35 Burst results for "Guggenheim"

"guggenheim" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

05:22 min | 6 months ago

"guggenheim" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"To raise third party capital of broker dealers required So I established the little fundraiser group at this small broker dealer and with the knowledge that we were going to try to create a financial brand out of a museum name And one of the founders of the broker dealer was very close to the Guggenheim family The father and the son that were owners of this brand and we spent a little bit of time during 2000 and in October 2000 we merged the broker dealer with the Guggenheim brothers created Guggenheim partners and then also in the same month closed on I believe it was 28 million in working capital and then we had a reverse merger also in the same month with a commercial paper conduit in Chicago by the name of liberty Hampshire and the CEO and founder of liberty Hampshire Mark Walter is still Guggenheim's CEO today That's quite interesting How did being at Guggenheim when it was founded affect both your career and the way you think about private equity I was exposed to private equity when I was at HSBC group after business school And that's what I was exposed to it in the early 1990s When I HSBC was on an acquisition binge in the late 80s early 90s and acquired some asset management businesses in the U.S. and when I graduated business school joined them and I was generally calling on institutions raising long only Southeast Asian equity mandates And at that time only the largest pension funds and institutional investors would make an allocation to such a narrow strategy And so it got me it allowed me to start a dialog with some of the largest institutions institutional investors in the United States Marketing those products And through that I was introduced to an individual that owned 25% of a management company in HSBC on 75% of where he had two small $35 million private equity funds focused on Southeast Asia and China Performance looked pretty interesting And his goal in 1992 I believe 93 was to try to raise some capital from the United States So you start focus point private capital in 2010 how was this different from what you've done previously in your career and what services does focus point provide Yeah so we learned a lot at HSBC We had it's a minority shareholder is an insurance company And that seated a number of the funds that we raised at Guggenheim So in addition to using the broker dealer at Guggenheim to raise third party capital Guggenheim was a principle in a number of different strategies and we would identify the management team the insurance company would provide some seed capital to get some investments completed and then we would go out to the market and raise the initial fund And then we would generally raise a follow on fun two or fund three and a number of credit related strategies as well as well as some equity Following the financial crisis in O 8 Guggenheim I would say less interested in seeding new managers and more using the balance sheet that they were building to act more as a direct investor middle of 2010 a lot of us on the capital raising private fund group inside Guggenheim became independent We're still very close with a number of the people that were there when we were there And focus point raises capital for private funds and direct transactions And I would say it's similar to what we were doing at Guggenheim and that we were continually meeting with investors in general partners One dynamic I've noticing is increasingly the capital raising business we're acting like almost like a search firm because we're continually meeting investment talent whether it's talented investors inside a private equity firm other independent sponsors that are more comfortable or confident in their ability to find profitable transactions and I've been unable to convince them to do a fund or touted limited partners that have been investing in the asset class for a number of years And we continue to see it evolve but looking back we've probably raised capital for over 21st time funds And which requires a lot of work but the reason you do it is for the successor funds Quite interesting Coming up we continue our conversation with David Conrad cofounder.

HSBC group Guggenheim Guggenheim brothers created Gu liberty Hampshire Mark Walter United States capital Guggenheim Chicago Southeast Asia China David Conrad
"guggenheim" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

