9 Burst results for "Guggenheim Foundation"

"guggenheim foundation" Discussed on Talk 1260 KTRC

Talk 1260 KTRC

06:55 min | 10 months ago

"guggenheim foundation" Discussed on Talk 1260 KTRC

"All right, the best biographer. On my radio show today is James McGrath. Morris. Jamie, How are you? Great. Glad to be with you. Call you I could tell the truth and see the best bargain for in the world. But you would. You would. Would say no, that's that's not true. But it is anyway. So New Mexico writers always night to talk to you, by the way. Knows about new mansion. Correct. It's nice to talk to you, Richard, but it's also appreciated by New Mexico writers. What a supporter of the literary arts you are. And it's a great time of year even though we're all locked up, but I think spring summer in the vaccine will restore our world. So we're planning for the future of the Mexico writers were getting around to doing another set of Grant. Music grants that we give out between $502,000 or Writers who were trying to do research published or something with the creation of new books that could be poets, journalists, playwrights something, you name it. But the idea is this is for New Mexico writers where a grant like this could really make a big difference. We're not talking about Famous writers who stand up They were talking about aspiring writers from diverse communities, and we certainly have a diverse and fascinating panoply of writers across the state. And we've been doing this now for guess pre three years because this year relate didn't happen the dinner, But we've been able to fund projects from poets from People doing Children's books to all kinds of things. And so we're now open up again for people to apply, and I'm thrilled to be able to get the word out on yourself. All right, Where would people go to apply it to start to look at this and consider? There's got to be. I mean, there's gotta be scores of people Jamie, who have started that that long awaited novel during the pandemic, or the book of poems, or some kind of musings or biography and autobiography, something the diary It'll be interesting to see. You know, I'm old enough to remember the New York City blackout. And they all claimed that there was increasing the number of Children born knowing mice after right and it turned out when they looked. It wasn't true, but it's a great story. So is there a new co big bash of literature waiting for us out there? It could be true. The easiest thing to do to start off simply either. Google New Mexico writers or go to an m writers dot Warg. We're non profits is not dot com dot ord. But I always find you just type in New Mexico writers, the first hit on Google the Web pages all of the information, including the online application that you can complete And what you want to do is put on your calendar that it's due march 31st. So if you're like me, you put a big note You counter march. 15th support yourself soon, not up against the wall, and it's very easy to apply for And there's quite a few different opportunities. One of really About this Doug Grant Doug Preston, who you know is perhaps one of our most famous authors, along with George R. R. Martin Hampton Sides and David Morel and a few others here in Santa Fe has contributed $1000, which we've matched in our own fundraising so that each year were able to give $1000 to a writer of this particular travel needs now. $1000 may not sound like a lot, but it could make all of the difference. Let's say you live in Farmington, and you're writing about something related to Navajos or to Pueblo and you want to go to the University of New Mexico Center for Southwest Research. That could be beyond your means. But this would provide you with a mean sustain a hotel means transportation, maybe even some money for photocopying so we could could be a critical amount of money for the right writer waiting for it. We're not Guggenheim Foundation. We're not giving out $60,000 a year. Low that we could I just finished. In fact, the Lady's Pendergrass novel from from Doug President once again, genius. Yeah, He's remarkable, and he's a remarkably generous man. A lot of writers. I mean, he could just sit in his house and write up these books he runs. He's the president of the author's skill, which one in a huge achievement in the Senate and House yesterday. His protection is coming for writers. That's in that massive bill. Um and you know, that's a thankless job being present in the office killed has been very active in supporting New Mexico Writer's gotta work and our organization and speaker or dinner, So it's because of people like that. We're successful who have not for gotten the day when they weren't when they were starting. And each of us who do have a career as a writer. You've asked can always remember the moment whether right hand out helped the right hand that helped us get up made all the difference in our lives. What kind of resource is people pull together in terms of flying on an example? I don't receive something Were they need a writing sample? And they need a letter from someone. Okay, wake up. But it's not. It's not complicated and its intended, um To be friendly and application, not a confusing thing, and we we review the application and make sure all the elements to there and we quickly send them an email. Saying, You know you're missing something. I'm a big spy was a midnight. I can't do that. But as they come in, all right, so, you know, um They try to see it. Yes, this plank will should tell May the exact little things that cooks need s. Oh, it's a 500 word proposal. That's about two pages of type text. Um, explanation of how the grant would help them at a time line to doing it. And then one or more letters of recommendation of somebody who could say something professional about their writing. Very often to community college professor. There's another writer and then a biography of 400 words describing themselves and whether it published or not, and You know what the hopes and goals are and a writing sample, So it's not not taxing to do it. And you know one of the things all of us who apply for grants. Find very useful is that even if you don't get the grand, sometimes the focus that's required to complete an application. Describing your work actually helps you make you your work come alive because you know it's the field elevator pitch. You know, everybody should be able to reduce their book down to one or two sentences. And until they do, they don't have a clear vision of what they're writing. And so the process itself can be very helpful. I'm last, but not least one of the things about New Mexico writers assigned for monetary things as we try to connect later. Of the annual dinner is a chance for networking and mentorships. We get letters from people and we connect people we provide answers..

