21 Burst results for "Gulag Archipelago"

'Insurrections and Double Standards' With Heather Mac Donald

The Eric Metaxas Show

02:42 min | 3 months ago

'Insurrections and Double Standards' With Heather Mac Donald

"Life. Welcome back, I'm talking to Heather McDonald, who has written a lot of stuff for city journal. Okay, so the piece we're talking about now is the January 6th piece called insurrections and double standards. So it's the same theme, there's this kind of woke narrative, and the only problem is it's become weaponized. You have the United States government throwing people in jail. I mean, it sickens me because I've had some of those people on this program and to hear their stories. I can't believe there's levels of injustice. It's one thing for some educated suburban housewife who's a docent at the Art Institute of Chicago to be sent packing. Like that's bad. Yeah. But to have people have their doors broken down to be arrested and humiliated because they dared to show up at the nation's capital, they didn't break anything. They didn't kill anyone. They didn't strike anyone. And so there's this narrative. And again, the worst part of it for me is that you're told, don't talk about it. Don't dare talk about it because you need to show that you're on board with this narrative. And if you don't show that you're on board with this narrative, you're probably part of the problem. Right. Well, on the one hand, I'm not going to go immediately to well they were a Jean provocateur. I think there is, I believe, in personal responsibility. And if you were trespassing, if you were vandalizing, you absolutely should be held accountable. That having been said, though, Eric, by the way, I'm against vandalism. Just to be perfectly clear. Let's just be perfectly clear. There were actions that day that should not be repeated. Correct. And if this becomes the norm, if you believe rightly or wrongly that an election was rigged, you should not, that does not entitle you to do this. But I will say this. You don't know when we pull the emergency court because you're absolutely right, there is a double standard here in the way these people have been treated compared to the Black Lives Matter rioters. And I've just read believe it or not, for the first time 1984, it terrifies me. It's part of my reading of gulag archipelago, narratives of Soviet totalitarianism, the thought of a government that has you have no hope for justice, the very instruments and institutions of justice are biased, the great human yearning is the possibility of an impartial hearing, a tribunal that you can come that you can tell the facts and get an impartial hearing. If we've lost that, it is all

Heather Mcdonald City Journal United States Government Art Institute Of Chicago Eric
Eric and James O'Keefe Discuss Doing the Right Thing

The Eric Metaxas Show

03:02 min | 4 months ago

Eric and James O'Keefe Discuss Doing the Right Thing

"Hey folks we're talking to the author of American muckraker rethinking journalism for the 21st century. His name is James O'Keefe. James O'Keefe, you just said that a lot of people are scared. This is the issue, right? And so part of it. But what you and I believe, and what many people in history have believed is that there is a God. There is such a thing as truth. And I need to do the right thing because I know that whatever they want to call it, God, the universe will back me up. In other words, that to not do the right thing, ultimately I pay a much bigger price. I sell my soul to the devil so that I don't get in trouble today. And I really do believe, I mean, if I'm speaking in churches, I say that, you know, you should worry about what God thinks. You should fear God. Don't fear what people can do to you or whatever. But we're in a culture now we're doing the right thing is less celebrated. As you're saying, it's kind of, it really is we have been generally and collectively cowed by fear of losing an Instagram account or this or that. And so we are being controlled. And never more than now has it mattered that people say no, no. I will do the right thing. And I, in my position, I would say, I will trust God with my career. With my voice, I have to I have to get serious. What do I believe? And I think people need to be encouraged that when you do the right thing, yeah, it will work out for you in the end, no matter what happens, somehow you can't, you can not really I've written about Dietrich bonhoeffer. He went to the gallows for doing the right thing. But he believed that Jesus defeated death on the cross. Like at the end of the day, you have to decide what you believe. And I think that we're just living in a culture where a lot of people aren't sure. And so they're kind of hanging back and they're letting people like you get handcuffed. Well, I mean, this is you mentioned Bond hoffer. I wrote about Alexander silts and eats and in this book and he talks about in the gulag archipelago, which I heavily cite, because that book kind of changed my mindset and he says, you have a choice to make. You go to one direction you might lose your life. You go to another direction, you go against your conscience. And to follow your conscience and wherever it leads you is important. But it does come down to fear. It comes down to fear of, as you say, fear of God not man, one of our whistleblowers I asked her, Jody, O'Malley, from HHS, this is in September. I said, aren't you afraid? And she said, I fear God not man. But do actually do that. I think is the point. And I spoke at one church, calvary in California. I don't really speak the churches, but my feeling Eric is that maybe Christians are too afraid. And maybe they're not acting out on their faith.

James O'keefe Bond Hoffer Alexander Silts Dietrich Bonhoeffer Archipelago Jesus O'malley Jody HHS California Eric
What Would the Playback Be for Eliminating Large Portions of the Population?

The Charlie Kirk Show

01:59 min | 6 months ago

What Would the Playback Be for Eliminating Large Portions of the Population?

"To eliminate a large portion of the population? What's so incredible to me is how close we are in historical terms, meaning not so far away from the intentional attempt to eliminate entire races of people. This is not just done by the national socialist Workers Party in the 1930s and 1940s in Germany, despicably and evil. But it's also attempt to be done by Mao Zedong and Joseph Stalin. If the 20th century told us anything, it told us a couple things as Alexander social needs and famously wrote in the gulag archipelago. He said that all of this was thanks to ideology. Now, Alexander social needs an reflected in the gulag archipelago, which I encourage you to read. He went into a deep reflection saying, what did I personally do that might have contributed to this great evil? It's very profound. And actually, that book was largely responsible for the downfall of the Soviet Union. There's another great book by Victor frankel, which is called man's search for meaning by writing that book he ended up starting a whole new psychological kind of school of thoughts called logo therapy. The will to meaning. Usually you have the will to power the will to pleasure. He says that we as humans have a moral obligation to have a will to meaning. Viktor frankl famously said in man's search for meaning there are only two types of people, the decent. And the indecent. We are so close to the committed and attempted elimination of entire groups of people. Why is it that anytime anyone says that the government might be trying to do that again, they're called a conspiracy theorist and you're not even allowed to talk about it. It's a very

National Socialist Workers Par Alexander Victor Frankel Gulag Archipelago Joseph Stalin Mao Zedong Germany Soviet Union
Area Libraries, Bookstores Celebrate Banned Book Week

Dennis Prager Podcasts

02:27 min | 9 months ago

Area Libraries, Bookstores Celebrate Banned Book Week

"There is a piece in the wall street journal by the president of regna. Repoed publishing full disclosure. They are the publishers of many of my books and all of my books in the rational bible series and i have appreciated their worked tremendously. Tom spence is. The president is piece in the wall. Street journal is about banned books. So tom first of all of course. Welcome to the show. Thanks dennis happy to be here. I'll bet are and i'm happy that you are. What is there. Every year is that there's a banned books week or something. What is it called. Yes it banned books week. It's a week long promotion in the book. Trade that sponsored by the american library association the american booksellers association and several other organizations. It's the last week of september so begins. It begins next week. And it's a way to promote books that have been ostensibly banned. The the joke of it is that the books that are promoted year after year have not been banned in any meaningful sense and now the books that are in some real sense. Being banned are studiously ignored by ban. Books week policy in the book but hypocrisies two-mile a term. It's orwellian the books that are banned are not mentioned during banned books weeks and books that our peripheral band give me an example of what they say is banned so so yeah i mean obviously it depends on how you define your terms so if i if i describe a book if i tell you that a book has been banned. What does that mean to you. What's your first thought that it is no longer available to the public right. I think that's a reasonable definition. So if i'm living in soviet union in the you know nineteen eighty five. And i want to buy the gulag archipelago. Am i gonna find it kid. It's been banned right the government or somebody with authority to the power to do. It has made that book unavailable.