05:31 min | 6 months ago

"guggenheim" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"As well as land C investment LLC previously he was one of the key players at Guggenheim helping to raise $6 billion for their many different investment strategies So let's talk a little bit about focus point What's it specialty Where do you really put your focus into focus point Sure We raised capital for private funds and direct transactions The typical fund strategies we are focused on are private equity managers in the mid cap space from 250 million to say 2 billion in fun size growth equity managers minority or managers focused on control some software but all throughout the tech sector tech enabled services software some hardware And we've lately done a little bit in the venture capital world And we do a lot in credit and income related strategies Who hasn't done a little something in the venture capital of these days It seems like there's just a ton of cash flowing into that but you mentioned equity growth are those private are you talking about hedge funds that are in the public market These are private equity firms that are not seeking control of the businesses So they're generally backing a management team bootstrap and they're the first institutional money going into the business So is that companies are growing 30 to 50% annually They need some equity capital to get to the next level These growth equity managers provide that with their guidance get them to a hundred to 200 million in revenue And then they show up on their radar screen of the larger private equity firms that are looking to add on looking for a portfolio company that onto an existing platform And so it's almost a food chain that makes our starting to see which wasn't as apparent three to 5 years ago but with the what's happening in the world of tech it's increasing rapidly Quite interesting Let's talk about land C investment It almost sounds like land and sea but it's land in the latter sea First what does that name mean And then we'll talk about what it does I've got a son named Lucas I've got a son named Alex I've got a wife named Nina My name is David And my last name is Conrad So there it is And that's the entity that owns the focus point private capital group And I say since 2016 2017 we've been through the capital raising business we meet some we started eating some talented independent sponsors that were confident in their ability to get a transaction done where they I was unable to convince them to do a fund And so we would raise equity for them and we started to participate in the promote structure with them So land C ons a portfolio of ownership actress in some direct transactions And on occasion we participate in the promote structure with some first time funds as part of our compensation So when you say you participate you get a slice of the GP Is that right The GP economics correct Not the control just the economics just the cash flow from that Part of the percent of their carried interest for raising the equity and in some cases we have invested in their GP One thing we noticed is with independent sponsors when they do have a direct transaction The lenders want to fund the GP commit is generally 2% minimum The lenders on a direct transaction for a sponsor who does not have a fund or asking for ten to 20% for a GP commit And they don't always have that lying around money And being able to help them solve the GP capital problem helps improve our economic sharing For example and that sounds like those are potentially lucrative investments over time That's the object of the exercise I guess Well as opposed to saying I'm going to put money into this fund that's going to yield 8 or 10% when you're putting money into a direct investment my assumption is those are your ordinarily attractive opportunities Yeah the investors are looking for a higher return We've done some things in the real estate related in the hospitality sector focusing on the extended stay and the select service market with a former principal at a large investment bank He had a $20 billion portfolio he oversaw at one point He's been operating at it as an independent sponsor for ten years Right And we've done completed now 6 transactions with him And we have I guess ownership in north of 60 of those types of hotels We recently identified a New York Stock Exchange listed insurance company to invest in 8 large shipping container vessels that 170 million is now worth north of half a billion and only 9 months as the container market is red hot right now Coming up we continue our conversation with David Conrad cofounder.

land C investment LLC Guggenheim Conrad Nina Lucas Alex David New York Stock Exchange David Conrad
"guggenheim" Discussed on Tesla Daily: Tesla News & Analysis