New Mexico writer New Mexico Writer Jamie Mexico University of New Mexico Cente Doug Grant Doug Preston James McGrath Google Morris New York dot Warg Farmington Richard Guggenheim Foundation Santa Fe president Pendergrass
"guggenheim foundation" Discussed on Jo's Art History Podcast

Jo's Art History Podcast

06:36 min | 10 months ago

"guggenheim foundation" Discussed on Jo's Art History Podcast

"I completely digress. Despite success peggy's har- stow belonged europe. And she made the decision in nineteen forty seven to close her gallery in new york. She packed up all her collection on. She sought to make a new start and europe on. She chose venice and when she arrived in nineteen forty seven. She was kind of just in time to be invited to the venice. Biennale which is huge are exposition. Which happens every two years in venison still happens to study on a nineteen forty eight she presented. She was invaded and presented her collection and her own pavilion. So and amongst the the displays from france from etteleat from the uk there was also the guggenheim collection. This where peggy should really for one of the first sign. These incredible works by the abstract expressionists of new york's so jackson paula and mark rothko but also the surrealists and abstract artists that she had been championing since day one when she opened her gallery back in the thirties and london. Peggy completely fell in love with this and after the bonaly found this unfinished palazzo on. Bought it for almost nothing on spent the rest of her life of renovating it and making it into her own gallery which she would open to the public to show her collection note. Nothing was ever for sale when you came to view. Peggy's works with an her pavilion on. So a place where you can go visit to. Of course kicking in venus. But she really just. It became this a safe haven for artists who sought solace and europe and come to pick st for a while. She would buy their work. Could help promote them. She was incredibly generous with her time on her funds on also like i say the public could come visit the collection three days a week which is just thinks an incredibly generous thing to do to again all in the name of promoting these artists and to show that if someone with standing and wealth believed in these artists and champion these artists. It really did have a knock on a fate to society when people were stolen during their grand tours of europe and the was a musi stole on there to see what she had in her collection and she continued to collect through remainder of her life on her collection includes jacket maty but also pick names like niro and condensed Claim this please off a pilgrimage for art lovers on really stella's to the state her eighth and nineteen seventy-nine. She left her home in her entire collection to the can hang foundation now the guggenheim foundation was actually is actually run and owned by her. Uncle solomon can hang who began the guggenheim team. And the nineteen fifties but peggy's collection in europe was really kind of the cornerstone of development. So while he was voting kickin haymond new york. She had her palazzo in italy. And the kind of twin if that makes sense on. There's nice several of these museums across the of. Course you have new york. And you have to get containment fantasy. Of course there's also one in bilbao and there used to be one and berlin for. I'm fairly certain that has closed but more. Interestingly is that they're building one an abi at the moment which is set to open. And i think twenty twenty another really important thing to note as guggenheim actually never paid anything. More than i think. Forty thousand dollars total for her entire collection which today is worth billions onto me again if that doesn't Har is an incredible dealer patron on collector. Then i really don't know what does i think he's an incredibly interesting women and somebody who shooting to see. I really didn't know too much about her. And i really only scratched the surface ever. So lightly here with peggy. She is someone who is such a huge character with an art history on promoting our throats of the pre imposed for eaters and europe and america. And just really so of opening an international art scene in a way by allowing people to to view works from american artists and her palazzo in venus. I think she's so so clever. And what you may have heard of. Peggy can have very briefly. Touched on is that. She's kind of ravaged in history as hot headed lustful vixen. Who really mixed art and six together and you re the couldn't of separate the two on. I haven't touched on that because i just don't think it's important and in my opinion everyone was doing it. It's just because she's a woman. I think the severi classic example of because she is a woman is kind of locked up his osha saucy. Because there's there's a kind that she. She said that she slept for over. A thousand men and peggy was an incredibly good biographer of her own life and when she was alive she actually hired someone to write her autobiography. And it's confessions Still available to buy. Today i would highly recommend if he would like to know a little bit more but peggy than it's only like six or seven pounds on amazon. I would highly recommend me to your local library. If you don't want to if you don't want to spend any money go to local library and see if it's there really what i'm trying to see as for me why haven't gone down this soci- dark cool of an older love affairs as i just thank. It's not important and there's no way that people like the other gentleman. I've mentioned so far in the series pullen whale Didn't have dalliances. I mean i don't know offhand. If the dead. But i'm fairly certain there's a low of scandals going around in the end as just never mentioned it's not important but i think because women people feel that they have to mention it so if you want to know more than please feel free to schtickle pay can and jackson pollock. For example. they're kind of affair is very very well documented. It's important for me really by just to end in saying that. I think she was an incredible champion. For new artists on the avant-garde the surrealists on someone who just used their whale for goods and to promote artists and particularly thank her helping artis escape europe during world war two as as an incredible thing and something that needs to be celebrated. Anyway that is why. I think quite rightly deserves to be part three.

