutes later to explosion suddenly tore through the horizon. Panicked workers rush to the lifeboats secondary eruption sent debris flying everywhere enflame soared two hundred and forty feet above the deck within moments. Even the water underneath the huge drilling station was on fire. It was covered in spilled oil realizing that their efforts were doomed. The remaining crew members piled into an inflatable raft others. Having no choice jumped from the platform along fall to the ocean surface. Eleven people died in the horrific deepwater horizon explosion and seventeen others were severely injured but with millions of gallons of oil pouring into the gulf of mexico from an unsealed. Well the worst was yet to come. Welcome to conspiracy theories and spotify original from podcast. Every monday and wednesday we dig into the complicated stories behind the world's most controversial events and search for the truth. I'm carter roy. And i'm ali brandenburg and neither of us are conspiracy theorists but we are open minded skeptical and curious. Don't get us wrong sometimes. The official version is the truth. But sometimes it's not you can find episodes of conspiracy theories and all other spotify originals from podcast for free on spotify or wherever you listen to podcasts. This is the first of two episodes on deepwater horizon in offshore rig in the gulf of mexico that exploded in two thousand ten killing eleven people in dumping millions of gallons of oil into the ocean. This industrial disaster left the public with questions about exactly what went wrong on the horizon that night and who was to blame this episode will explore the history and purpose of drilling for fossil. Fuel will also run through the april twentieth explosion and rescue as well as the devastating impact on the environment and american economy. Next time we'll examine those who could have benefited from this catastrophe among them. North korea. big. Oil and eco terrorists. Ooh we have all that and more coming up. Stay with us. The fate of deepwater horizon was sealed long before the disaster that destroyed it oil drillings complicated past laid a foundation for the company's practices and culture that has decimated the infamous rig crude. Oil is a fossil fuel. Meaning the yellowish black liquid is made up of the remains from plants animals and dinosaurs. This resource was. I used to light fires around two thousand years ago in china in the late eighteen. Forty s. geologists chemists discovered new ways to distill the thick black liquid into various petroleum products like gasoline diesel asphalt and more these products were far more efficient energy sources than coal in this scientific revelation changed the economy of the world forever. The first step along the road to an oil-based future came in eighteen. Fifty seven a group of businessmen in titusville pennsylvania commissioned an entrepreneur named edwin drake to find and deliver the promising new resource up to this point. No one had figured out a way to cheaply and efficiently acquire the raw liquid. That was about to change. It took two years then. Drake and his team manage to create the first commercial well in america the strategy that changed everything was a deceptively simple one. Drake pioneered the technique of lining the boreholes with pipe to allow for deeper digging. His proved to be decisive. Because not only did it make drilling easier but it allowed the ability to collect massive amounts of crude oil at the time. The innovation caught the attention of a young john d. Rockefeller the bookkeepers saw potential in this new resource so he went into business and formed the standard oil company over the span of a few decades. He built wells and refineries across the northeast and midwest in bought out or acquired other small oil firms by the beginning of the twentieth century. Standard grew to control ninety one percent of petroleum production and eighty five percent of final sales in the united states. By this time. However the corporation was so powerful that the public and the us government greatly feared the conglomerate it controlled railroads influence legislation and maintained horrible working conditions in nineteen eleven. The supreme court ordered the oil giant to dissolve its trust into thirty four smaller entities among these companies. Were what we know today. As exxon mobil and chevron over the rest of the twentieth century oil became one of the dominant energy sources across the entire world the us in particular used massive amounts of it utilizing the resource to fuel cars. He buildings and produce electricity in two thousand seventeen well. Russia japan and india each accounted for roughly four percent of world petroleum consumption. The united states used around twenty percent second only to taxes energy revenue disbursements from resources such as oil and natural gas generate the most funding for the us treasury of any one source on top of this these industries support. Five point six percent of national employment. This is the economic paradigms that gave birth to a rig like deepwater horizon for decades offshore drilling had been a successful technique for oil collection across the world it in an effort to minimize dependence on foreign petroleum the us invested in domestic sources such as the gulf of mexico by the end of the twentieth century. The gulfs prosperous inspired waves of new drilling technologies and strategies. Sunday strips was building the horizon by the year two thousand four transocean and offshore drilling company valued at over five hundred and sixty million dollars. The rig was a technological marvel and industrial goliath. Many floating rigs are essentially giant ships. They can move from one oil well to the next. The horizon took this model in refined it using a technique called dynamic positioning which stabilized the ring directly over the well. The horizons technology also managed the bulk of pipe handling which was typically the most dangerous part of drilling jobs after it was built transocean lease the state of the art rig to be p p l c the third largest oil and gas producer in the world under their control. The advanced rig managed to drill the deepest well in history in two thousand nine and completed many other challenging projects in the gulf of mexico however the rigs biggest test came when bp called on it to drill a well known as the macondo prospect. This was a recently discovered oil source located forty one miles off the louisiana coast and approximately five thousand feet. Below sea level. As january turned to february. In two thousand ten the rig reached the well and the crew began their typical procedures. I they lowered something called a blowout. Preventer down to the ocean floor. Then they attached to the well. This device purpose was to prevent any sort of uncontrolled release of oil or gas. If that were to happen while the raid was drilling it would be extremely dangerous. During the first three months to the horizon spent working on the macondo workers experienced well control issues for separate times. This triggered emergency protocols on each occasion but every time larger crisis was averted however this amount of trouble was still unusual for drilling expedition and many of the crew members started calling macondo the well from hell in april. Two thousand ten deepwater horizon completed the well. The next step was to seal the hole and then move onto the next project and the clock was ticking. The plan was behind schedule and over budget in. Bp was anxious to wrap up halliburton. One of the world's largest oilfield technology companies was contracted to close the well. Which is a vitally important safety. Step after pumping cement around the pipe. The corporation ran several test to make sure the well was secure. According to their reports it was at this news bp executives or as they were called on the rig company men reportedly urged the crew into double time. They wanted this project done as soon as possible. Because of the cost overruns the rush meant skipping several operational steps for example. The rig workers were allegedly told to replace heavy drilling mud with lighter saltwater before they were meant to this exchange would disrupt pressure in the well in should not have been done before. The final cement seals were in place in a safety meeting afterwards. Witness accounts suggest the transocean representative. Jimmy herrell demanded a more cautious approach on behalf of the rigs crew the workers. Who were there at the time. Watch the tension grow between harrell and the bp companyman supposedly bob qaluza herald told him that the oil corporations orders undermine safety protocol but qaluza put his foot down and said it was his way or the highway. This was far from the first time. Be p representatives interfered with operations on deepwater horizon because the technology and the rig was new and advanced it allowed transocean and bp to eliminate some of the typical positions on an oil rig crew but as the horizon got older and wells became more challenging. It was hard for workers it did have to keep up adding fuel to the proverbial fire. Bp at this time is said to have had a policy that made their disdain for safety clear if any employees on one of their drilling platforms made a suggestion that saved the oil company money. That worker would get a bonus this incentivized looking for cheaper and faster ways to operate so when the company men insisted on cutting corners. It wasn't personal. It was just business. However this institutionalised greed had serious consequences up next. Bp's shortcuts put deepwater horizon at risk listeners. This month marks sixty years since john f. kennedy became the thirty fifth president of the united states measuring his already prominent family into the highest enclaves of political power but behind their story. Successes lie secrets and scandals so severe. If it were any other lineage they would have been left. In ruin this january to commemorate this iconic milestone dig into the dramas of a real life american dynasty in the spotify original from park. Cast the kennedys. This exclusive series from spotify features. Your favorite podcast hosts including me covering every angle of the kennedys from shows like today and true crime conspiracy theories crime countdown and others. Assassinations and conspiracies corruption and cover ups international fairs and extramarital wants to examine all of the kennedy family's most controversial moments. All in one place you can. Binge all twelve episodes of this limited series starting on tuesday january nineteenth. Follow the kennedys free exclusively on spotify now back to the story. In april two thousand ten the technologically advanced oil rig deepwater horizon completed drilling the macondo prospect for british petroleum. The well from hell had already proven a challenge for the crew with the project behind schedule be executives ordered shortcuts in sealing the well to make up for lost time on april twentieth. Everyone on the horizon was working. Full tilt anxious to move onto a less challenging drill site that morning a team of oilfield service providers from slumber j. limited god on a helicopter and left the horizon according to doug brown the rigs chief mechanic. They were supposed to run a test and confirm the integrity of halliburton's cement seal job but peace at the team home before they could inspect the safety of the well hoping to save time and money. According to the oil company halliburton's reports in the horizons internal inspections made this extra safety. Step seem unnecessary in preparation to leave the macondo entirely. The horizons crew conducted many internal tests to confirm the integrity of the well and the cement job however these procedures went off the rails when the tests returned to contradictory technical readings. Most of the had never seen results like this and disagreed over what they meant after discussion of these results don vitrine the well site leader and senior. Vp company man ordered a second test. Some transocean representative stott. Vitrine was being unnecessarily cautious. However at least one worker was convinced that the site leader wasn't cautious enough. According to several accounts this individual argued with another bp company man. Bob qaluza before storming off the drill floor when the second test came back. The results were again abnormal but nobody made records of the procedure and findings for this follow up testimonies from the crew about this second report are contradictory but we know one thing for sure with the support of site leader vitrine. The crew went forward with protocols to close up shop and move the rig off the well at around eight forty five pm just hours. After the test results natural gas made it around the cement seal and traveled up the well undetected. This build up caused the pressure to rise for almost an hour by nine forty pm. The force of the gas became too great mud and sea. Water burst out of the pipe and onto the reisen stack alarmed. The crew called the dream immediately. Who grabbed hard hat and ran towards the gushing. Well they signaled a blowout preventer to shut. Which should have stopped the flow of mud. But for some reason the blowout preventer malfunctioned the slurry of mud water and now gas projected from the pipe hole into the air was such force that it ricocheted off of walls glass and debris exploded two crew members had been working nearby. Ran to help but quickly retreated. They tried to radio their bosses. Who were in the drill shack right next to the eruption of mud but they didn't receive an answer then. Another worker smelled gas. This caused panic. Among the crew to rise. They were right to be alarmed. sensor started. wailing on the bridge crew members should have activated emergency systems. That might have prevented gas from spreading or igniting. But those workers in the rigs nerve center didn't bring those systems online. Maybe it was because of technical issues or a lack of training but regardless they also failed to sound general alarm to prompt evacuation as the chaos mounted all power on the rig suddenly cut out. There was a brief moment of silence. And then the flow of natural gas found a source of ignition in one of the drilling stations engines seconds later the first explosion occurred the second explosion came immediately. After the first and it was massive people were hurled across rooms in paled by shrapnel or consumed by fire. In seconds the rig became a war zone crew members of doused in mud blood combustible gas crawled through dark hallways and over bodies looking for a way out cries for help. Filled the air as flames covered. The rig though accounts vary some say that multiple people called for emergency disconnect system to cut the drill pipe in seal the well but the rigs workers were hesitant to do so without first receiving permission by waiting for orders from their superior to engage the emergency disconnect system they were apparently following protocol regardless at the time these actions only spread confusion and distress. that's why a crew member on the bridge decided to take matters into his own hands. He stepped around his captain. Prepared to defy orders and start the disconnect system. Himself at that moment jimmy harold. The transocean representative came running into the bridge partially blinded by debris he was screaming a three letter acronym. Eds emergency disconnect system the crew member push the eds button in the rigs computers signified that the process had been successfully with the blowout preventer. But it hadn't. It's possible that the first explosion damaged the system and the device couldn't cut the pipe on top of that there were two backup methods to ensure the preventers sheers worked no matter what but they both malfunctioned in a last ditch. Effort three men ran across the rig to the standby generator. They hope that by turning it on they could get power back on the deck but when they got there and follow the sequence three or four times they realize the generator for some reason was dead with a lack of power and a failed. Eds it was time to abandon ship. Parts of the horizon. Were simply gone at that point blown away by the explosions there was also flying debris further injuring people trying to escape. Lastly fire was burning everywhere. Two lifeboats were lowered into the water. They began moving away from the blazing oil rig. The remaining crewmates piled into an inflatable raft and descended seventy five feet. The thick black smoke and flames made it impossible for them to see where they were going but then the raft finally made it to the water. The crew was relieved until they realized they couldn't cut the rope that connected them to the horizon. They were completely stock while they struggled underneath a huge ship. Three people panicked seventy five feet above on the structure stack. It's unclear if there was no room left in the raft or if these workers had been separated from everyone else but regardless they stood on the rigs deck among the wreckage unsure of what to do. There were no lifeboats left even worse from what they could see. The gulf of mexico was covered in flaming oil. But there are other choice was to burn alive on the rig itself. One of those crew members moved up to the helicopter deck. The horizons highest point. One by one they took running starts. They gained as much speed as possible before launching themselves into the air then plummeting through the flames and smoke the crew members on the stuck liferaft. Watch their colleagues hit. The water and surf nearby. Miraculously alive was one sliver of badly needed. Good news however the inferno continued to rage on the platform above them and they still couldn't cut their ties from the rig nearby. A motor vessel call damon bankston sprang into action as soon as its crew saw the flames. They dispatched a fast rescue craft which sped towards the rig. This boats spotted those who jumped because of the reflective patches on their work overalls and started fishing them out of the water. Eventually the rescue boat noticed the raft. The burning rig the craft steered as close as possible following the screams for help then with a knife borrowed from the bankston. One of the swimmers finally managed to cut the raft free soon crew members covered in mud seawater water and gas poured onto the bankston stack. Finally it seemed like they were safe for hours. The rescue boat remained five hundred meters away from the burning rig. Crew members surveyed the damage and tallied missing crew overall. Eleven people never made it off the rig and for some reason. The bankston wasn't allowed to bring the survivors to shore just yet so. The oil workers watch deepwater horizon burn along with eleven of their colleagues finally bp and transocean gave the bankston approval to bring the remaining crew in however under orders from the oil company. The ship made several stops. I some of those detours let high level. Bp and transocean personnel off. I this added delays struck many of the rank and file crew members as odd and distressing considering what they'd all just been through when the bankston finally reached the nearest louisiana port. It was one thirty. Am on april twenty second over a day after the explosion but instead of seeing their families the crew was immediately sequestered in a hotel. They were questioned by transocean. Bp investigators given your analysis tests and asked to sign a form. The form had two statements. One said i was not a witness to the requiring the evacuation and have no firsthand or personal knowledge regarding the incident. The second said i was not injured as a result of the incident or evacuation tired hurt and having just seen a horrific explosion. Many crew members signed without considering how it would affect them later. Something that transocean. Mvp counted on their disorientation. A lawyer later suggested that the companies left the crew on the banks in for a long time so that they could assemble teams of corporate attorneys on land but bp and transocean had a much bigger issue than lawsuits on their hands. The unsealed was still pumping natural gas. All over the rig. The coastguard and other emergency responders tried to fight the three hundred foot flames by surrounding the station with boats and dousing the structure with water but it was a lost cause. There was no simple way to fight a fire with endless fuel. After a day and a half of burning the rig started to creak and groan firefighters later described it as the sound of ship dying. Multiple explosions went off and debris flew into the air. The firefighters continued their efforts to save the ship but prepared for an emergency evacuation around ten am on april. Twenty second deepwater horizon started to slip into the gulf of mexico within minutes. The vessel was completely submerged. The fight was over. The oil rig had sunk when the horizon crumbled under the waves the pipe between the rig and the well beneath it broke with no pressure. Keeping it underground. Oil flowed freely from the earth gushing into the gulf at horrifying rates at the time. Bp claimed the volume of escaping liquid was about one thousand barrels a day. We now know the real amount was far higher for months afterwards. Experts tried to seal the well. They domes over the blowout preventer and drilled mud into it but still underwater cameras showed brown plumes of oil escaping. The broken pipe like smoke from chimney giant remote controlled submarines with mechanical arms prodded the leaking equipment trying to see what could be done eventually. It was a combination of efforts that sealed the spill one of the caps fitted to the well slow the leak and the drilling mud helped enough to stabilize the flow than the faulty blowout. Preventer was exchanged with a working one. The new machine ran through all the functions that failed the night of the explosion. This time they worked on september seventeenth. Two thousand ten. The well was completely sealed after cement was placed and tested the spill lasted eighty seven days and dumped over two hundred million gallons into the gulf of mexico up next the aftermath of the largest oil disaster in history. Now back the story after a horrific explosion and devastating oil spill transocean. Mvp responded not with compassion and aid but with teams of lawyers. however the spill's impact on the world was about to expand from the horizons. One hundred and twenty six crew members to entire ecosystems by the time the well was sealed the colorful orange oil slick spanned more than fifty seven thousand square miles across an otherwise teal colored ocean greater than one thousand miles of shoreline. The wheezy enna. Mississippi alabama and florida were polluted with oil and tar balls. The spill wreaked environmental havoc. Dying turtles and birds arrived on land covered in thick layers of sticky goo and elsewhere on the food chain. The oil proved toxic for a wide range of organisms including plankton invertebrates fish birds and sea mammals the effects ranged from death to disease to impaired reproduction. The spill also brought the fishing industry in the gulf of mexico to a complete halt more than a third of the us. Federal waters closed due to fear of contamination. This devastated many of the american port cities along the gulf that relied on fishing for their economies. Bp vowed to clean up the spill as soon as possible among many methods floating booms were used to contain surface oil then the company employed machines to remove the crude by skimming off the surface only two to four percent of the spill was collected this way another tactic involve the use of controlled burns setting the oil and fire at the ocean. Surface accounted for five to six percent of the removal after deepwater horizon. These cleanup efforts were organized by the national response team. A coalition of government agencies with the us coastguard and the environmental protection agency at the lead funding and support came from bp and transocean as well bp's cleanup attempts had flaws despite the fact that the company made ernest public declarations about their efforts for example they started a program called vessels of tune. Ity that hired fishermen who had lost their jobs to use their boats and equipment to recover oil in a video interview for a documentary. One fisherman pointed out that his net was designed to catch fish. Water ran through the tool freely. Making it useless to collect spilled crude. The interview was cut short when the fishermen was reminded by a co worker that he had signed a form with bp saying he wouldn't talk to the media as the months passed. The disaster continued to impact thousands of americans. The obama administration enacted a moratorium on new offshore drilling after the spill which caused the temporary employment of an estimated eight thousand to twelve thousand people. This was just the initial response. Regulations hurt the oil industry as a whole beyond just pp. The more that petroleum corporations in general were reprimanded for this disaster the more jobs they eliminated to account for litigation and relief funds and these funds were substantial. Bp under pressure from obama and facing an overwhelming amount of public anger created a twenty billion dollar compensation package for those affected by the spill. This fund faced criticism from every side. Both were approving too many and too few claims more than anything people wanted to know whose fault the disaster was. An investigatory report ultimately placed most of the blame on bp this inquiry completed in part by the us coastguard revealed that bp and transocean representatives on deepwater horizon had ignored many early signs. That something was wrong therefore they missed numerous opportunities to prevent the blowout after this report. The us department of justice levied a huge lawsuit at bp and transocean for violating the clean water act and oil pollution act bp later agreed to settle claims with spill victims for at least seven point. Eight billion dollars. In addition to covering economic losses the settlement mandated the payment of medical claims related to the spill for the next twenty one years. The consequences didn't in there in november. Two thousand twelve bb pled guilty to fourteen criminal charges including eleven counts of manslaughter for the deaths aboard the horizon that same month the epa temporarily banned the british oil company from entering new federal contracts to drill then in january two thousand thirteen. Transocean reached its own settlement with the government. The company agreed to a one billion dollar civil penalty under the clean water. Act they also paid a four hundred million dollar criminal penalty and resolve plaintiff claims at around two hundred eleven million dollars a couple months later. The halliburton corporation also saw consequences. The corporation pled guilty to criminal charges that its employees destroyed evidence suggesting there. Cement job was not stable in response. The company was find a two hundred thousand dollar penalty later. A civil trial by the federal government found bp sixty seven percent culpable transocean thirty percent and halliburton three percent. The ruling recognized that bp had claimed approximately two point four five million barrels of oil had leaked into the ocean while the us government estimated that four point one nine million barrels had spilled then in the largest financial penalty ever delivered by the us government against one company. Bp's final settlement was said at twenty point eight billion dollars in addition to financial punishments. The government publicly reprimanded the oil companies at fault as well as the industry as a whole the subcommittee on energy and environment in the us house of representatives. Some the ceo's of bp exxon mobil shell oil sitting behind a desk in a line. Each leader had to answer why the companies had invested so little in safety and cleanup furthermore bp countrymen. Don vitrine and bob qaluza were charged with manslaughter for ignoring safety. Protocol and concern among the deepwater horizon crew. These charges were later dropped. The father of gordon. John's was one of the eleven people killed on april twentieth. Attended these hearings. He said he was disappointed that no one will ever spend a moment behind bars. For killing eleven men due to reasons based entirely on greed between these financial punishments the temporary moratorium on drilling and the public shaming. They delivered the. Us government finally seemed to be taking action against the oil industry for decades. The country bent to the will of petroleum corporations after the spill the us publicly stated no more but this show of strength didn't last as mentioned at the beginning of this episode. The entire infrastructure of america relied on oil to keep the economy running despite concern over the spill. This dependency persisted afterwards. Congress passed the two thousand twelve restore act which ensured that civil penalties from the spill would be shared amongst the states other than that obama administration imposed some safety rules and regulations through the interior department. But many have since been reversed within two years of the spill. The us government sold thirty nine million acres in the gulf of mexico to companies like exxon mobil shell chevron and of course bp the government made one point seven billion dollars in profits on water. That wasn't even cleaned up yet. The sale was completed at the same time. The federal government sued these energy corporations while people and ecosystems still struggle today from the aftermath of the bp oil spill. America has returned to its cycle of oil dependency. Us oil production continued to set records through two thousand nineteen dipping only during the covid pandemic the negligence of companies involved was clear but this catastrophe one of the biggest environmental disasters history prompts important questions. The rig had countless safety systems in place yet. How was it that. All of them failed the night of april twentieth and did the halliburton employees. Destroy more evidence than was acknowledged publicly next week will explore some theories surrounding these questions. Deepwater horizon and it's fiery demise. I would discuss the involvement of foreign powers like north korea and russia in whether or not their exclusion from the world's oil profits led them to undertake sinister actions. Second dive deeper into the corporations. That ran the infamous rig to see if the negligence on display was actually a conspiracy will investigate executives set out to make money from selling shares of stock right before the explosion finally will explore the potential role of some eco terrorist groups. It's possible that radical environmentalists plan to expose the dangers of oil drilling by targeting the vessel in creating that disaster themselves after all. The rig sank just before earth day. Well many chalk this up to coincidence it could instead be due to sabotage we Thanks for tuning into conspiracy. Theories will be back wednesday with our second episode on deepwater horizon. You can find all episodes of conspiracy. Theories and all other spotify originals. From park asked for free on spotify until then remember. The truth isn't always the best story and the officials story isn't always the truth. Conspiracy theories is a spotify original. From podcast executive producers include max and ron cutler sound design by dick schroeder with production assistance by ron shapiro carly madden and freddie beckley. This episode of conspiracy theories was written by kit fitzgerald with writing assistance by nicholas. Smart and abby geli. Idee magoo fact. Checking by bennett. Logan and research by bradley klein conspiracy theories stars molly. Brandenburg and carter roy fact fiction fame. Discover the real story behind. One of history's most formidable families in the spotify original from par cast the kennedys. Remember you can binge. All twelve episodes starting on tuesday january nineteenth. Listen free and exclusively on spotify.

transocean bp gulf of mexico halliburton bankston america carter roy ali brandenburg edwin drake us treasury louisiana coast
Monitor Show 09:00 07-26-2020 09:00

Bloomberg Radio New York - Recording Feed

01:42 min | 7 months ago

Monitor Show 09:00 07-26-2020 09:00

"Covid nineteen can the world reopen for business gives a sets of higher wrapping up taking care of folks on the ground. What's the long term to? Why will we not see a v-shaped recovery? Wind will there be a cure or vaccine? How can you model that at a time? When it's unclear whether we're GONNA, see a resurgence in viruses. The answer is will emerge. Can you give us a sense of timing and you'll find them here? Bloomberg radio the Bloomberg business. EAPPEN, bloombergradio DOT COM. Bloomberg the world is listening. Ours a day at Bloomberg. Dot Com on the Bloomberg business APP, and Bloomberg quick take. This is Bloomberg radio now a global news update. Drenching Taxes Drenching Hawaii I'm Christopher cruise south. Texas, is preparing for possible flooding after Hannah Aurora short from the Gulf of Mexico as a category, one hurricane she's now been downgraded to a tropical storm, but she's lashing the area with high winds, heavy rain and storm surge meteorologist Allison Chinchar at the Baptist morning replaces reporting those hurricane, strength winds, and even some tropical storm Corpus Christi Picking Up a wind gusts of sixty eight miles per hour when you have wind gusts. Gusts that high it is no surprise. You were going to get power outages. You have about two hundred and fifty thousand people without power in the state of Texas, and it is going to be slow to get that power back on because the storm isn't yet done category one Hurricane Douglas is expected to reach parts. Of Hawaii this afternoon. The storm has gradually weakening, but who remains under a hurricane warning and the Big Island and Maui. We are under hurricane. Treasury Secretary Steve Mnuchin says Republicans will soon rollout and other economic stimulus bill correspondent Kristen Holmes says Mooching told reporters that the bill will extend a weekly.

Bloomberg Hurricane Douglas Hawaii covid Texas Hannah Aurora cure Gulf of Mexico Big Island Kristen Holmes Steve Mnuchin Allison Chinchar Mooching
Ep. 98: Reviving the Gulf Coast Dead Zone

Got Science?