Tesla Daily: Tesla News & Analysis

05:17 min | 8 months ago

"guggenheim" Discussed on Tesla Daily: Tesla News & Analysis

"More, Tesla says this vehicle was built with a battery pack manufactured as early as 2017. While the pack was brand new when the vehicle was built, which was more recently, the cells have reduced capacity due to their age, and you can expect up to 12% reduction in range from current production specifications. So some people complaining about this today, I don't think it's a big deal at all. Tests are just using their resources that they've got. Some of those being older packs. I don't know where those older packs are coming from. Maybe salvage, maybe refurbished, but Tesla obviously, putting them to use in their demo vehicles and then putting those demo vehicles to use eventually reselling them. It shouldn't be any problem with that as long as it's clearly disclosed, which it obviously is. If anybody doesn't like that, then don't buy those specific vehicles. It's obviously going to be a very small amount of vehicles. So no big deal to me. And as for that 12%, don't just assume that's all degradation or something from the battery age. You'd also have to factor in improvements that Tesla's made to the current batteries from those older versions. All right, next, also on batteries we've got an update from Moneyball on Twitter that Chinese battery manufacturer Gaussian has signed a 200 gigawatt hour with the iron phosphate battery supply agreement from 2023 through 2028 with an unnamed U.S. auto manufacturer and that they would also agree to building a U.S. battery plant. So pretty interesting, given the volume there, even if the 200 gigawatt hours is not an annual basis, that's still 33 gigawatt hours per year over that 6 year period. That's enough for about half a million vehicles per year. Not a ton of companies that would be doing that kind of volume, especially with your Martin phosphate batteries alone. So definitely makes you wonder that if the support is accurate, if this is Tesla. It is probably worth noting that Volkswagen owns about 25% of this company. And while Volkswagen certainly makes vehicles in the United States, it would be weird to refer to them as a U.S. auto manufacturer, though obviously things can be lost in translation sometimes and maybe if this is focused on Volkswagen in the U.S. in terms of what the supply is going to be used for, I could definitely still see that happening, and I do think it'd be a little bit odd for a company that Volkswagen has such a significant stake in to supply such a huge amount of batteries to Tesla. Yes, folks might get in Tesla generally play pretty nice together, but still. So, I don't know. We'll just have to keep an eye on it, but my best guess would be Volkswagen or Tesla. Last few things here first up, just kind of a crazy story on Tesla. There was a couple that was trying to get to the hospital to deliver their child, but there was just too much traffic and they weren't going to make it. So they ended up putting the vehicle in autopilot and delivering the baby who is now happy and healthy in the Tesla on the way. Apparently autopilot was quite helpful in facilitating this and getting them there very shortly after so that they could get some assistance. Next up, neo has unveiled their next vehicle..

Tesla Volkswagen U.S. Martin phosphate Gaussian Twitter
Author Paul Gottfried Has Written the Book on Fascism... And Antifascism

The Eric Metaxas Show

02:13 min | 9 months ago

Author Paul Gottfried Has Written the Book on Fascism... And Antifascism

"And Paul Godfrey has written a book titled anti fascism. The course of a crusade, who is Paul gottfried, you wonder, I'll tell you, first of all, he's my guest for this hour. He is the editor of chronicles. Some of you know that journal, he's an American paleo conservative philosopher historian columnist. He's a former Horace raffensperger Professor of humanities at Elizabethtown college in Elizabethtown Pennsylvania, as well as a Guggenheim recipient wow, doctor gottfried welcome to this program. Thank you for having me on. Well, it's a joy to have you on and to talk about your new book anti fascism. You had to be aware that there's something funny about the idea that you've written a book called fascism, the career of a concept followed by anti fascism, the course of a crusade. Tell us about that. Well, you know, I became interested in the subject of fascism before I was confronted by the problem of woke of the woke left, which is what we're dealing with right now. Much of my earlier scholarship, you know, dealt with political movements and movements of the right, as well as movements to the left. And I wrote a biography of Carl Schmidt, a German political theorist who influenced into war fascism. So sort of natural that at some point I wrote a book on fascism as well. And in studying the book on fascism, I was informed by a person who has become sort of my mentor Stanley Payne who's probably the outstanding scholar on the subject of fascism that the best part of the book was my treatment of anti fascism. So I was urged by Stanley and then by Amy ferranto, who was my editor at Cornell University in northern Illinois university presses. They're now merged that I should write a book on anti fascism, which I did. And as I told her, I found it much less interesting to my book on fascism because the people I was dealing with were much less

Paul Godfrey Paul Gottfried Horace Raffensperger Elizabethtown College Elizabethtown Gottfried Carl Schmidt Pennsylvania Stanley Payne Amy Ferranto Cornell University In Northern Stanley
Adrienne Rich was One of the Most Widely-Praised Poets of the 20th Century