peggy europe Peggy jackson paula new york Uncle solomon mark rothko stow palazzo guggenheim foundation niro france stella bilbao uk guggenheim london berlin italy
"guggenheim foundation" Discussed on When in Spain

When in Spain

03:35 min | 11 months ago

"guggenheim foundation" Discussed on When in Spain

"I imagine when you stood right up next to it it it must be pretty Pretty incredible needs to mazing and also Because he's such a strange shape I go to bilbao once a month for work reasons and every become a seat i take my breath away in a from different angles and if the sun is shining innocent. Why it's on the river. I've heard Frank gehry who designed it talk about it and he would say things like you now. I wanted to tie in with the former industrial vans. Scape of the city and those kinds of things within your soul I think he actually achieved that. And of course the diviners a very very proud of it. They love it and he does it. Just a real focal point of the city. It did a lot of money. They had to pay a lot of money to the guggenheim foundation. The cost of automated itself than they have fitted with all works at a lot of money. Went out there. But these four million tourists that came in and thirty three years and it's very easily argue that it's hatred so many titles us. I'm glad to hear that because as we know there are many projects like that that happened in other parts of spain which ended up in complete white elephants Thinking of like the city of arts and sciences in valencia for example which was a vast amount of money. I mean amazing architecture to look at but isn't much really to see inside the military they've been successful or somewhere like the guggenheim in bilbao underneath. I don't even know if i mean there is a lot to see inside in harm. But i'm no expert on now My feeling is that most people go to bill about. Don't go for the content so thin museum they go for. The effect of the museum had on the city. I guess it would be remiss not to mention janika. Many people will know from well first. I i suppose pablo picasso's Very powerful mural. I suppose depicting that sort of chaotic war scene from the bombing during the spanish civil war i think in nineteen thirty seven often from bilbao potent to the idea of basque identity because the original laws of the basque action financial those of the basque country in the agreements with the rest of the kingdom of spain sweaters. And all. that sort of stuff. Albay sta this tree. That goal there trio gaffney guy ritchie's very important in boss folk glow And that's why That's why they bombed that sick that that town rather than bombing assets rational about nineteen thirty seven's rain from bone de destroyed. Eighty percent of the of the buildings were destroyed owning but it was then rebuilt. I'm very well. The town was rebuilt very well by Who control of it. Rebuilt it very very interesting as as almost like a perfect town so it is actually a nice place to go to even though most of the buildings date from the late nineteen thirties. It has a. She's about ten years old. I think he's an amazing museum. A peace museum and these absolutely. It's a wonderful experience may not taking my kids there. I've been there a few times than it's audio visual experiences. You can treat us if you're in a room phones coming down and it sonnets. It's a.