28:56 min | 3 months ago

Ep. 98: Reviving the Gulf Coast Dead Zone

"Welcome to the got science podcast. I'm your host calling mcdonald today. We're talking about dead zones dead zones that have nothing to do with your cell phone and stick around after the interview research analyst. Anita dessiken has some promising news about the biden harris pandemic response. This episode is all about externalities. An extra analogy is a term used in economics. It's when some practice that involves two parties ends up costing or benefiting third party when that third party didn't agree to assume that cost or benefit. It's a little like the so called butterfly effect or the law of unintended consequences. An example of a positive externalities. Is that if i choose to walk to the store wearing my mask of course. Congestion from traffic is reduced in my small town. An example of a negative extra analogy is if i choose to take a private helicopter to the grocery store and the wind from the rotor. Blades blows the roof off my neighbor's house. Today's guest is my colleague economist. Rebecca beim who studying an external negative. It's created its own dead zone. Her research is on. How farming practices in the mid west can affect the livelihoods of small fishing operations in the gulf coast specifically how nitrogen runoff gets into the water and creates dead zones. Where marine life can't thrive but don't worry also gonna talk about positive externalities to like the fact that changes to farming practices could drastically reduce dead zones and because of that would basically pay for themselves. Dr beim tells us about the threat to traditional ways of life in the gulf coast solutions. That can be implemented team. And how the real problem is well poop rebecca. Welcome to the podcast. Thank you for having me. I'm really glad to be here. Yes so you've been studying the environmental and economic impacts of the gulf dead zone and while the term dead zone. Sounds kind of ominous. You've got some interesting ideas for solutions in there but let's start with a definition of dead zone because we're not talking about a cell phone dead zone here right. Yeah so a dead zone is an area in ocean water that is devoid of oxygen so just like humans need oxygen to survive there needs to be auctioned in ocean water marine life to be healthy and so a dead zone is in area where this the oxygen levels are very low that's resulting from nutrient imbalance essentially in the ocean water and so the one that we focused on in our reviving the dead zone report was the gulf of mexico dead zone which is along the southeastern border of the united states. But these these dead zones make can be all over the world. They are all over the world. There's one in the gulf of oman in the arabian sea. And there are many others but we focused on the gulf of mexico deadzone because it is linked its fate is linked very closely to agricultural production north along the mississippi river and it is the second typically the second largest in the world but it varies from year to year. So what causes a dead zone. Yeah so as i said. Agriculture is very tied into the fate of the gulf of mexico. Dead zone so nitrogen is a really important nutrient. In agricultural production it ensures good crop yields and it is used a lot in the mid west midwestern corn grain production and the way that farmers typically grow. Those crops means that a lot of nitrogen leaves the the farm and ends up in waterways and that that water carries the nitrogen downstream into the gulf of mexico. And so i earlier said you know. There's a delicate nutrient alison in ocean water including for nitrogen. So there's there's a kind of goldilocks right amount of nitrogen in the gulf of mexico. That's good for marine life. You know good. For fishermen but the nitrogen that runoff farms in the midwest ends up in the gulf and the leading contributor to the dead zone that nitrogen coming down the mississippi every single year millions of tons is what creates the dead zone. With all that excess. What actually happens then. Yeah so once. The excess nitrogen finds its way down from the mississippi river and enters the gulf of mexico. It actually produces a lot of algae. Algeria's basically plant life microscopic plant life near the surface of water ocean water so the nitrogen actually stimulates more growth of algae. But then there's something in this case. There's something called too much of a good thing. So nitrogen is necessary for algae to grow. Algae is what other marine life eat. So it's sort of the beginning of the food chain or the food web in in the ocean but too much of a good thing increases the algal growth bacteria consume algae and other species they produce waste and the waste is what causes oxygen levels to decrease in the gulf of mexico so too much nitrogen too much algae too much waste not enough. Oxygen is sort of the the simple way to think about it. It's it's a pretty complicated process. And so that's really all that nitrogen coming down. The mississippi river is is fueling that algae growth and causing the dead zone. So the sounds to me like it is something that could be reversed. Yes yes absolutely. As i said. Agriculture is leading cause of this problem in the dead zone and so there are changes to agricultural production that could occur that would reduce the amount of nitrogen fertilizer. That ends up in waterways. So one of those ways is cover crop So when farmers done for the season they've grown their crops. Farmers can leave their their field. Merrin planting cover crops so crop just holds in the soil and his is there in the in the time where the the main production crop is in growing Actually keep nitrogen in the soil and keep it from entering waterways. You can imagine like in the fall or winter. There's heavy and that field is is just soil. There's no plant life any nitrogen that might have been applied could wash off the farm through and end up in a nearby stream or river an also can leach into the groundwater so you know in the mid westerners amid and all over there's aquifers under the and nitrogen can enter those those aquifers and contaminate groundwater sources so so bottom line is we need to do some weenie shift. Some of our agricultural practices to keep the nitrogen out of weiwei's keep it on the farm if farmers are gonna use it. So what impact is the dead zone. Having for community is on the gulf coast so the dead zone occurs every spring summer season. So it's not there all year it disappears part of the year. But it is there. It happens to coincide with the shrimp harvest season and so increasingly shrimpers sort of have to navigate around this giant dead zone in order to catch a profitable amount of of shrimp. And what happens is the shrimp who may be in the dead zone. They try to leave it so that forces some shrimp to congregate around the edges of the dead zone which actually makes it easier for shippers to catch them but also obviously it does affect reproduction of the shrimp. And so there's you know in some cases there's been fewer shrimp to catch so it presents. Big challenges for shrimpers and other types of fishermen fisher people in the gulf in the fishing industry is huge industry. All along the gulf both for commercial production. It supplies a lot of seafood for restaurants including no new orleans and all along along the gulf ended his obviously important for the tourism industry. So the dead zone is really a problem for the gulf coast economy that relies on healthy ocean waters so that it can function right so aside from the the economics of it there's also sort of a cultural aspect to what's happening. Can you talk a little bit about the communities in these areas. And what's happening there. Yeah in the course of doing the research for this report. We talked to a lot of people on the ground who are affected by the dead zone who are also affected by hurricanes. This area is is has multiple big issues. It's it's confronting the it's a diverse group of people who are shrimping on the gulf coast to are our fishing and it ranges from indigenous communities. Who lived along the shore for generations and there are also immigrants especially vietnamese immigrants who fled vietnam during the vietnam war. Who brought their fishing traditions with them to the us. And so there's a range of people who are living off the gulf waters and and really need needed to be healthy so that they can earn a livelihood but also continue on with some of their cultural traditions so in the report you talk about the economic benefits of getting the dead zone under control and the nitrogen is coming from farms in the mid west so the solutions are going to come from the midwest which is not the area that is experiencing the problems. How do we come up with solutions. That will incentivize farmers in the mid west to adopt better practices. That will help the gulf coast. Yeah that's a great question and to bring in a little econ. One win is impacted by transaction occurring. Kind of somewhere else economists. Call that an extra. So we have this big analogy in the gulf of mexico And as you say that the solutions do come upstream and so you know in our report. We've provided some policy recommendations to make it easier for farmers to adopt practices like cover crops. Which i talked about earlier and those policies include one. That was introduced last year called the cultural resilience act and so this bill provides funding and resources for farmers to help them adopt these practices. 'cause it's it's hard to take as a farmer you know once you get into doing thing that you've been doing for a long time. It's it's hard to shifted. There's also costs associated with changing how you plan things and how you manage your farm and so bills like this are really geared toward making it making shifts that will help keep nitrogen out of waterways. Make it easier for farmers to do that. Do you get the sense that farmers want to adopt different practices. That's a great question. I do think there's an appetite for this. One piece of evidence can share that. There's a program called the conservation stewardship program that. Usda operates in helps farmers have this sort of whole farm approach to preserving natural resources like soil and water and also it helps them to be more resilient to things like climate change it helps them adopt practices. It that do that in blue seem demand for that programme far outstrips. How much funding is available. So we think there is an appetite absolutely for this. And i think some of these practices that keep nitrogen on the farm if it's used. These practices help farmers to be more resilient to climate change when there is a flood. If you have more organic matter you have roots in the soil it's gonna reduce soil erosion on your land in. It's gonna keep that soil on your farm so you can be productive long-term and the soil will hold more water so there's less damage to the farm in the case of extreme flood so there's there's benefits for farmers but there's also benefits for claiming in for water-quality for some of these practices that that can really reduce nitrogen losses from farms. We'll be back in a minute with the second. Half of our interview got science brought to you by the union of concerned scientists more at got science. Podcast dot org. You can find us on apple podcasts. Stitcher cloud px all the usual podcast outlets for a transcript and links to additional resources from this episode and a full bio of our guest over to god science. Podcasts dot org. If you like the podcast you can help us reach more people by simply sharing the podcast with your friends. Your co workers and on your social networks. Another way to help us get noticed is by leaving a review on apple podcasts. It's quick and super easy and finally if you're on twitter come on over and talk to us at got science ucs. Now let's get back to our interview. I've read in the report. Summary that the solutions will actually save more money than they cost so this seems like an economic win. Can you talk about that a little bit. Yes so in analysis. We looked at some recent estimates of how much it would cost for widespread adoption of these practices like cover cropping and prairie strict planting in a few others if we adopted those at a wide scale in the mid west. How much would that cost. Because obviously it's gonna cost the money again. Farmers have to change the way they do what they're doing in the cost of that. At least from a policy perspective would be cost to the government would bear so we'd be providing incentives or funding pharmacy. Do this so we compared those costs to the costs of reducing the damage that the nitrogen causes in the gulf of mexico so we we estimated the impact from the nitrogen on marine habitat 'em fisheries fishing stocks in the gulf and we found that those benefits in some of our scenarios outweighed. Those costs that we would have to incur. If we were to help farmers make these shifts so we think you know getting new funding getting farmers to these new practices. It is always a challenge. It has been a challenge for a really long time but we know what we show in our report is. There'd be a major return on investment in the gulf if we were to move on these policy options that we have to increase adoption of these sustainable practices that are good for the climate. Good for farmers. And i'll say that in addition to the benefits to the gulf that we found that we identified in dollars there's also benefits upstream that we didn't quantify so we feel like the benefits that we calculated it or sort of an underestimate of what the true economic benefits would be if we address this problem focused on the dead zone in the gulf. We've talked about the problem of midwest farms in the runoff. Going all the way down into the gulf of mexico but have you focused at all on nitrogen runoff closer to home. And what happens there. That is what. I'm working on right now. Actually i'm so glad they're really so you know when we do. Ucs reports we consult with researchers. You know and we talked to a lot of people in the course of this report In many events that hey you need to look at what's happening upstream because there's water quality issues all along the mississippi river and near the farms where you know where this runoff and the nitrogen losses are happening and so we thought it made sense to to do our work in that area so give me a sneak peek at what you're looking at. What some of the issues are that. You're working on. Yes so we are looking at iowa because there's a lot of grain and corn production in iowa and also a lot of livestock production. And so what we're looking at now is were estimating. How much nitrogen is used in both crop and livestock production in iowa and it's pretty astounding. How many billions of pounds of nitrogen go into the system or the agricultural system in in iowa. And i should say it may not be clear where the nitrogen comes from from animals. It comes from their waist. And so you know we're trying to quantify like how much how much is going into the system. how much is entering the waterways and then what impacts that has on the water quality in iowa. You're looking at so there's the nitrogen that's runoff from fertilizer. But there's also nitrogen associated with livestock. Yes so according to our. This is a draft estimate. I'll give you a sneak. Peek in iowa there are more livestock animals than humans and those livestock animals like these cadillac in hogs and chickens. They produce you know poop ways to end. That actually contains a lot of nitrogen. So you know just in our preliminary estimates in one year in twenty seventeen there were eighty eight million animals just in iowa producing hundred seventeen billion pounds of manure in one year and has a lot of nitrogen in it. Nine hundred ninety nine million pounds so that that has to be stored somewhere. It has to be Something has to be done with it in so Oftentimes it's actually sprayed on land on farmland nearby farmland and then the nitrogen can wash off into waterways just like with fertilizer. So we've got a lot again. A lot of nitrogen from crop production livestock going into the system in iowa and nitrogen very easily washes off farms and leaches into the soil into groundwater. You're talking about you're talking about this leaching into water the potentially becomes drinking water. Yes yes that is exactly right. So iowa relies like all of us on groundwater and surface water sources for drinking water. So does the does the nitrogen get filtered out. Yes so there are public water systems all over. Ira that have to check for nitrates. Nitrites what you would find in groundwater surface water you know if it's contaminated from Agricultural livestock production. So yeah the. There's federal and state regulations that require monitoring for the nitrate levels in. If it gets to a certain level. You know you have a problem for public health. And so there's a lot of money going into treating drinking water sources nitrates and i'll stop various. Okay yeah because we don't wanna give away too much. Yeah before the report comes. Yeah the only other thing. I'll say is to connected back to the gulf. When drinking water systems treated for nitrates the nitrates are taken out there removed from the drinking water. Then they're put back into surface water and then they ended up downstream anyways. Why would they put it back. It has to go somewhere. It ends up in surface. Water is unlikely ends up in the in the gulf of mexico where we have the central problem so really we have to get a handle on this we. We have to use less of it. Yes in a way to do that. Is some of these practices that we think are good for farmers good for the climate and good for soil. Cover cropping like a said rebecca. If i were gonna put you in charge of this whole large project to You know make our systems better. What is a time line for. Actually making some of this stuff happened. It's not going to be quick. But could it be done in five years ten years three years well in the current political context i think given the urgency of climate change some of the things that we need to do need to happen in that five to ten year period even though that seems quick for having sort of wide-scale shifts in how how we grow corn and other crops in that part in the midwest not part of the country so i think it's sort of probably. There's some things that can happen. We just have to make it happen. Sort of we need a self fulfilling prophecy if we if we're going to. We need ambitious goal and we need to be ambitious because the climate so we should so there are many upsides to bring these better practices which is really good news right. Yes we can. We can do it. Yes i think so. And as i said there's appetite there's appetite for among farmers. I think there are some challenges that farmers faced it has to be confronted in. We need to talk honestly about those challenges in also in the context of the farm economy in crop prices and how that impacts how farmers are doing business. But i think there's a lot of. There's some win win win scenarios that we need to. We need to make possible through federal policy action. Excellent will rebecca. Thanks so much. I'm glad to have a podcast where we can end on an upbeat note. That doesn't help that. What has actually right now. Yeah no i. i'm hopeful. I'm on optimist so yeah was great. Talk to you calling. It's time now for a short segment by research analyst anita when the barrage of bad news with the pandemic keeps coming. We recently passed a quarter of a million deaths in the us alone from covid nineteen but there is good news with promising vaccines on the way and the incoming biden administration announced their plans to halt the spread of covid nineteen and it looks pretty solid. Here's anita with the story. President elect joe biden and vice president. Elect kamala harris. Didn't wait long to let us know that they have a plan for handling the pandemic just two days after the election was called they announced the creation of a transition covid nineteen advisory board. It's made up entirely of doctors. Scientists and former government health officials which is goodness also. Good news is that it's clear. The incoming administration is taking the pandemic seriously. It's plan literally promises to always quote. Listen to the science unquote. The new advisory board is made up of sixteen members. many of whom are women and people of color. It's three co chairs are marcella. Newest smith a yale physician and researcher vic murthy a us surgeon general from two thousand fourteen to two thousand seventeen and david kessler an fda commissioner from nineteen ninety to nineteen ninety seven marcelo. Smith has researched health disparities and discrimination in healthcare in march populations expertise. They will be especially valuable now as kobe. Nineteen disproportionately harms people of color as for Murthy and david kessler. They have worked closely with biden throughout the duration of the pandemic leading briefings since its earliest days they both have stellar records and as federal scientists both are willing to advocate for science based actions. Even in the face of political pressure as for the covid. Nineteen plan that these individuals and other transition officials are working on it promises. Access to free reliable testing accelerated production and distribution of personal protective equipment or ppe evidence based guidance for communities treatments and vaccines are distributed equitably protections for people who are at high risk of developing severe covid nineteen symptoms reconvened federal pandemic response teams and mask. Mandates here are even more specifics. The incoming administration is planning to invoke the defense production act to increase ppe supplies to create a pandemic testing board to produce and distribute millions of tests and to mobilize one hundred thousand people to perform community focused contact. Tracing biden's team is also signaling that it will send her racial equity in its pandemic response. One of their goals is to quote. Establish a covid nineteen racial and ethnic disparities task force to provide recommendations and oversight on disparities in public health and economic response and quote. This team will transition to a permanent taskforce on racial equities in infectious diseases. Once covid nineteen is under control. Finally the team is requesting that the cdc issue evidence based guidance on how communities can navigate the pandemic and they say they will take steps to ensure that the vaccine development at the fda is non political and led by scientists. So they're going to let science-based federal agencies do their jobs without political interference. That is good and that is the way things are supposed to be. Currently the us is facing one of the darkest chapters of the pandemic daily case. Numbers are repeatedly spiking to the highest numbers. We've observed daily death. Totals are at the highest levels seen since may and covid nineteen hospitalizations are so high that many hospitals especially in the midwest and the west are reaching their capacity to provide care. We in the united states are in desperate need of an administration willing and able to use science based tools to slow the spread of this deadly pandemic with the announcement of this advisory board and the steps. The transition team is already taking on. Its plan we now have a better chance of coordinating an aggressive science based response against the greatest public health crisis seen in a century. My colleagues and i are grateful for the return to science and public health since the only way. we're going to make any real progress in slowing and halting the spread of covid nineteen is with a science and public health based approach. And we are ready to hold the biden administration accountable for managing this crisis and protecting our health. That's it for this episode of the got science. Podcast got science is made possible by the hundred and twenty-five thousand members of ucs and especially our partners for the earth the thirteen thousand supporters who make monthly contributions to help us stand up for science. Learn more at ucs usa dot org slash partners special. Thanks to dr rebecca. Beim editing and music by. Brian middleton additional editing by omari spears research and writing by pamela worth and john leon our executive producer is rich hayes and on your host. Come mcdonald come chat with us on twitter at got science. Ucs thanks stay safe. Wear your masks and see you next time.

gulf of mexico gulf coast mississippi river iowa gulf Anita dessiken Rebecca beim Dr beim midwest the arabian sea Merrin biden rebecca vietnam weiwei oman mcdonald united states Algeria hundred seventeen billion poun
Monitor Show 06:00 07-26-2020 06:00

Bloomberg Radio New York - Recording Feed

01:42 min | 7 months ago

Monitor Show 06:00 07-26-2020 06:00

"With covid nineteen so much unknown. Is this the worst you've seen? But we are committed to getting you every piece of information we can. As soon as we can tell us about this first. Big Win, you have what is it twenty four million in ninety five masks fewer unknowns winning here? Where's the pressure right now? That's our goal. What worries you the most? The time is going to take for Vaccine Bloomberg radio, the Bloomberg business APP, and Bloombergradio Dot Com Bloomberg. The world is listening. Twenty four hours a day at Bloomberg Dot Com on the Bloomberg business, APP and Bloomberg quick take. This is Bloomberg radio now a global news update. One ashore another closing again heated protests I'm Barbara Kusak South Texas bracing for flooding, after Hannah roared ashore from the Gulf of Mexico as a Category One hurricane yesterday, but still dumping heavy rains in the region as a tropical storm radar accumulated rainfalls that have been observed here have been over a foot of rain in about a twenty four hour period, and there's still more rain to come, so flash flooding a real threat, a real possibility again as system rains itself out meteorologist Derek. Derek Van dam also tracking Hurricane Douglas, which has its sights on Hawaii and may make landfall later today, dozens arrested and many police injured in clashes around Seattle's biggest black lives matter protests. In weeks, federal agents, police and protesters also faced off in Portland Oregon. We're correspondent. Lucy Cavanaugh says military veterans joined the movement protect black lives matter. They lined up in front of the Federal Building when things are still to try to put themselves between the federal officers and the demonstrators TV personality.

Bloombergradio Dot Com Bloombe Bloomberg Bloomberg Dot Com Derek Van dam Federal Building Lucy Cavanaugh Hurricane Douglas Gulf of Mexico Barbara Kusak Portland Oregon Seattle Texas Hannah Hawaii Twenty four hours twenty four hour
NPR News: 08-26-2020 3PM ET

NPR News Now

04:39 min | 6 months ago

NPR News: 08-26-2020 3PM ET

"Live from NPR news in Washington. I'm Windsor Johnston officials in Wisconsin say they've arrested a seventeen year old suspect in the shooting deaths of two protesters last night violent demonstrations continued for a third night in the city of Kenosha following police shooting that left a black man critically injured Kenosha county sheriff. David. Beth. Addressed the recent clashes between demonstrators and the police but to some people you know the bad the bad people and to the majority of the of the committee where the people that go out and help save and protect. The other part of it is the courthouse courthouse represents justice and I know the people are are looking for justice it is there's just as in We found guilty and refund. Innocent. So I'm sure they'll come out in time video of the incident shows an officer shooting several times striking twenty, nine year old Jacob Blake in the back as he tried to get into a car. Hurricane Laura is intensifying as it approaches the US mainland. The powerful category four storm is packing winds of one hundred, forty miles per hour and is expected to make landfall along the US Gulf coast later tonight Texas Governor Greg Abbott says the impact of the storm will be severe. This has been categorized repeatedly. As an unsurvivable storm surge where it will be hitting. And that storm surge could continue inland for about thirty miles. Forecasters say Hurricane Laura could produce up to fifteen feet of storm surge in some parts when it makes landfall NPR's Rebecca Hersher reports the family warm waters of the Gulf of Mexico continues to fuel. The storm moves closer to shore the water on the surface of the Gulf of Mexico is nearly ninety degrees in some places. That's hot significantly hotter than the average water temperature. If you look back at the last century and hot water is like a battery charger for hurricanes hot water helped power some of the most damaging hurricanes in the last few years, Hurricane Harvey and Texas Maria Puerto Rico Florence. In the Carolinas and Michael along the Gulf coast, they dropped enormous amounts of rain over a large area and forecasters say flooding is a top concern with this week's storms. Global Climate Change is causing big wet hurricanes to get more common warm air is like a sponge for moisture from warm water Rebecca Hersher NPR news. The Republican Party is gearing up for the third night of its nominating convention vice president. Mike Pence will deliver a speech tonight from Fort McHenry in Baltimore other speakers on tonight's lineup includes senior White House adviser, Kellyanne Conway who announced her resignation earlier this week the convention up tomorrow night with President. Trump delivering his acceptance speech from the White House. On Wall Street, the Dow is up twenty nine points you're listening to NPR news in Washington. Women's equality. Day is being marked with commemorations of the centennial of the nineteenth and -ment which granted women the right to vote NPR's Melissa Block reports look up tonight around the country and you'll see landmarks illuminated in purple and gold the colors of the women's suffrage movement from the gateway. Arch in Saint Louis to the Statue of Liberty's torch and the welcome to Fabulous Las Vegas sign hundreds more all part of the forward into light commemoration and in New York, city Central Park. Three. They unveiled a sculpture honoring three pioneers of the suffrage movement and shows sojourner truth Elizabeth Cady Stanton and Susan B Anthony in deep animated. Discussion Hillary Clinton spoke at today's unveiling a century. Later, the struggle to enforced the right to vote continues Melissa Block. NPR news firefighters are working to contain more than two dozen large wildfires across California cooler temperatures, and rising humidity are helping crews make progress against three large blazes. In the San Francisco Bay area. The fires have claimed the lives of at least seven people and destroyed hundreds of homes. All of the major indices are trading higher at this hour on Wall Street. The Dow Jones Industrial Average is up forty two points at twenty, eight, thousand to ninety one, the S&P five hundred, also trading higher up twenty six points. The Nasdaq composite up one forty one this is NPR news.

NPR NPR Hurricane Laura US Melissa Block Gulf coast Washington Gulf of Mexico Kenosha county Kenosha Jacob Blake Windsor Johnston Beth vice president Wisconsin David Hurricane Harvey San Francisco Bay Republican Party
ENCORE: Why Sea Level Rise Varies Across The World

Environment: NPR

03:51 min | Last week

ENCORE: Why Sea Level Rise Varies Across The World

"The earth is getting hotter. Ice is melting. The oceans are creeping higher and over the last century. The average sea level around the globe has risen about five to nine inches. But that is the average sea level rise. Npr's rebecca hersher tells us why you could be experiencing a lot more or a lot less depending on where you live. When you imagine the ocean you might imagine it like a bathtub and that all the ice. that's melting is like turning on a faucet. Unfortunately you'd be wrong. The old bath analogy so this is the analogy that in oceanography one on one. The professor is very quick to dispel. Christopher pia khushi a climate scientists at woods hole oceanographic institute the ocean. He says is way more complicated than a simple tub of water for example currents and winds change how high the water is in different places could think about the east coast of the us andrea. Dutton is a geographer at the university of florida. Off the east coast. There's a huge conveyor belt of water called the gulfstream because of climate change. It's slowing down as that current slows down. It spreads out to the sides. And there's no place for it to go. It pushes the water up at the coastline. That's helping you drive faster than average sea level rise long much of the east coast almost twice as fast as the global average. In some places it's happening especially fast from new jersey south not only because the ocean is rising but because the land itself is sinking and to understand why you have to go back to the last ice age when there were ice sheet a mile thick all the way down to long island. You have this massive weight sitting on the comments you can think of when you go to bed at night. You sit down on your mattress. What happens mattress sinks beneath you because of your weight but the area the edges of where you're sitting it actually bulges up slightly. During the ice age that happened to the land to kind of like a seesaw. Anywhere around the edge of that kind of got leeward up in the thousands of years since the bulge area has been relaxing that means the mid atlantic coast from new jersey down to north carolina is slowly sinking and lower. Land is effectively the same as higher water. The mid atlantic coast is one place that you hear about having more pronounced rates of sea level rise and that's one of the reasons because the land is sinking due to the pack as she has melton gone away land can also sync if humans pump out too much water or oil from underground. That's happened along. Parts of the gulf of mexico and in cities like and jakarta earthquakes can also cause land to rise or sink. That's happening along the west coast of the us. All of these factors contribute to how the extra water from melting ice affects the sea levels in specific places. And there's one more big thing happening. That's pushing water onto the land. The oceans are heating up as you heat up water. It expands warmer. Water takes up more space than cooler. Water and the average surface temperature of the oceans has increased about a degree in the last century. Which may not sound like a lot but water expands a lot even with a very small temperature chains that exacerbates level rise everywhere. It all adds up to wildly different experiences of sea level rise for people who live on different coastlines which means local communities are leaning heavily on scientists to help them understand. What's coming and to prepare for it. Rebecca hersher npr news. This message comes from npr sponsor capital one offering capital one shopping a downloadable browser extension that searches various sites for shoppers. What's in your wallet. More at capital one shopping dot com.

rebecca hersher Christopher pia khushi woods hole oceanographic insti atlantic coast Npr Dutton new jersey university of florida andrea east coast east coast us melton north carolina gulf of mexico jakarta Rebecca hersher npr news npr
6am Newscast

Houston Public Media Local Newscasts

03:17 min | 5 months ago

6am Newscast

"Live from news eighty, eight, seven in Houston. I'm Eddie Robinson more on Hurricane Delta. It's spinning across the Gulf of Mexico as a cat three storms you just heard on NPR news while the storm is expected to mostly impact Louisiana Yeezy eight seven Kyra Buckley tells us a hurricane warning has been issued for the Texas coast from High Island to Sabine Pass officials say. Galveston and the Boulevard Peninsula could see storm surge of one to three feet. Wind and rain is also a concern and here in Houston we are expected to see rain throughout the day and some areas east of I, forty five could be vulnerable to flooding the National Weather Service says, there could be significant impact from wind as well for the eastern Galveston. Bay Area. Cairo Buckley reporting. Yeah. Mainly a windy and rainy Friday today for our local area. The farther you go north and west the less of an impact from delta will be felt cloudy Breezy seventy six degrees right now near Hobby airport. In other news controversial plan to widen I forty five north is moving closer to reality but Gail delattre tells us some neighborhood groups are worried. There's not enough effort to get input from the public on the next steps. If the project goes forward in its current form hundreds of residents and businesses along I, forty, five north would have to relocate over the next thirty days textile will. Gather public comment on the final environmental impact Statement Textile District Engineer Elisa Paul says, the statement addresses some of the earlier comments received. If we does any new come as we definitely will look at that and we'll also take into consideration but Susan Graham with a group stop text I forty-five says she's worried not everyone will get worried about the project and they won't comment period extended. Time Time New Year to really. Stay. The project before we start to fallen that statement is online and people can also view it at tech stocks district offices. I'm gail to lottery in Houston for linked to the final environmental impact statement to learn how to comment you can go to Houston Public Media Dot Org. Are At at the University of, Houston. Has Opened a touch less convenience store floor Martin tells a students can shop with no scanning and no checkout line customers have to do is download a mobile APP. They can then grab whatever they want and walk out of the store without interacting with the cashier or scanning anything cameras pick up whatever you buy you h says it's the first existing store in the nation retrofitted with this autonomous checkout technology they. Say the plan is to convert more stores on campus in the next year flooring Martin with that report speaking of Uh College football and a long awaited season opener the cougars rolled past two, lane, forty, nine, thirty, one at TD stadium last night Houston played its first game some fifty three days after the start of fall camp due to three games being called off due to opponents is covert nineteen problems. Next Friday night. UH, slated to host Byu. More local news coming up at six thirty I'm Eddie rob support for NPR, comes from the corporation for public broadcasting a private corporation funded by the.