Tom Spence Street Journal The Wall Street Journal American Booksellers Associati American Library Association Dennis TOM Soviet Union
"gulag archipelago" Discussed on KTRH

KTRH

01:35 min | 1 year ago

"gulag archipelago" Discussed on KTRH

"The American rescue plan. But how is it that that is an argument that to be made when the president never mentioned Needing money for police to stop crime wave when he was telling the American rescue well, the president did mention that the American rescue plan the state and local funding, something that was supported by the president. A lot of Democrats who supported and voted for the bill could help ensure local cops were kept on the beat and communities across the country, As you know, didn't receive a single Republican votes. Yeah, you know, one of the quotes that I often read on my show actually, almost every day at this point, thanks to Jen Pataki's from Alexander Solzhenitsyn, who, of course, wrote the Gulag Archipelago and he said they know they're lying. We know they're lying. They know that we know that they're lying, and they continue to lie. And Caylee as a former White House press secretary yourself, You know, you know exactly when you have certain information, and you have to process it and get it to the media in a certain way, But I never once I'll give you credit right here. I never once or you brazenly lie the way Jen pus AQI is and she knows that no network Or major news outlet, Corporate press of The New York Times Washington Post or anything else is going to call them out on him. That's a fact they've got complicit. Help from the mainstream media, So they know the lie long enough, and it's only it's only it's only a lie. If you don't believe it, right 5 26 time to take a look at your money. All right. We've got according to host standing by with an update this morning. Good morning. Well, good morning. Jimmy.

Jimmy Caylee Alexander Solzhenitsyn Jen Pataki Jen Democrats White House Republican The New York Times this morning one American Gulag Archipelago secretary Washington Post 26 time AQI quotes 5 single
"gulag archipelago" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

860AM The Answer

02:38 min | 1 year ago

"gulag archipelago" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

"Like the heart. Of so much of the left. Was the wealthy are are leftist. I think they feel you know, made all this money and now I believe in wealth distribution. I don't know what animates them. I really don't Donald Trump represents the little guy. And the left has contempt for the little guy. They speak in his name, just like Communist spoken workers names. If your if you are taken in by that, because you're ignorant of history, and you're ignorant of history because you studied in the average American school. How many college graduates can identify the Gulag archipelago. If you can identify the Gulag Archipelago, there's something wrong with your education's deeply wrong. You know what the Chinese cultural revolution wass? The great leap forward. Only about 60 million Chinese were starved to death by Mao. Anybody know that I graduated college know they know about preferred pronouns. They know that Shakespeare was dead White European male CIS gendered Probably Yeah, that's what they know. What this election is about. Not about Trump. With the love of Donald Trump. So I found out The the rally that I mentioned to you that that shook up the Democratic lieutenant governor of Pennsylvania. That rally had 56,000 people. Butler Township, Pennsylvania. 56,000 people in an epidemic. Did he say Now? What? What do you say that Biden gets 25 people. Writing is a nothing Everyone knows he's in nothing. The left knows he's and nothing. The right nose. He's in nothing. The left loves the fact that he's a nothing because he'll do exactly what they want, which he has already said. I watched the zoo call with Bernie Sanders and his fellow left. This is basically you know, we've got our way guy. We won Hi, Bernie didn't win, but my ideas one The president, now speaking in North Carolina, lets him for a moment.

Donald Trump Gulag Archipelago Biden Bernie Sanders Trump American school Butler Township Pennsylvania North Carolina president Pennsylvania.
"gulag archipelago" Discussed on KSFO-AM

KSFO-AM

02:10 min | 1 year ago

"gulag archipelago" Discussed on KSFO-AM

"The Legislature's elected the Senate And then the senator's played a bigger role in presidential elections. Blob. That is why we aren't a democracy and our republic. At least there's in theory, One level removed in between democracy is another word. Another term for mob rule. And there's a rule. There's a role for democracy in the republic. But it is not. It's it's treated like a religious like totem. The word democracy. Stop it. Let's see Moving along. Ah, Another freedom loving quote of the day about power from Drew the millennial. I like this from Alexander Solzhenitsyn. Villar Gulag Archipelago. Power is a poison well known for thousands of years to human who has some faith and a force, which holds Dominion over all of us and is therefore conscious of his own limitations. Power is not necessarily fatal. For those who ever for those, however, who are unaware of any higher sphere. It is a deadly poison for them. There is no antidote. Interesting, you know. Well in juices. Godel associate pats who are unaware of their own limitations is a pretty solid description. Most politicians and despot's Yeah, well, said drew the millennial. Not one, but two mentions of get goes in mailbag today, Claudia and beautiful Edmonds. Washington is pleased that you have a gecko and didn't hear whether Gekhi returned safely to the household. Found it behind the bookcase. Geekiest. Fine. Jack is now a lizard guy. She also points out that indeed, the murderer used by the way, thank you for the murder Hornets were captured in western Washington. Not eastern. As I'd said, I apologize for the grievous error and had assumed incorrectly that they're out in Apple country anyway. Moving along. Good morning, guys. I have a gecko named cricket liquor that's picked the last two presidents correctly dead cricket on a piece of paper with the names of each candidate. The cricket ease. First is the winner. He picked Obama and Trump in the last two elections. I did it again. And guess what he picked Trump now be done so so cricket liquor. Has picked. The next president is some of the polls are strong.

Trump Villar Gulag Archipelago cricket Washington Hornets Gekhi Alexander Solzhenitsyn senator Legislature Godel Obama Jack Edmonds Senate Claudia president Apple murder
"gulag archipelago" Discussed on The Dan Bongino Show

The Dan Bongino Show

04:20 min | 3 years ago

"gulag archipelago" Discussed on The Dan Bongino Show

"Let's make it one hundred pretty wage Bernie Sanders a fraud Bernie Sanders has always been a fraud. He's as a lazy fraud. I'm really sorry people out there the birth Bernie Bros.. Who believe in this guy? He's a total fake at all like the millionaires you notice. He stopped saying what he says now. I'm not messing. He's not a joke the listening to him now. He goes like the billionaires. Why why do you stop say that? Is he billionaire. That's right. I'm a millionaire. I forgot so when he becomes a billionaire. He's going to Idaho like the trillionaires I can't had standards. This guy is the biggest fraud and Congress fifteen dollars a fight for fifteen o gives like the Communists I. Let's go. This guy's a fraud. He's a fake. He's got like that the hammer and sickle thing going. He's a phony except he doesn't WanNa pay any of his employees on his campaign fifteen dollars an hour now. We covered that story earlier in the week. It'll cover stories twice but I don't have to. What's the update? This is hysterical. We gotta treat workers fairly bloomberglaw Bernie Bernie Sanders White escapade labor complete peace ever piece. This greatest peace ever Birdie said there's paid as been hit with a National National May Labor Relations Board K. play by unnamed individuals in Indiana staffers this tension between Sanders and his staff is boiled over publicly. This is amazing. Listen to the allegations Birdie says Bernie Sanders. I love the workers. His campaign has been accused of illegal employees interrogation and retaliation against staffers folks. This guy is a colossal tedious level six tries to highest level of trump derangement syndrome infection fraud. He's a phony not only did he not give his employees to fifteen dollars an hour minimum wage right then when they complained retaliated started interrogating him because I loved a police state I am the party's not front Birdie is a bright show Bernie's communist communist would do next. He'll be here here. We go. I love this is one of my favorite books next to Gulag will become in the best book ever the Gulag Archipelago next thing you know Bernie. You'll be setting up the KULAKS. He's that should be his answer. I am not a fraud. I am a communist and what do we do. We beat the snot out of our employees in interrogation. What is what we do hammer in style? That is how it's done. Didn't you idiots pay attention to history. I call me anything but I am the real McCoy we put them in a room with the heat. headlamps red sparrows style. You see that movie Red Sparrow we put the heavy metal on and that's what we did. What is the NAPLE relations board complaining about this communism at its fighters? I take all of that bags. Bernie is not a fraud. He is a legit communist they lie they cheat they steal and they never have any accountability at all and when people complain they interrogate them Birdie is legit. This guy is the real McCoy Ladies and gentlemen. They're throwing the flag on myself under the Hood for review Dan Bongino we are reversing the play on the field Bernie Sanders. There's is not a fraud. He is legit Communist. We just provided the evidence the red flag of course we want to the hood for review. We are reversing the play on the you feel. The play is reversed. Birdie is the real McCoy all right. We gotta get out of your. Hey Watch me on the five later. I promise it'll be if I am not putting up with any collusion nonsense today. Don't miss this show and don't miss the Tucker explosion the news explosion. I do like eight fifty eastern time. I'm going to hang around up in New York to do that before I had back tomorrow. It's going to be a tomorrow Saturday tomorrow.