Encyclopedia Womannica

01:56 min | 1 year ago

Adrienne Rich was One of the Most Widely-Praised Poets of the 20th Century

"We're talking about one of the most widely taught widely read and widely praised poets at the twentieth century. Her burke brought the minute show of women's lives into the spotlight challenging the idea that to right from the female perspective was uninspired and undeserving of attention. Let's talk about adrienne rich when she was born in baltimore in nineteen twenty nine adrienne rich's parents thought she would be a boy they'd plan to name her after her father. Arnold a doctor. Instead arnold decided his daughter adrienne would be a literary prodigy by the age of four. Adrienne could read and write by six. She wrote her first poetry book by seven a fifty page play about the trojan war. This is the child we needed and deserved her mother. Helen wrote in a notebook. Helen had been a concert pianist and had given up her career for marriage. And motherhood as much as adrian's childhood was marked by long hours in her father's library her mother's sadness and lack of agency left a lasting impression to in nineteen fifty one while a senior at radcliffe college. Adrian experienced her first big break her poetry manuscript. A change of world won the yale younger poets prize. The prize came with a publishing contract. W h auden wrote the foreword and reviewers loved it. At twenty two years old. Adrian became a critical darling soon thereafter. She won a guggenheim fellowship. Which funded additional studies at oxford. There she met alfred. Conrad a graduate student from harvard. Despite her father's disapproval and married alfred. Nineteen fifty three

Adrienne Rich Helen Burke Adrienne Baltimore Arnold Radcliffe College H Auden Adrian Alfred Oxford Conrad Harvard
'Black grief and white grievance' at New Yorks New Museum

The Art Newspaper Weekly

04:06 min | 1 year ago

'Black grief and white grievance' at New Yorks New Museum

"Now. The new museum in new york this week open grief and grievance art and morning in america and exhibition originally conceived for the museum by the hugely influential curator of queen ways or before. He died in two thousand nine hundred nineteen grief and grievance features thirty seven artists to address the theme of morning commemoration and loss in response to the racist violence experienced by african american communities the title the museum says refers to quote the intertwined phenomena of black grief and a politically orchestrated white grievance against each structures and defines contemporary american social and political life. Curatorial advisory group has worked together to realize an interpreter. Basil's vision maximiliano gio knee of the new museum. The artist glenn ligon in ways. As regular curatorial collaborator mark. Nash and owe me beckwith scenic creator of the museum of contemporary art in chicago. He's just been appointed chief curator of the guggenheim museum in new york editor in the americas. Helen stolis spoke to beckwith about the exhibition. I wondered what's it been like bringing the show to its final stages making sure that oakley's incredible vision has been realized. What was your thinking through the process to make sure you've got this kind of final end stage oak. We have a brial mind. There were always so many things that he was thinking about and working on and he can have an idea a decade ago that manifests itself into a show much much later and so his ability to kind of hold and juggle things Intellectually and mentally that then get realized later was uncanny honestly the more that i read essays of his from about ten years ago i realized the core of some of this thinking was already there especially the core of ideas in grief ingredient. So all that is to say that this actually is unlikely to be. Oh quiz show believe it or not. They'll be more coming more things to watch and see. The man's ambitions were amazing and so lars they will extend extend far past life But in terms of grief and grievance started as a lecture series for harvard and oh a curator. He thinks through art a curious interesting. That i'm still speaking about him in present tense and so he thinks through ours and he started then to take. These ideas That he'd been mulling over these ideas around. What really are the kind of core conditions of american race relations. Where did they begin. What catalyzed them and what are the ramifications of that core This sense of black loss and a sense of white grievance let really in his mind got catalyzed around the civil war. What are those ramifications for the american polity right now our process as curatorial advisors which is what we've been calling ourselves has really been about trying to round out oh quiz vision where it was necessary. Okay already had a rather. Set schematic for the show. He had core objects that he was interested. In working with a painting of awesome blogs painting by daniel johnson another awesome. Blah's painting by jack whitten and a painting regime michel basquiat. He was really interested in these three objects as the ways to anchor away of of both thinking through reactions to Black and justice but also aesthetic forms that moved between abstraction and figuration between forms that are legible and gestures that deal. Mostly i think with the monochromatic. So these being the kind of catalyzing ideas for the show. were great signposts for us so then began to work with those themes and ideas for the rest of the checklist.