Houston Hurricane Delta Galveston NPR Eddie Robinson Gulf of Mexico Kyra Buckley Gail delattre Cairo Buckley hurricane Statement Textile District Susan Graham Sabine Pass High Island Louisiana Eddie rob Martin Texas Hobby airport Boulevard Peninsula
NPR News: 09-19-2020 10PM ET

NPR News Now

04:39 min | 5 months ago

NPR News: 09-19-2020 10PM ET

"Live from. NPR. News I'm Janine herbst at a campaign rally in Fayetteville North Carolina tonight president trump told the crowd. He plans to fill the vacancy left by the death of Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader GINSBURG. So article two of our Constitution says the president show nominate justices of the supreme. I don't think it can be any more clear candidate I don't think so. and. He says, he plans to nominate a woman for the opening next week. But says, he hasn't chosen anyone yet. Trump also mocked criticism from Republican Senator Susan Collins who said the Senate should wait until after the presidential election. said, previous presidents have filled vacancies on the court every single time ignoring the Republican controlled Senate's refusal to consider the 2016 nomination by former President Barack Obama of Merrick, garland ahead of the election meanwhile in to the death of Justice Ginsburg Democrats are donating a lot of money according to the democratic fundraising platform. Act Blue NPR's house. Mahala has more. It looks like they've raised more than thirty million dollars from nine pm last night until nine pm this morning. That's just an astounding amount of money at act lose democratic online fundraising site. So if there's anything that we can interpret. In that, it does seem to be that Democrats are energized and somewhat angry about what could potentially happen in the. Senate between now and Election Day and here's Oz Mahala president. Trump says, he's giving his blessing to a deal between Oracle Walmart and Tiktok for the US operations of the Chinese owned video APP. Tick Tock allowing it to continue to operate in the US he says the company is addressed US national security concerns ended the new company would be based in Texas. He has been targeting Tiktok a video APP popular with younger people as well as we chat another chinese-owned. APP. Forecast say is slow moving storm Fada is inching its way across the Gulf of Mexico toward the Texas coast Texas public radio's Brian Kirkpatrick reports coastal residents are preparing for high winds, heavy rain and flooding, but the exact location of landfall remains unclear. Galveston Galveston County officials issued voluntary evacuation orders ahead of tropical storm, Beta high tides, and ten inches of rain are expected to leave roads. Impassable forecasters were predicting up to four feet of storm surge along parts of the Texas coast that included Baffin Bay Corpus Christi Bay and Galveston Bay forecasters say Beta could leave up to twenty inches of rain in the Lake Charles Louisiana area. If it slows down Beta was in the Gulf of Mexico three, hundred five miles east southeast of Corpus Christi Texas on Saturday. It was moving at two miles per hour to the northwest a tropical storm warning in effect from Port Aransas Texas to enter coastal city Louisiana I'm Brian Kirkpatrick Antonio this is NPR In Thailand protesters installed a plaque in the field opposite the Grand Palace in. Bangkok. Inscribed with the message that Thailand belongs to the people and not the monarch. It was the latest challenge to the monarchy. After tens of thousands of people joined the biggest protest in years on Saturday calling for curves on the king's powers along taboo subject demonstrators say they will hand the king a letter with their demands. Protesters are also calling for new elections and a new constitution. Two of Canada's senior politicians and Ottawa have now tested positive for covid nineteen and carpenter reports both our leaders of opposition parties Erin O'Toole the newly elected leader of the official opposition Conservative Party confirmed his positive results after he and his family got tested for the corona virus earlier this week his family tested negative O'Toole says he's feeling well, but will remain in self-isolation also this week the leader. Of. The separatist bloc Becua- e Francois Blanchette entered self-isolation after testing positive staff members in the offices of both leaders are also isolating o'toole recently met with the Premier of Quebec Francois Ago who is now also self isolating covid nineteen cases have been trending upward in much of Canada. In recent weeks with some fearing, the country might be entering a second wave for NPR news. I'm Dan Carpet Chuck Toronto. The man who created the fabric. GORTEX? Has Died Robert Gore's breathable. Yet waterproof fabric revolutionized outerwear his discovery in one thousand, nine, sixty, nine lead to waterproof foot those readable raincoats, shoes and outerclothing he died in Delaware he was eighty three. This is NPR.

trump NPR president Justice Ruth Bader GINSBURG Senate Oz Mahala Gulf of Mexico Texas Erin O'Toole US Supreme Court NPR Blue NPR Tiktok Galveston County Janine herbst President Barack Obama Baffin Bay Corpus Christi Bay Galveston Bay Thailand
In the Loop: Understanding the Role of the Gulf Loop Current

Weather Geeks

39:35 min | 1 year ago

In the Loop: Understanding the Role of the Gulf Loop Current

"The effects of the Gulf current on tropical cyclone development and intensification is often a major focus for forecasters castors however this current has much broader impacts. Beat Pon tropical cyclones such as extra tropical cyclone development and even tornadoes. Today Day we welcome Dr Anthony. KNAPP director of the geochemical and Environmental Research Group at Texas Am University. He's also a member of the board of directors for the golf of research program in this episode. We'll explore current research being done to improve understanding and predict the skill of the loop current system. And it's Eddie's Dr Net will also discuss how his team at Texas A. and M. plans to increase observations of the loop current to aid in regional forecasting Dr Nap. Thank thank you for joining us on the weather. GEEKS PODCAST is a pleasure. This is going to be really interesting because as I was telling my colleagues here in the in the engineering room this the topic that I know a little bit about from my meteorological end as a as a meteorology professor myself. But there's so much that I'm eager to talk to you about but before we do that. I want to give a little context because one of the first places I really became aware of the loop. Current is during Hurricane Katrina back in two thousand five I I understand that there. There may have been some interplay between the loop current and Katrina in its intensification so let's start with a basic definition for our listeners. Of what the Gulf loop current Luke Luke. Current system is okay. Well the loop. Current is a a current body of water that moves up from the Caribbean and enters the Gulf of Mexico between the Yucatan Straight and The West End of Cuba. That's about two hundred kilometer of one hundred and forty mile a passage and that water moves through at an incredible rate The total in oceanography. We use a term cold as fair drip which is a million cubic meters of water moving past one point per second in this case the measurements suggests that it's about twenty eight million Sfeir drips and I guess to make it more easy for everybody that if you consider. Volkswagen is is about three cubic meters. It's about nine million Volkswagen's going past one point per second so it's a great deal of water. Wow that is quite a bit of water moving and it also leaves the Gulf of Mexico through the Florida Strait and then and then mixes with the Caribbean current becomes the Gulfstream. Now rather there are three phases of the loop one is extended and your point with Katrina. It was extended ended so hot water went all the way out almost to the coast of Louisiana. So that's one form. The second form is when it's retracted. So instead of moving up towards Louisiana it just moves across the coast northern coast of Cuba and then joins the Gulfstream and then the shedding and so this is when the extended part pinches off and that forms forms a loop as our Eddie and that Eddie moves from east to West and causes havoc with the oil and gas industry and many other things. If you want to kind of get a visual of this loop current system I just put in loop current system in your Google Earth in your browser and I think you'll find many examples of the system we were. I'm looking at one here from NASA and the University Corporation for Atmospheric Research UCAR. But I'm sure there are many others. 'CAUSE podcast audio format but I think it would be useful to Kinda Google along as you're listening here now. One of the things you mentioned and I want to stay with this moment. You mentioned a loop current system and you also mentioned the extension engine that impacted Katrina. I know that Hurricane Michael in two thousand eighteen which devastated parts of Florida Georgia in the southeast moved into this region I would. I would assume that the loop current may have played a role in hurricane. Michael these loop current waters You mentioned the Gulfstream. So they're anonymously warm as compared here to this sort of surrounding or ambient water. Yeah that's correct they you know. They contain a huge amount of heat. And what happened in two thousand and five with Katrina Wilma and Rita was the storms. Went over the loop. It takes very little area physical area to you. Take those storms up to category five. And that's what happened and also as you know as a as a meteorologist urologists that they can take heat from seventy five two meters One hundred meters down so in the old way of looking at hurricanes we used to think think that you know the surface temperature had to be twenty eight point five degrees centigrade or whatever it might and now what we're interested in far more is upper ocean heat content that where there's a lot of heat going down so at least seventy five meters in the case of Michael was a Eddie that it that Michael went over and that caused the intensification to Category Four. I'd like to contrast that that though with Hurricane Harvey which was very local local for Texas and Harvey Intensified to a four and much of that was due to the coastal heat that was available in the coast of Texas. It was very warm My group did a study of it. We just had a paper published in and Jr Jr Journal in in a in the US. Yes and so. It's interesting because I hadn't actually actually thought about the implications linkages in terms of Harvey as well but that was a more localized regional heat. But I wanted to start there. I WANNA candidate circle back now and tell the listeners. A bit more about you and your research. But I wanted to start with that discussion about Katrina and Michael just to give give the listener some context for why this loop current is so important in this loop current system and we're gonNA talk about other facets of whether as well but I wanted to make those linkages but before or do that let me just kind of set the stage on who Tony KNAPP is. He's the director of the geochemical and Environmental Research Group at Texas Am. University has a Bachelors Degree from Wisconsin State University a Master's in oceanography from University of Southampton and a PhD in Chemical Oceanography from the University of Southampton as well. Oh He's also a member of the National Academy of Science Gulf research permit FIS re-board In the Research Program Board as well as the national academy so he someone someone that knows the system well and as you already heard has a really good a way of talking about this so I always like to ask my guest on whether Geeks how did you get into becoming an ocean versus many of the meteorology guests that we have on here talk about becoming interested in fourth grade middle school have have you always been an ocean geek. I guess I have. My father operated some cargo ships and in that used to trade all around around the world. When I was a small kid I was instead of going to summer? Camp was shoved on a ship given chipping hammer or rag depending depending on whether my job was in the engine room or up in the up in the bridge sorrows very interested in science but I actually did pre med and after a a little bit I realized I would probably injure more people than like save so I switched to Oceanography and started with a masters in England. Thank you can and you can do a one year master's so I did my Bachelor's science in the United States I'm British as well so I went to England did a one year master's astor's then stayed on. I did a very nice and I found that interesting because I yeah it's always important listeners to realize what your strengths and weaknesses are sometimes early and it sounds like that was the case with you in terms of your premed realization there now. The National Academy of Sciences received a five hundred million dollars to create the Gulf research program. And I would like to sort of know for myself and I'm sure the listeners would be interested as well. What is this this Gulf research program? But before you do that Tony could you tell the listeners. What the National Academy of Sciences are because we go both of us know but people listening to the podcast may not know so? The National Academy of Sciences was founded in eighteen. Sixty three by President Lincoln as an independent advisory board for the government. It's not a government agency as complete the independent and as a result they have done studies on many things. There now is not just the National Academy of Sciences is also the National Academy of Engineering and the National Academy of Medicine and so they're called ASEM or nays them If with all three together but they're independent they carry out studies on many things They'll get a expert panel together and study You know what are these cases. It was the Gulf fluke current and the predictability of it but they do things from supercomputers to engineering too many things. But it's a very well known organization if anyone has ever in Washington DC. You should certainly go in and visit the building. It's at such a the beautiful building Along Constitution Avenue and It's been there for a very long time. Yeah I've had the pleasure of serving on a couple of National Academy St Expert Spurts Study Committees and have visited that very beautiful building as well as their newer building over. Closer to the Verizon our guest. I don't think it's derived whatever the basketball arena Rina's correct actually. I have a newer facility as well. Now tell us about the Gulf research for I understand. It may have some origins in the BP oil spill bill in two thousand ten which I know that BP was required to pay a penalty of more than twenty point eight billion dollars making it the largest environmental damage damage settlement in history. So is there a connection here to the Gulf Research Berber. Yes in fact. There were a number of things with that twenty point eight billion dollars that was used and five hundred million of it went to create the Gulf research program and as they wanted it to last a very long time in this case thirty year endowment the word many organizations that they felt could manage this for that long a period and be completely independent. So that's when the national academy were are provided with that with that money and then they they managed it over that period of time very nice and so how did you get involved with the program. Well I was I was. I'm actually just to clarify. I'm now off the board you Ta- you do three year term so I would somehow I was selected and there's a board of twenty two members made up of in my view fascinating people and I guess as you know in the studies you've been involved with with the National Academy. They attracts a very interesting eclectic group of very brilliant people I was you know. I don't think I've ever been around around. A group of twenty one very smart people can't really figure out why I got selected but I did and I really enjoyed my time there and The beauty not about the Gulf Research Board and the whole program is five. Hundred million dollars is a lot of money and the whole aim aim is to use it to benefit Gulf communities and the Gulf ecosystems and to tackle oil system safety human health and environmental resources. So it's that's a big re-met and With experts in various fields One has expertise to be able to decide how you going to Steward this large amount of money and five hundred million dollars. Also Makes interest list as well so the total amount of money available for this program of thirty years is going to be very substantial. There were other things that were started. There was one one called the Gulf of Mexico Research Initiative which was also given a ten million dollars but their remit was to end in ten years and this is the last year that program. There are a number of excellent studies that were done by what is called Gumri Gumri in the NAS EM Board Board and research program worked together on a number of things so it's not just an isolated use of the money and we are back on the weather geeks. PODCAST I am Dr Marshall Shepherd from the University of Georgia. And I'm speaking with Dr Tony KNAPP. WHO's the director of the geochemical in environmental research group at Texas? And we're talking about the Gulf loop current that may be something that is a bit new to you if if you're a regular listener to earth you're popping in the weather geeks and that's what we do here. We're going to break it down for you. Talk about why it's relevant to weather and climate. So I wanNA talk a little bit more talked about some of the waist the loop current and Luke current system have impacted hurricanes like Katrina and Michael. There is some sort of speculation or perhaps even research that suggests adjusted the loop. Current system is tied to mid latitude cyclones in even tornadoes and storms. Can you make those connections or is that that bogus the I. I don't know whether it's bogus or not I. I tend to I so one of the things I did. When I was in Bermuda my previous life I started a long time series in in Bermuda which is going out measuring the deep ocean Every month and in some cases every two weeks and so we now we have thirty two years of data and with that you can make predictions about what's important how the oceans changing over time. I think one of the problems is that in the Gulf of Mexico. We have very little long-term data programs especially in the deep ocean and that that to me is a is a is a shame and it's a bit of a loss the day you don't start a long time series in my view is a day lost so the you know the the climate is going through. Many changes We have a perturbed cycle Of but you still have the heating and cooling of of winter and summer and so to be able to see changes in the cycles. You actually need a lot more data than I believe. We have present so I can't really I don't have a view. I don't have information on that You're Otieno meteorologist so perhaps you do. But but I don't I think I don't think there's enough data to be able to determine that yet again. That was something. That's fairly new to me. As a meteorologist I certainly am aware of the tropical cycle genesis and intensification linkages but I certainly could understand typically mid latitude cyclones and Those storms often have frontal systems that can produce tornadoes They form in areas of what we in Meteorology Call Barracuda areas where we have gradients in temperature and so we often see for example off the coast of the Carolinas. We often see a formation zone for cyclones Because of the Gulfstream in the gradient in temperature there and so I imagine that this the notion is related to whether these glue current systems are creating sort of gradients that support what we in meteorology costs Cyclo genesis or the formation formation of cyclones. So an interesting discussion here along the same lines and perhaps Again may not be an area of your expertise but are there any impacts from your Lens of climate change and the loop current system. Well you know that that's always a subject of of great interest but as I say this Relatively little data in the in the deep oceans to be able to to tell whether that that actually is the case I mean we certainly know that the oceans are warming and You know that's something that is true right. It's no but but the question of what that warming is doing and how that affects the loop current at this stage. We don't really know. And I'd like to state the there have been many many good studies on the loop current and but the problem is they have not been sustained. They they you know maybe a study two or three years was done and not sustain what the Academy report that has been recently published published suggests that there should be a ten year campaign so we can really understand the loop the loop forms and and the the timing of it is anywhere from say ten to fourteen months so you don't get many shots over three a period an Anna over ten years you know you might get four or five opportunities to test with measurement what is going on why the loop separates. This isn't important. I you know I want to kind of deviate a bit here from the topic to just talk about science because we're we're to scientists and I think the public coffin may not know the full lens of how science is done and how we achieve and gain knowledge and moved science forward. One way that we do it is through studies and grants and whatnot. What not to scientists at universities and NGOs and perhaps even private corporations but one of the aspects of much of the physical sciences work whether we're talking meteorology oceanography? Your climate is the need for long-term observations. Now Tony for example. I spent a good part of my career before coming to the University of Georgia Reja at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center working on large satellite missions to measure rainfall from space. And one of the reasons we did that as we want it long term trends an rainfall around the globe so we understand changes to the water cycle changes in precipitation intensity and we are now up to a fairly significant sort of record We launched a couple of satellites in nineteen ninety eight and several years later. We're starting the bill that long-term record and I hear you saying that. We need similar. long-term longterm records in the Gulf of Mexico studied the Gulf Gulf loop current which brings me. I guess to your understanding Gulf Systems. Grant Tell us a little bit about this grant. I and I really want to dive into it because your specific grand. This is a system of eight projects. I understand totaling ten point three million dollars but your particular part of the the project addict is a passive Gulf of Mexico loop current observations from high frequency radar. So tell us a little bit about that overarching project and in your specific diffic- research okay so the The understanding the Gulf systems grants which you also known as you Gos- one there were thirty one proposals and they funded eight projects And the whole goal was support research and observation for To improve proved the understanding of the loop and one of the things. That's really interesting. And what we have is about one hundred eighty Radars around the United States. These radars are high frequency. Radars about five megahertz there her They have a transmit antenna and a receive antenna and they basically just bounce a signal off surface waves. They can look at about a hundred and eighty miles one hundred and eighty kilometers. I'm sorry about a hundred and thirty miles and and get information. Nation on current speed and direction one of the interesting aspects of this. Is that in order to expand our ocean observations nations and really understand the loop we need some idea of the current speeds direction excetera on the inflow. That's the water going in between the Yucatan Straight and Cuba and the outflow through the Florida Straits between Florida and and Cuba uh-huh what's called the Cuban Straits but never mind and And so there's been a strategy and my group. We formed into a an association. Called the loop consortium and that consists of Texas am. I Am University Rutgers University Miami University of Southern Mississippi and USF which is University of south. Florida we he put proposals with a similar data system to put radars number one on oil platforms. which is a subject in its own right number? Two two on the Dry Tour tougas in the Florida Straits looking south and then my group would pudding radars radars. A on in Mexico on the place called and Puerta Morales which is in the north life part of the town peninsula and those are going to look across the strait and our hope actually. And we've been working with the Department of Meteorology in. Cuba is to put one radar in Cuba looking west to meet up with the radars in Mexico and another eight hour and Vada looking north to complete a whole program of of Surface measurements in that area We have intentions with rutgers to move all the way down into the Caribbean and then supplement that with a a program of gliders or were underwater drones that we own that that's very interesting. Interestingly those underwater drones we had some colleagues from my university the skidway institute that are using gliders gliders to look at ocean heat content in hurricanes so so we've actually whether listeners should be familiar with the concept of these underwater robotic body gliders. I want to circle back to your radar because I I have some familiarity with radar because Some of my earlier Graduate Training Within Radar Meteorology at Florida state and typically in weather. We use what we call see band or s band radar so they're usually five or ten centimeter radars To sort a probe the the precipitating systems storms etc.. You mentioned that these are fairly high frequency radars. I WanNa Kinda stay. Stay there for a moment just to do a little radar meteorology for the weather geeks listeners. Here so you talked in terms of frequency and I was talking in terms of wavelength but these systems systems are much higher frequency than the types of typical weather. Radars is that correct. Well that's correct. That's why understanding I'm not a A radar expert at any way. I use these tools to Measure currents and look at at ocean systems but they are much higher frequency. There are a number of types of radars. You're listening to spy. Be Interested to know there are. There are raiders which are known as we're as which consist the number of antennas about fourteen to sixteen antennas and it my background to try to get permission to putting radar Dr a beach. They have to be within about one hundred fifty yards of the beach and they have to be the two antennas have to be about two hundred feet apart and To get permission is difficult so luckily I haven't had to try to get permission for sixteen sixteen antennas but only To these radars with two are called coders and though the most used radars around the united added states. There's a whole network of these and we have five in Texas. Where putting in our last one in the king ranch? So we'll have the whole of the Texas coast completely covered and we are back on the weather geeks podcast. I'm Dr Marshall Shepherd At with a fascinating discussion about some things that may not have been in your wheelhouse of understanding before you decided to tune into this podcast today. But that's the point of a podcast right We're we're exploring new things learning new things and I'm learning right along with all of the listeners. Today with Tony KNAPP. The director of the Geochemical Environmental Research Group at Texas AM and. I WANNA stay with your project here because it's just so many other questions I have about them that you you mentioned that you're going to be deploying your radars down near the Yucatan peninsula. Well I know. A lot of people are familiar with that area. Because they've vacation down there in Cancun or cozumel will there be opportunities or necessity to perform any type of dual doppler synthesis to fully. And I think you may have alluded to this a little bit again. We used tool doppler technique than weather as well. We can use dual doppler radar art to actually see the motion in clouds and perhaps detect motions associated with rotating updraft storms or perhaps even a tornado vortex signature Do you use these dual doppler techniques in ocean. Current mapping as. Well what we do. Not What we we use these. You know these linked radars and in the case of if you look at the east coast of the United States Rutgers operate a network of about twenty eight of these that are different frequencies The higher ones like twenty. Eight megahertz are very focused and like if the interests of the Chesapeake Bay. You can see a very very fine resolution of currents the ones we're looking at our our interest is to really look out At least one hundred and eighty kilometers off the coast and look at Eddie's and other things that occur at the surface they one thing I should add is these radars a incredibly useful for search and rescue If bogus down someone goes in the water. You could put an artificial drogue drogue assay someone one hundred eighty pounds whatever height and it will model where that person should be and generally generally. It's it reduces the search pattern required. Define that person to forty percent of what will be done with a normal ocean model. So they're they're coming into their own even though there are technology that's been around for a very long time. Of course. The software is is better that I used to be and linking up all of these around the US coast gives us a terrific Observation Capability very very interesting. Thank you for adding that I actually could bit of nugget for our listeners. Here I WANNA Kinda pose a question about timelines. We're are you in the project in terms of your timelines we're we're behind. Wouldn't that dismiss science. We know that well the finest I I certainly understand so so one of the one of the issues that we are challenge and there's another challenge with the radars on platforms on oil platforms. So that's another challenge but our challenge has been you know. We're working with colleagues in Mexico and Rules in different countries are different such as licensing etc.. So we're going through a a longer process than you probably would happen if for the United States but you know that's just typical and we're hoping that these sores. The timeline goes that these radars radars will be operating for a long time. One of the You know there are some radars. The Rutgers operate that are twenty two years old. That's not ideally not like to replace a bit ten years but the point is that once you put these in. They operate for very long time with very little maintenance and so the running costs. It's a quite low compared to the acquisition costs so the acquisition cost of a radar is about two hundred twenty five thousand dollars each and you have to to have a pair. So that's four hundred and fifty but if you amortize that over ten years or twenty years that's not a huge amount of money compared to say a glider which is actually the same amount of money but the running costs are very expensive in this case. The running costs. Not The data are are Go into scripts university in San Diego and that data then served publicly. So you can look on if if you go to a Jacuzzi which is a just Google A. C. O. S. site which is the Gulf coastal Russian observing system. You have a great depiction of these radars. In real time you can see our Texas radars and the other radars that are in this network of people a US them off to if they're gonNA go fishing or whatever to see what the currents are etc.. It's their remarkable tool and it's free very interesting now. I am curious as a satellite person. I look as I mentioned. I spent a good deal of my career. NASA cannot in there any ways east to make some of these similar type measurements. That you're doing sort of from the radar perspective and from Remotely since perspective from space. Well I'm I'm not a satellite person. We use satellites Continuously to look at Sea surface height because when the water and the water is warmer. As you probably know I used to when I was in Bermuda used to race the Bermuda race all the time and you actually go up hill when you get to the Gulfstream because it's about a meter three feet higher than the water around it because the temperature the ocean expands so this is the whole issue with global global climate change and one of the tools we have to determine where the loop is is satellite measurements because the water is warm. It's much higher the water around it and you can You can actually see where the loop is going or is more or less in real time so the you know the radars are part of an Arrow in a quiver. Okay satellites are another. Booties or another. And there are many Other observations and systems that we use to get a bigger picture of everything sort of like the way a a doctor would diagnose the disease. He's a person from blood tests x rays to whatever and so We use all tools at our disposal to be able to determine and what is happening with system our problem though as I mentioned earlier is the predictability of the difficulty of predicting taking the the loop and the formation of eddies and oil and gas companies are so interested in this because they actually have to stop operating operating when a when a large eddy goes by because at strums pipe you know you can get four four and a half knots of of speed. We can certainly affect the safety of drilling. Yeah I could. I could certainly see how that would be a challenge for those types of operations. No my producers actually had a note here and they wanted me to ask if you can speak to this and if you can't we'll move on but there was an interest in knowing how to loop current system effects Things like red tide dead zones. I know these are played the Gulf ecosystem in recent years with a dead zones very large record dead zones. Are there any relationships between Luke. Current current system dynamics in these dead zone red tide events. Well those you know. This is the The loop and it's as-associated associated at ease is really the dominant physical force in the Gulf of Mexico. If you look at say the outflow from the Mississippi I spoke about fair drips outflow from the Mississippi is about point. Zero two sphere drips and the loop is twenty eight so so the even even though you know we think of the Mississippi is an important force and it is costly as far as the energetics of the Gulf of Mexico. The loop is is important and when the loop penetrates the shelf the area near the coast Water that's rich in nutrients trance which is down In the lower part is up weld and that forms primary productivity. which is I guess? A long term lauhgter for fighter plankton growth which affects the little zooplankton that feed on that and the fish feed on that. So it's incredibly really important for sustainability of fisheries and also mixing water being the the The Harmful Algal blooms for example. There's been a study which was sponsored by the National Center for Coastal Science suggests that the the the position of the loop in early summer can predict the position of And severity of red tie blooms in the fall. And I don't know I don't know that. Study for Stan. I just no all of it and also as you know the the The Mississippi this giant amount of freshwater Schwaiger entering the Gulf is full of nutrients and that nutrients is partially responsible for The the the lack of oxygen or Hypoxia. And as that that it's also responsible because it prevents mixing so if if you have a freshwater layer on top of salt you stop Gases being transferred between the two and obviously an eddy or the loop itself is going to cause a lot more energetic a mix up sooner so you know everything is connected. That's that's the beauty about the Mexico and everywhere else you know. We haven't even mentioned what happens in Mexico and Mexico waters off Cuba so we have a one Gulf that we have to study at absolute debt. Definitely dill image demonstrates the interconnectedness of all aspects. Fix of the Earth System. Final question. Because we're kind of running short on time. I wanted to get your thoughts on. What are some of the other areas of research that need to be focused on in the Gulf? That aren't right now. From Your Lynn's well I sort of mentioned earlier that I think we need some long time series studies studies in deep water. There is one that has started recently. Funded by Shell with a partnership with is public Private Private Partnership so grow which are a Meta Ocean. Company company does a lot of work commercially on Meteorology and oceans for are willing gas companies so shell Fu grow the university southern Mississippi and our group Texas A and M University have a mooring at the the stones a site which is a production. Well in three thousand meters of water and that sort of the start and I think you know what we need is is more of these private public partnerships because the only gas companies. The data We all scientists need need to know what is going on in the Gulf of Mexico and the public in in the end. It's all about the people that live on the Gulf use. The Gulf eat the the seafood fish in it and and have their recreation. I mean is very important. The Gulf is well taken care of and that stewardship could only be done with good high-quality reproducible. Science is there any way if someone was listening to this podcast today and just really got jazzed about it and wants to find out more information as our website or any social media sites. You can point is to the one I would recommend is that of the Number when you can go to our website which is G. E. R. G. Dot Tamou Dot. Edu We run a whole series of bullies and gliders off the Texas Shelf and you can see that in fact you want to go fishing offshore. I recommend you look up. Our booties in real time. And before you got with two large distances have a look and see what the wave heightened weather is out there and the other one is g coups which is the Gulf coastal title ocean observing system and much of what I've spoken about is available. They're they're cheetos and other things that are available. What I would highly recommend using that Chiku site? This has been a fascinating discussion. And I knew I would learn some things because this is a new area of topical for me into into. I Really WanNa thank Tony Nap from Texas and for joining us on the weather geeks. podcast thank you so much for explaining the loop current and telling us about your exciting research research. I agree. We need those long term measurements. That's critical to understanding change. Dynamics Tony Thank you so much for joining us very welcome. Thank you for the time. This has been Dr Marshall Shepard. I'm from the University of Georgia. We're listening to the weather geeks. podcast continue to tune in remember. We released a new episode. Every Wednesday share to follow us on facebook and Mike is on twitter as well are are and Mike on Twitter or facebook. You know what I mean. Keep following this on social media. See next week on whether they do uh-huh.