fraud Bernie Sanders Bernie Bernie Bros Birdie McCoy Gulag Archipelago Idaho National National May Labor Re Red Sparrow New York Indiana Congress Dan Bongino fifteen dollars
"gulag archipelago" Discussed on News Radio 1190 KEX

News Radio 1190 KEX

02:36 min | 3 years ago

"gulag archipelago" Discussed on News Radio 1190 KEX

"All right. We're back with Brad Thor. So yesterday, we asked people, and we got a lot of responses online. Just go to glennbeck dot com slash save books. We got a lot of things a lot of repeats, animal farm Fahrenheit four fifty one, the bible of mice and men grapes of wrath, the brave new world lot of Calvin Hobbes police or not, I don't I don't know about that. But I wanted to get Brad Thouron because I wanted to get his list, and then I wanna ask him another question about books we should preserve. But first, let's get your your list Brad. All right. So my list kind of have it broken into groups would be the bible, the Suma theological by Saint Thomas acquaintance. The federalist papers complete with the founding documents the constitution declaration of independence, the road to serve them, the Gulag Archipelago and Cinderella story, my life engulfed by Bill Murray. I the Bill Murray, one took me by surprise. So, so Brad, I think actually it's important to preserve culture as well. Both good and bad show. You know where where we were as people Brad? I, I was thinking about on my list, putting perhaps you or Tom Clancy or some Vince Flynn on my list because you're not only part of the culture, but you have, there's so much truth in the books that you guys, right? It has to make sense and it has to be based in fact, otherwise, you guys couldn't sell a book, if you were going to preserve. You called. It faction Glenn. You said, you know, you don't know where the facts end in the fiction begins that your phrase. I mean, I've done thrillers about the Federal Reserve about threat of too much technology. I mean with each book, I do. My job is to give people a white knuckled thrill ride a fun. You know take it to the beach take it to the lake kind of book. But when you close, it, you're smarter about the threats that country faces in what your role is as a citizen. So I mean I'm thrilled that you, would you put me in that group with with Vinson with Clancy. But I think that's probably not a bad idea. If you wanna get a current snapshots of the threat to the country faces well, I did include Michael Crichton's sum of all, fears. I think that's isn't that it some of all fears.

Brad Bill Murray Brad Thor Brad Thouron Tom Clancy Gulag Archipelago Michael Crichton Calvin Hobbes Federal Reserve Saint Thomas Vince Flynn Vinson Glenn
"gulag archipelago" Discussed on 600 WREC

600 WREC

02:36 min | 3 years ago

"gulag archipelago" Discussed on 600 WREC

"All right. We are back with Brad Thor. So yesterday. We asked people, and we got a lot of responses online. Just go to glennbeck dot com slash save books. We got a lot of things a lot of repeats, animal farm Fahrenheit four fifty one, the bible of mice and men grapes of wrath, the brave new world lot of Calvin Hobbes, police it or not. I don't I don't know about that. But I wanted to get Brad Thouron because I wanted to get his list, and then I wanna ask him another question about books we should preserve. But first, let's get your your list Brad. All right. So my list kinda have it broken into groups. It would be the bible, the Suma theological by Saint Thomas acquaintance. The federal is papers complete with the founding documents the constitution declaration of independence, the road to serve them, the Gulag Archipelago and Cinderella Newry my life in golf by Bill Murray. I the Bill Murray, one took me by surprise. So, so Brad, I think actually it's important to preserve culture as well. Both good and bad show where we were as a people, Brad. I, I was thinking about on my list, putting perhaps you or Tom Clancy or some Vince Flynn on my list because you're not only part of the culture, but you have, there's so much truth in the books, that you guys write it, it has to make sense. And it has to be based. In fact, otherwise, you guys couldn't sell a book. If you were going to preserve the phrase, you called it faction, Glenn, you said, you know, you don't know where the facts end in the fiction begins that that your phrase. I mean, I've done thrillers about the Federal Reserve about threat of too much technology. I mean with each book, I do. My job is to give people a white knuckled thrill ride a fun. You know take it to the beach take it to the late kind of book. But when you close, it, you're smarter about the threats the country faces, and what your role is as a citizen. So I mean I'm thrilled that you, would you put me in that group with with Vincent with Clancy. But I think that's probably not a bad idea. If you wanna get a current snapshot of the threats that country faces. Well, I, I did include Michael Crichton's sum of all, fears. I think that's isn't that it some of all fears.

Brad Brad Thor Brad Thouron Bill Murray Tom Clancy Gulag Archipelago Federal Reserve Michael Crichton Calvin Hobbes Saint Thomas Vince Flynn Glenn Vincent
"gulag archipelago" Discussed on KTOK

KTOK

02:37 min | 3 years ago

"gulag archipelago" Discussed on KTOK

"All right. We're back with Brad Thor. So yesterday. We asked people, and we got a lot of responses online. Just go to glennbeck dot com slash save books. We got a lot of things a lot of repeats, animal farm Fahrenheit, four fifty one of the bible of mice and men grapes of wrath brave new world. Lot of Calvin Hobbes police it or not. I don't I don't know about that. But I wanted to get Brad Thouron because I wanted to get his list, and then I want to ask him another question about books we should preserve. But first, let's get your your list Brad. All right. So my list kind of have it broken into groups would be the bible, the Suma theological by Saint Thomas acquaintance. The federal is papers complete with the founding documents of the constitution declaration of independence, the road to serve them, the Gulag Archipelago and Cinderella story, my life in golf by Bill Murray. I the Bill Murray, one took me by surprise. So, so Brad, I think actually it's important to preserve culture as well. Both good and bad show where we were as a people, Brad. I, I was thinking about on my list, putting perhaps you or Tom Clancy or some Vince Flynn. Onto my list because you're not only part of the culture, but you have, there's so much truth in the books, that you guys write it, it has to make sense. And it has to be based. In fact, otherwise, you guys couldn't sell a book. If you were going to preserve. Afraid you called. It faction Glenn, you said, you know, you don't know where the facts end in the fiction begins that that your phrase. I mean, I've done thrillers about the Federal Reserve about the threat of too much technology. I mean with each book, I do. My job is to give people a white knuckled thrill ride a fun. You know take it to the beach take it to the late kind of book. But when you close, it, you're smarter about the threats the country faces, and what your role is as a citizen. So I'm thrilled that you would you put me in that group with with Vincent with Clancy. But I think that's probably not a bad idea. If you wanna get a current snapshot of the threats that country faces well, I did include Michael Crichton's sum of all, fears. I think that's isn't that it some of all fears.

Brad Brad Thor Brad Thouron Bill Murray Tom Clancy Gulag Archipelago Federal Reserve Michael Crichton Calvin Hobbes Saint Thomas Vince Flynn Glenn Vincent
"gulag archipelago" Discussed on News Radio 690 KTSM

News Radio 690 KTSM

02:36 min | 3 years ago

"gulag archipelago" Discussed on News Radio 690 KTSM

"All right. We are back with Brad Thor. So yesterday. We asked people, and we got a lot of responses online just to glennbeck dot com slash save books. We got a lot of things a lot of repeats, animal farm Fahrenheit four fifty one, the bible of mice and men grapes of wrath, the brave new world lot of Calvin Hobbs, police it or not. I don't I don't know about that. But I wanted to get Brad Thouron because I wanted to get his list, and then I want to ask him a another question about books we should preserve. But first, let's get your your list. Brad. All right. So my list, I kind of have it broken into groups, it would be the bible, the Suma theological by Saint Thomas acquaintance. The federal is papers complete with the founding documents the constitution declaration of independence, the road to serve them, the Gulag Archipelago, and Cinderella worry my life engulfed by Bill Murray. I the Bill Murray, one took me by surprise. So, so Brad, I think actually it's important to preserve culture as well. Both good and bad show. You know where where we were as a people, Brad? I, I was thinking about on my list, putting perhaps you or Tom Clancy or some Vince Flynn. Onto my list because you're not only part of the culture, but you have, there's so much truth in the books, that you guys write it, it has to make sense. And it has to be based. In fact, otherwise, you guys couldn't sell a book. If you were going to preserve the phrase. You you called. It faction Glenn, you said, you know, you don't know where the facts end and the fiction begins that that your phrase. I mean, I've, I've done thrillers about the Federal Reserve about the threat of too much technology. I mean with each book, I do. My job is to give people a white knuckled thrill ride a fun. You know take it to the beach take it to the lake kind of book. But when you close, it, you're smarter about the threats the country faces, and what your role is as a citizen. So I mean I'm thrilled that you, would you put me in that group with with Vincent with Clancy. But I, I think that's probably not a bad idea. If you want to get a, a current snapshot of the threats to the country faces. Well, I, I did include Michael Crichton's sum of all, fears. I think that's isn't that it sum of all fears.