Beckwith Maximiliano Gio Glenn Ligon Helen Stolis New York Guggenheim Museum Museum Of Contemporary Art Basil Nash Oakley Americas America Chicago Lars Harvard Jack Whitten Michel Basquiat Daniel Johnson Blah
Bill Bruford (Yes/King Crimson) 1980 Interview

The Tapes Archive

08:47 min | 1 year ago

Bill Bruford (Yes/King Crimson) 1980 Interview

"In this episode. We have one of prog rock's greatest drummers bill at the time of this interview in nineteen eighty. Broussard was thirty one years old and on tour with solo band supporting his album. Gradually going tornado in the interview buford talks about why he left. Yes how robert fricke try to cancel the king crimson. Nineteen seventy four central park concert and the advantage of making a name for himself and banned by yes genesis and king crimson as always we have music critic mark allen at the helm conducting the interview. One last thing before we get to the interview the tapes archive. Podcast is a proud member of cyrus media a global community connecting passionate fans with podcast and experiences about artists and topics loves. Thanks for tuning in. And now it's time to open the vault over. No i'm not gonna player stations here and i'll give you rush especially in that not many commercials. Well the recent that lies these senior can add vocals eventually note. I don't know that wouldn't think by. Anthony singapore quite probable. There's nobody bill. Prince discounts finals. I it's just that this particular album. Not on kuwait's america would voice and something this hotline dance especially yes and on such a huge level. You made your holiday every two years now here you are. i just. You're staying with less than had to move with yet more. Yes that's not the only ask you how. How does as eddie feel about the. Because you're obviously made a name for yourself willy. Mason soldiers is that america beside more for music and the whole thing is a viable proposition. She's really good. It doesn't so listen. I'm going to be stable kind of and who who doesn't doesn't mind. I like to be able to play madison back on. Not that i ever have to and And trump's although there's not a whole level of problems occur pasta two three thousand seats by now we can just play music or problems. Did you have that are raised now. A group of flannel. It's magic pilot very easily that level. It's incredibly uninspired. It's amazingly easy to find some to seventy thousand blackout faces. Eight any pressure tool because the sounds inside. North and the whole shemozzle would sucha an isolated insulated kind of fair so much no reaction no visible reaction from anybody to your play like in a club. You can see people reacting in those places. None of that happens to. It's an extraordinary ritual. It's an amazing amazing feeding of power. But it was a strategic. Bit of works really got me to america to keep interest in on wants to in future thing this. I've had this time. And american gotten how planners do places north america generally in american about me and on you always make a good to substance feels. Good gets me and say you need some sort of strategic planning for thing like that genesis suitable time. You've got new playing it. Got my face around. It wasn't the best musical world. Then it wasn't gonna be paid for by a five month job which was fine. I could stay. Probably but i had other plans so i think we used each other way. German ankles return for it. Because i was having or without america trying very hard to exist by five synthesizers to buy a hop hannah's to buy another tunes. It's europe is a very strong place to and we could pass numerical together for the good work here more or less decided book. America's favorite and no sheppard's son to healthy strict with north vessel for any given output the musical direction. You're likely to gain the speech. Must people. you'll disseminate music. Quickest efficiently probably followed by canada. I wasn't sure