bilbao Frank gehry guggenheim foundation janika spain Albay sta valencia pablo picasso ritchie
"guggenheim foundation" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

C-SPAN Radio

06:22 min | 1 year ago

"guggenheim foundation" Discussed on C-SPAN Radio

"Preference breaks rest must journey girls who who thank you so much restaurant was wonderful next up is George Saunders George Saunders is the author of nine books including the novel Lincoln in the Bardo which won the man Booker prize and in the search starts story collection tenth of December which was a finalist for the National Book Award as best selling book congratulations by the way some thoughts and kindness is an expanded version of his two thousand thirteen commencement address given at Syracuse University George has received fellowships from the Lannan foundation and the American academy of arts and letters and the Guggenheim foundation it was included in TIME's two thousand thirteen list of the one hundred most influential people in the world his forthcoming book a swim in a pond in the brain it was for dead Russians give us a master class on writing and life will be published in January twenty twenty one George we have a video because he had some issues with his broadband so this is going to be a tape recording of George and I think that that some of your writers out there will really find inspiration welcome George high twenty twenty right my name is George Saunders I'm a writer for The New Yorker I am a professor at Syracuse University a little bit ago when this court he was just starting I kind of find possibly running emails to some of my graduate creative writing students and I thought I'd share that with you today as you prepare to go out into the weirdness that is America twenty twenty dearest you writers Jeez what a hard and depressing and scary time so much suffering anxiety everywhere I saw this be happy buzzing around a flower yesterday felt like more if you only knew but also cursed me that this is when the world needs our eyes and ears and minds this is never happened before here at least not since nineteen eighteen we are especially you are the generation is going to have to help us make sense of this recovery afterwards what new forms might you invent sister shines about like this where all the drama is happening in private is actually are you keeping records of the emails and text you're getting the thoughts you're having the way your hearts and minds are reacting to this strange new way of living is all important fifty years from now people age you are now one believe this ever happened I will do this sort of viral we all do when someone tells about something crazy that happened in nineteen sixty okay future care is what you were able to write about this and what you're able to write about it will depend on how much sharp attention you're paying now and what records you keep also I think was how open you can keep your heart I'm trying to practice using something like hi so this is happening now or so this too is part of life on earth did not know that universe thank you so much sticker in a real quick try to pretend I didn't just call the university I did a piece of journalism once for I want to live in harmony and a homeless camp in Fresno for a week very intense but the best thing I heard in your was from this older guy from Guatemala who is always saying everything is always keep changing sure words were never spoken it's only when we expect solidity non change that we get taken by surprise and we always expect solidity no matter how will we know better well this is all sounding a little preachy and let me confess that I'm not take my own advice at all it's all happening so fast my wife also has what we're hoping is just a bad cold and I'm doing a lot of a nest caregiving our dogs can feel something weird is going on no walk again but I guess what I'm trying to say is that the world is like a sleeping tiger and we tend to that our lives are on its back we're much smaller than the tiger obviously right by reading cans on the back of a tiger now and then that tiger wakes up and that is terrifying sometimes it wakes up in someone we love dies or someone breaks our heart where there's a pandemic but this is far from the first time that tiger has come away he she has been doing it since the beginning of time and we'll never stop doing it and always are good writers to observe it and later make some sort of sense of it or at least bear witness to it it's good for the world for a writer to bear witness and it's good for the writer to especially if you can bear witness with well and you were and despite it all some fondness for the world just it's manifesting warts and all hello this is say there's still work to be done and now more than ever it's a beautiful story about the Russian poet on Oct marble her husband was shot in her son arrested during the Stalinist purges one day she was standing outside a prison with hundreds of other women in similar situations this Russian called and they have to go there every day wait for hours in this big open yard they get the answer that today and every day there will be no answer every day that you come back hello my recognizing her as the famous poets as can you write this moderates responded a second says I can't our products are something like a smile yes we need over the woman's face I wish you all the best during this crazy period someday soon things will get back to some sort of normal it will be easier to be happy I believe this I hope that for each one of you hello forward to seeing you all again and working with you and even in time with sufficient PP during a handshake or a please feel free to email me any time for any reason George I just had a my wife call is healthy and fine and happy as I hope we all will be soon.