Brad Brad Thor Bill Murray Brad Thouron Tom Clancy Federal Reserve Michael Crichton Gulag Archipelago Calvin Hobbs Saint Thomas Vince Flynn Glenn Vincent
"gulag archipelago" Discussed on Newsradio 1200 WOAI

Newsradio 1200 WOAI

02:36 min | 3 years ago

"gulag archipelago" Discussed on Newsradio 1200 WOAI

"All right. We're back with Brad Thor. So yesterday. We asked people, and we got a lot of responses online. Just go to glennbeck dot com slash save books. We got a lot of things a lot of repeats, animal farm Fahrenheit four fifty one, the bible of mice and men grapes of wrath, the brave new world lot of Calvin Hobbs, police it or not. I don't I don't know about that. But I wanted to get Brad Thouron because I wanted to get his list, and then I want to ask him another question about books we should preserve. But first, let's get your your list Brad. All right. So my list, I kind of have it broken into groups would be the bible, the Suma theological by Saint Thomas acquaintance. The federalist papers complete with the founding documents the constitution declaration of independence, the road to serve them, the Gulag Archipelago, and Cinderella my life in golf by Bill Murray. I. The Bill Murray ones me by surprise. So, so Brad, I think actually it's important to preserve culture as well. Both good and bad to show, you know where we were as a people, Brad. I, I was thinking about on my list, putting perhaps you or Tom Clancy or some Vince Flynn. On my list, because you're not only part of the culture, but you have, there's so much truth in the books, that you guys write it, it has to make sense. And it has to be based. In fact, otherwise, you guys couldn't sell a book. If you were going to preserve the phrase, you called it faction, Glenn, you said, you know, you don't know where the facts end in the fiction begins that that your phrase. I mean, I've done thrillers about the Federal Reserve about threat of too much technology. I mean with each book, I do. My job is to give people a white knuckled thrill ride a fun. You know take it to the beach take it to the late kind of book. But when you close, it, you're smarter about the threats the country faces in what your role is as a citizen. So I mean I'm thrilled that you would put me in that group with with Vincent with Clancy. But I think that's probably not a bad idea. If you wanna get a current snapshot of the threats that country faces well, I did include Michael Crichton's sum of all, fears. I think that's isn't that it some of all fears.

Brad Brad Thor Brad Thouron Tom Clancy Gulag Archipelago Bill Murray Michael Crichton Calvin Hobbs Federal Reserve Saint Thomas Vince Flynn Glenn Vincent
"gulag archipelago" Discussed on News Talk 1130 WISN

News Talk 1130 WISN

07:56 min | 3 years ago

"gulag archipelago" Discussed on News Talk 1130 WISN

"Good afternoon. Welcome to the program. I'm Vicki McKenna news, talk eleven thirty, w I s n hey, I learned a couple of new words today. Learned a couple of new words today, flat bought and cracker dog. Flop bought and cracker dog. So I'm going to start with something that just some some recommendation for anyone who wants to. Take a break from the nightmare, that is this world turned upside down of American politics. Go learn what the word flop bought and cracker dog means I'm I might my dad gave me a whole bunch of books when I was a kid and I found an old box of books and in the box had stuff like the Gulag Archipelago, I kid, you, not the unabridged three volumes set. And I my dad wanted me to read it. He read it for pleasure. And another book brother brothers karamazov was in their crime and punishment, which I did read he gave me that when I was a teenager. I was the kid who read crime and punishment. Because my dad gave it to me and said, it was a good book for fun, not for a book report. But anyway, there's just kind of a weird array of books in this box. Johnny got his gun by Dalton Trump. Oh, yes. The communist, the Hollywood communist, the godfather is in this box. But also in this box of books, was the book all creatures great and small by James Harriet. Can they turn it into a TV series? I never watched it. It's about a country vet in Yorkshire England. And when you learn the definition of the word flop bought in cracker dog by reading this book, you'll want to hug everyone around you. It's so lovely. It's such a nice distraction. It's better than a TV show. It's better than listening to your favorite album. I'm telling you read the book. It's old James area died, I think in the mid nineties. I can't remember the exact date. I looked it up after I was like, wow. How my dad gave me this book when I was a kid, and I never read it. I felt so guilty. That's what I did. I found this box of books, and then I feel guilty for the ones, I haven't read in so I'm trying to get through these because he thought enough to, you know, give me the books. He's no longer with me. But in any case this book. So I thought I've been reading a lot of CS Lewis. I've been reading some heavier stuff. Some I, I read two books by g k Chesterton, which are fun. I've been kind of diving headfirst into apologetic, and I need a break. So I picked up this book and started reading it, and it's just it's hug, your neighbors wonderful, and you'll love it, and you should read it. And if you don't wanna read it, I suppose you can listen to it. But it's it's lovely. And when you learn the definition of cracker dog and flop out, you will laugh I promise. All right. So now, that's, that's my Friday recommendation going into the weekend to not to, to is a way to distract yourself from, from what we're about to talk about next because that's the world turned upside down, you're not ever supposed to be able to experience. I guess just, you know, joy, again because the politics of America demand, you never be allowed to just relax and enjoy yourself. Resist that, by the way. So here's what we're going to talk about today, the tariff panic tariff panic. The latest tariff panic is, is President Trump threatening a five percent tariff. On Mexico of Mexico doesn't start doing anything to deal with the migrant problem that is hammering the southern border of the United States. So everybody's freaking out all the Dow is up the Dow is down the Dow is, is going all over the place because Trump threatened a well, he's actually promised to five percent tariff in, in with the second week of June figure it out or so, we'll talk about that, God, congressman Grossman's actually on the border. What do you want the president to do? What do you want him to do? The Democrats won't do anything they won't. They simply steadfastly refused to do anything about the migrant crisis. They steadfastly redo refused to do anything about funding. They won't fund a wall. They won't fund border patrol. They won't do anything they will do nothing. In fact, Dr drew Pinski, how many of you saw Laura Ingraham's interview with Dr drew Pinski you should go. Find it and watch it is talking about typhoid to Burke, yellow sus Bhubaneshwar plague now, infesting, the streets of Los Angeles because Los Angeles has become nothing, but a giant flop house for people with third world diseases to squat. What is Los Angeles or the state of California wanna do about that, nothing, nothing? There is nothing. Anybody is willing to do so what's left Trump tries to use administrative actions. He gets shut down in court. What's left? What's what's left on the table? He tries to get a chance to change the rules to rain in the migrant problem immediately. He gets dragged into court in front of an Obama appointee and a nationwide injunction. Is issued. So now we have to fight this through the court system for the next two years. Meanwhile we've got a crisis on the border. We have got now what Senator Ron Johnson said, was eight expected, eight hundred thousand people. One and a half times the city of Milwaukee by the end of the year coming across the border and staying in the United States. Can't do anything to reign it in administratively from the from an executive capacity. Congress won't do anything to stop it. Nothing Democrats simply refuse to work with Republicans. Well, there's one thing left on the table, there's one tool left in the toolbox. And that is tariff. We need other countries to stop this because we have rendered ourselves in capable of doing it. So we'll talk about that on the program. That's a lovely subject, isn't it? Wouldn't you rather be reading all creatures great and small and learning about flop bots and pressure dogs. But you would also on the program. Just saying biology is a thing to say in it to say biology's and thing. You could potentially lose your job, you could potentially find yourself under investigation, as my friend. Dr Duke passed at the university of Wisconsin Oshkosh is, but in any case, here's what we're gonna do. We're gonna take a break. We'll come back. Congressman Glenn growth men standing by he's in somewhere between Laredo, and I don't know where his next is. But he's just left Laredo is gonna share some of his experiences on the border Democrats, by the way, not even bothering to go to the border, not even bothering to talk to border patrol. Not even bothering to talk to people who are the ones who are having to contend with the problem, not even willing to, to admit that a problem, even exists in the news media, not willing to even report on this. We'll be right back. Are you a real quick fam- odyssey? Cruises up their game. If you're thinking about maybe a romantic night out with your lava, or maybe you just want to go ahead and enjoy the beautiful scenery of DC. You gotta take out the wavy redesigned, their ships from the refinements in lighting and textures to the remodeled dancefloor and bar space. I said bar and not to mention minimizing fuel consumption and emissions..