Gulf Texas Mexico Dr Tony KNAPP United States director Cuba Eddie National Academy NASA Environmental Research Group University of Georgia Yucatan Katrina Gulf Caribbean Gulf of Mexico Research Initia Mississippi National Academy of Sciences
Episode 170  Are you willing to communicate?

Organizational Success Strategies with Business Consultant and Corporate Trainer Dawn Shuler

13:35 min | 3 months ago

Episode 170 Are you willing to communicate?

"This is dawn. Schuler certified trainer and business consultant at the shooter group with people. Thrived companies thrive podcasts. For almost all my twenty years and business that you cannot over communicate with me there will not be a time where when someone gives me an update that will say. I didn't need to know that. I like to be informed. I like to know what's going on. I don't want to have to guess. I do not want to have to chase you. I want to know things are being handled. The best way to do that is to communicate with me whether you are a staff member whether you're a vendor and even whether you're a client you cannot over communicate with me. I've recorded several episodes about my dissatisfaction with companies and organizations who do not communicate well and i do have to chase them. Which is very frustrating. Today i want to call out some examples of companies who do a great job of communicating. So i have this podcast. You're listening to it. There's a lot of work that goes on behind the scenes so that you can listen to what you're listening to. I have a team who helps make this possible. Somebody does the audio editing. somebody creates the artwork. Somebody gets it published and out there in the world somebody else helps promote it. I do have a team. It's awesome and i just received this email from my account manager. Who said just to let you know. There are some weather issues going on in the vicinity. Were most of your team is located if you have a podcast. You're a podcasting client. Here's what this means for you if you are lincoln client. Here's what this means for you if you are a social media client. Here's what this means for you so as a client. I can go find where i fit in and what it means for me. In some cases it was. You probably won't be affected much at all and other cases it was yes. You will probably see som- downtime. Because of loss of electricity et cetera. And if that does happen then here's what we are going to do about it. We are going to bring on extra support staff to supplement. Whatever can't be done by the original main team first of all. I didn't know that there were weather issues. And secondly i was really glad i had that heads up. Maybe there would be delays in my service. Maybe there would not. Paul is most important is that they communicated this ahead of time. I didn't have to chase anybody saying will what happened to the publication processing timeline for such such podcast episodes. I haven't heard anything. They initiated the communication as well as. And here's how we're going to respond so three things one. Here's the information to this is how it affects you three. And here's what we're going to do about it. If i wasn't already absolutely thrilled with the service. I've been getting you know i am so over the moon because we go back to. You cannot over communicate with me now. Some organizations may feel like. Oh well we. We don't want to tell them that there might be a problem. Because if there's no problem then why would we say there might be a problem. That could make them have less confidence in us and painting won't want to work with us and and maybe they'll start to worry that we can't meet their needs fear based. I don't see it that way i don't see. Oh no did. I choose the wrong team. The wrong service to help me with this quite the opposite. This is just reinforced. My decision to work with this particular organization. I remember years ago. The web hosting company who hosted a major client. That i was chief operating officer for said there are major storms headed toward the gulf of mexico. They were located in houston texas. Her server farms are in houston. We are taking precautions. We are moving them to a more secure location. We are also doing triple and quadruple. Backups of the data. So we anticipate there will be no problems with your website your email and your data that we are hosting now. I remember thinking. I had no idea that the server farm was in houston lied. I had no idea and i felt very comforted that they were taking these extra stops to make sure that my information or the company i was working for their information was safe. Secure taking precautions again. That only reinforced my confidence that this wasn't organization. I wanted to continue to use to meet my service needs. So now i turn this to you and your organization. Where can you be communicating more. Where might there be service. Outages or product delivery dropouts. That might behoove you to communicate before time. Even if it's just a precaution maybe nothing will happen. An by communicating to your customers and your clients that here's a possible scenario and here is what we are doing to take measures to make sure everything we do for. You is safe and secure covid. Nineteen hit earlier this year. I have a podcast episode. That said you have to communicate with your people you to acknowledge this and you have to acknowledge what they can expect from you as an organization whether you are service product nonprofit donor. It doesn't matter you must communicate yes. Cove nineteen was off the charts as an unexpected to say the least situation with huge ramifications as we have since found out of course we did not know at that time that the ramifications would be as long lasting as they were but at least communicate looking ahead with the recent election and the surge of mail in ballots. That's going to slow down postal delivery times. If you're particular or depends upon product delivery you might want to preemptively send something out to your customers saying because of the upsurge in age of the united states postal office you may see some delays in receiving the product to ordered. Please know that we are doing our best to mitigate this and get you you're product as quickly as possible. I'm not asking you to try to foretell the future. What i'm asking you is to look at what's going on now that it might if it's not an absolute certainty already that whatever's going on might impact your service and product delivery. Can you be proactive and communicate with your customers. Your clients your community if an organization does not do that. I think it's for two reasons one. It's fear based because they're afraid by showing what they see is may be a weakness that then they will lose customers and clients. I believe that's false. As i've shown in the examples i've given you letting me know that there might be an impact to my service only reinforces the fact that i'm dealing with a company that has integrity the second reason that organization might not communicate is because they just don't care or they don't think they're onto the next thing they're actually not committed to communicating with their community and their community is made up of peers vendors customers clients in my mind that communication effort should be number one priority. It should be. The question asked at every executive meeting. Is this something. We need to communicate. And of course we go into is something that needs to be communicated to the rest of the organization. Is this something that needs to be. Communicated to our stakeholders. Is this something that needs to be. Communicated to our clients and customers is something that needs to be communicated to the public in general. That should always be the driving force with whatever situation is going on. Do you communicate more importantly are you willing to make a commitment to communicate until next time. May you thrive.

Schuler houston twenty years lincoln gulf of mexico Paul texas Cove united states
Jim Gossen  Good Steward and Ambassador for Gulf Seafood Industry

Discover Lafayette

57:22 min | 1 year ago

Jim Gossen Good Steward and Ambassador for Gulf Seafood Industry

"This is John Swift and you're listening to discover Lafayette a podcast dedicated to the personal touch of a community bank please visit Iberia Bank Dot Com for more information our guest today is Lafayette Native Jim Goson southern living's heroes of the new South awards and is one of Cooking Lights Twenty Food Heroes in America today we get to learn about the importance of the Gulf seafood industry and how important it is to our culture in lifestyle jim welcome discover Lafayette here and Being Lafayette I know I know so are solutions dot com I'd like to also thank Iberia Bank for its support of discover Lafayette founded in eighteen eighty seven Iberia Bank is the largest bank aboard until his recent retirement. Jim is a recipient of the Environmental Protection Agency's Gulf Guardian Award my tables legends of the industry based in Louisiana and is headquartered right here in Lafayette with three hundred twenty five combined locations throughout the south they offer the resources of a national bank with the president of the Board of the Gulf Seafood Foundation Gem is an industry leader for the recovery and improved sustainability of the Gulf of Mexico seafood industry little disclaimer. We are neighbors you also live in Houston but we live right by the oil center and it's kind of a block forgotten so chance for businesses of all sizes raiders motto. Is You just want it to work we understand if you're wondering if writer can help your business please visit rate his career in the restaurant seafood processing manufacturing and distribution business began in one thousand nine hundred seventy two when he began selling Gulf seafood out of a pickup Oregon city and I was asked about similar landry's to go check on a restaurant that was up police in Morgan city this was the genesis of the business that would turn into Louisiana foods a global seafood purveyor that he sold the Cisco in two thousand twelve and we're where he served as chairman eighteen seventy five and let's back up from there because I want to get you to talk a little bit when you started and the reason I mentioned in the intro about the hard and of course been Houston forty something years I moved there at seventy five yeah you've got a fascinating history in it did I went and looked at the building it was seven hundred fifty dollars off back then oh gosh and Don Landry said well if you and I had no intention to get back into that worked in high school and College should dawn seafood downtown and really didn't have the attention to go into the rest for businesses Oh yeah in fact about my dad's house after he died from the family and spending more time here now that I'm semi re- nineteen th I moved to Morgan City I think I was twenty three and then by the time we open I just turned twenty four and moved to Houston and art right here though you graduated from U. L. U. S. L. Yes for you nineteen seventy-one and I was working in in and out pickup truck you were actually delivering you were picking up buying and picking up and delivering Gulf seafood right to make this high quality come and work with you could have stop well that changed everything yeah maybe you be interested in trump is she got into that and and basically two things shrimp and red snapper and we would sell ourselves we had a little company we call Oh creole foods and we would sell to some of the other dawns and just pick it up at the dock and go run into the restaurant and in my little better price and to be able to go pick out what we wanted on the dock and of course when we moved to Houston we realized to be able to get that so you brought Louisiana seafood than when you moved to Houston I mean that you were really bringing in Louisiana bringing in fact we were the first and other things that we we changed the name from Creole Food Sy- Louisiana boots can you didn't know what Creole Matt Right Right and so you go twice a week though I mean you really a road warrior yeah a and when we started that we we didn't have any intentions basically what to do crawfish in Houston and boiled crawfish and eight to fe and all that we also brought community coffee there it wasn't Mayor Orleans and down to the mouth of the river picking up oysters box root beer when barks owned it community beans beans yeah and and by being on the truck and looking at what I was buying and of course I've made relationships with people because you're the the floyd still in in in the record business and has floyd's in and around Houston Billy unfortunately died of cancer and when we would pick it up lied Nama French bread I bought a tractor trailer truck in one thousand nine hundred seventy eight and I was driving it myself twice a week back and forth burrows down in I guess gramercy down that area pick up on dewey sausage none of that was available in Houston at the time so you were driving from here but based in Houston you like I said earlier you were really supplying Louisiana Seafood to Texas we were supplied so basically you know catfish frog legs shrimp crab meat raw speckled trout flounder catfish and your company Louisiana Foods because that's really at from what I understand the crux that was your your big business and how did that evolve over the years because you were due today I mean you go to any steakhouse ever crab cake they didn't have that back then you know and they have items that when I first started I had nine items and we had some other partners in some other restaurant but yeah it was reading Magnolia Bar and Grill Jimmy will landry's and Willie Jays yeah yeah the time that part trying to build easy food and of course started with three trucks and I think we had like fifty waitering which we do a lot of oil related catering right right well can you talk about the growth to Houston Texas and to the cowboys they were cowboys they just didn't eat salmon was not available we really when we open the restaurants we really had probably if I do it again I'd have had just one name but looking double its farm race it's consistent you could put it on a menu and you'll know the price is going to be pretty consistent and you know you gotTa have it every day old landrace and Willie g tillman fatigue which now is Landry's and so I spent most of my attack us in fact some of what we did I try to fill up the tractor trailer truck to pay for the freight you know and dimming learning it being on the trucks being salesman so you've seen him at collectors everything you've seen the industry change though because back then guy buying it and you're the guy selling it so see reporters Landry's border to Bill Landry Ford Landry when we first opened up and try to sell to some other my friends in Houston and we in nineteen eighty late eighties we and started producing farm raised salmon we started selling it now probably samant companies number one selling fish in volume wow because it's available and it's a perceived high quality fish yeah healthy right but halibut you we couldn't fly food I mean people didn't eat squid here people didn't eat You know octopus here you know when I grew up you know if I would've tried to sell salmon there to run me out of Houston really well just wasn't available at Kabul was one of the first people to bring in Norwegian salmon sermon me so it was just like not knowing the business just being at it and being involved I know in the eighties there weren't limits right. The industry has changed dramatically they had yeah they didn't have limited probably didn't have the the demand for seafood as the rush that were we would always eat in the past now they're only available to I guess recreational fishermen lied Nama French bread and then of course as you on Dewey sausage and we'd go to back on it but we didn't WanNa have to where we have a chain of where we had to do everything the same each one will want to have a little still have one rush Amino Wild Salmon was not marketed outside of the North West and of course when the Norwegian any kind of new product they will willing to try it and if the consumer bought it that was great keep buying it and before we started go in nature I mean if we couldn't get it on the truck we didn't get it you know pretty much in that time now we can get fish from all over the world if chains this chefs became more competitive with each other and trying to bring in different items in different and if you brought the podcast you brought up something interesting and it brought back memories of delicious dishes that are probably haven't had in a long time you were talking about speckled trout and how some of the fence impacted your business impacted the industry greatly where you know a guy that has adopted buys fish every time he takes had to have the relationship with the people who are buying for right and basically I didn't know what I was doing so I had to learn my way Ed fish after Paul Prom he took an underutilized species that really no one eight I think we sold a million pounds total in the state that away from him you taking Gross revenue away from him and as you take the revenue away from you take his profits away so if he can't it retrospect take it said okay we get allow this much to be harvested for the consumer that dead fish half Jimmy Johns and you're in near the airport in Houston and a catering company with an he sent in Houston Coal Louisiana said we gotTa Stop Commercial Fishing Trout and red fish and which is going to be recreation I remember that yeah and you know which they should have family owned they come into the doctor self they've there and we'd Never Brealey bought when you start getting into selling seafood I guess it was in the eighties they they against concerned that they will overfishing the commercial fisheries overfishing speckled trout of red fish and lacking but he he did a black and red fish more to help an underutilized species and no one could have imagined anything back there the the airlines didn't want anything that could leak on the plane and mess up any other freight that they had so we had the food like we did we need all different sizes shrimp we needed pack to certain way and so we bought from the the processing plant how many there are now how many fishermen especially in the Zenana but these are small businessman that are living pretty much off the land and things the husbands fishing and the wife is running the business let me tell you if the wife didn't like you you didn't get fish really if you didn't pay bill or you didn't do we so mom and pop businesses there no big industrial like the northeast in the northwest and Alaska there's no big big operations is we'll get it they'll I sit down and you'll buy from them and go pick it up well back in God I remember the and that's what the consumer would buy what's been interesting for me getting to know your story jam is that over the years you've become known so you know you can get fish from Australia within a couple of days of being out of the water search it's completely changed and people used to eating all types of oil spill in particular you use established a foundation that was a precursor of the Gulf Seafood Foundation because they were devastated for your conservation efforts for your stewardship of the industry and from what you're saying here this is I don't know collectively they have a voice because people like you but individually they probably don't know how to get the word out when they need help and I know after the beep was driving my mother you say why do you want to do that because I can't get anybody else to do it right I can relate and really it was building business to protect that industry because it evolves tourism boats and all that but they had a bigger lobby have happened that have impacted their livelihoods and I know you've been concerned about protecting and sustaining this industry because a lot of them take off and went worldwide and everybody wanted red fish said it was no control over it and so all of a sudden that's been my not to take away from anything from the recreation Oh that's a big industry and we need it in understand yeah but we also and more more fishing you know recreational fishermen is a big industry and we really need to you know he would maybe run crabs over his doc he was getting speckled trout over his dog he was getting redfish over there they make so much a pound basically the but we have more than just the industry it's a culture of what we have down here in South Louisiana and the Gulf that that started their grandfather was in the business and as it got further along where they had more and more restrictions I remember that I used to lobby back then that was big news they were all over the commercial fisherman I it's all most of the businesses on the Gulf coast not really for aquaculture and I'm involved a little bit with chocolate culture which was an e it's and they had everything either way you buy Peo- shrimp or head on trip or a certain size certain counts oh so I mean I used to run up and down from Naples to Brownsville on the Gulf coast and it's all the same it's it's small family businesses easier thing to start because you can't there's nothing you could find negative about growing oysters an uncle culture when you use that term you're talking about farm like fish would be willing to pay so I know that you believe that I know that most of the Fishman aren't paid much and if we want to eat our own food own grown food we have to think about we can't just keep and I'm sure they they heard every year with less and less shrimp with all that fresh water they came down to Mississippi which there's really no way to in the commercial and I always thought well you know we have to keep enough seafood for people to be able to what they have and the importance of this local industry you know yeah I mean it's tough to compete tough to compete go to supply the demand worldwide we don't have enough fish we don't have any big processing plants other than shrimp I mean most of them are just trying to make a living yeah they don't have time to go it's not like a company big enough to have a lobbyist she really ran the benching without their normally doing You know everybody. Most of the shrimp boats are fast trump from Bahia Ecuador we by Ecuador in trump. You know we by Indian shrimp we so I don't think it would hurt our fishery that we had aquaculture would just make it more valuable because some people that appreciate while caught assisted living you because believe you me if you don't have a lobbyist you not represented the last person represented and look at it differently and also by growing our own seafood and helping the fishermen I had a I was talking to take but if it was not catfish or tranquil trout flounder that would just need it you know with the taste and is it worth more money to buy American products that you know that has certain restrictions on the fishing of it or and they had to have management and but they just shut it down they just shut it down in the lobby was bigger on the recreational side in the fishermen and I've said that we can't compete on price we have to compete on quality so how do we focus on improving our quality of what we can ah treating a product like it's a premium product not trying to compete on price because we'll never compete with China can just keep lowering the price so we have to attenuating to do what we've been doing right and whether it's going to be offshore aquaculture we were not beaten salmon today if there was an aquaculture because watch whether it be slow you know less drag times in the Gulf or you're putting less sulfites on anything area Louisiana Shrimp Alabama sure if it's all go shrimp but maybe we need to rethink of how we promote our American made products by Chinese shrimp not saying where it's coming from and I don't think we have enough money to be able to promote every little if you go into a store and it's not your plate of of while Sam not forty dollars you're not eating real while salmon it's just expensive hey see the value in not trying to see how much they can push the price down to the fishermen they go back to them and like for typical but that read this anyway Jim if you can explain it that as an industry it would behoove them to market like markets farm-raised where it's controlled we wouldn't be eating seafood today pretty much if it was not far away we don't have enough shrimp oughta proud of and say wow by this but it has to be able to get more money and because if the fishermen don't make a living up if they don't see that they can make a living being fishermen they're just not going to do it and I know that historically it's been like you said family oh I don't want to buy food from China and I know a lot of a lot of the commercial fisherman a day and nobody up the chain makes it then you just sell in the same thing everybody else is share and you lose the culture in nine pruitt runs passion one of the owners of passion New Orleans he sees the value of what do you need to make a living then it's up to me I work with you L. on Jeff's Dr Stewart on they're they're doing a study now and I said you know I really thought that we needed to sell it and that's what I've been trying to do for years you have to be able to sell it if I can't sell it then it doesn't do anybody any good but I have to be able to get in in New Orleans and the John Bash's grouping and donald links group then eat if they just want to go buy it at a grocery strike me if you don't a boat you shouldn't be penalized if you WANNA eat red snapper so consume them or you can't ship Oh so you know so if they if they put it in a cooler within one hour then they can get tagged moat Gulf seafood but I said we really need to promote American seafood because then we can have more people chip in to help promote it because we don't buy it's not that I wouldn't is just that China is a big producer top Lia will you would think that till oppy wood because they had no refrigeration now in the summertime they have refrigerated is on the boats they have to be in a refrigerator within one hour of catch are you the countries become more prosperous the people will be able to buy their product and eventually may not be able to get anything from China or India is when you can't let's say you use a sixteen twenty count shrimp and you can't get a golf sixteen twenty cow trump and this restaurants if you sell crawfish that imported you have to specify that or shrimp that's imported you have to specify that all demand for seafood as I look at it I look at you I'm not a big fan I don't eat it but so there's a new breed of fishermen it's young people and it's really our job as the old guys in the business to make sure they survived but we won't have anything does or do you just want to buy the cheapest and you'll always have both people that WANNA pay premium that's why you have prime meeting if select the people that for the passing it down but this is this is an issue you know passionate down in a lot of them today if their boat wouldn't pass down from their fall though grants this is just for people giving me feedback you know and they have to go to buy shrimp from Ecuador fences then they you know that that that's when market it's not as great for prime but you get into high price right but this is all important if we're going to sustain the industry because if young people coming up he's had these labs now that that testing the water and probably we have the safest seafood we ever had it just that we have a world table to ship so the the seafood is taken care of a lot better than it ever will and it's more cast being done the water all these universities somewhere else not really you know use that would know what happens I know there is a law that was passed that said that seafood in Louisiana it has to be labeled they said don't buy that you know there's local and it costs it costs more but I bought it about the yeah the one that was local but the name on the Chinese crawfish two fits foreign is that right like from China will Shrimp not yeah shrimp in crawfish if fish I think it was last year and it was called Boudreaux's or something but it was Chinese and I was at trump pines one of our local are Dros yes they started peeling or selling small across fish will you can't fool people I mean and if people don't see a value difference if it's not something that they noticeably nays you can't force people to spend more money the price would go down but it keeps going up because the people in China buying more so as the the aww they couldn't afford to buy a boat and pay for it for what they catch you know they like the Dickie Brennan's Groupie because the people will be having more money by they own product if we don't produce it here you know I've here where we could buy everything a- as I see it's changing but you know the crawfish meat in a pack the Chinese sold it is people and rich culture of Lafayette the gateway to South Louisiana we record in the offices of Raider solutions which offers a complete fleet of it solution a hundred count eighty count of one hundred now we just sell it as a pack of Louisiana crawfish and just because it says it on the pancakes by law and that's FDA law and you have to look closely some time so I was trying to buy cross in restaurants the two different if you go into Costco or rouse's or any major or eighty grocery store you have to have they call it cool country of origin label official I want and I'm in town crawfish out called frank and but it costs more you might be getting twenty percent year where big crawfish occasioning Kinda mis- misleading you know and it it's amazing that the FDA let them do that but you know the bottom line is I mean you shouldn't be able to hide which eating is that just in restaurants cameras any seafood you purchase like Costco let's say if you Ko and is you have a pound or crawfish if it's this is a rice you don't WanNa buy now so I'll go back to like sue by like Frank Randall. He peels big prevented it just happened I mean what do we do about it now and its impact all of crabbers life shrimpers oyster people the now I know that the health department's been going out finding that are are and I really believe everybody should know whatever they eating you're getting fourteen a twelve percent because they're big claws big shells and having that whole experience yeah it's just it's it's menu and I know a lot of people that were you far against it I mean I think everyone should have the right to know where the eating and the problem exists analogy play apart any of this yeah I mean technology plays supported to like the old saying where you don't eat issues in our months will oh that's a good thing we have to produce a better product when the Swedes came in and bought all our big crawfish years ago they've taken out all the big one weather can seafood normally can seafood like you buy from Spain is the highest quality sardines very are really yeah they the best one if he says if it's would olive all you can be sure it's high-quality saw dean but assures the dolphins and turtles in the the freshwater was causing them their eyes were affected and it pitted their skin and they perished advocating for the fishermen and we have a great group of people and it has many organizations we're just one of them but well I was looking at some went through some news stories and that's when the freshwater was being flooded you know affecting a lot of the wildlife and they should we see that the issues that these fishermen have and we could tell all we can do is tell the story and hope that semi listens right and it's like they have such a small volley individual one thinks of their problem I mean it's you know ears and a half weather but yes I'm very active I of I really see that that without people we're ready to tell the story if the story needs to be toll we were the ones that came out and got DVD exco they helped peel the crawfish shucked oysters were they gotta pay them whether they have product or not right so somebody should and you could go and open up and eat some fresh crawfish tails out of a can be delicious but we have to change the way we marketing things and and get the most for the product rather than trying to compete with Chinese crawfish. I mean so you're active I mean you know you retired from Cisco is Shane Ears and you'll Smith and Eddie chows and all this group of the doctor you do and once we lose that I think we'll lose something very special you know it's something that I don't WanNa live without right I don't either this past book we didn't know if it if if the federal government would do it were we knew that hey look you do this for the farmer what about our guys it's you know you have flood insurance right if you house floods you get somebody that's why you have insurance but the fishermen no have any of that Senate governor and and we have several organizations to declare a national emergency for the seafood industry there has never been done before Ed to the wildlife and what you're saying is very thought provoking well I mean it's very important he this going on live questions I want to get you to discuss so I know that one of the things you've been lauded for is working with chefs to so we just don't have the the big companies to be able to and so that's why it takes guys like me and frank and you know all and you know surviving in many cases so this is actually worked out pretty well there ride figured made people aware that we have so many in those kind of things we saw too after the BP oil spill and I know that people thought about the fishermen but not in the same way I think is it'd be responsible even though it's a it's a manmade thing it's not a man made thing it's a it's a God created act but you know red snapper my company bought one fifth of the whole Gulf quota for red snapper which or a triple tail all these different fish where you might catch two hundred pounds of it it's not enough to market it it's not like you have a Lotta quota I for one company to be able to purchase a million pounds of the five and a half million at the time and and that at least we can preserve the coach and because the culture is on all along the Gulf coast fisherman don and there used to be I guess a lot of ways because you said that those fish they don't survive if they've been caught you can't really release them and have them whatever but there is a market for everything when you travel the world you see that the different people in different parts of the country use the by-catch like when fishermen are out in the water they catch other fish and other seafood as they're pulling their net you know so things have changed we've had a speed of the microwaves microwave remember when we didn't even Oh yeah eh they can't afford to lose a crop they have a lot of them have to be labor they bring them in for Mexico and then they go back to me I'm very active my wife got sick retired in and probably that Thank God every day that I was able to do that and spend the last we don't have a lot of fish on there where a company can say well we have all this wild fish so it was very important will if this is edible and any wonderful fish in the ocean that no one eats they never had to didn't know about it there's no reason to when you get all of the speckled trout you want it back from the consumer and say well you know we can't sell it it's you know it's either too strong taste took things die I mean you know fish die in the Oh you just never see it right and so it's not something that you would say well we have to think out at different than we did than our grandparents did it was an abundance we didn't have the demand we have today everybody Russian also shifting gears a little bit about always tres I know read some articles you were working with a fellow that was thinking about getting out of the industry a miracle weight sink in water rights but yeah the microwave was slow to their milk in every part of the fifth we're the only ones that take the fillets throw the rest of the way and it's interesting yeah I remember years all the the Sh- redfish you wanted all the snappy wanted but I mean we have so many so much fish that we'd never had to target and then and I know there was a study done that people like oysters to be a certain size like the average person can you talk about that you know this is about seven eight years ago I believe it is my thing eats offer something else and but if we want to have a seafood industry but you ate all this it's putting pressure on the the other of the seafood of course there was no fishery for let's say at one time you will be catching snapper in You get Kenji trigger fish it gave me pause because I didn't know what Kobe was her trigger fish you know it's really up to the restaurant parrot and to get the that's-that's using everything and my my whole thought was that if your stomach full and you only ate a portion of this other type stuff this is delicious fish that go beyond all these different fish that no one really had ever had the eat but I've seen these on menus only when they float up ashore but most fish that die in the ocean they eat and butts up melts predators and and stack them up and steam them and then take the bums out all the meat and it was the best tasting fish we'd call it a fish stew you know but has instant demand for everything they want I heard this young young college purchased the play their microwaves slow I said wow I mean yes maybe you go to the old fashioned oyster bars yes you go to Abigail and they'll want you can't serve the little oysters ago in Morgan City we had the we get catfish and we'd fillet it and we would take the the bones and lay it in a pot on it and he said you know I'm I'm not making any money I just don't see the volume of washes at my grandfather and my dad so I took him to see bill and you know it's it's like you're looking up at a bird on the wire and it falls out and he dies well you never see you think that's in my shoes because of the you know levies and what have you so all our our estuaries a different today and that's one of the good things about it they did about seventeen men and they tom with tongues and they would send a thousand sacks every other day to New Orleans from there bluefield employees with that and they were trying to use everything and some of the people would cut details off and fry them but I'm in Alabama they had one farm which it's called a AILSA alternative oyster culture and it's basically taking a c you can you can control it I think better than just wild fish right right that's interesting well The chefs want when I grew up people eight before in choice shore they didn't need it they didn't want a small oyster but now the tastes have changed from groups whether it's magazines or government agencies where do you see like how do you see things in general the the upper scale restaurants upper and they're they're warning it for two reasons that's what the consumer wants and they want offing over the next five to ten years do you anticipate more big changes in your industry I think we're GONNA see changes at I'm really hoping for some of these awards you got Jim I understand now I mean you have been a guardian of the industry and you've been recognized by so many lead auster that's grown in a lab and put it out in the wild in a cage whether it be floating or on the bottom and growing it out to the size we'll get a release in a in permits from that while wildlife and fisheries and also from the corps of Engineers and and you know that's one of the things about aquaculture the people like myself and the wholesalers and the the big seafood company if we want it we've got to help them survive we can't just say they're not looking for big profits they're looking to feed their family and raise their kids and that's that's that's I just don't see the volume of voice he has about a seventy foot steel hoist your boat it took a crew of three and three hundred dollars worth