George Saunders
"guggenheim foundation" Discussed on The Archive Project

The Archive Project

01:45 min | 1 year ago

"guggenheim foundation" Discussed on The Archive Project

"Ugly Music is was the winner of the Payment River prize a graduate of the MFA program at Nyu. She was awarded a Global Research Initiative Fellowship to Florence Italy. She is the recipient of additional fellowships from custom window community of writers and the Fine Arts Work Center Summer Program. Her poems can be found in Washington Square Review Bennington Review the Adroit Journal and elsewhere. Her heart is in Brooklyn. Next is Malcolm Tehreek from Savannah Georgia and is the author of extended play winner of the two thousand. Seventeen Gertrude press poetry CHAPA contest. His debut poetry collection is. He'd the hollow which is just this week right who's to a graduate of Emory University Tariq has a PhD in English from the University of Michigan. And he lives in New York and Jericho. Brown is the recipient of a whiting writer's award and fellowships from the John Simon Guggenheim Foundation the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study at Harvard University and the National Endowment for the Arts Brown's first book please when the American Book Award His Second Book the New Testament One the Hanes Field Wolf Book Award his third book. The tradition shortlisted for the National Book Award. Good luck. Jericho appeared widely in publications such as the New York Times. The New Yorker Time magazine the Pushcart Prize Anthology and several others. He's associate professor and the director of the creative writing program in Atlanta. And My name. My name is Erica. Stevens and I am a senior editor at Coffee House. Press come through Coffee House..

National Book Award Fine Arts Work Center Summer P associate professor Coffee House Emory University Tariq Payment River Florence Italy New York Pushcart Prize New York Times MFA John Simon Guggenheim Foundati Malcolm Tehreek Nyu Erica University of Michigan Washington Square Review Savannah Georgia Brown The New Yorker Time magazine
"guggenheim foundation" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