that he would be person. You would like to talk to as many as i liked to. I actually. I am doing this as a promotion exercise. There's no doubt about. I need you know with mike to rice about what it is. Because i'm interested in. It really wants to get it across that. It would be lovely day. It's an insane people kind of associate. What communist play. There was no constant need to keep talking about see we have tried to compete with. Americans are americans be comforting to six weeks which seemed like forever but an american band will six months about thinking. It's an order to compete a tool to be in the same race as all must make use of here in college is coming in at smaller the low level where you stopped club. We're not we're not on the bottom is out. I mean the clubs club sold out and that's great. That's not actually at the starting gate and a lights to up. Cities is the american system. Sex could sound systems by much. And sometimes you can to the radio same time so food good system and there's no other way to do it. I mean next level of this hour talking about what the next rung. Up hewlett america. You have to be seen to keep climbing runs. And she else kills loose successful in the country. And i'm sitting. We'll be able to come back short and hopefully find some colleges and smoke. Fix that will. That will be good year to something like that and then we'll worry about what happens. Then what would you want to tell people about your music. It's not death you serious one out about the guggenheim museum. It's not it's the instrumental music. This must be either jazz or classical something like work about some h. Difficult music. And i see that tool. We have supply interesting music fry or or accessible particularly. I think we when we play. We play in such ways to invite people in this environment. Rob repel oppress them and defy. Likes which is not at you. Some refunds out. But i don't like a lot to recession music. Most standardized breath cheating quick tudor or the need to survive really. It's an era fear round action especially because in the bottom. That's right if there there's definitely a climate of whereas the sword go full next. It's partly to good specific management company that we're announces gun because well there's potential that may not be too modest talked about the groups that you played in about people. I band savoy grounding. Savoy was my best friend and that was pretty awful three days and that was that was good that i came up with my first guitar hero. Gibson's she was guitar by then. I looked around a bit and came close. Yes and that was good basketball break. Excellent be very well and I've had enough about six hours. Somebody because i didn't want to spend a lot one time insisted on the last one that can agents. I love sweating. Giving trump generally and i was thinking how am i would support each other and a plane can crimson. Then he sees you superior way. And so i said well that sounds great and off. You went five mercantilist. Some last show ever played in central far out you that that was an emotional night was in when i talked to him about that. He said that was the closest that i'm to being great. Since the first and like you said that the last king clinton in the i can principle the best. It was extremely good easy. You might like no one further anecdotes about that story. Which is the chinese absolute damnedest to cancel events about some sounds which inaudible kind of buzz to hear any sound system and said it was impossible for us to play and he was cut gerald and bullied threatened in two thousand people and he was just about dragged on student and now he will no doubt hail it is being here on the strongest span of did. He's a man of fiction on many levels and not least of which is that. That's enough the mandate about that greg. We really pavlik and blue myself. One of those great night's you believe you're strong as you are. I really enjoy that.