Lafayette Jim Goson Gulf Seafood Foundation Gem Gulf of Mexico Iberia Bank Louisiana Gulf Iberia Bank Dot Com Houston Environmental Protection Agenc trump John Swift America Nama French writer president of the Board Ecuador Spain federal government
A Conversation With Jack E. Davis, Author Of "The Gulf"

Florida Matters

27:41 min | 1 year ago

A Conversation With Jack E. Davis, Author Of "The Gulf"

"This is Florida matters. I'm Robin sussing ham, Jack e Davis is a professor of history and sustainability studies at the university of Florida. He won the two thousand eighteen politics prize for history for his book, the Gulf, the making of an American c which was also winner of the Qurqus prize, a New York Times notable book and a Washington Post best book of the year. Among other accolades. Jack davis. Welcome to Florida matters. My pleasure, Jack you begin your story about the Gulf of Mexico by talking about Winslow Homer. The painter why why start with him. Well, I wanted my readers know up front that the, the Gulf of Mexico is not a regional see that it's a sin American see. It's also an international. See. And so throughout the book, I make connections between the Gulf of Mexico and people from elsewhere around the United States and across the globe, people places, and ecological events. And so it made sense to me to open up with Winslow Homer since he was from Maine and came down to the Gulf late in life and discovered the wonderful fishing there in the beauty of the Gulf of Mexico to, but also his sensibilities are very very much in sync with those of my own or actually the way, I constructed. Book round making this connection between humanity history and nature, which which home or did in his paintings, and also through Winslow Homer, you kind of get the contrast with the Atlantic Ocean. Because of course, those are some of his most famous paintings and the drama of the Atlantic Ocean, compared with sort of the serenity of the Gulf, it xactly that was another strategy. The actually there were there, a number strategies in opening with him in that that was one, because I knew that the front I wanted to make that comparison between the Gulf, and the Atlantic. And of course, I see the Gulf of Mexico as a superior see to that land now. And whistle Homer said, you know who spent his time, not just painting on the Atlantic fishing. It was an avid fisherman. He wrote home to his brother during that first winter on the Gulf of Mexico that the fishing in the Gulf of Mexico was the best mayor in America's Farsi. Could see. I thought that writing and. Nineteen o four six years before he died. He returned the Gulf every year after with exception one in which he had a stroke onto fish. So we might wonder why you were so fascinated with the Gulf to write this complete book about it, and so much research that have gone into that. So I grew up on the Gulf, and I have this intimate lifelong relationship with it, and both in north Florida and in the Tampa Bay area, and in growing up in the Gulf of Mexico. The Gulf is really my neighborhood. The, you know the, the water was my cul de sac. The docks were my, my sidewalks. My, my little boat was my bicycle and my fishing, rod and bait or or my bat and ball. Yeah, it was so much part of your life. So it was kind of you live there in your formative years. And it's I guess, always fascinated you it has? And you know as I was writing the book, I live landlocked in Gainesville Florida now. And as I was writing the book each morning. When I sat down I was I felt like I was going home and also going. To, to my childhood in. So writing the book was was truly a labor of love. I never once I never once had a fight myself to, to sit down write this book. I was drawn immediately to my writing desk, and I write every morning, even on holidays. I related a lot to that feeling because I grew up here, also, and I was thinking about the earliest memory, I had of longboat key was, I was sailing as a little girl. My father took me sailing, and I got very, very seasick. And we got in the dinghy put ashore on longboat key in that time, Longbow there was a little motel, and that was it, it was just the Australian pines, which now we know are not supposed to be there, but they were very beautiful and white sand and just nothing there. And since then, watched this explosive growth along the coast and places like and these barrier islands just something that I know you must have been observing and. How did you feel about it? Oh, both in north, Florida and Pinellas county when I lived in north Florida and for one beach, which is right? Next to Destin. You could actually see the water then. And there were no hotels. There were couple of beat as we called him beachcomber motels, but no condominiums or anything like that. And today when you're up there, you, you don't see the water and same Pinellas county. You, you drive down these, these wonderful beachside dries, and there is this wall. Ours, we fondly are not so finally called them condo. Canyons you driving through at that really steal away the, the Gulf of Mexico from you. And yes, I is horrific on many levels. And of course, I'm a person who drives around using landmarks and in a panel counties, you know, or the Tampa Bay area landmarks change overnight. I could be away for just a couple of months at a time. And in return home and become lost. Because my, my landmarks. Are no longer there. They've been replaced by something else, and usually something bigger. So how did you structure the book? How did you envision the structure to be like a biography of a c or a social history? How did you decide to organize the book? Well, it's an environmental history, but it is very much. A biography of place by my previous book was adobe or fee of martyrs. Stillman Douglas in the Everglades. And I really liked the, the by graphical form. And so I wanted to pursue that in my with my next book, and I discovered that nobody had written a comprehensive history of the Gulf of Mexico, and so it seemed like a natural fit for me, but I did want nature to be in the forefront of this book. I didn't want to write a traditional history of the sea, that is plotted a around human events and said, I wanted to show nature as a historical agent that actually shapes the course of human history. So I organized. Chapters around natural characteristics of the Gulf estuaries fish birds beaches, rivers barrier, islands, weather in and so forth. And of course, certainly I tell the human story there too, because as environmentally story and I'm interested in the, the historic relationship between nature and humans. And so there many, many as I call them characters in the book, like Winslow Homer, and others. And of course, most of them Gulf side, folks, but fascinating, interesting people, many of them, who had not been aware of, before you devote a whole chapter to sport fishing for Tarpon. I didn't realize what an impact that's for it had. Yeah. I, I loved writing that chapter, it was so fun. And I, I was familiar with the tarpons influence on Gulf tourism. And as I say in the book Gulf tourism, did not start with our beautiful beaches. It started with this particular fish in eighteen eighty five. When a New York architect was down at Fort Myer. Ars when Fort Myers wasn't even listed on the maps, even though it existed. He was down by four between Fort Myers, Santa bell and hooked the first tarp on record. And these were big fish than they are still but one hundred and fifty two hundred pound Tarpon were not unusual in those days, and you catch a couple of dozen in, of course of a week. He hooked a first Harpin, and it set the sport fishing world on fire people from the northeast midwest and the British Isles converge on the Gulf of Mexico, mainly south, Florida and southern Texas. And of course, the folks in Texas said they're tarp, and we're bigger than those in Florida. And there was so, so many interesting historical facts around that. Like you said, they're scales were used as calling cards, they'd carve the name and date of whoever caught the fish and maybe leave it at a restaurant. And it was famous one in Texas. Yes, they're scales are silver dollar size or easily removed and exactly as you said. People would write their names on the scales, along with the way to the fish in, in Texas. There are scales with Franklin Roosevelt's name on them and just a number of interesting and famous people, and in some places those scales still exist on the walls. They've been there since nineteen century such is on new CEPA island in, in Florida down by Santa bell, and captive L. They still have those there and their clubhouse. Are they do? Yes. I didn't realize okay. Obviously, I'm not a tarp and fisherwoman. But I didn't realize you don't hook them. They their mouth is to you said it's like steel so they really have to ingest, the hook. Or you have to catch their Gill, something like that. Yes. That, that that's right. And that was the trick that we m-, housi- would the archetype from New York figured out. And, of course, is special hook was designed for the Tarpon Edward von Hoff, who built the cattle. Lack of fishing reels in, in the nineteenth century design, specific real for, for the Tarpon Eastman, thirty years coming down from New York during the wintertime to fish Tarpon doing as I say, quote unquote, researching design. So this really set off tourism, though, then in the area. That's, that's exactly right in women were just as through Ciaston about Tarpon fishing a woman held the Tarpon fishing record in the late nineteenth century early twentieth century for seven years. She caught her Tarpon probably somewhere around Sarasota around the mouth of, of Tampa Bay. And so eventually, men and women who come down to fish for Tarpon in eventually, they discovered the beaches and started coming for the beaches, rather than in Tarpon, and by the twenty century, the tarp in population had begun to wane significantly that the fishing had taken a heavy toll in, in some ways, making the shift to beach tours was timely and practical and Hemingway, I guess helped to popularize that I would think Hemingway was just an outstanding sport fishermen in a in a fanatic about it. He caught carpeting car. He caught everything got everything big. He wanted everything big, and he fished mostly in. The Gulfstream which is heavily populated with, with, with marine life, and yes and Ted Williams is as well. That's right. That's right. He wrote a book about Tarpon fishing. And of course when he, he came down to Florida for spring training. He would he would also fish as did many of the ball players. They many them love to fish while they were down in Florida during the spring. So you point out that what makes the Gulf of Mexico? So fascinating is the diversity and the abundance of it. See life. And you devote a chapter that you call a fishy. See the fact that the Gulf was so full of fish, a lot of fishermen migrated from New England. And that itself was a major impetus for settlement along Florida's coast. Yes. And that that expression of fishy comes from a poem written by wall, Stephen, SU who liked to come down to the Gulf of Mexico and fishes. Well, and love love the Gulf coming down from Connecticut. I should say where many of those early commercial fishermen came in the early nineteenth century, the Spanish around the Gulf for three hundred plus years, they never. A commercial fishing industry to British didn't they started to get into, but we're on the Gulf long enough to French didn't? And so that was developing industry really love to enterprising Americans and really began to develop after Andrew Jackson seized. If you will the Florida's from, from, from the Spanish, and so from Connecticut, Massachusetts from New England where they'd fished out many of their cod grounds. Fishermen come during the wintertime, Leonard destined, who's the namesake of Destin Florida was from Connecticut and permanently settled in present day destined, you could go to Pensacola in the late nineteenth century, which was probably the busiest commercial fishing port on the Gulf of Mexico at the time, we know Pensacola, fort Spanish, heritage city, this very much today in touch with the southern southern heritage. But back then it was very much. A New England city you would hear a New England accent as readily Z wouldn't hear any other accident. Pensacola new Inc. Oakland city that's really you wouldn't expect that, but they were coming down in such numbers. That's right. All the names on the fish houses in Pensacola were names of people from Connecticut, Massachusetts. And they knew what they were doing. Absolutely. They did. So I'm going to read this paragraph because I think it's a it's a beautiful description of some of the different kinds of sealife that you describe around in the past and into Choctaw hatch, e bay, the bottom was grassy with intermingling beds of oyster 's and the water tinted by organic materials from inland wash. It was vibrant with crabs shrimp and a curious jumping fish called a mullet, twelve miles out into the Gulf Destin, and other fishers from Alabama and Mississippi discovered the one hundred fathom curve, a sharp, six hundred foot plunge where grouper mackerel and snapper could be caught two hundred miles more over toward the peninsula was one of the largest sponge habitats in the world. And feeding on sponges were sea turtles. Riding on invisible. Currents to and from every corner of the Gulf each corner was as splendidly alive as the other beautiful writing. Jack. Thank you. And a lot in that paragraph. So I was I found it surprising. At one point, you give gave the ranking of the seafood economic importance, I guess it was about one hundred years ago, and number one was oysters, and then sponges was second, and then grouper mullet shrimp and red, snapper. I found that surprising that always tres and sponges. So economically important. Yes. Well, of course, in, in those days were talking to nineteen late nineteenth century, there were no synthetic sponges. So natural sponges were what people use the had many purposes as sponges to do today. And so it was a lucrative industry or issues were in demand. Particularly in New York City, which had at one time probably the largest or sure habitat in. In North America, if not the world, and it had been depleted, both by by overharvesting in in pollution, and so officers from the Gulf for exported or early on. Even today forty percent of domestic on forty or more percents. Domestic oysters come from the Gulf of Mexico. Some eighty percent of domestic shrimp, come from the Gulf of Mexico, despite the impact, we've had on estuarine system on the Gulf of Mexico coming from various sources. It's still remains a very robust fishery outperforming the east coast and entire east coast, fishery, and I'm not talking about Florida. I'm talking about from Maine on down to Florida in many years. And you describe what made Appalachicola what made they're always tres tastes, so good. Or what made that such a great place to find always, and Appalachia coal? You kind of describe the geography there that made that. Special that magic elixir that, that mix of freshwater from lap, latch coal river and salt water from the sea in the barrier islands. Also that helped coordinate in that, that freshwater saltwater mix in Appalachia cola the nutrients coming down the, the river and a combined with the fresh water or just ideal for the growing of these plump moisture's that are the preferred choice, tres domestic oysters among chef from from coast to coast, United States, coast to coast on fortunately, up river activities have taken a toll on that water. It's no longer as enrich with the right sort of, of substances and the, the fresh water isn't flowing at the same levels as as it had before. Yeah, there's kind of terroir for that waster like there is with wine. And if it's growing in the right kind of environment. It tastes better. And you talked about. The barrier islands that are by a freshwater river and how that kind of. Filters the saltwater that gets in and gives it just the right mix and other places around the Gulf, where they have those barrier islands. They also have good choice to grounds. That's right. Barry islands are really important geographic feature of the Gulf of Mexico important in ways other than building giant condos on them. But ecologically, they're important just as as you described. But also, as we know they are excellent, buffers against an intense, weather, and a buffer for the mainland. There's no such thing as it deserted island or non inhabited island. Those barrier islands even the ones without the cars in the condos are flush with with wildlife. One of my favorite characters in the book, if not my favorite is Walter Anderson, who spent the last twenty years of his life, mostly on barrier. Islands off the coast of Mississippi and Louisiana was an artist who loved to paint and draw in just in right about and be in touch. With the wildlife on these islands that were not inhabited by humans Mollet is another interesting character, another interesting fish, that you talk about you devote some space to we've talked about mullet before on this show. It's always important for the poor people. Yeah. Is important for it's, it's such an important food source for both wildlife, and people and during the great depression, people who lived on the Gulf of Mexico lived on those bays and by us in at the mouth of rivers didn't starve, because they could always go out and catch mullet. And in fact, the people down Cortez called their bay the kitchen because when they got hungry, they would just go out to the bay and catch their meal in his very plentiful. And again, is the food fish for for people, but it's also a fish that birds love. And, and of course, other fish love as I quote, someone in the book, who? Describe the mullet as the poor mullet because everybody loves the eat it. Yeah. Every predator seemed to go for the mullet in including people who I mean, I don't know if they would've fished out every row mullet that existed, but they did a pretty good job of overharvesting. Yes. That's correct. I think there there's an argument that can be made there. You know, I interviewed some commercial fisherman who were -ffected by the, the gillnet ban that took place in nineteen ninety five and Florida they've got their own perspective. They there they said that the population was not nearly as diminished as the quote unquote experts said that they were still out there jumping, but, you know, the moment is one of my early childhood memories on the Gulf, because we lived on Santa Rosa sound up there off of Choctaw hetchy bay when I was in elementary school, and I can remember an old mullet fishermen, who would rose vote. He did not have a motor and he would row pass, our dock, and my dad. Run out to the dock and waving down by by mullet from him as well as crabs. And how would he cook those mullet, your dad? You know, I don't know because I don't like fish. No. You don't. You don't like fish. I don't like there's some fish, it's got to be very mild. Molly. I've never I understand the fascination, I understand people salivating over mullet. But I cannot stand mullet. I'm sorry. I don't like shrimp. I don't like crabs. I don't like always tres. I will eat some clams. And but unless it's a mild fish. I'm just not I'm just not into it. I find that fascinating because one of the questions I had for you was writing about all of the seafood in this richness and seafood. And how desirable, a lot of these things. I'll my gosh. The that always tres and the red snapper and the shrimp if you became more interested in cooking seafood, while riding, but I guess you got even more turned off. No, I wouldn't say get turned out. What happened was on? I'm questioning myself, why don't I like to stop? Because I in books, I've read about the Gulf of Mexico or parts of the Gulf of Mexico about fishing on the Gulf of Mexico, sometimes the, these authors talk about having these sumptuous meals, and just these culinary orgasms, if you will eating shrimp or crab or lobster, and I just can't figure out why I can't have that same sort of response to seafood, I was hosted up in, in proud sneck main last summer was low home or country and my host brought out just the most beautiful red main, you know, pink cooked orange pink red Maine lobsters, and I and I had a decline and have a salad and everybody else's just drooling. Well, I admire you for having so much interest in writing about it, even though. You know, you don't like to eat it. You know another thing I wanted to talk about the was ice. You talk about what a game changer. The ice business was to fishermen in Florida. Yes, it was because, you know, Ma is something that is easily dried and salted in so Mont early on was was fish could be shipped around the country or to Cuba, or the Bahamas wherever else, there was a market for it, but other fish, either required staying alive until they got the port and then sole generally locally and until ice came along. It wasn't really possible to, to ship fish, except for that, that was dried and salted on the railroads from, from the Gulf of Mexico to other parts of the country. Snapper was one thing. That was really confine regionally early on. But once ice came along, it became more popular in other parts of the country in, in those those big cities with, with a with a real restaurant market, and same with other marine life to not, not just fish, but the commercial. Fishing industry generally, so you mention briefly writing style. What, what is your writing style? Like you've been very prolific. My running style is. I don't write for an academic audience as I like to say my talks you. You're right. A book for an academic on and sit ends up in academe library, new, you do the twenty dollar Bill tests, you know, soon as on the shelf and economic library. You turn to page one hundred put the twenty dollar Bill and you go back ten years later, and you take a twenty dollar Bill back. But I wanted a very much wanted this. I wrote this book for a national audience because I wanted my readers to know that all Americans are connected whether they've seen the gopher non connected the Gulf, both historically and ecologically in so I love writing. I work very very hard at it. I have a great writing partner and Cynthia bar net. You probably are aware of what our expert water expert, wonderful Florida journalists. Excellent book writer last book on the history of rain was a long list for the national book award. So she reads everything I write draft. I read everything. She writes draft nets that is tremendously important to me. I read good writing, and I pay attention to how good writing as written and pay attention to the words, I pay attention to the Senate structure, to paragraph organization, all of the techniques and, and I can spend an entire morning on a single sentence. Or a couple of sentences. And I'll do that. And until I get it right. And Cynthia night have been known to Email back and forth sentences for hours, the same damn sentence. And you know, because we wanted to get it right. I don't know how many times I wrote that prologue. They opened the Winslow Homer opening to, to the, the book, it took me months to, to get that the way I wanted it set the tone for the rest of the book do. That's right. Do you wait for inspiration? Or are you someone? That is a very disciplined writer. Do you get up at certain time every day in work before you go teach a class, I am very disciplined. I was up at three o'clock this morning. Writing and running for a couple of hours. I'm working on a book on the bald eagle now cultural natural history. And then I go back to sleep for it for a couple of hours. And then I get up again. And right. So I get to mornings out of each day, because that's when I'm freshest as is in the morning in the. You know if the inspiration isn't conning I get up take Walker. I or I work out or go fix breakfast. And in most cases, the, the words of will eventually come to me or if I'm if things aren't moving. I'll read good writing, and sometimes that, that kicks in inspiration. Oftentimes does have you thought about writing a novel? You know, I've tried to write a couple of short story fiction store stories and been rejected. I you know, I've toyed with idea and people suggested I might do it. But it's a it's a very different animal. You know, a lot of fiction writers are able to bridge over into nonfiction. But I think those are start out as non fiction writers are there fewer who make the, the transition to, to fiction. That's interesting. Jack davis. Thanks so much for speaking with us. Oh, absolutely. My pleasure. Thanks for bringing me back home. Florida matters is on Twitter at Florida matters. And Florida matters is available as a podcast, you can search for it were ever, you get your podcast or go to our website, WSF dot org. Click the listen tab, Clorinda matters is a production of USF public media. The engineer is Craig George. The show is produced by Stephanie column beanie. I'm Robin Sesing ham. Thanks for listening.