07:12 min | 2 years ago

"guggenheim foundation" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Project anyway well you know let's give it a try I mean it's it's a decision which had been taken as such to be taken in the late nineteen eighties you may be right that he would not war but given that so much money has gone into this project I would say you know that speedy doctors he'd be war and what if any kid doesn't we can ask ourselves how can we how we can improve on it discuss how Venice fits in Italy you know we go there we try out there we say we went to Venice were there for ex number of days we stand in line we do all the things you do in Venice and then we leave how does Venice domestically fit in the fabric of Italy well I think you know it's very easy interesting how the status change then you know you're right there are I think around twenty million estimated tourists have flocked into the city at the state having fortunate CD which is that these being progressively deserted by residences there is a big yeah you know it's very expensive and very troublesome to leave their so Edie's he's becoming and all of his tweets way more profitable distaste to rank your slot on Airbnb or the like so it is a city which is progressively you know being detached from the fabric of a tally of course it's hugely lucrative if you own a business or a lot there but I think you do you say that you know you he goes into this very deep question of how you manage a tourism flows in despair and age of mass profiting especially when you have countries such as China rod you know emerging markets in Asia we tried we want to go into the ward at the you know can the war the call date all these people this is a nation government does nothing how long before Venice doesn't exist anymore well there are some reports saying that you know if if the Mediterranean Sea goes out into the estimated the mad could rise by around a meter over the next hundred years and that would cause that serious serious problems in Dennis you know some tape with the think it I mean obviously these projections are are very hard to make but you know that's where we are and it's very very very warring indeed then this would you go there now I mean if the tides are receding it was C. experience Ferdinando of the water comes in whether it's six inches or three feet which we have at the local areas here I mean how quickly does Venice recover they mean they're used to this right it happens every winners justice times worse right well I think you know E. does happen and whenever you go there you just see you know the signs of the thank goodness of this nation so it's a it's a city which is used to this but I think there are two issues one is the opportunity you know the size of dates and you've seen the images so we're only going on in mark's basilica man god knows if they've been apartment in damages due to repeat the question but I would say the additional thing if the frequency ten becoming much much more frequent I think it's the base which should really one final question here Mrs keen emails and I don't know what a surprise listen to see Mrs cumulus use Ferdinando well the Gucci story okay cal Largo twenty two marzo you know author of San Marcos group you know away from the away from the cathedral the church in Maine well the retail shops be okay do they recover well I mean they're they're being they're being told cove some bags floating around yeah find some it is lightly keeper pride to look in the gun to lose you go by thank you so much for the known as yellow greatly appreciate it with a just a visceral knowledge of Italy I I will say Leeson out of be there at the end of the year it is magical and I go to the end of the year because then the terrorists are just terrible I think I can imagine the summers you're gonna be going on there so I have not no I I can't fathom the summers I ate the terse one under the bridge outside where we stay is completely packed the end of December I can't fathom what it would be like so what do you do what do you do when you go to what we do what we we just crash to be honest it does this is very important this the the whole Venice is not water logged his height parts Venice and of course the media goes to San Marco square which is very low action of an app on my phone which shows the elevation of the fiery stops so not all of Venice is under water there's many parts of Venice that are very quiet very residential particular to the north side an awful way towards the train station but you know it's a little misreported OMG Venice under water many parts are still dry and life goes on even now and I think that when we talk about the rising seas that's only part of it the buildings are also sinking lower part yeah and I think that that's the key issue it's sort of you know could you do something to stop the sinking in that factor well to your good questions of Fernando I think the American approaches what are you waiting for fix this now and that's sort of a whole the the the swirl of Italian government I don't even understand you could turn the question right back to the United States seven fifty nine TV I mean come on this is it you could put a big sign here's the thing possible but not just that but also with levees and with other is used to to accommodate climate change people opposing including with the U. S. in New York subway system so you know you could turn it right back right in season are trying to get a remote there me she she was on the phone with us and you know we were the the the name excuse number to a former ambassador of the United States to the United Kingdom he's on the Guggenheim foundation museum board there and you know there's a whole thing about Venice that's away from what we see in the tourism in a cruise ships going by and all that's really mad you just want to catch some good to better route for Mrs king it's scary should should we like lobby pharaoh king for would have to leave it remote from Venice I could see on a gondola yeah I will the surveillance gondola we could do the calling the twins could come along and be great they beat the cute little twins to be there in the the blue and white striped shirts I hear screaming it sounds like someone is cut off his hand in the control room there it would be interesting anyways thank you for not a John own particular things to Francine for guidance on the story Venice earlier this morning in the floods there very very serious what appears real damage to some of their history futures deteriorate negative four negative seven Dow futures negative forty five much coming up further testimony of chairman Paul this is Bloomberg this is a Bloomberg market and is now a page from the diary of flow dear diary I got the brush off again I don't get it is there something wrong with the way we've elbow wrist elbow wrist by what.

hundred years six inches three feet
"guggenheim foundation" Discussed on WHAS 840 AM