President Trump border patrol Los Angeles United States Dr drew Pinski Vicki McKenna Laredo Mexico g k Chesterton karamazov headfirst James Harriet Congressman Glenn Obama Hollywood Yorkshire England Johnny Congress America California
"gulag archipelago" Discussed on 790 KABC

790 KABC

05:36 min | 3 years ago

"gulag archipelago" Discussed on 790 KABC

"Join forces Jordan, either snappy interest with love because you should you should talk to back controlled speech mandate. Yeah. Because that's where he, and he'd references the archipelago's very about that VDI of him on YouTube, when he's like twenty five teaching in, in the university, maybe thirty years old teaching university, about their Gulag Archipelago. So he'd been fan. Long time. Yeah. The Canadian government compelled and the universities, follow the, you had to address people by their preferred gender pronouns. They listed like a hundred including people that change every ten minutes. And if you missed the right one, you're guilty hate crime on sorry. That was. Rebelled again, saying, I don't mind being kind to people, but trying to legislate me to do this. I'm not doing too. The government compelling, right. And because it goes good cappella gross, right? Yeah. So what else what else you want to do with this degree you're going to do a podcast you can do any ever restoring? I, I will probably do research. It's necessary. I think the research is happening in the world right now. All you need to do is just becuse. And like looking at I just typed teen how do. Chinese government control their people. And here you have ten YouTube videos that are very clearly showing what's happening right now. You don't have to think about nineteen seventeen in the Soviet Union taking over, you can look at it two thousand nineteen and see that the billion and a half, people are basically just robots that the government controls, they have no there there, no Bishen, because I mean, the government controls all the sources of production things, and they are capable of producing a lot of great well, but everybody knows how much the other person is making. It's just the Soviet Union. We were we had we knew that the doctor and a plumber gets hundred twenty rubles a month. That's it no matter how smart yard. That's what it is. What you call a. Of outcome versus equality of opportunity. Right. That's right. And he mandated equality is intolerance, right? He's tolerance. The name of been intolerance tolerance. It's weird logic. You end up in a bad place. Kills that, what I talk about it kills the laughter because there's no complementary opposites. What does Martin seldom think about this? I didn't go into their with him there. We had a conversations more about relationships because I was very focused that I went for a divorce and, and that triggered the whole thing laughter, was gone, the only people who are laughing were that turn. All the way to the Bank. So I noticed the difference. How much laughter I had in the beginning relationship and then nothing in the end have going go away. And then I looked around, it's not, I'm not the only one this is cows and billions of people, you know, dealing with that what you direct some attention is the insular cortex of the brain. Yes, there's a bunch of really good research, coming out right now that the insulin probably the relieve the region where we experience, what it feels like to be the feeling of the feeling. The experience of the field. It's sort of right in here. And there's a there's a vague. There's a vague holistic poll, a more self conscious present almost pre quarter-final component to it. It's focused buried and stuff. I got directed to that by neuroscientist recently. And I was like, oh my God. This is the seat of what it feels like to be self person. To laugh together. It's all embedded. That system is embedded. Of course. About being present like. It's like, like if you're in pain, it's very registered pain, in the affect of component of pain would feels like to be paying that with the pain is. This feeling of being. Thank god. We have right. We have our brain fills us the feeling of being shelled out and, and hopeful for the Murph and the, the mapping this we're hopeful for that. But we're fearful of the other one, so we might not go into that experience because we had some very sad, and bad and pain on that has to do with a lot of people who throw themselves or whatever, because the skin. Feeling being in pain? It's like so they medicate just stop with the feeling of being. That's right. Blank whatever I feel any, right? I wanna feel scared to be alone. I don't wanna be paying abandoned. Aspect of feeling that people find. So just the feeling it's the, the what it's like to be in.

YouTube Soviet Union insular cortex Gulag Archipelago Martin Chinese government Jordan Bank thirty years ten minutes
"gulag archipelago" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

860AM The Answer

01:41 min | 3 years ago

"gulag archipelago" Discussed on 860AM The Answer

"Some of. This hysteria. That just heard rape is going to go up every every half degree. There'll be more rape, more more conflict morph child abuse. The there is no limit to the lying and sickness of the left. There is no limit. They can say anything, there's no, male and female, you understand what you have to believe to be on the left. You have to suspend all critical judgment. It's it's an intellectual and moral fraud. And yet this book was reviewed in the New York Times. See that's what they do. They own the media. So that's the reason this book is number twenty two on Amazon just came out. We'll see what it is in two weeks. But that's extremely high twenty two. Extremely high the uninhabitable. Earth is the most terrifying. Book I have ever read Farhat Montjeu in that writing in the New York Times. Really? Really? Wow. I don't know. I found the Gulag Archipelago and histories of the holocaust found them more. Terrifying. Fact, I'm more I'm far more terrified by the left that I am of global warming. I always said to you. It depends what everybody has fears. So we know how you think by what you fear. So the New York Times love the book. But this guy was panned. That's the amazing thing. He was panned by activists who said he went too far. Because he doesn't have evidence. But I look if you want to believe if you believe it, there's nothing there's nothing I can say grape will.

New York Times rape Farhat Montjeu Gulag Archipelago Amazon fraud two weeks
"gulag archipelago" Discussed on AM 970 The Answer