Gulf north Florida Mexico Florida Tampa Bay Jack e Davis Winslow Homer Maine Gulf Destin mullet New York City Texas United States Atlantic Ocean Winslow Homer university of Florida New York Times Washington Post cul de sac Tarpon
The End of The Insanity is Near - Will a $15 Minimum Wage Save Us?

Ron Paul Liberty Report

28:49 min | 2 weeks ago

The End of The Insanity is Near - Will a $15 Minimum Wage Save Us?

"Hello everybody and thank you for tuning into the liberty report with us. today is co host. Chris razini chris. Welcome to the program to be with you. Pull well very good. We have a problem to solve There are problems out. Their political problems seem to be a mess Social problem seems to be a mess in the politics and economically. There's a mess even know even other printing a lot of money. It just doesn't seem to satisfy everybody. We want to talk about the Is sanity of solving the problem of a diminishing value of the dollar by putting a lot more of them and then deciding what we need is regulation prices at this particular juncture. They want to regulate the wages and prices especially the wages and That is regulate i'm upward. People are short short of cash. Cost of living is going up so we need to raise the minimal minimal wage and that will solve the problem the one characteristic of all these crises that i've sort of watched For many decades now is no matter. What's going on whether What what kind of crisis we have with monetary system and prices and whether the economy's weak or too strong prices going on. There's always one thing that they say we don't have enough money it when you think about why. Why don't they have enough money especially under today's conditions we've never in the history of the world have seen a country print money and create money. Like i like we have been doing and yet. What is the shout. We need more money. And therefore what we have to do is We have to get congress to do their part. They should appropriate money and pass it out to everybody and even if it's in the trillions of dollars but then they say well there we might miss somebody so if somebody's working for Twelve dollars an hour and producing for about ten dollars. An hour's worth of work You have to have to solve that problem. Solving the problem is equality so everybody should make fifteen dollars an hour and we'll make up for the deficit in the cost of living. But that's generally the sign that there's something wrong with the monetary system any economic system is when the people suffer and there's The costs are too high. that The spending and the inflation of the monetary system. The printing money is the problem. And the odds of you solving that problem or slim to none and I think they're getting desperate We we have a desperate situation in the political system in the economic system in the social system and quite frankly i think the foreign policy problems are going to Grow exponentially with the new president because in spite of the old fashioned idea that democrats were better for peace than republicans. It looks like they're going to have some competition with trump because trump managed for years imperfectly. But like he said he wanted to wind on some wars and he also didn't wanna start a new war and there's there's rose of success there but so we have all these problem. So chris solution to this is to have a have a raise. The raise the minimum wage which will be a cost. And i'm sure you must have some shortcoming thinking on this. It might not just be what the liberals think. It'll be that this is going to help us quite possibly at might make things worse chris. That's right dr pull. The minimum wage is one of those feel good laws were superficially it seems like a good idea. I mean like the stimulus checks. Government has no money yet. They're all sending checks out to everyone. If you know it's a feel good thing but it feels good at the moment but it produces very bad results. Let's say you have a worker. Who's earning nine dollars. An hour sweeping floors. You know. that's what he agreed to. That's what the employer agreed to. But then the politician comes in says no you must pay him fifteen an hour. Well the business owner is going to say no. I'll sweep it myself. I'll give it to another person and give them a few bucks. Were per hour. Or get a roomba. I'll automate and have the the floor swept that way so a government dictate cannot make this person who now is really earning the minimum wage of zero. Because he now doesn't have a job government dictate cannot give value cannot make you more valuable and not valuable as a person. All what do you mean value. How can you that as a person. Not as a husband or wife as an employee with skills. That's what you're paid for when you get a job. So the government sticks sticks its nose in to voluntary contract and completely destroys it but it feels good at the moment but it produces very bad result. Yes and there are a lot of other tricks. They play This is just one of them You know in world war. Two and also in the korean war they had wage and price controls so prices have to be controlled to and it's always serious business you know and if you break the law you can be in big trouble and where you have. The most control of prices are the. It's it is. It's in the country that do the most interference in the economic system. And that's socialism communism because they control the means of production so therefore have it operates smoothie they have to decide what the prices are in and they can't decided they. They just chuck the whole idea of supply and demand and a marketplace determining given the information necessary to find out what people should producing and whatnot to produce so but this is We're talking to but just the wages but you can be assured that there's a lot of other things already in place that are regulating the system trying to make sure that everybody's treated fairly and that the prices are fair and equal and They they they do this with the intent that everybody will have an equal amount of money and purchasing power. And it doesn't doesn't work. So but i do think it will get much worse. But this isn't new. This isn't something that i just happened to remember. You know from world war two on. It's been around for hundreds of years. Because as long as you can find in history where the botched the currency inflated the current destroyed the value of currency which pushes the prices up has has been used the wage and price controls control of the results. has been the method of taking care of this because they cannot afford to let the cat out of the bag and let the people know why there's a shortage of money when they're printing day and night the money and of course it's because they're devaluing. The currency currency has has no restraint to and we're living in an age historic age where literally trillions of dollars are being produced last year over six trillion dollars. And they're out of the gan. There's a big argument big debate going on in washington right now. Should we Pump out another one point nine trillion dollars or two point nine trillion dollars. You know but nobody says quit. Quit before before it's too late so it It it is not a solution. It's it's just a diversion from the real real problem. Which is a monetary and a spending problem but The one one price that they get involved in we have conditions like this that they to regulate because if the market was was allowed to regulate the interest rates very quickly. This thing would close down because nobody could afford the interest rates and so they They have to Make sure that most of the people especially the wealthy people investors have very very low interest rate but If you had a market you know the interest rates probably would be much much lower. Could be you know. The average interest rate could be five six eight percent. But there's only a little. There's only one place you can get a hint of what the interest rates might be and that is credit card interest rates payment. I was astounded. When i found out somebody said well they. They had heard a credit card companies. This now up to thirty nine percent. interest payments if you You know borrow money from the credit card company. Well that's not for most of the people in the country but interest rates are up the market says it'd be much higher because the devaluation of the currency continues in. They're using that to solve the problem and they're only only making it worse but not only. Do they manipulate And the value of the interest rates price at the interest rate As a as a solution they do other things to to try to hide was gone doing an internationally The fixing of of Currencies the currency markets There's there's there's the market would you know be free. Markets in determining the value of currencies of course in the old days Which was in my lifetime is. The dollar was defined in terms of gold up until nineteen seventy-one so things were chaotic. Because it wasn't a truly gold standard american still a lot of own cold but you know there was a little bit of of of operation with the economy. But now that's not the case. So there's a lot of war currency wars going on and that's going to continue to increase but that's price-fixing so whether it's price-fixing a wages price-fixing of goods and services or price fixings of currencies All these things result in making the economy worse but the people aren't told exactly what the problem is because it's politically unacceptable You'd be accused of lying and now if you tell a bold lie like inflation comes from too much too many dollars. How could we have too much too many dollars. No you can't say that. I mean truth really hurts People who are manipulating the economy. And that's what's happening. But the one thing chris that we've been warning about you have spoken about in. That is this cannot last forever and it just keeps boiling and boiling over and they rescue the economy for a little while just like this past year there was a tremendous rescue the economy even in spite of the tremendous damage placed on the correction already in place With the illogical lockdown of the whole economy which decreased production which affected all kinds of prices so the interference by government with prices of wages currencies interest rates. It's all opposite of what free markets are like. And they want to avoid it and they will not admit the closer you get to a socialist communist philosophy and unfortunately we're moving in that direction not toward a free-market the worse this gets because some bureaucrats make the decision and that is what happened. Can you imagine people At one time saying well we have this pipeline going from canada to the gulf of mexico. And i don't like it. I'm gonna sign this little piece of paper it's canceled. We're you there was an argument. A good are you about what it was going to do. Two jobs and why it wasn't a good idea. And why the oil prices gonna go up but not a whole lot of why in the world have we given that much authority to one person. The president united states. Who said i'm going to do it. I'm getting rid of that pipeline We don't want cheap energy and we're going to stop it so they come in because they want to appease a small segment of people who don't who don't think we should have that pipeline but the bigger issue is high. Why did we turn those decisions over to some bureaucrats or one individual that to me is astounding. Because it once again. It is interfering and the price. Guess what's happening right now. You know oil not too long ago was under fifty dollars a barrel now. It's closer to sixty dollars a barrel and it's going to go a lot higher because the new administration doesn't even pretend To want to help The market You know keep energy supplies You know available to the people so It's it's his whole notion that the bureaucrats are so smart that they know how to Take care of everybody's needs and demands at the same time all the ill effects can be cancelled out by more of the same policy. Have more debt and print more money and we'll work our way out of it. Dr politics its political. Intervention is really a fight against realty and the truth and in the end. The truth always wins. Reality always wins. It's just painful when the battle is going on because it hurts everyone when they do it and earlier. I mentioned how the minimum wage hurts workers. It also hurts small businesses and we just have to look at this last year and what happened with small businesses and how big businesses capitalized. It was was it because the all these tens of thousands of business go out of business because their customers didn't want their products anymore. Nobody liked them. Wasn't that at all. They're going out of business because of government did it's and you know it's it's amazing because the left pushes all this stuff they. They hurt the workers who they're trying to help and they say that they're against big corporations yet. They're the best friends of big corporations that their policies ah big corporation loves it that includes the minimum wage. What if you're a small business and you can't pay fifteen dollars an hour. You can't cut costs. you can't automate. You're trapped what do you do you go under. You go under because your customers don't like you anymore. Now you go under because a politician says this is what you have to pay people so again. This is intervention. it's a fight against reality and it just hurts everybody except the small elites and the politicians in the big this. Oh you're right about that. You know when i country gets into a situation like we have now actually the whole world where they Beyond Their means Individuals corporations and governments when they live beyond their means they have to live beneath their means to get things straightened out and so they have to eventually eliminate the mala investment investing in the wrong things and they have to eliminate the debt So take for instance the Well intention i'm sure of helping people go through college and setup Student loan policy Before you knew it got very popular. Ain't got more care. Listen this this the ex students now. They're out struggling. It can't pay That did is up to one point six trillion dollars. And so it's that kind of thing that they can't handle so that'll be liquidated and And it just means that it will be a debt to the government. Most of it is owned by the government so it just be more debt to the government and That money will become like pretty. Chris money and they will never do that. Equitably how are they going to make sure that somebody Everybody that received the loan is equal to the other person So they'll they'll probably exempt everybody or it'll be contagious. That people will just quit paying. So that thing that thing will the debt will disappear. But that's the way most of the dad is going to disappear Through liquidation through inflation and watching the currency where the currency doesn't buy anything and it doesn't by The debt you know we talk about the wages emphasizing wages because people don't have enough money and the prices are going up show The other thing that they they they goes wrong where the people complain Especially the working class in the middle class and say my standard of living is going down and there's a lot of confusion out there right now because things have been tided it over with and made worse of course with the lockdown So temporarily they've gotten a little boo. Some people feel better but even that was not equitable. A lotta people gotta that should have got it. People make one hundred and fifty thousand dollars or getting these checks Dead people are getting these checks it just goes on and on. It's when the the details that this is if it ever if it ever is People say what were they thinking What how did they think. This was going to help the standard of living. That's really why cow is is you know the The getting rid of the notion that we have a shortage of money federal reserve note. Nell solve the problem. We have a shortage of Identifying the marketplace and lenton letting the market dictate value and prices and let people produce take care and take advantage of the signals. I get you know right now. I more or less have cast out this whole notion of supply and demand. And that's what socialism so all the. We're not a socialist nation. We have extreme ventian with a lot of socialist leanings Because socialism usually means the government owns everything. Well what's a whole. What's the big difference between the government owning it like they do in a soviet or or or fashion system. It's it's it's it's still when bureaucrats control it. Just just take a look at the nonsense going on about you. Know the dictatorial rights or the bureaucrats and and the local government officials who just love all this power given to them Under the under the guise of taking care of the coronavirus crisis so they have all this power. But fortunately chris for us I think there's some people out there nibbling away at we good stories about what's happening in florida and other states and south dakota and we're really reading the bad stories with the country the the States that kept regulations on You know the longest other worst. But once again i complain about one person. Deciding about the pipeline. Well what about all these regulations and most of the states even admit if you pin them down. They never passed the law. Most of these regulations just came out of the sky and people get intimidated and social pressures. Put on you might be. You might be banished from the economy and you will suffer all kinds of social consequences if you don't obey and yet sometimes there's not even a law that says okay. You can't go into a restaurant and these sort of thing so right now we're in flocks and believe the problems out there. won't be solved with a tinkering with the wage The minimum wage The one the one negative of course. It doesn't work and it costs a lot of money. The other negative is it might help for a little while and bailouts of the past year helped for a little while people see it helped it helped we have to keep doing it more and more and more. That's damaging because people get misled thinking these radicals at one sound money. And they don't want the government just to print money when they run up debt and let the politicians by their constituents. Whatever they need we'll get it for all. The students need laws. We'll give them to anybody who needs something. We'll give into because deficits don't matter which is what has been preached in our universities for dozens of years decades. Now that is what they've been taught. Especially since the depression out deficits don't matter everybody pretends they do but they really don't if they were worried about it they wouldn't be doing. The politician wouldn't be doing it. The federal reserve wouldn't exist. You know we would deal with these problems. We're not there. So that's why i think things are going to get a lot worse and we have to. We have a race with What's happening versus us. Getting information out to get people to understand why they will be better off than their best interest to go along with the belief in liberty. Right dr paul. I'll finish up agreeing. Of course it will be getting much worse because it has to Because we wanted to. Actually we want the bottom to be put in someday and that for people to embrace new ideas but i you have to identify the problem and you. Now that dr paul we have in hyper interventionist government and at the top sits federal reserve by printing. Money manipulating straights. They make everything else possible. Which is an. I listed some stuff you know. All the subsidies bailouts for big businesses the licenses the fees on top of fees. You have the alphabet soup. Agencies that the so so-called regulators that you know it's a revolving door between the big businesses regulator. They go back and forth. And you think they're looking out for the regular have american now. They're they're just feathering their own. Nests government has tangled. It's up self into healthcare and totally destroyed that industry like you mentioned. They destroyed education. You have student loans. Student loan forgiveness. You have that mess. If stimulus checks foreign aid the empire cova we. Could i swear. Sit here for a half an hour and take the entire show and list every single way. That government interferes and we probably would run out of time so anybody that looks at this and says well you know we need government to do this we. The problem is capitalism and free markets. I mean come on already. We have the biggest government to ever exists. It's time for free markets and capitalism to dig us out of this gigantic mess. Very good you know. An eighty seven You know there was a crash and it was significant. I think murray went on twenty percent and one day. It was big news. Ronald reagan was president and the markets. Were really intolerable. And and reagan wrote on executive order. Set up this thing called a presidential working group financial markets to settle things down when they get out of whack but the question is who who put him out aware of course it was the federal reserve but anyway that was established and people refer to it as the plunge protection team. Now what what do they do to protect the marcus. The market is wall street. It has to do with the bond market has to do with. The stock market is That commodity maher is all this because it's financial as financial control and they are very much involved in and really. Their biggest goal is to maintain You know a functional stock market and bond market. And if you look at it in a narrow sense if you look at it You know We're might go. it's still relatively calm. But it's also a bubble s ready to burst and the uncontrollable but everything that is done through the plunge protection team and all the agencies that government is designed to prop up. You know the proper prop up the stock market and the prices of stocks and bonds. The marketplace is very very powerful And usually overwhelms they fix the price of gold at thirty five dollars. An ounce for forty some years and finally the markets you. Can't you photos enough for a long time. No gold has to be higher so the mortgage usually You know works on the long run but with some of this money that was just sent out this past year. This trillions of dollars believe it or no some of ended up in hands of individuals that sorta like this idea of dealing with the market and some have reported. I didn't do the measurement but some have reported that a lot of that cash Went into the smaller investor. That started You know Buying these naked puts betting on the market will go down and manipulate and mark which goes on all the time. Because the i think the big guys manipulate those markets And i always have to depend on not that They were gonna quit as much as the market will finally teach everybody a lesson. And that's why. I think people should realize that but i did you there. Are these statistics just recently. We had We had the saudi crisis between those who Sold all those shorts And they were naked shorts and And then all of a sudden There was a crisis building. And that's that's going to go on this gonna go on as long as As the credit is available in the crowd is always going to be available until it quits. And that's why although the markets try to say that interest rates could be twenty thirty or forty percent when you look at credit cards or whatever but if a big corporation or bank needs to borrow money and it's going to be very very low one percent or two percent if you wanna go to the bank and be frugal and act like you have some commonsense and say you know. I need to put some money away for kids. They're going to be needing some money to go to college. And i don't want to speculate in the stock market. So i'm going to put it in a savings scott and earn some intra. It's right now. People will say the craziest thing in the world to do a lot of people. Still do i still think ready cash to be somewhere but it. It doesn't it doesn't make any sense whole thing punishes people who want to do the right thing and it rewards the people who are on the inside track or the money managers and the bail out process and and guess what with all this money. Chris mentioned earlier. It all the bail out money You know bailed out big corporations and big companies but it didn't bail out the little guy and that's why they say the little guy has to get some help now. Make sure that checks go-to guy and in the meantime that's make sure if he does have a job he gets fifteen bucks an hour even though he's only producing ten dollars an hour. So it's it's a mass because people basically the majority especially those who are in In in influencing government And it's in their interest to do it. Is they They they They can be benefitted by by doing this. And they get the bailout. They don't have confidence in the marketplace. Don't have confidence in the principles of liberty. We have lost our way when it comes to that and we desperately need it because it's not complex it's simple and if anybody wants a little guide us use the constitution what the government has been explicitly given authority to. Do you know at the federal level. I mean we wouldn't have a federal reserve. We wouldn't have the welfare warfare. State would have our troops at home. We'd have a sensible gun and believe me. We would find out where the deep sea steep state really is but people have to confidence that liberty is better than authoritarianism. Voluntarism is much better than allowing the bureaucrats to tell us what to do what restaurant we can go to whether or not we can go to church at all these things i i. I'm not shocked and totally surprised at all that nonsense. But i'm very disappointed that the people don't say enough is enough. We know what the answer is. An answer comes in quality and the determination to promote a free society. Wanna thank everybody for tuning in today to deliberately report. Please come back soon.

Chris razini chris chris dr paul Chris money chuck federal reserve congress gulf of mexico lenton Nests government
14-Year Oil Spill In The Gulf Of Mexico Could Go On For Decades

Environment: NPR

04:32 min | 2 years ago

14-Year Oil Spill In The Gulf Of Mexico Could Go On For Decades

"Support for this podcast and the following message. Come from discover who alerts you if they find your social security number on any one of thousands of risky websites. Alerts are free for card members just sign up online. Learn more at discover dot com slash free alerts. Limitations apply. How long does it? Take to stop an oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico. The nation's longest offshore oil spill has been leaking for more than fourteen years. There is still no solution in sight. Now. The coast guard is stepping in to try to clean it up. Teagan Wenlin of member station, W, W, N and NPR's, energy and environment. Team reports on a windy spring day. I set out on a tiny fishing boat with the captain and a scientist giant waves toss around whereabout ten miles or after south pass of the Mississippi River, delta the crew is standing up well challenging ocean conditions. I'm trying not to throw up, but Ian McDonald is unfazed by the six foot waves. He's a scientist at Florida State University Murray. Studies oil spills the fumes hit us. I the smell is overwhelming. And then we see it. It's not a black sticky slick, but a glossy layer that stretches for miles coming up. Rainbow. She narrow so that's all way back in two thousand four powerful. Hurricane Ivan toppled in oil Reagan to the Gulf. It was owned by Taylor energy, a New Orleans based company which managed to plug some of the twenty-five broken pipes, but the leak didn't stop. Jonathan Henderson runs an environmental nonprofit called vanishing earth and worries about the impact on marine life. Everything that lives in breathe is in the Gulf of Mexico travels back and forth through that zone. Fish and the sea birds and the sea turtles and the dolphins. The government is studying this, but it's hard. They can't even figure out. Exactly how much is leaking. Neither can the company Henderson's been trying to monitor it himself doing regular flyovers and reporting what he sees. I don't see why if it's gonna continue to leak that they can't recover some of this oil. I mean, if we can put a man on the moon, we can figure out how to like grabble that's coming up from the sea floor and four hundred feet of water. The department of the interior. Dear and the coast guard have been working with the company to try to stop the leak for years. But it's a major engineering challenge. The wells were buried under hundreds of feet of mud in an underwater mudslide, which are common in this area. Where the murky Mississippi dumps into the Gulf Ed Richards is a law professor at Louisiana state university. This is a well-known a high risk area of a whole huge amount of unconsolidated sediment coming out of the river, basically piling up. He says the situation raises questions should they been there? Should they have built the rig the way they built it should have been permitted that way and Taylor energy's not the only company that built there? There are many rigs in the area, the company has spent about five hundred million dollars to try and stop this Bill, and it's paying for pilots to fly over and monitor it the companies reported less than a barrel of oil a day on the surface. But scientists McDonald calculates that more than one hundred barrels a day are spilling into the Gulf. He says the whole situation should. Serve as a warning to regulators as they attempt to expand oil and gas drilling in the Atlantic. Where underwater canyons pose a threat to the idea that we would be building in deep water and making pipelines going back to land in an area this susceptible to those kinds of accidents is something that we should take into account as we do our planning. And do you think we are? No. The Trump administration has rolled back offshore safety rules, even as it works to open up more areas to drilling back out in the Gulf a giant ship looms in the distance contractors hired by the coast guard to drop a giant metal dome of the wells. And collect the oil Taylor energy says this could just make it worse. So it suing the coastguard neither the government nor the company agreed to go on record saying litigation is ongoing McDonald remains hopeful I'm really glad to be out here and being able to see this aberration. Because it's been a long time coming and there's a lot riding on it. But in the end, he says, it might be that no one is able to stop the oil from bubbling up into the Gulf. If that's the case, according to government estimates the leak could go on for a hundred more years for NPR news. I'm Teagan wins. Lind import heats, Louisiana.

Gulf Ian McDonald Taylor energy Jonathan Henderson Mexico NPR Mississippi River Teagan Wenlin New Orleans scientist Hurricane Ivan Louisiana Ed Richards Mississippi Florida State University Murra Lind
The Gulf Of Mexico's Expanding Dead Zone

Environment: NPR

03:52 min | 1 year ago

The Gulf Of Mexico's Expanding Dead Zone

"Support for this podcast and the following message come from frame bridge. They make custom framing easy and affordable frame. Your art in photos at frame bridge dot com or visit their new stores located on fourteenth street and Bethesda row. Get fifteen percent off your first frame bridge order with code NPR, bad news is flowing towards the Gulf of Mexico. The catastrophic rains that have pummeled the midwest, this spring are flooding streams and rivers with farm runoff, fertilizers and sewage runoff that will soon hit the Gulf greatly expanding the dead zone in the fishing grounds there. Scientists say that about eight thousand square miles of the Gulf will be affected. Driving away crab shrimp and fish as the water loses its oxygen. Marina colleges. Nancy rebbe of Louisiana state university has been studying the Gulf waters since nineteen eighty five and she joins us now on the line. Welcome to the program. Hello Lou, thank you for having me. So as I understand it a dead zone appears in the Gulf every summer. Because of farm runoff, but this one could be a record breaker. That's correct. We had a lot of freshwater in February and March went down for awhile, and now it's back up to all-time record highs. And it's going to bring a lot of nitrogen into the Gulf of Mexico this summer. And so we've mentioned that shrimp and fish are driven away when this happens. But the pollutants also affect what lives in the sediment of the Gulf rate. That's right. There are things that cannot swim away like worms snails starfish, and they can't escape. So they will eventually die off. And what does that mean for the ecosystem there? That's particularly nobody really cares about worms. I do that these animals support the face of the food web for the fish and shrimp and crabs that feed on the bottom. So even after the low oxygen is not a problem anymore, there still is not a good food base for these organisms. So. So do the shrimp and fish return once the worst is over. Right. They, they will come back into the area because the reason they leave is the oxygen is just too low. And how long does this last normally, well, the area of low oxygen that's pretty widespread is predominant in June, July, August and sometimes into September. So it's, it's a long lived phenomenon and its severe ended affects a large area of the Gulf of Mexico and imagine it has economic implications for the fishermen and consumers you. Yes, it does, especially for the shrimp, fishery, the small shrimp, removing out of estuaries and trying to go offshore right now. And they're pretty much hugging the coast because there's a large low oxygen water mass, and they can't move further offshore to grow to a larger size. So the shrimpers no they can catch lots of small shrimp insure, but. Those don't bring a very good price and to get to further offshore. They need to spend more money on diesel and fuel an ice and food to catch the larger Schmidt, which aren't going to be as plentiful and with foreign imports competing for Gulf natural shrimp. It sometimes there's not a good return on the largest shrimp as well. Isn't any way to prevent these events from happening. The answer is well upstream, and it includes stopping or mitigating, the nitrogen, that's getting into the Mississippi River in there are all kinds of improved agricultural practices that can be applied. But if we do start taking small steps, and people started opting better practices. We can make a difference. Marina colleges Nancy rebbe. Thank you so much for speaking with us. Thank you for your interest.