WHAS 840 AM

04:46 min | 2 years ago

"guggenheim foundation" Discussed on WHAS 840 AM

"Seoul three is when tacos for a year we got about ten minutes before we're gonna draw that name out there and somebody's gonna be really happy for a year they also do catering will go talk to the caring guy before we get out here this evening but right now giving it a fan I know it's last second could you grab the jeopardy there's a jeopardy on you too that's got like ten hours of Jesse music just with that at all because we're going to. because here's the deal we did get to play Tuesday and I've got the questions and going to the king of tomorrow so I want to do is get all right to attribute Jennifer crusade for children if these guys get eight of the ten questions and I will give. fifteen dollars but if you say for children it's one eighty five now. thirty five dollars to one. disease and I know. for more than eight to ten year. all right number one Shannon you should get this one correctly remember all three of you are sharing the brain okay actively can get the and we in addition to being the name of Metallica's album what is the term ride the lightning refer to I got it hi on what is the electric chair final okay final answer yes. correct your current electric chair by the light. well. he got on the line who gained notoriety for her work with the parents music resource center an organization it advocated labeling music. and they put stickers on CD yeah she was married to a vice president. tipper gore correct we need to also you got. and in the do you have I was gonna say that before he okay. here in a brazen just blurt out answer I don't think this ruling I don't take the first one so your two for Tuesday in the. I love the attitude I don't I need. what abstract painter applied for a fellowship from the Guggenheim foundation in nineteen forty seven but was rejected anymore hall. abstract painter right. you've just made that up. yeah yeah yeah yeah yeah this one here often the artist. you're gonna kill yourself when you hear the Fendi of an answer. Austin I mean that Google it real quick the the only famous one I know was war hall when you talk about abstract I'm thinking more hold on I think trip the art stuff right so I mean he's the one that got killed in a car crash because he was drunk and high but later y'all don't have it it's Jackson power. yeah that was gonna be my guest okay which Saturday this is one of the greatest films of all time which Saturday Night Live. a personality appeared in the two thousand and four film mean girls. yes correct yes there you go alright you've gotten three of four here after which south of South Park today's mean girls say girls is a really yeah October third my daughter loves that movie she was it could we come home is just one watch mean girls all right after which South Park character did scientists name a mutated gene that causes fruit flies to die within two days. Kenny Kenny. it's our canning always rags right correct your four oh five good job guys all right in which film would you encounter the characters stacks Mickey eyes and Billy bass. dax Nikki eyes and Billy yes can we get a gangster film. good. the the outsiders. American gangster. you have mentioned the movie so is gonna pick one the one that you just mentioned the girls it's not against. good. fellows is the correct yeah that's right Billy bass yellow more always got murdered in the in the channel who doesn't need another help now Shannon may arise you all rolling here your role in here who pay these kids going to get the money you just got to finish up strong here which who painted the last judgment on the ceiling of the Sistine Chapel. Sistine Chapel who painted the Sistine Chapel. yes no that was the fifteenth chapel. but answer. Michael and. it was the. the fifteenth. get a lap or that they. I'd like to apologize my parents for that we feel like they're always.

Sistine Chapel Shannon tipper gore Guggenheim foundation Billy bass Seoul Metallica vice president. Sistine Chapel. Jesse Jennifer Billy Kenny Kenny. Google South Park Michael Billy bass. Austin
"guggenheim foundation" Discussed on This Movie Changed Me