AM 970 The Answer

10:16 min | 3 years ago

"gulag archipelago" Discussed on AM 970 The Answer

"Show. You could tell because the Partridge family is not played on other talk shows is it. No, it's not I'm talking to Daniel Mahoney. The idol of our age is the new book published brain counter how the religion of humanity separates Christianity. You've also written on Solzenitsyn. These ideas are very connected. The light what he wrote about and stood for and and the idea in this book. Yeah. Very much. So there's a beautiful couple of lines to parallel passages in social Nixon's famous Gulag Archipelago his great indictment of ideological tyranny where he says. He essentially learned in the camps that the line between good and evil goes through every human heart not through nations not through parties. Now, the government's not through ideologies and that while we can constrict evil in the human heart, and we can even through an openness to God's grace elevate the human so we can never abolish evil from the world and. Association really sort of independently through the experience of the Soviet camps. Rediscovered a kind of Christian and classical wisdom about human nature, and the sources of this terrible ideological deformation of man, and he applied some of this to liberalism to western liberalism. Because while he of course, preferred are imperfect democracies to the totalitarian regimes he saw that at least in its lease Elise. Sober. Dimensions that much of modern liberalism also denied the drama of good and evil in the human soul that that's part of what you're talking about in this new book, the idol of our age, right? The idea that we we don't need to live in the Soviet Union under Stalin or under Kim Jong Hoon to experience. What you're talking about here. Making an idol of of ourselves of the human project of of something that doesn't include God now divorcing freedom from any notion of purpose or limit. Know the premium is only meaningful it's tied to some end some purpose some measure, otherwise what do we do with our freedom row when we lose that that dynamic that connects human freedom to old ultimate gorge freedom, literally become subversive. It undermines itself. Will now souls an in his nineteen seventy eight. Commencement speech at Harvard in the rain that famous speech. I think that you know. Well, I know that he was it was what he had to say was not well received. It was really he was a thundering profit on that day, and he he really kind of lost the popularity that he had suddenly he's not a Soviet dissident and we're cheering for. But he's the bummer come to tell us that we're part of the problem, and nobody wanted to hear it, and I argued with my friend Hugh Hewitt about that. In other words, I said we did a sock. These in the city event some years ago when I was basically making the point that Solzenitsyn was right? And that what he said has come to pass is coming to pass. What are your reflections? I know that you're aware of the speech. I'm talking. Yeah. Absolutely. Yeah. I I saw social needs an says for the beginning of the Harvard address that Harvard's motto is very tough. And he says I've come to speak truth, but I've come to speak truth as a friend. In other words, he was this wasn't a total critique of western life. And in fact, he says in the middle of the Harvard address that at the time of the American founding there had been a profound recognition that you mean? Freedom had to be tied to what he called the great reserves of mercy and sacrifice at the heart of our tradition. The great I can't believe that. I've not heard that phrase before reserves of mercy and sacrifice at the heart of the American and western tradition and. So it's not a total critique of Barikot by any means, it's a call for America and the other western democracies in a way to fortify themselves on an older moral capital. That's a roading, and it's a roading in part because Sosa nation Hannay somewhat technical formulation or the Harvard addressed. But it's a very good one its anthropocentric humanism. And he says exactly right. That's that's what your book is. Exactly and Solzhenitsyn says anthropocentric human is reveals its least ugly face in a certain kind of modern liberalism. But it will always get radicalized socialism. That's where we are America. Today. Kind of. I think he was the prophet to come back to your word of a kind of postmodern Neil. But that isn't that where we are today. In other words, that you you who would have thought I mean, I have to say that even I've been surprised by how in just the last few years, the imposition of the transgender agenda, this idea that suddenly everyone has to agree that there's no such thing as gender that it is immutable thing that we we don't need to pay attention to biology any more than we need to to listen to what the bible says we can do as we like. And as we feel, and and this is this is an idea that it it it has every right to exist and to be heard, but it is now being imposed and so there's a kind of a cultural Marxism happening. And so when Solzenitsyn was talking to nine hundred seventy eight he foresaw as. As you just said, this is the this is where those things go. They tend in that direction if they're left unchecked. That's right. And and at a certain point we end up with a reductive materialism we end up. I have afraid at the beginning my book, which I think connects very well to tighten Solzhenitsyn. I said our situation today is marked by this unholy mix of relativism, and a kind of absolute moralism, we have more or less. That's the irony. We have more Elizabeth all around us. But it's not a morale moralism rooted in an understanding of human nature of the moral law. It's a moralism that's angry with the with God's creation. Well, it's either it is I it is either ironic or hypocritical or both or both and other teaching a senior seminar at my college last semester. And we read a essay by Roger scrutiny where he talked about the need for modern man to re reconsider this idea that we're capable of absolute self-determination, look where that lead in the twentieth century. And what am I students raised her hand? And she said, well, I agree with that. That's true except what gender and she insists rate. We. Absolutely free to recreate ourselves at will, no biological, no, psychosocial nature. No, spiritual nature. Not none of God's creation. Justice absolute freedom of autonomous individuals to make themselves. And so it is a it is a strange and Hetty and a nerve thing and Mia Listrik mixture of relativism and moralism. But I'm quite with you. It's all around us. I quote cardinal Robert, Sarah, who's one of the good guys from the Vatican. It's very close to do. They still have those there's there's very few, but cartel Sarah was very close to John Paul the second and Pope Benedict. But he's compared transgenderism to this cultural Marxism to the totalitarianism of the twentieth century because he says it's the same willful denial of natural law and God's creation. We'll see that's where the Catholics, and you're you're Catholic you teach at assumption. That's that's something that the Catholics have always. Well, I shouldn't say always, but but especially recently with natural law. It's something you guys get that. Even if you don't talk specifically about the God of the bible and the Christian, faith, there's this other thing. And really, you know, these are just different terms for what we call reality reality. And we don't need to like it. But there it is. And we're kicking against the goads when we kick against it. But it's so funny because there is this can do is in America that says if I were card enough, I can do anything. And it's like really if I work hard enough. I can be six foot four and Nordic. What what are you talking about the story of the news recently about a man in the Netherlands sixty nine and he sued to reduce his age to forty nine genius. And the guy don't know how serious he is. Right. I don't think I don't know if he's making a point about the wilfulness of the of gender theory and all of this. But he's saying I feel forty nine and in a world where I'm autonomous. I o. Ought to be able to feel that my eyes are piercing and blue. And you know, what if you say that they're not your big bigot? Because it's important to me. I've always felt that they were piercing and blue. And if you don't mind you need to get with the program and acknowledge that what I say goes what I feel. I feel. Burien impulse that Solzhenitsyn saw a work not only in twentieth century totalitarianism, but an kind of liberalism and Postmodernism that had. Divorced freedom from all the moral contents of life, and from an acceptance of this reality reality with a capital are, you know, this given -ness of things when you talk about the nation's address he he refers to the reserves. Can you say again, the he said that the American founders still deferred he called it to the great reserves of mercy and sacrifice. Yeah. That it informed. Our traditional thousand years that I have to give you a copy of my book if you can keep it because this is something I take very seriously. This idea of when we talk about freedom. What do we mean? What did the founders mean when we talk about it today? We've lost really the understanding that they had of what it is. And what it requires when we come back. We'll talk more about all of this wonderful stuff, folks. This is the Metaxas show. My guest is Daniel Mahoney. The book is the idol of our age stick around..

Harvard Solzhenitsyn America Daniel Mahoney Solzenitsyn Gulag Archipelago Soviet Union Partridge Hugh Hewitt Nixon Barikot Sarah Burien Sosa Elizabeth Netherlands Roger Hetty
"gulag archipelago" Discussed on AM 970 The Answer

AM 970 The Answer

06:02 min | 3 years ago

"gulag archipelago" Discussed on AM 970 The Answer

"Metaxas show, I'm sitting here with an extraordinary musician, ignorant Solzenitsyn. He's the principal guest conductor of the Moscow Symphony Orchestra and conductor laureate of the chamber orchestra Philadelphia. He also happens to be by some coincidence. The middle son of Alexander Solzenitsyn ignorant again. Welcome. It's funny to sit here talking to a real musician because you you're saying nothing me with some of my bumper music. The eagles Supertramp Elton, John or whatever you. I if you if you were anyone else, they'd say, you really need to know this music, but we won't talk about that. We're talking about your father. And I was saying that it is amazing to me to hear you his son. Tell the story of how he chose in the middle of having this horrible sentence. Of hard labour. People can hardly imagine the horrors of this unless they've read his books to choose to go back. Why did he do that? Well. The the proximate reason the immediate reason was that he was being asked them this research laboratory to embark on the project of that he objected to it wasn't just general scientific research was. Developing technology. What do we call it today voice recognition to recognize voices two? Why would the Soviet state need that you're telling me in the late forties? They were working on voice recognition technology. Absolutely. That's a stunning thing. Absolutely. Because because before it really video technology was was was was far advanced the audio bugs were everywhere everywhere. They wanted them to be in every department in every community Arment in every phone line or certainly the needed there. And so then to be able to track who was it on the phone who said that people from this is this is a stunning thing. So you're telling me your father because of his conscience. He says, no, right. I won't do this. But then you will be sent back to the Campsie says go forward, and he already knew that he could survive that that it's physically possible. You know, we fear. Most what we don't know. And so when he first went into those camps in the forty five he he almost did die, and but this time as a seasoned prisoner already. He knew he felt he could survive, and he felt even if you didn't. So be it. It's it's the choice the most important lesson that he learned in the camps was that even in the camps. Human dignity matters choices that we always have choices even in the camps. Even when everything's decided for you. What clothes you wear what food food? You'll given and everything is regimented. There's always a choice to behave to behave with with with with with freedom and a sense of dignity or not because this is a radio program. Many people didn't see you do the air quotes when you said food. Let's get specific. Because again, they're plenty people. Young people have no clue what we're talking about. When the communists sent you to prison camp to hard labor. It is affectively a death sentence because you're not going to be properly fed anything can happen. You can be beaten to death tortured. So what kind of food quote, unquote? Did they have? I mean, you hear of people killing rats to to survive to eat the rats to do these kinds of things. Your father's written about that. You know, the the. Prologue to the Gulag Archipelago to the book opens with a description of a. Article a brief note in the Soviet science journal true story. That mentions. How fascinating that far far away in the remote far east far north of northeast of Russia of Siberia, what we think of a Siberian here in the state. Some folks came across a prehistoric salamander she's in the ice from. Millions of years ago. Ambi were fascinated by this discovery. And when they broke open the ice befouled out that the Salamat actually was quite fresh. They tasted it, and it was delicious. And story. Now, that's true story. That's a true story except the article in the in the science or Soviet science, whatever that journal was didn't mention that. These folks who discovered this brief stork salamander where. Labor camp prisoners. And the reason they founded the salamander so delicious was that. That's the first meet of any kind that they would have seen in years. And so, and so that's how the hell me eight a million-year-old millions year old salamander. I mean, again, I I want my audience there's never enough time. And even just doing this one hour with you. We just scratching the surface. There's so much to talk about on this subject of your father. And I know we'll have subsequent hours to do that. But I want my audience to know, this is real stuff. This is not something that happened in the middle ages. This happened to your father, correct and two members of my family. This is real and we're seeing a renaissance of some of this kind of thinking happening in our time. So it's vital that we know this history. Your father famously said a word one word of truth out ways. The world. One of the greatest quotes I've ever heard in my life. So he dedicated himself to speaking the truth of this evil, and he changed the world your father, you know, that. We we just have a few seconds left in this segment when we come back more with ignite Solzenitsyn. We're.