Gulf frame bridge Mexico Nancy rebbe midwest NPR Lou Mississippi River Louisiana state university eight thousand square miles fifteen percent
SpaceX Dragon Capsule With NASA Astronauts Makes Successful Splashdown

TIME's Top Stories

06:17 min | 7 months ago

SpaceX Dragon Capsule With NASA Astronauts Makes Successful Splashdown

"SPACEX dragon. Capsule with NASA astronauts makes successful splashdown by Marsha, done of the Associated Press in Cape Canaveral Florida. To NASA astronauts returned to Earth on Sunday in a dramatic retro style, splashdown their capsule parachuting into the Gulf of Mexico to close out an unprecedented test flight by Elon Musk's SPACEX company. It was the first splashdown by US, astronauts in forty five years with the first, commercially built and operated spacecraft to carry people to and from orbit. The return clears the way for another space x crew launches early as next month and possible tourist flights next year. Test pilots, Doug Hurley, and Bob Bankin road the SPACEX dragon capsule back to Earth less than a day after departing the international. Space Station and two months after blasting off from Florida. The capsule parachuted into the COM-. Gulf waters about forty miles off the coast of Pensacola. Hundreds of miles from tropical storm s ice pounding Florida's Atlantic. coast. Welcome back to planet Earth and thanks for flying spacex said mission control from SPACEX headquarters. It was. was, truly our honor and privilege replied, Hurley. The astronauts ride home in the capsule dubbed. Endeavor was fast bumpy and hot. At least on the outside. The spacecraft went from a screaming orbital speed of seventeen thousand, five, hundred miles per hour twenty, eight, thousand kilometers per hour to three, hundred, fifty miles per hour five, hundred, sixty kilometers per hour during atmospheric reentry and finally to fifteen miles per hour, twenty, four, k. p. h. at splashdown. P Keating during descent was thirty, five, hundred degrees. Fahrenheit nineteen hundred degrees, Celsius. They anticipated top G. forces felt by the crew four to five times. The force of Earth's gravity. Endeavor has you loud and clear Hurley radioed following a brief communication blackout caused by the heat of atmospheric reentry. A SPACEX. Recovery ship with more than forty staff including doctors and nurses moved in quickly following splashdown and lifted the fifteen foot capsule onto. It's deck to smaller faster. Boats arrived first at the capsule while it was slowly bobbing upright in the water to keep the returning astronauts safe in the pandemic, the recovery crew quarantined for two weeks and were tested for the corona virus. After medical exams, the astronauts were expected to fly home to Houston for a reunion with their wives and sons. The last time NASA, astronauts returned from space to water was on July twenty, fourth, nineteen, seventy, five in the Pacific, the scene of most splashdowns to end a joint us, Soviet. Mission known as Apollo. Soya's the mercury and Gemini crews in the early to mid nineteen sixties parachuted into the Atlantic. While most of the later Apollo capsules hit the Pacific. The Loan Russians splashdown was in one, thousand, nine, hundred, seventy, six on a partially frozen lake amid a blizzard following an aborted mission, the harrowing recovery took hours. Space X made history with this mission, which launched may thirtieth from Nasr's Kennedy Space Center. It was the first time. A private company launched people into orbit, and also the first launch of NASA astronauts from home turf. In nearly a decade, Hurley came full circle serving as pilot of Nasice, less space shuttle flight in twenty eleven, and the commander of this spacex flight musk monitored the descent and splashdown from spacex mission control in Hawthorne California. NASA turned to SPACEX and also Boeing to build capsules and ferry astronauts to and from the space station following the retirement of the shuttle's. Until Hurley and Bankin rocketed into orbit NASA astronauts relied on Russian rockets, spacex already had experience hauling cargo to the space station bringing those capsules back to a Pacific splashdown. This is the next era in human spaceflight where NASA gets to be the customer, NASA, straighter, Jim Breitenstein said, from Johnson, space center in Houston shortly before the astronauts return. SPACEX need six weeks to inspect the capsule before launching the next crew around the end of September. This next mission four astronauts will spend a full six months aboard the space station. Hurley and Banken's capsule will be refurbished for another flight. Next Spring. A Houston company run by a former NASA official meanwhile has partnered with spacex to send three customers to the space station in Foal Twenty twenty. One. Boeing doesn't expect to launch its first crew. Until next year, the company encountered significant software problems in the debut of its star liner capsule with no one aboard last year, it's capsules will touch down in the US southwest desert. By. Beating Boeing spacex laid claim to a small us. Left at the space station by Hurley and the rest of the last shuttle crew, the flag which also flew on the first shuttle flight was carefully packed aboard the Dragon for the homecoming. Also on board a toy dinosaur named trimmer sent into space by the astronauts young sons, the boys recorded a wakeup call for their father's Sunday morning, urging them to rise and shine, and we can't wait to see. You don't worry. You can sleep in tomorrow said Benkin, six-year-old son, Theo. Who was promised a puppy after the flight hurry home. So we can go get my dog.

SPACEX Doug Hurley SPACEX NASA Space Station US Houston Boeing Foal Twenty twenty Kennedy Space Center Elon Musk Florida Gulf of Mexico Bob Bankin Cape Canaveral Florida Associated Press Pensacola Atlantic Marsha P Keating
Monitor Show 05:00 02-15-2021 05:00

Bloomberg Radio New York - Recording Feed

01:42 min | Last week

Monitor Show 05:00 02-15-2021 05:00

"He order breakfast at mcdonald's drive-thru tell yourself you'll wait to eat at work but it smells way too good so you eat it right there in mcdonald's parking lot neil. There's a meal for every morning at mcdonald's right now get any size. Iced coffee for ninety nine cents until eleven. Am and pair it with your favorite breakfast or one of our tasty. Bakery treats price and participation may vary but by mcdonalds. I'm lovin it to you at number. The world is listening winter. Storms are making life miserable for hundreds of millions of americans. A winter storm system expected to bring snow and ice into the southern part of the country. Lisa taylor with weather service says the frigid. Arctic cold is pushing. The jetstream southward. Today the cold will combined with moisture from the gulf of mexico. Snow and ice will show up further south than usual starting in the upper midwest and dropping into texas by late monday the system will have expanded into the northeast and mid atlantic and from the ohio. Valley southward into the tennessee and mississippi. Valleys i'm lisa. Taylor michael mcdowell is picking up the first win of his cup series career. The daytona five hundred mcdowell surged ahead on the final lap. Caution after joe. Lugano and brad keselowski rank to win the great american race. The race had been pushed late into the evening following weather in the day. Chase elliott finished second. While austin dillon took third the national guard may be staying in washington. Dc for quite a while cameron fairchild has more guard units may stay in the capital at least until fall of twenty twenty one. That's according to an internal memo obtained by fox five in.

mcdonald Lisa taylor Valley southward mcdonalds neil Taylor michael mcdowell Arctic gulf of mexico midwest Chase elliott brad keselowski austin dillon Lugano mcdowell mississippi tennessee texas ohio lisa
A little state called Pennsylvania The Trillion-Dollar Reason Why Joe Biden Wont Ban Fracking  OGTW216

Oil and Gas This Week Podcast

25:51 min | 5 months ago

A little state called Pennsylvania The Trillion-Dollar Reason Why Joe Biden Wont Ban Fracking OGTW216

"You're listening to the oily gas this week podcast with Marc Lacorte and page Wilson. Vince is the show for busy oil pros who quickly want to keep their finger on the pulse of the industry. You're listening the oil and gas this week podcast brought to you by IBM this is the show for busy all pros who want to quickly heap their finger on the pulse of the industry. Thanks for joining us for episode two one six. How's it going mark? It's going awesome page but you know what? I'm Kinda, sad why we didn't get any reviews mall it's better than getting bad ones I guess I don't know. That's a hard choice to make because even our worst reviews aren't really that bad that's true. But anyway, people showed Lisa reviews and we'll give you a big shoutout feel kinda lonely here but it's time for the news story. What's up I Liberty Oilfield services put slumber J. Tech in its yards Halliburton in its crosshairs. Yes. This is a really good story. If you haven't heard yet basically slimmer, a has decided to get out of the actual fracking business and they look for a partner which happened be liberty oilfield in Olympia fields such a cool partner well, I did interview. Their CEO Chris Right Yup, and they also hosted are Denver happy hours exactly. DENVER. When life was normal. So just a great company, we know them love them to death I was a little surprised when this happened and I think it's pretty cool. So basically, liberty bought summer JAS fracking business unit exchange with thirty seven state thirty, seven percent stake in the company, which makes a very good deal for everybody, and then it's really interesting. You Know Halliburton is top fracking company in North America right now, and for Chris come out says Hey Halliburton crosshairs on your I liked that. Even in this, you still down economy down all field. You know he's looking at growing his business and he's looking at the biggest competitor out there the biggest owner of that fracking's base and coming after and and I love that in a big red, you know you have to hustle, stay this, keep your number one spot, but it's just a great article and what this is doing bottom line is this let these guys keep their jobs right? There have a different logo on their paycheck and on their their Afars go bill to keep their jobs so. Hats off to them like I said, like you said, you know Chris he's a good guy runs a tight operation, very strategic move at a time where he basically picked this up for much less than he would have just even a year ago. So let's keep this to see where this goes and he's just a laid back guy really neat. He's a good guy his heart's in the right foot. Absolutely one hundred percent. All right. So the next one is OPEC to hold digital workshop question page. Yeah. The first paragraph, the OPEC what OPEC Secretariat what is that? That's a good question. Okay. That's why we have google. Anyway. So here's OPEC saying you know what we do that technology's important. We know they're our future is a tech future and we just want to understand what other people are doing. OPEC. Tins have everything kind of close to the vest. They're not known as being the most cooperative cartel out there and I say cartwheel lightly but seriously, and so they're saying, Hey, let's get. All the brains in one place this get all the people that have problems in one place. Let's talk about this new digital future, no oil and gas industry. Now to you in me, that's been going on for last five years because the way the politics are in the Middle East they do look at new tech, they do it processes, but it almost clandestine the and this. I think is pretty cool their public about this, and they just basically looking for new processes, new technologies to improve efficiencies and drive down costs, wealth saint keeping people safe. So the coolest part about this story is that its OPEC Not Saudi Aramco, not the Kuwait, oil company but its OPEC itself, the cartel solicitor by together to me, this is the beginning of cooperation, right? And cooperation outside of OPEC which if OPEC is going to stick around which I don't think it will. But if it's going to stick around, you have to change the way it does business with the rest of the world. This could be the beginning of that how in secretary at means a permanent administrative office or department especially a government one and it's also an American racehorse. Oh actually never think about the they one duckie debbie what like in the seventies movies there's a movie about it I think Nineteen, seventy, three, seventy, three. Folks that old right let's go to another one queens. Okay. So the next one is shell sees natural gas is a destination fuel. What does that even mean? I mean I. Read the article I understand it. But so she'll seeing a couple of things. So shell same number one, they would be a net zero net zero carbon. Coming by twenty fifty or sooner I get that. Right everybody's wanting to work that way and what they're saying is that natural gas is a fuel to bridge between where we are now and where we get into the highlight fairy energy world of all renewables right that world will never exist in the way that people want it to please people very pro renewable I. Love Renewable Energy Use have to understand that the cost of storage of renewable that problem is not been fixed yet and the renewable industry itself here and also starting in Europe and pretty soon happen globally is starting to face some the same challenges that we as an injury of face last thirty years. Landowners don't want windmills. People don't want solar people don't want to have varied amounts of electricity. Look what's going to California. Right now. Right. So like shells basically saying you gotta remember this is at College. Energy which is very much. Pro Renewable publication is basically saying, Hey, look, we know we have to get to this future that everybody thinks we need to get to before we get there we're gonNA, use natural gas, and of course you've heard me say this a million times by move from coal and natural gas electrical generation to reduce emissions by sixty percents much cleaner for the environment. I really believe natural gas is the fuel of the future hydrogen is an interesting part of. That in a bunch of different ways you and then toward the end, the guy's name is wetzlar was shell. He basically defended gas industry which I thought was really cool and he basically said the industry can and should be a driving force toward a net zero economy if the world is delimited the global average temperature raise to bla-bla-bla in these wait, I'll sit these hearts avoid emissions. Everybody knows my view on climate change. But the fact that we're trying an industry to lure a carbon footprint is not a bad thing. As long as we understand the science behind it Shell is probably running second fiddle to Ecuador is for as their involvement in the renewable side of the house. I would take delivery approach that called out Halliburton. I. Will say Shell Obgyn's launch and renewable podcast we're coming after you right. So if you want to promote renewable energy, you're gonNA have competitors, which is gonNa be us which is really just good for Obama just having fun with this but it's you once again shells calling the destination fuel you'll hear other people call it a bridge fuel I think the world's move toward natural gas and stay with natural gas in the liquids will be used more and more moving forward the future to make stuff out of but good article what's next interior to push drilling in Florida waters after November election how much bleeping is that GonNa Start? So, what a lot of people don't know is that the Gulf of Mexico is very abundant, mostly easy to recover reserves and that's the entire Gulf of Mexico include the eastern Gulf of Mexico, which is on the Florida coast, and so what does articles about is that of interior is gonNA open up Moorlands for federal drilling permits including hopefully if this article is. Right, the eastern part of Gulf of Mexico which is on the Florida border now for people live in Florida, let me explain a couple of things to you know you're scared that's hurt your tourism industry I often hear quotes of the BP Macondo disaster. So in the BP McConnell disaster happened and we never ever want something to happen again. So don't misquote we illness. The tourist industry in Louisiana made more money than you made the year before why? Because BP paid them, right. So number one, you don't need to worry about that. If something would happen, you would not lose revenue number two, the jobs that would be created and you'd think you're making money off tourism. Wait you have drilling contractors coming out you know those companies have big dollars have big checkbooks and have to rent rooms for hundreds of their guys at a time have to fly them all our opening up the Gulf of Mexico just add more energy independence. Now, here's the thing that nobody talks about knowing talk about it in this article. Go drill right now but a well. All too cheap. There's no reason to do that type of exploration now, but some point in the future they may. So if our political ministration opens up drilling and they're they're talking about doing it right after the election or right before which makes political sense to me from a strategy point of view you know then there's GonNa be a time where the public it's to comment on it, and then the state itself has some input, suit the state still push back and say you can't drill in state waters right? What you could drill in federal waters, which may only three difference between the state border is where the federal. I really hope for the people of Florida, that they support this and understand the advantages and the prosperity that brings to their state Florida. All the other states, the Gulf coast make money off oil. You don't. Yeah. Exactly. We'd like to have you join the party but Dewey. Get half the news that comes out of Florida. All right. So speaking of controversy, the trillion dollar reason why Joe Biden won't Ban fracking you at the bottom y y? He's saying he won't be in fracking what's up we'll stay called Pennsylvania. Yeah, familiar. So Pennsylvania if the Democratic Party wants to win the president election, they have to swing Pennsylvania. The problem is course Pennsylvania's that big oil and gas state they like their jobs they like their tax dollars, the prosperity, their roads like their schools, and so trying to get them to swing over is GonNa be impossible if they even think you might ban hydraulic fracking now. You say hydraulic fracking. You're not the most of the liberal side our political agenda in. Washington want to stop or gas exploration production. Most. Will admit it some won't. But most unbelievable there's other ways to stop it. You know they get on California right now where they want to be in any oil gas activities within twenty, five, hundred feet of any made any dwelling that's might lives. In California right and you see the same thing happens with people at one oppose water usage or the ability to build access roads or pipeline. So that sort of stuff. So just because President candidate Biden insane, he's not gonNA fracking don't think that his party is pro oil and gas the prosperity that the fracking industry has brought to the US in the last ten years eight years has been incredible. The cost of electricity has gotten so cheap. Here that we're bringing manufacturing jobs back from overseas it's actually cheaper to manufacture stuff here than is in. China. Because the cost of electricity so much cheaper here and so much more reliable the state tax dollars at the stakes mates off of hydraulic fracking the fact that it's such a less impact to the environment hairless bad stuff. But before I draw it fracking was invented you'd go out to a Freshfields Sheffield it'd be hundreds of wells drilled. Literally hundreds of wells I got pictures of it. Now they drill one well, the ESPN much vertical shafts, right so you had hundreds of wells in a shell, play all these vertical shafts. Come back with how fracking you can drill horizontally. So you'll have one well pad with a bunch of horizontal runs. Pack four pack we do that all the time and so instead of think of a beautiful meadow covered with hundreds of oil derricks, that's how it was done in the fifties and sixties and Seventies. Now think of one one acre installation it's fenced in and producing oil from it. It's totally different impact to the environment. So fracking is a great thing is great invention whoever? took the by way. A lot of people knew this had this conversation just other day fracking itself was invented by Shell in the fifties to stimulate water well, productions in California because you're going to drought the process of pump and water under pressure into the ground to produce something was originally done to help the farmers in California. Then later people took that technology and combined. It with a new technology horizontal drilling and that's where we hydraulic fracking and now it's bad. It's bad right? Yeah. But you know then finally for this, let me just say to anybody that's in politics right now when you enact laws that in some way, add cost to our industry or gas industry, the people you hurt are the people that have the least income, right? People that are well off can afford a fifty dollar hundred dollar jump their electric bill low income people can't. Then you start increasing the price of food because it costs more to move eggs or milk or bread or whatever. So you know this election for the oil and gas industry is critical this year you got side that hates us at owner stand what we're doing. Yet the other side that doesn't hate us, but they still need be educated they still quite sure what we do, but at least they're not trying to kill us so. The trillion dollar reason why Joe Bidden won't Ban fracking quite honestly comes down to him being elected and getting Pennsylvania swing over which I don't think. So happen I don't see it either but you never know it's twenty twenty crazier I now. So next article is Neptune Energy begins installing world's longest heated production pipeline. So why do you think paid? You'd want to heat a pipeline 'cause it's cold and so what else something to do with API gravity's Actually old track. So all of those cold is heavy. You can't move through the pipeline right and it gets a little chilly in the north, sea? Negative numbers. And so this is really cool. This is thirty six kilometers, which I think is about twenty three miles. So I do the math for me. This is the longest heated pipelines ever been built. Now, here's a really cool thing. It's a heated pipeline in pipeline. Now, there's a reason for this. Is a lot of people out there that we don't care about the environment. Bright we do. There's been an extra money that the heat from the pipeline will not trickle into the ocean and artificially raise the temperature within a foot or two of the pipeline because the wildlife there's accustomed to that temperature so they won't have zero zero impacted environment. Let me ask you this. Do you think that when they build the windfarms out there and they had those electrical cables, they run for the windfarm to short bring lectures back. Do you think they put a cable cable to keep that heat for be a display into the ocean now because y'all all care not that they don't care about the environment, but we have such a eagle eye on every little thing we do. So they're actually building this pipeline pipeline part of that is actually for pipeline integrity with biggest part is the minimize impact to the environment, and this is net to working with guests who they worked with the latest. One of our sponsors. Which one techni very good we're taking sponsor has the best subsea domain expertise. FM Sandy from C. SO TECHNIQUE FOMC was the project director on this their vessel actually off the installation the vessel deep energy. Cool me. Hey I, wonder if we get. To, get us a ride on a deep energy vessel nor how would be Owned by Yourself That's right I. Forget you get seasick. Here's a way for them to be bring oil back safely environmental responsible so that they can put it in the system so that people can buy it and use it for stuff and they're doing away. That's never been done before and I loved the partnership between Neptune. FOMC. So go guys. This is really cool. All right. So Exxon, mobile Baton Rouge Lard Oil donate fuel to support hurricane recovery. So I've been in that refinery quite a few times it is a city within a city. So what? Exxon Mobil's doing donate and fuel from relief efforts both gasoline diesel but they have to have a way to get it there. Lord. Oil stepped in and said, Hey, we got the logistics will handle will donate the logistics will delete the truckers. It's donate the fuels, and so they're working together to help clean up what happened after Hurricane Laura, and this is just like the Exxon their big company. Yes. They have PR and marking people. Yes. But they care the care about the communities that they operated. And here's Exxon mobile baton. Rouge age knowing that it has people in its area that have been feckless and they wanNA give back and they want to help so big shout to Exxon Mobil Lord Alfred doing this for donating the fuel to help the people in their time of need also mentioned something else. So our partners which is real where which makes the only intrinsically wearable out there and livestream, which is a software company supports remote learning partnered with us and so for people in the area. If it would be beneficial to you to be able to have remote eyes and ears in the field think of your doctor and you can't get into Cameron Louisiana right now because the infrastructure because the roads and everything but somebody needs hand surgery. Well, we could Flou- one of these wearable units and by using Labor stream you actually could see could actually telemedicine see the patient talk to the patient talked to the tending nurse or physician whatever and help them by bringing your expertise remotely to the area. Same Way if you're commercial worker getting electricity backup if it would if it would be helpful for you to have eyes and ears. So people back in headquarters could see what you're doing to help you stuff. We're giving us stuff away for free. That's awesome. So we'll put a Lincoln this show with a shot a short video, and Lincoln, but reach out to real where there's a Lincoln air. Think it's basically sales at if you're -ffected area and heaven remote eyes and ears in anything to do would be useful to reach out to real where there's like I put Lincoln shoots and they will donate the hardware and. livestream will donate the software. So we get you back up and get people back home and safe and effective area, and also Exxon, jumped on it immediately, they began shipping fuels over August thirtieth to Lake Charles Sulphur Louisiana was along no, not at all not at all. So speaking of sponsors, IBM's next big bed is the oil and gas industry surprise surprise mark. So even though IBM sponsors showed this news article is. Not. In here because I being sponsored just randomly came in here. Actually it's funny 'cause the next one's going to talk about them to. But basically slumber J. AN IBM partnered up they've created digital platform where August companies can access real time data and software to give you a competitive advantage in this crazy world, the platform that slumber. Jeez. Suite of APPs it's called Delphi and actually had one of their heads Adelphi. On the only guest tech podcast just like a week or two ago fair fascinating conversation and so digital is is become important August gas industry, but it has to serve. It's purpose we don't just need technology for technology's sake by this partnership, IBM's getting all the domain expertise of one largest service companies in the world slumber J. at the time when slumber J. Changing its direction slumber as CEO has taken a very. Big Stance on technology and basically saying slim will be technology company in the future which something I've been saying I don't know how long. This IBM coming in bringing their technology expertise things like hybrid cloud ai that source of to Slumber J., and then they're using red hat which IBM acquired for about thirty five, billion last year goodbye IBM by the way to make this integration work. So you see a lot more of these partnerships between big tech companies and oil and gas companies you're you're seeing it as been. Going on for a while and you can see more and more of it. This is a great fit. I know IBM extremely wellness slumber J. Very well it's nice to see these titans come together shake hands and the to out in the work in the field and help or gas companies survived through this year and prosper in the future. Yeah, and then the next article is. A major deal with IBM and red hat. Yes. So the cool thing about this is what's against the second oracle once again, just because I be sponsors show doesn't mean these articles showed up because of that. But the cool thing about this is that the cognitive environments I think of artificial intelligence can be deployed over a hybrid cloud and we'll say hybrid. Cloud think of a mix of public clouds and think of aws Azure I. think a Google and in your own internal cloud, right. So you can mix that you'll have to go one way or the other and by mixing it, you get the best of both worlds plus you're kind of vendor agnostic. So if one major vendor and you don't get along, it's Easy thing to move your everything your cloud everything over to the other vendor right and so this is once again slowly worked with red hat to get Delphi environment out to everybody and it's really cool because by working together, red hat is learning more about only gas in sheet, which is allow them to think of solutions that they would not have thought of before and slums. As help they can get those solutions out to the market and the course because red hat's by. Him IBM's benefit from this to their focusing really heavy on the upstream part especially, the geoscience who were characterization optimizing drilling optimizing production, all that sort of stuff which has been going on for a few years now. But when you pull these tech giants together with the domain expertise luxury, you could see the needle move a lot which is what we need right now bill drive even more efficiency I haven't looked today, but we're still hovering around forty, forty, two dollars a barrel. And Tula gets to fifty five or sixty driving efficiencies is the name of the game everywhere. So this is once again you know I've said this for years I thought I was crazy but you know the technology the big tech companies are the ones that are coming in help us drive the fishes that we need truly glad it's happening and you know isn't cool. That's our sponsors do yep exactly. Exactly. All right and that's the articles for this week. What's the thing with that Damn giveaway page to shirt a shirt it's really pretty shirt. Shirt actually, and then we still have some swagger given out pink, my contacted IBM. They apologize when this Laura thing came through they kind of shut we'll waiting for them to ship some more of it to so sort given out. So just right around the corner. But if you ever registered go register to win is a link in the show notes is really easy if you don't win this week back in next week and then we're gonNA do some really cool stuff with that. Speed really cool stuff I'm almost scared to ask you what's the recount ads not too shabby actually in the united. States we have account of two hundred and fifty six at were to up from time Canada where at fifty two were only down to an internationally were at seven, forty, seven up four. Oh, that's good news. And speaking of good news what's the deal street team our moving the Lincoln from face Berg do we grow up or something I think so This lead that effort Warren? So her we say this before stream was my idea that a plagiarized from somebody else I showed them no love because we got busy, which is just wrong. I Apologize. Street team were moving the stream for facebook to linked in. We have a bunch of stuff planned. WE ARE ASSIGNED THAT TO WARN Warren's happily jumped into take over the street team. We got a bunch of cool stuff much more engagement. We're GONNA. Have some strategic lassiter's were some ribbons that were have out were formed subgroups. If you're out there and you WANNA play a role with O. G. G., and we're play roller growth we asked for an hour's worth of work a week if you can't do it, it's totally okay it's all volunteer, but you're part of our extended family. So you're not the MOM and dad and kids, but your cousins. We. Love you. We like to see. Louisiana. Everything. Yeah and when life gets back to normal to come to Oliver Vince for free and then if we go to conference are expert in your area, the would you can join oppressing, which is actually really fun if you've never done that before. So go to Lincoln go join a street team. For All, that stuff star backup I've just totally missing friends networking which you. Ever heard me say in my life. Yes. So here you say you miss conferences as bad to miss being around other people that have similar interests right I mean I just go to target and then St team what the heck what. So we got the Lincoln Company page group scenes with links for everything. Yet I put them in there earlier. What's the difference between the Lincoln Company Page in Group Group and company page the company pages where we have two hundred, fifty employees. Then, the group is the one where we have everybody forty thousand. No that's like the three thousand or four thousand people right and then any street team. Then while you can go the website calling us this week dot com email address that's go away very quickly the final touches, the new Oji web page are taking place. Now, we we're going to have that up by the end of the month once that goes up all of the individual webpages for podcast or disappear from your view. Anyway, listeners and everything that we do is we sent her an Obgyn Dot Com and then our monthly newsletter out I got actually amazing number people saying we Miss Judy. Gus You just Miss People. So if you want to get a monthly email from me with all the August events that are going on, it's free we put it in your box once a month, we never spammy there's a leak in the shoots, go sign up for that, and then if you want myself or any of the team, any of our experts come to your event and speak to life podcast. Let us know we do a lot of that source of doing a lot of virtual speaking of have four gigs I think just in October. Yeah. So let us know we have to then first Friday Cuna know deal. If you have a question, reach out all this week dot com click on a question for us your question on the air. You'll get a big shout out and with all that said page let's get Outta here. Alright. Remember folks do great work pay it forward and we will see next time and hair savannah was events on. This is Savannah and here are the events on deck for September twenty twenty. There's The F. P. S. O. World Congress two, thousand twenty minutes that's on September first to the fourth and also the and it's all on. The next one is building the future industrial summit on September sixteenth, and that's also on. There's also the fourth annual blockchain and oil and Gas Conference Twenty Twenty and that's on September, the sixteenth to the eighteenth. The genius. Symposium and exhibition for Upstream Innovation Twenty. Twenty and that's September. Twenty. Second to the twenty fourth. And there's also effective leadership through change and uncertainty featuring Condoleeza Rice, and that's on September the twenty fourth. There's also nate summer twenty, twenty from all the eleventh to. September. Fourteenth and last leaders BP Week Twenty Twenty September fourteenth to sixteen. That's all for September. Hope you guys have a great month and thanks for tuning in. Tune in next week for another informative and entertaining episode of Oil and gas this week podcast, a production of the oil and gas global network learn more at. G. Dot Com.