This Movie Changed Me

03:49 min | 3 years ago

"guggenheim foundation" Discussed on This Movie Changed Me

"Winner of the national book Critics Circle award in poetry and the Penn Center USA poetry award. Claudia continues to push the boundaries of imagination. She's been awarded fellowships by the American Academy of American poets the National Endowment for the arts the Guggenheim foundations and five years ago. She was elected as chancellor at they kademi of American poets and she happens to teach at Yale. This. Fearless poet is a critical voice in discussions about race. She speaks to us powerfully through poetry, essays, lectures and short films seeking to understand American life in all its promise. Hope betrayals contradictions and fragility. Let's welcome Krista. And claudia. Two. New York City. Just before I started I want to I I just don't say how fabulous it is to be here. And I've wanted to interview Claudia forever and just kind of been waiting for the right moment. And this was it. And here we all are together for it. And I want to thank Melissa case and WNYC, and especially the great people at WNYC studios. And I want to say to you. I think we're going to focus especially on themes in citizen and the white card, but I did bring and I have those with me, and I have a couple of other books, and if you just feel inspired to read something you can. But Claudia just told me just just grab it. And but but Claudia just told me that she's working on a new book. And that that may and that kind of that that what's on your mind. Maybe it'd be what those into this. And that's great too. So you were born in Jamaica and came to the US when you were seven always, correct. Okay. And somewhere when you were describing the. That that that time of your birth. You put it in context this way that eleven days after you were born on September fifteenth nineteen sixty three four black girls were killed in the bombing of the sixteenth street Baptist church in Birmingham. So you were still in Jamaica those for seven years of her life, and I wonder did you know that that did you have that context? Or was that sequence something that you learned later when you were in the states, I didn't know, I didn't know I can't even say if my parents knew, but what they did know is that that wasn't a surprise. So the when we came to United States. My mother said there's one thing that you must know. She had two things two things that she believed in it in case one was that public school was awful. And and to and she did say this to me, you cannot trust white people. Those were her to as a Jamaican woman coming to the United States in the nineteen sixties when the American government opened up immigration because of a need for healthcare workers. So that that's brought a kind of flood from the Caribbean and previously must immigrants had been white Europeans. Yeah. Exactly..

Claudia national book Critics Circle a United States Jamaica American Academy of American WNYC WNYC studios American government sixteenth street Baptist churc Penn Center USA chancellor New York City Caribbean Krista National Endowment Yale Melissa Birmingham eleven days
"guggenheim foundation" Discussed on On Being with Krista Tippett

On Being with Krista Tippett

03:49 min | 3 years ago

"guggenheim foundation" Discussed on On Being with Krista Tippett

"Winner of the national book Critics Circle award in poetry and the Penn Center USA poetry award. Claudia continues to push the boundaries of imagination. She's been awarded fellowships by the American Academy of American poets the National Endowment for the arts the Guggenheim foundations and five years ago. She was elected as chancellor, they kademi of American poets, and she happens to teach at Yale this. Fearless poet is a critical voice in discussions about race. She speaks to us powerfully through poetry, essays, lectures and short films seeking to understand American life in all its promise. Hope betrayals contradictions and fragility. Let's welcome Krista. And claudia. Two. Oh, New York City. Just before I started want to. I I just don't say how fabulous it is to be here. And I've wanted to interview. Claudia forever. Just kind of been waiting for the right moment. And this was it. And here we all are together for it. And I wanna thank Melissa case and WNYC, and especially the great people at WNYC studios and wanna say to you. I think we're going to focus especially on themes in citizen and the white card, but I did bring and I have those with me, and I have a couple of other books, and if you just feel inspired to read something you can. But Claudia just told me just just grab it. And but but Claudia just told me that she's working on a new book. And that that may and that kind of that that what's on your mind may be what those into this. And that's great too. So you were born in Jamaica and came to the US when you were seven so is correct. Okay. And somewhere when you were describing the. You know that that that time of your birth? You put it in context this way that eleven days after you were born on September fifteenth nineteen sixty three four black girls were killed in the bombing of the sixteenth street Baptist church in Birmingham. So you were still in Jamaica those for seven years of life, and I wonder did you know that circle that did you have that context? Or was that sequence something that you learned later when you were in the states, I didn't know, I didn't know I can't even say if my parents knew, but what they did know is that that wasn't a surprise. So the when we came to United States. My mother said there's one thing that you must know. She had two things two things that she believed in it in case one was that public school was awful. And and to and she did say this to me, you cannot trust white people. Those were her to know as a Jamaican woman coming to the United States in the nineteen sixty s when the American government opened up immigration because of a need for healthcare workers. So that that's brought a kind of flood from the Caribbean. N previously must immigrants had been white Europeans. Yeah. Exactly..

Claudia national book Critics Circle a United States Jamaica American Academy of American WNYC WNYC studios American government sixteenth street Baptist churc Penn Center USA chancellor New York City Caribbean Krista National Endowment Yale Melissa Birmingham eleven days