principal guest conductor Moscow Symphony Orchestra Alexander Solzenitsyn Soviet science journal Gulag Archipelago Supertramp Elton eagles Solzenitsyn Philadelphia Campsie Ambi Russia Salamat John Siberia million-year one hour
"gulag archipelago" Discussed on AM 970 The Answer

AM 970 The Answer

10:20 min | 3 years ago

"gulag archipelago" Discussed on AM 970 The Answer

"There folks that's held them. Johnny's not in the studio. But fortunately, we had Solzenitsyn in the studio. It's so wonderful to have you here. We're talking about the work and the life of your father, the great Alexander Solzenitsyn how many years ago did he pass away ten ten year. It's already ten years hard to believe it's hard to believe. And are you his his youngest of the three boys middle of three the middle of of three? It's his life is just about impossible to some upward to do Justice. And so I find myself a little bit. Unequal to the task. I wanna talk to you about so many things, but I want my audience first of all to know in this hour about your father in case, they don't especially in case, they don't you said that he was exiled from the Soviet Union. So was it seventy two that he was was XL seventy four seventy four. Okay. And that's when the book exploded on the scene, the Gulag Archipelago, correct? It was such a bombshell in the west in the world because it revealed something that you know, we still had and today still have people in the west like Lillian Hellman like I mean, a lot of literary figures artistic figures who were foolish enough to be pro Soviet to be pro-stalin. Your father's book was as you said earlier, it was it was the death sentence for seeing the Soviet Union that way for most people. Well, the great difference. I think after the publication of Gulag Archipelago was it became no longer tenable to avert ones is as so many western intellectuals did a so many of what we used to call fellow travelers. Did with pleasure. It's remarkable that that phenomenon has been completely eradicated yet as you point out. There are still some and particularly with those communist regimes that continue to exist or even flourish today. Fidel Castro or roll customer now, but the song goes on. And it seems that there's plenty of warm warmth and support for this barbarous regime from from fellow travelers in the west. So the domino continue as I said to you earlier, I'm sort of cheating because my mother grew up in what became east Germany, and she could tell me firsthand, my father growing up in Greece with the Greek civil war. Could tell me firsthand. I mean, they raised me to understand that communism is the enemy of human freedom. I knew that. But there's so many people today that they don't know that maybe because they're young they don't even remember the Soviet Union. And they think the worst Russia could produce be some authoritarian authoritarian like like Putin or his puppet Medvedev or something I did they have no idea what existed for decades and decades. So getting back to the store. Your father. He he was exiled then in seventy four. He he was in the Gulag Archipelago as he called it for many years. And I read a book by my my my friend Chuck Colson, where he tells the story in the first chapter of his book loving God of this man in the Soviet camp coming to faith, and at the end of the chapter it says and this man was Alexander Solzenitsyn. And I just about fell out of my chair when I learned that this great Alexander SOS uneaten was a Christian. I had no idea. What is that? Tell us a little bit about how many years he was in the gulag. And and why he why he went there and about his coming to faith. He was raised by his mother. His father was dead. In the church and the orthodox Russian born nineteen eighteen thousand nine hundred eighteen a child of the revolution or sibling of the revolution. In the same. The same twelve months, of course, the Russian revolution nineteen seventeen and very quickly. This faith of his fathers of his mother literally was beaten out of him. Also, quite literally by his teachers by his peers. In school. This was the time of the most militant atheism, of course, in the Soviet Union, by the way, communism's perhaps number one feature not a bug as they say the feature is a militant atheism. The crushing of the soul and not leaving people alone to believe what they wish as long as they don't know. It's not enough. They have to they have to love big brother as George Orwell told us, and and this is exactly was the case with with with my father has crossed that he wore was torn off by by his by his kids by by his fellow. Grade school kids with the approval of the director of the school, and the teachers and so forth. And so and they didn't have PTA where you could complain this state telling children what they must believe in. If your parents don't agree. They can go to prison or be killed or be tortured. Absolutely. Absolutely. And so so very quickly. He came to see the the the wisdom of this progressive worldview that was destined to take over history Marxism-Leninism, and as a high schooler and then in university, he was a convinced Marxist. He was convinced Leninist. He did have grave doubts about Stalin. And whether this man in charge of. Soviet Russia wasn't somehow corrupting or polluting the pure Leninist ideals of the revolution. Let me ask a question of ignorance when did Lennon die and Stalin takeover? What year was that lemon Lennon already in can twenty two. I think incapacitating stroke. And so basically it was no longer in power died. I think in twenty four there was a kind of interregnum in the mid twenties when Stalin and Trotsky and others were jockeying for position. And by the late twenties, of course, Stalin consolidated his power. Absolutely. So for social needs in them. He the war breaks out. He enlists, and then goes to artillery school and fights in the war and is decorated and almost gets to Berlin. In the spring of forty five when he's arrested in East Prussia just some kilometers from Berlin. Arrested and taken back by prison train to the secret prison Lubyanka in Moscow to be tried for. Counterrevolutionary activity, which was what which was not without basis. In other words, some people were arrested literally for nothing. So if some was arrested actually for writing letters with a friend from university criticizing not regime, of course, but criticizing Stalin saying that maybe this is not the best way to approach Lennon's legacy. So criticizing Stalin from a pure communist point of view as he thought. Right. And this is what earned him again with some justification from that Soviet perspective. Eight years of hard labor and perpetual exile in Siberia, perpetual, exile, perpetual, exile, was was a was a one of those kind of loving articles of the Soviet penal system perpetual, exile. So until until you die or the world and whichever comes first, but why eight years of heart? Why only eight years of hard labor and then perpetual, exile? In other words, the yacht. Could have been ten years could have been twenty five. It was really a question of fashion in the jurisprudence of the time. And so at that moment for for his particular crime article fifty eight ten article fifty eight eleven they were giving eight to ten years. He could've had Tatton. He was okay. Eight eight to ten years hard labour and did he ever leave that for the perpetual, exile? Or was he perpetually in hardly served out the eight years in labour camps, although with a kind of saving interlude in the midst when the middle of the sentence when he went to a research institute prison called the shot Ashgar, which was much more easier conditions and allowed him probably to survive. But it must be said that he voluntarily. Asked to be taken back to the depths from that first circle. And of course, that's another great novel of social needs some in the first circle. But from that first circle of hell would the reference, of course, to Dante Gary's inferno and the first circle of hell, and then descending lower and lower. He wanted to go to the experience properly the absolute depths of the labor camp system, and he did. And that's when he touched bottom on his feet touch. Bottom is when his reconversion to God and his return to God was completed. There's a beautiful poem of that time. Nineteen fifty one a Catholic status. Which describes or encapsulates that that returned? That's his his mom. Yes. Well, let me let me ask you. I think it goes without saying that the greatest people in the history of the world are what the rest of us have to understand are crazy. In other words. Your father's bravery can never be properly. Understood. So when you say something like he volunteered to go back to the depths of the Soviet prison camp system. It's so impossible to understand how someone could do that. We don't we don't have time in this segment when we come back. I want you to help us understand that because anybody who who understands the horror of that wicked genuinely hellish place. Will only the more. Appreciate your father, and his bravery and what so many suffered. We're gonna be right back folks talking to ignite..