IBM OPEC California Florida Shell Halliburton Pennsylvania Gulf of Mexico Gas Conference Twenty Twenty Chris Right partner Joe Biden google Lincoln Oliver Vince Denver Exxon CEO
12pm Newscast

Houston Public Media Local Newscasts

02:19 min | Last month

12pm Newscast

"Live from news. Eight seven houston. I'm kyra buckley. Texas governor greg. Abbott is due in houston. This hour. he'll be holding a roundtable with houston methodist hospital. Healthcare workers vaccination efforts. Texas is one of several states. That's opened sports. Stadiums convention centers and fairgrounds to process thousands of shots per day to a more diverse group of patients and houston health officials. Say they're learning lessons. From those vaccine mega sites nearly seven thousand people were vaccinated over the weekend but only five thousand were actually scheduled to receive the vaccine. Dr david purses the chief medical officer for the city of houston. He told houston matters. He received reports that people were sharing their appointment. Confirmation numbers brexit ain't folks our goal is people vaccinated until we ran out of vaccine but that unfortunately left a lot of votes who probably have legitimate confirmation hours. A day reno to that. Dr purse says about a thousand people who had appointments were left to get the vaccine but that when the city gets more doses. Those people will be rescheduled per says. The city is working on an improved system to prevent duplicate appointments for the future. The federal government plans to nearly triple the size of a marine sanctuary in the gulf of mexico. That's home to endangered sealife as environmental reporter katie. Watkins tells us. The proposal has been in the works for years. The flower garden banks national marine sanctuary is located about one hundred miles off the shores of texas and louisiana. The expansion will protect an additional fourteen reefs and even larger expansion was proposed back in two thousand and sixteen but that was revised to address concerns from the oil and gas and commercial fishing industries. Sanctuary is known for its underwater mountains. And it's home to sea turtles manta rays and coral reefs katie watkins reporting several state. Lawmakers are hoping today will be the last official confederate heroes day in texas houston democrat. Jarvis johnson is sponsoring a house proposal that would abolish the annual state holiday. It was established in one thousand. Nine hundred seventy three. I'm kyra buckley. And you're listening to news. Eighty eight seven support for comes from duolingo. a language. learning app built around the idea. That learning should be fun with more than.

houston kyra buckley houston methodist hospital Dr david texas brexit ai Dr purse Abbott greg gulf of mexico katie watkins Watkins federal government katie Jarvis johnson louisiana
MTTA 70: Michael Lister

Meet the Thriller Author: Interviews with Writers of Mystery, Thriller, and Suspense Books

33:58 min | 2 years ago

MTTA 70: Michael Lister

"You're listening to meet the throw -ther the podcasts were interview writers of mysteries, thrillers and suspense books. I'm host Alan Peterson. And this is episode number seventy and this episode of the podcast, I'm going to be interviewing New York Times and USA Today bestselling author Michael Lister, Michael grew up in north Florida near the Gulf of Mexico and the Appalachia caller river. He comes from a small town. And he has a fascinating background in the early nineties. Michael became the yen this chaplain within the Florida Department of corrections. He published a power and blood in nineteen ninety seven and that's was his first novel which kicked off his John Jordan mysteries. Was she is. Now recently published in nineteenth book in that series. Thatta great time talking with Michael about his long winning series about his writing process and a whole lot more and a reminder to please review and rate this. Cast on items or wherever you subscribe to to it. It helps me get the word out for the podcast. And I do appreciate it. Here's my interview with Michael Lister Peterson here with meet the thriller, author and in this episode. I am talking with Michael Lister who's on Skype. Are you Michael great? Are you? I'm doing good. Thanks for being on the podcast. Could you tell the listeners about your background? Sure, I've been writing just my first book came out about twenty one years ago. And I started like seriously pursuing writing about three or four years before that. So then at this quite a while. My original goal was to get published before I turned thirty. And I barely beat that made that goal, but I did I did beat that deadline and got right under the wire. And I'd always read mysteries and thrillers and really loved the John RA in new that's what I wanted to write. So when I started that's what I started with and pretty much stayed there. I I write a few things outside of the John Rowe, but most of mine novels are mystery thrillers, and I live in north Florida in. So that's a huge part of what I write about this where the majority of my books are set primarily in north Florida. And in Atlanta, Georgia, the I think, you know, there's a lot of influences we can talk about if you want to. But basically, I've got one main series go in and then quite a few. What were originally thriller stand-alones, but they've actually the characters in those have worked their way into my main series. So now pretty much everything I write is related and my main series is the John Jordan series. There's nineteen books in it, so far, and they're a murderous suspense thrillers. When the series Oakland's John Jordan is an ex cop. Returned from Atlanta to Florida and is become a prison chaplain and started as continuing to do investigation and then about midway through the series. He becomes a sheriff's investigator again. So that's John Jordan. And that's the the series sorta where I started has the I I read them power in the blood. That was the first John Jordan of book. Right. Yes. Yeah. I remember reading that last year. And I didn't realize yet that published twenty years ago. So amazing. It was nineteen ninety seven and I was actually a fulltime prison chaplain at the time that came out in two thousand I was able to stop that and start writing time, but the last year in in twenty seventeen we actually put out a twentieth anniversary edition of power in the blood, and I really cool book. What it what happens was had -tunities? To to rewrite it, so essentially, I went back in edited and revised and kept kept the original book, but did a lot of revising. And so it's not it's not the the twentieth anniversary edition is not the book. I would have written twenty years ago. And it's also not the one I would write today, but it's sort of a marriage of those two things it's got a really beautiful introduction by Michael Conley? And several other writers in and fans of the series have essays in content in the book and really really pleased with how it turned out. I notice that inter for Michael Connelly. That was a really nice the nice forward for you there. He's not just a great writer. He's a great person. Dowana might one of my favorites for sure Finn associated Vissel fascinating. I think this cool of about your about the judge Jordan series is like I said, I didn't realize you've been writing to for twenty years but to follow the diff. Arcs like you said he started out as a as an ex cop, and he became a chaplain sheriff's investigators. It's been interesting to see him grow and change throughout the years. Really? What appeals to me the most about doing a long series is to be able to. It's almost like I have several mini series within the main series, and I've actually gone back and written three prequels so far so John when he was when he graduated high school here in north Florida. He moved to Atlanta to really pursue is going to seminary, but he was pursuing the Atlanta child murderer and the actual the true crime case that actually took place there. And so that's a big part of the series. But I went back and wrote the seventh book in the series called innocent blood is actually a frequent. So it takes place starts in nineteen eighty when John actually encountered the Atlanta child monster the land child murderer and then his moving to Atlanta to investigate that. And then the tenth look in the series blood cries is is a sequel to innocent blood. It's continuing those early. Years of John stone cold also is a prequel I've got three prequels, and I've got the the years in which John was a prison chaplain Annan investigator and the now from book eleven which was led owes forward. So book eleven through book nineteen he's a sheriff's investigator. Again, he still does part time prison Chaplaincy, but his his primary job is an investigator is is one in which he's carrying a badge in a gun again. And is unofficial sheriff's investigator for Gulf county, and that one's that's bloodshed is the latest one right this release the last month. Right. Exactly. Yup. An invalid shed he actually John is investigating a school shooting. And he luckily local law enforcement are tipped off by the school resource officer that she believes there's a plot for a a school shooting detect place. I said they begin investigating before it takes place in an attempt. To prevent it. But it deals with sort of school shootings. What's happening in our society related to those? And there's a lot about that. But it is it's a it's a just got a lot of real information from Columbine forward. But there's a lot thriller. You know? So it's there's a lot of fiction in it and sort of marrying the two true crime in fiction, but it's also a mystery because in this case when the school shooting happens the shooter is wearing a mask and by the time all the chaos clears the mask has been thrown aside. And so the school shooter walks out with everyone else instead they have to you know, the mystery is who actually perpetrated that crime. But interesting twist. I wanted to take you know, what's going on with them. And then add add elements that were new and different. And and to to not only have a thriller. But also have a mystery, you know, I really enjoy mysteries. And in all of these books have mysterious mystery elements there who done it must of the time, you not revealed until the very end, you know, who actually is responsible for the crime, and and get into psychology of why in the in the revelation of who the killer is and really enjoy that aspect of it. He had I think it's so cool. You like you actual the chaplain in the potential in the prison of I mean, what was that like to be a chaplain in a prison? It was a really cool experience. I something I never considered. I mean, just was not even on my radar. But in sorta where I live in the early nineties late eighties early nineties. They built a lot of prisons in in this area and one in Gulf county where Al. Live. They built in is just a couple of miles from where I live a small group of us went out to meet with the the chaplain there at the time. And and there were three of us. We sat down with him. And we're just asking, you know, what we could do to help, you know, if we could volunteer for programs in different things in is we're talking he looked at me. And he said you need to be doing this talking about Chaplaincy before that moment. I just it just never had occurred to me so within it was just one of those sort of serendipitous kind of things because within a few weeks at was doing it and most of the most of the decade of the nineties. I was a prison chaplain with the Florida Department of corrections. And that meant I worked with a lot of criminals, I worked with a lot of officers and staff, you know, gained a lot of experience in stories in ended alive counseling in you know, hurt a lot of four stories than it. Just was a great foundation for the John Jordan series is. You had a goal of being posed before you turn thirty. But did you always dream of becoming a writer from a very early age? I was a storyteller and wanted to always did things within the arts. You know, see I was riding from an early age. I was doing some filmmaking doing a little music, but as I grew up really riding became the the primary thing, and I just fell in love with fictions on love, particularly with crime stories in what kind section was capable of at as many writers have said, I'm a I'm a reader moved to emulate, you know. So I I I read books that I loved and I just wanted to Ryan them. I wanted to write books like those. And so that's what I started doing. It was in my what was the summer ninety four. I had many in college. I had tried to write in did. Right. But it just wasn't a good was having a hard time. You know, four sorta click in the fall in the place, but I I did. A a graduate program. And it was a it was a modular program which met I was on campus. Just very just a few weeks year the rest of the time, I was working from home. And so it required a lot of writing. And when I came to the end of that program, and when I graduated I decided to the the amount of time. I was spending an academic writing every day I was going to vote to my fiction writing. And I did and that was the summer of ninety four ages. Click three years later, our in the blood was published by pineapple press in in south Florida, and sort of where everything began we have lots of series out there like ten look at your website. I have I guess I have probably four series in like I said now they sort of all is almost all like, they're all part of the John Jordan series, but have a a nineteen forties Noir series set in Panama City, Florida during the world ward sued during the sort of. On the home front always loves Ilna war and the classic hardball detective novel. So it's sort of a Ammash to those and that's the Jimmy Riley series. And there's five of those far, and then I have a series with a FDLE, which is the Florida Department law enforcement. That's like the state cops in Florida. I have a series involves a a female FDLE agent college religion, professor who soft crime together and then in a few others. But like, I say, John Jordan is the main series and in all of those characters that have written about sort of make their way into the John Jordan series. Eventually as interesting another in the last couple of years have been a lot of books published in but inferred a crime mysteries and Florida northern Florida. The like the Gulf Coast on that that's such an interesting area. Have you noticed that trend that they're also more books now published a in Florida is interesting because in when I first started writing south, Florida was just sorta the sort of capital crime fiction is just as post Miami vice era narrow lot of writers writing about crime in in Miami. And in south Florida. And so I was one of the few that was writing about crime writing crime fiction in north Florida. But now, you're right. There's more and more seems like writers are writing crime fiction set in in all parts of Florida. But really lately the new parts have been really dealing with with central Florida up to north sorta were live in the really the difference. The states kind of south not north another four California question. It is interesting because the south art of Florida is more like the north arm of the United States. It's in the north Florida. Florida's more like the south part of the United States. What I mean, I really live by living in north Florida. I really live in the deep south. It's a rural. It is, you know series of small towns in it is very much a part of the deep south. You can't really distinguish where I live from Alabama, Georgia, Tennessee, very similar, Louisiana. Very similar mindset saying history in that kind of thing to some of the raiders that influenced you, then when you before you started to write you a fan of the John RIA who are some of your favorites. Well, it really, of course as a kid. I read Sherlock Holmes in some of the classics. So that was certainly an early influence in high school. There is a TV show with a private detective called Spenser for hire. And that's what led me to the books of Robert b Parker in the Spenser series. And he was very. Very early influence in a love the character spent Cerna love love Parker's writing style, like his prose a lot. And so then I just really started investigating the John reading more not James Lee, Burke, became a huge influence of big fan of his Michael Conley. Dennis lane, Graham Greene, Walter Mosely, just just several and of course, it classics too. You know, Agatha Christie, Raymond, Chandler, national Hammett. Lot of lot of those riders both the contemporary and historical have had a huge influence on me. So from your books of the Jordan series. Did you ever you say you heard a lot of stories that a horror stories for being a chaplain in the imprisoned? You the near those ever make it into one of your the basis through to one of your books. Definitely fictional versions of things. I experienced. While I was a chaplain in stories out her definitely in fact for the second book in the series, which is called blood of the lamb by should say every John Jordan book as the word blood in it. So there's, you know, our no blood of the lamb flesh and blood and on and on and on up until bloodshed that just came out, but I had the second book in the series written. And then I had an experience as a chaplain. But the situation that happened in prison that I just discarded that second book I have written and wrote another book based on inspired by actual events that that had happened to me in that I was involved with in the in the prison. And so that that happened a lot. And then I guess maybe that's what has inspired more and more over the years. More and more true crime has worked its way into my novels. Now, you know, they're all these are fiction. You know? This is fiction in his it's not their novels, but I have experimented with both using elements of true crime. I've used the Atlanta child murders I've used Ted Bundy what he did Columbine. The Jon Benet Ramsey case. More Murray Heyman Lee, you know, at non science case, a lot of a lot of cases have made their way into my fiction. And if I am specifically talking about them than than his factual, I'm using the actual true crime. You know, the real stories and people in in factual history. But I'm married that with fiction, and so for instance, in blood work. There's a cold case that John is investigating in his looking at it very closely. And originally it was believed that Ted Bundy was responsible for Ted Bundy, of course, came to Florida and spent time in Florida and was caught in Florida. And ultimately he was executed in Florida. And so I used all the historical. Events related to Bundy in what he did in. There was a time in which he left how has seen drove across the drove west across north Florida to Pensacola and was ultimately apprehended over there. But I used that journey that he was on for intersection with fictitious characters, and that was the basis of bloodwork. So I I've always I guess brought in elements of things I've actually experienced in true crime elements, and until you just asked that question. I guess I really haven't thought about my early experiences as a chaplain in using those inner true life experiences is probably what opened the up to use a more and more true crime in my novel, unless the preparation process for that the the research before you actually dive into the writing. Yes. Yeah. It is interesting because early on in the series, you know, a lot of ways I was was living the research, but as the. Series continued in went on. I've I've done more and more research over the years. And of course, like I said when I use the elements of true crime. I I studied the do a real indepth study of the cases that I'm using. But even when when everything's fictitious in is not based on a real case or something related to true crime. I still do a lot of research, and I'm in the extremely fortunate position of having a childhood friend of mine who is was in my class when we actually started school together. And when all the way through from kindergarten to to graduating high school together, he is the sheriff of the counting where I live, and he has been from the last ten or twelve years, maybe more the primary consultant for my books in. So you know, my books now are set in Gulf county in John works with Gulf county sheriff's department. And it's my friend who is the sheriff of the of Gulf county in. He's just given me so much great information, and I have asked him questions continually. I've also got a really good friend who was in Terni in now has been a judge for several years and another friend who's forensic pathologist. So I I call on them. You know, of course, you there's all kinds of good information in books and online, but these three really provide me with just hands on details that ENA their experiences that I really couldn't get anywhere else. Yes. Especially reading the in the area that you're reading to this as a pretty great the connections. Is the area you said Gulf county. But it is the town that that the gender and lives and works in is that real or what happened in started? Like, I said when I was a on first novel published owl still full tempers chaplain. And I had to make the decision if I was going to set the the novels in a in a real place like in prison. I was working in town. I was living in or if I was going to do a fictitious. So I I made a fictitious town where John is fictitious prison, and all and so this fictitious town where he lives in the fictitious prison where he works are actually located in and are surrounded by real places in in north Florida. And then in the eleventh book in the series, which in a lot of ways called blood owes than a lot of ways is really like the start of the new series or the second part of this series. And I moved John to a real. Location is so John actually lives now in we were hitch go where I live, and is like I said worked for the Gulf county sheriff's department, so actual real places, you know, whereas before I was using a fictitious town surrounded by real places real towns. Now, everything in the novels are set in real places actual actual places which now is a new challenge to do. I've really enjoyed that. And I've continually look for ways like that to keep the series fresh both for me as the the writer of them. But then also for the readers, the what do you find as a writer? What the is there a big difference between writing fictious fictitious down versus a real life town or a definitely a lot of challenges. You know, obviously the fictitious town. You can do absolutely anything. You want us down is based on real places. Yes. Fictitious versions of real places. You've been no about. Because it you know, it has to be credible, and it has come across his real. But if you need to if you need a fictitious business or you need to move a road or any you can do anything in the fictitious town in things like that. You know, that you can't when you're writing about real places, but the real places come with a lot of material to work with they come with a history. You know, they come with actual literal factual events things you can describe and explain, and so, you know, there's a lot to work with either way, but I've enjoyed both aspects and I enjoy doing both ways in and like I say, it's just really kept the the series fresh for me. I speaking of that I'm not I've read series in which I felt like that either. The author got tired of writing the series in wasn't sure why he or she continued or either it seemed like they were writing the same book over and over. And over again. And so I've made a real conscious decision not to do one of those things. So I felt like as a lot of diversity in the John Jordan series from a stylistic standpoint, you know, from the stories themselves might approach like I said moving from a fictitious place to a real in in various things like that. And so I'm going to keep it as fresh in interesting in in fill light that each book is better than the previous one and win that stops. I will stop writing series. And Dan Jordan has been aging through the through the twenty years. Yes will interesting because when I first started, I wasn't sure house gonna handle that. So in the earlier books wasn't one allows specific references. But went undecided to do the prequel and have John investigate the Atlanta child murders. Then I that's when I specifically set him and the books in actual, you know, time in place. So then then it became on new, you know, the the audience now, the readers know, exactly, you know, who John was born when he graduated when he went to Atlanta when he came back to Florida, you know, all of those things are are tied to actual events in history. Now. Yeah. Love the John Jordan timeline that you have in your website. That's pretty cool. I thought again the for a long series. I think you is helpful to do things like that. And and you never know when when when readers going to join the series, I've written an essay that's in most of the novels explains. You know, the best way to read the series, and the three places where I think the three books that I think are the best places to enter the series, which is innocent blood, the prequel mention power and above which is the first buttons in written our blood oath the eleventh book when John becomes an investigator. Again. I mean officially investigator again, but a ride in where you could pick up anyone in start. You know, each book each novel contains a a a self contained mystery that solved in that novel. So anyway, things like that I think help for with a long series help reader in a stay sort of more to the. Series. And know what's going on, particularly if they pick up later book in and then decide to go back and read the books late and did that work for you. As a from the writing perspective, you have like a spreadsheet to keep track of all the time lanes. And do a lot of outlining before you start to write your stories. I don't I don't do a lot of outlining. I'm a right. I've been I guess in terms of just love the characters and events or so in the novels or so real to me in been so much art of my, you know, the last twenty four or five years of of my life in writing about them that I talk I'm really good sense of know now characters who they really are their past and their histories. But definitely I do make notes in. If there is something I need to double check. I'll just go back to the text of the novels, you know, in animals to look up in if I need to. Reminder of exactly when something happened. You know, how it happened to write a novel Aspen? A lot of time. I do my research has spent a lot of time thinking about thinking about the characters in what's going to happen with them in in the the mystery in the story itself, and I'm I do make little notes, but not much and I definitely don't outline. So when I start I have a good idea of where it's going, and I know a couple of the main things are gonna do not believe we're going to happen along the way. And I have some notion of how it's going to end. But that's it in the rest of it. I want to discover it as I go, and I believe that if I, you know, excited to wake up every morning to get to the keyboard to see what happens next and see how it unfolds and discover things along the way a hope than that translates to the reader having that same kind of exciting experience with novels and you set like reading goals when you're writing a an active project, you say like I want to write five pages today or two chapters. Ters or five thousand words, I do I don't it's not that specific. But I do I write when I'm writing a novel. And is almost always am at this point. I am when I finish in novel in then, of course, after do some of the promotional kind of things related to the release or launching the book. But otherwise, I'm always researching in preparing to write the next novel in so I take a little time off in between each each book to renew and refresh. But then also to do my research in live with the next story for a while for it to develop in in in my head at least in. But when I'm writing I really that's pretty much all I'm doing. So, you know, all day every day, I'm I'm working on that novel in so I that's just where my focus in concentration is and it enables me to to produce a lot in in a short period of time. But most of the most days, I will write probably two to three. Chapters, but always at least one chapter a day in depending on how it goes in how long chapter is. But most of the time is two or three, and I don't have a particular word count. But I I know, you know, so good about if I get you know, x number of chapters done than on on. No. Make an account of progress than I won't to on the book, and are you working on a book number twenty? Now, the done Jordan ham in the research in sort of living with the characters in story mode. Some not actually started this, of course, is part of riotings. I I can't sound having started the writing. But I haven't started putting words down on the page yet. I'm probably have a few more weeks of research and study in into now start the next one suspect exciting number twenty in the series. Credit accomplishment. It's it's because the third book in the series is a collection of short stories. It's the twentieth book, but it's the nineteenth novel. But he has very special, and I've been thinking about you know, some of the ways in which I can commemorate it being the twentieth series. And so before I let you go some others reserve sparring writers here and advice that you could give them a with regards to writing. Well, I would say that when it comes to writing it really is something that you you learn by doing and it takes tremendous amount of effort and focus, you know, an attention. And, you know, Malcolm, glad well mentioned the have active do something for ten thousand dollars or ten years to get very proficient at it. And there there are no shortcuts you have to his very idiosyncratic endeavor. You know, you have to study it, but you mostly have to do it. And you learn to do it by reading good books and Rakim down in studying how they work, you know, but they mostly do it. Writing. If you commit to write in write it, you know, trying to write consistently every day if possible and then get good feedback. So you can can learn grow and be open to that good feedback and be willing to to change things that need to be changed. Then you can't figure it out. And you figure out how you have you do how how it works for you by doing that by by figuring it out yourself. Once you do that like you really know how to do it. There's not a great books as rent courses and things, but ultimately, you know, we're the ones who have to figure out how to write in by in doing that that process really prepares us teaches us to to be able to do it. Well, but it's not quick is there there are no shortcuts has craven for the veterans to find you you websites of Michael the third dot com. Yep. Michael dot com. And that's has most everything you know, the that about the series. On the different projects going end up. You know, how to get them in that kind of thing. Even at a cool stuff in there like like like merchandise to like, I really like some of the yes, free awesome. Some some John Jordan Birch in the videos are really cool to trailers we've made a lot of trailers for the books over the years on. There's interviews there's as interview Michael colony and I did a couple years back. That's on the air a lot of good material, especially for people are fans of thrillers in mysteries in in Spiring Reiner's. I think no I think they'll find something that will be benefit for them. All right, cool. Well, thank you so much for taking time to talk to us. I really appreciate you very much. I enjoyed it. Thank you for listening to this episode of meet the filler author. I'd like to ask you to please review and rate this podcast over on itunes. It really helps me get the word out. If you take a few seconds of your time to do that, it would be much appreciated. Visit my website at thrilling reads dot com forward slash podcast for show notes on this episode as well as information about the podcast in general, and you can also sign up for my minimalists there. You'll be getting special offers from our guests as well as formation behind the scenes information on the podcast, and please do visit my website at Allen Peterson dot com. I appreciate your support. And so until next episode we'll talk to you then.

John Jordan Florida John writer Atlanta north Florida investigator north Florida Florida Department of correcti Gulf county Michael Jordan ham John RA Alan Peterson John Rowe Michael Conley Michael Lister Peterson John Jordan Birch Gulf of Mexico Michael Connelly