Soviet Union Stalin Gulag Archipelago Alexander Solzenitsyn Soviet Russia Lennon Lillian Hellman Fidel Castro Johnny Berlin Chuck Colson George Orwell Russia east Germany Moscow Greece director Siberia
"gulag archipelago" Discussed on EconTalk

EconTalk

06:05 min | 3 years ago

"gulag archipelago" Discussed on EconTalk

"So he won the Nobel by tackling these themes, but that wasn't the big impact yet, the be impacts came from the Gulag Archipelago, which would be published not in the Soviet Union but abroad beginning in the early nineteen seventies seven nineteen Seventy-three after he had won the Nobel. And fact book was one of the main ways in which many people not just intellectuals, but the mass readership the public the kind of people who are court any country's democratic order. Those people began to see that the regime was rotten in its roots. That there was no better revolution inside the Stalin regime that Stalin's years of the nineteen twenty through nineteen fifty three would know better or I'm sorry. No worse than Lennon's nineteen seventeen coup-d'etat in October nineteen seventeen. So this achievement of soldier needs eighteen hundred pages much longer than Warren peace longer than Homer's Iliad and odyssey combined and yet readable a page Turner in many ways. Yes, this incredible achievement which was well documented despite him having zero access to the secret archives. Of course today people like myself and other skull we can read those archives, but Sola needs had no access to those whatsoever. He read publish sources Soviet newspapers and other periodic Soviet books. And of course, his own life experience and the life experience of two hundred twenty six other political prisoners whom he interviewed and who stories are related in that magnificent three-volume Gulag Archipelago the first volume as I said of which appeared in nineteen Seventy-three this is a singular achievement. There was nothing else like it. And so all those people who are making these fine distinctions between Leninism and Stalinism between the original revolution and its opposed degradation. Now. Had to contend with what soc needs and showed which was that. The gulag started years before Stalin and his despotism before Stalin was the sole ruler. The system was in place, and it was in place from the beginning. It feels. Non specialist in the area. Feels like it's even more than just the historical fact that that there was a Prussian before Stalin. It's also. The the intellectual corruption and impossibility of the ideals of the Soviet system just shines through over and over again in his work. I used to tell us told listeners before, but when when I teach undergrads on the last class, I would recommend a series of books. I didn't think they might think of reading that. I would recommend encourage them to read and for years over decade, certainly in the eighties and a lot of the nineties. I would recommend that they read the archipelago just out of tribute to his courage in writing that book that I felt like morally he deserved from people to read that book. I also would recommend an apple bombs book, the gulag, which is very nice shorter version of the history. And of course, there's now a one volume. Version of the Gulag Archipelago that as you write in your essay that social an approved of if I got that. Right. Yes. So. You mentioned some of the of his interactions with regime in passing I want you to talk about the roller coaster of his relationship with Soviet leaders begins in some sense with his imprisonment after returning is a veteran from where war two, so he's he's suffered Stalin's hands. He's than somewhat rehabilitated by crucial. Then he's on the outside again. So he has this incredible up and down relationship with already and at the same time seems like much of the time the authorities don't know what to do with them. And in have unleashed him with affects that they did anticipate. So I get the feeling tell me if I'm wrong the crew Shaw thought he was using social scented Vance's own political aspirations in in putting down style. But eventually he just lost control of that. You're right. Soldier knees. Was somebody who served in the Soviet army in World War Two. He was part of that invasion force that's swept into Poland. And then Prussia audits way to Berlin. In the midst of that he was arrested for some indiscreet comments about Stalin, which were normally would be considered harmless, but in such a regime as the Stalin regime were considered a political crime. And so he was sentenced sent to the gulag, although the labor camps. By the way, we should knowledge that it was sold to needs in who made that were gulag widespread in multiple languages, including English. Of course, he was released eventually and Khrushchev like you said did see him as an instrument in this diesel innovation. Khrushchev was denouncing Stalin's crimes in excess is not denouncing for example, collectivisation of agriculture where millions of peasants died in.

Stalin Gulag Archipelago Soviet Union Sola Soviet army Lennon Khrushchev Prussia Warren Vance Berlin Turner Poland Shaw
"gulag archipelago" Discussed on EconTalk

EconTalk

05:42 min | 3 years ago

"gulag archipelago" Discussed on EconTalk

"And he brought the voices of all those suffered onto that system to the fore in his work this achievement. It was not paralleled by anybody else. Yes. There were many other courageous people. Yes, they were people right there at the Hoover Institution like Robert conquest who wrote magnificent books about the true covering the truth of the Soviet Union. However, salsa needs did something more what he did was to show the Soviet Union. Was evil not just from a political point of view. But from a moral point of view, and he did it in a way that was persuasive. I find it fascinating. Of course in the twenties in the nineteen twenties. There were a lot of apologies who who believed or hoped that the Soviet systems creating a new a new man new human being a new system a better system. There are people who lied on its behalf who covered it up who trusted the propaganda that was pumped out by that system and the lies that were told when people visited there I can't help. But think of Walter to Randy as shameful piece of that story and a lot of western electricals? Of course. Fell prey to that. They they were eager to believe this something new and better was going on. And then there came a time. You'll correct me if I'm wrong, but there became an awareness somewhere between I would say nineteen thirty five nineteen fifty five you'll be precise that that something was very rotten there that there was an incredibly oppressive regime that it abused citizens and terrible ways. And although a handful of people in electoral continued to apologize for the system or for Stalin, most westerners turned against the Stalin Stalin's vision. Why did it take? So what's the independent contribution of say SocGen since firsthand accounts in the Gulag Archipelago that he collected his own story, and that of dozens and dozens of other Zack's other political prisoners, what was the extra impact of that literary achievement above and beyond? What? Was somewhat. Well known. Well, known maybe Ross we have to remember that the French communist party was Stalinist during the whole period of Stalin's rule and even after Stalin dying was the nnounced. We also have to remember that many people downplayed the evil nature of the regime that is to say they would acknowledge. Yes, there were famines. Yes. Millions of people died, but these were not intentional these were mistakes. These not core to the system the gulag where the labor camp otherwise known as the labor camps where millions of people were incarcerated often first so-called political crimes is not. So big the numbers were exaggerated. Yes. There were excess is but nonetheless, even Stalinism was not beyond the pale. Let us also remember. That in this confusing debate where some people defended Stalinism once again, Russ just about nobody got away with defending the Hitler regime. In this confusing debate were some people including prominent people defended Stalinism. We also had a large number of people who saw a better revolution inside the Soviet regime, which may be could be recuperated one Stalin died so Khrushchev's secret speech, which denounced Stalin for his crimes was actually an attempt to rehabilitate the Soviet system it harkened back to a pure version of the revolution supposedly associated with Lenin and with Leninism, so that's thal and became a cult of personality in Khrushchev's term a degradation of the revolution. And therefore, they would be a second wind a socialism where the human face or communist reform, many people were newly attracted to the Soviet phenomenon upon Stalin's death. In fact, there was a split on the left between those who denounce Stalin. Than those who continue to praise though, what both sides shared was a belief in either the Stalin version of the revolution or enriching Lennon version of the revolution as being historically necessary. Incorrect we forget those debates because now, of course, very few people will defend that history the same way, but that's the context in which souls eats arrived. And he started out he started out trying to figure how he could capture described this reality, and he wrote a couple of really important novels on the labor camps from firsthand experience. And they stood the test of time, in fact in nineteen seventy he won the Nobel prize in literature for these novels, and we know them as one day in the life of I've Indonesia vich, we know them as in the. I circle and of course, cancer ward..

Stalin Stalin Soviet Union Robert conquest Hoover Institution Gulag Archipelago Randy Nobel prize Indonesia Walter Russ Lennon Ross Khrushchev Zack Lenin one day