America Robert Fricke Cyrus Media Anthony Singapore Mark Allen Broussard King Crimson Buford Willy Kuwait Eddie Mason Prince Madison Rob Repel Sheppard North America Hannah Hewlett Guggenheim Museum
"guggenheim" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

06:02 min | 1 year ago

"guggenheim" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"W N. Y C FM HD in AM New York. Today on the New Yorker Radio Hour We look at a grave moment in American history, the final days of Donald Trump and Insurrection at the U. S. Capitol impeachment. And an ongoing threat to the security of the nation. I'll talk with Luke Mogensen, who's been reporting on the pro trump uprising and the challenge to democracy in America. At the end of the night after the National Guard had finally managed to expel the last of the writers from inside the Capitol. A man give a speech. This was the beginning of a new civil war and that they needed to go home. Go storm their respective capitals. Go hunt down the traders and kill them. Kill the traitors. That's ahead today on the New Yorker radio hour. People, people, people who are filled with movies. Bye from NPR News on trial. Snyder president he liked Joe Biden is laying out the details of his plan to speed up vaccine distribution as the U. S. Nears 400,000 deaths with coronavirus. NPR's Windsor. Johnson reports some Biden's plan after he called the rollout under the Trump administration. Dismal failure. Biden is pledging to correct course and meet the goal for distributing 100 million shots in his administration's 1st 100 days. We will immediately work with states Open up vaccinations, tomb or priority groups. The process of establishing priority groups was driven by science. The problem is, implementation has been too rigid and confusing. Biden says he'll use the Defense Production act to increase the supply of vaccines. His plan also includes the creation of vaccination centers across the country and mobile clinics to reach underserved urban communities and rural areas. Winter Johnston NPR news California and other states, including Wisconsin, Illinois and Michigan, are working to avoid what happened at the U. S Capitol last week. They're beefing up security ahead of Joe Biden's inauguration on Wednesday. Demonstrations are expected to begin this weekend in Florida. Prosecutors say a man has been shared with trying to organize an armed response to Prothom protesters expected to the state capital. In Tallahassee tomorrow before senators he like Jonah softened. Raphael Warnock can be sworn into the U. S. Senate. Georgia must certify the results of the January 5th run off elections from member station W. A. B E in Atlanta Christopher Alston reports today is the deadline for election officials in Georgia's 159 counties to certify the results of the states to Senate races last week. All except a few dozen counties have completed their certification. As of Thursday afternoon. George's secretary of state's office will review the certifications after the Martin Luther King Jr holiday weekend They must certify results for the state by next Friday, January 22nd, once the secretary of state certifies, the results are to be confirmed by the governor then delivered to the U. S. Senate, George almost completed certification process before Democrats can establish their majority in the Senate. For NPR News. I'm Christopher Austin in Atlanta Party of German Chancellor Angela Merkel has elected a new leader. Pro business politician are meaningless shat offers a clear continuation of miracles policies and as NPR's Rob Schmitz reports. He's now one of the top contenders to replace Merkel as chancellor for more than three years. Arming the shed, has served as the premier of North Rhine Westphalia, Germany's most populated state. As a politician. The six year old the shed has been a close ally of Chancellor Angela Merkel and his candidate for chairman of the Christian Democratic Union Party, offered a clear continuation of her policies. As chairman of the CDU. Let's shut is now one of the top contenders to replace Angela Merkel is chancellor at the end of this year, and you're listening to NPR news. This is w. N. Y. C in New York. I'm lance Lucky. Hundreds of people flocked to the Brooklyn Army terminal Thursday night after word spread on social media about extra Corona virus vaccines about to spoil w got to miss Jake. Often, Hearts has more parks vote resident Henry Toobin says he heard the rumor from a family member and immediately about his parents to the site. There was one guy who started yelling at people like, Hey, you know you're cutting me off. It was like, you know, a breadline period stampede. Mayor De Blasio's administration tried to convince others to stay away, claiming the rumors were misinformation. But city officials later acknowledged there had been extra doses of the vaccine about to expire. Some people online did receive shots without an appointment. It wasn't clear if any doses have been thrown out. A spokesperson for City Hall says the matter is under investigation. New Jersey health officials say they're in the process of setting up a call center for people who want to register for the covert 19 vaccine or make an appointment. But don't have Internet access. Health Commissioner Judy Person, Kelly says the department is training people to answer calls, she says the call center should launch by next week. The state is allowing anyone over 65 those with medical conditions such as cancer, diabetes and obesity. Get a vaccine by appointment. Only the more than 160 sites offering vaccines are not requiring documentations to prove medical eligibility. Guggenheim disappointed Naomi Beckwith as it's deputy director and chief curator. Back with his currently the senior curator at the Museum of Contemporary Art Chicago, where she spent since 2011. The Guggenheim says she will oversee collections, exhibitions and publications. In her new role. Beckwith is the first black woman to hold the position. It is 41 degrees. It's cloudy now the clouds with us today near 45 for Sunday, Sonny and 46 rather windy Tomorrow. This is W N. Y. C. Anyone who comes to Support for NPR comes from noon Ah personalized weight loss program designed to give people knowledge to set new goals.

Joe Biden NPR News NPR Angela Merkel U. S. Senate Chancellor New York Donald Trump Atlanta Naomi Beckwith Luke Mogensen Guggenheim National Guard chairman America New Jersey Sonny
Guggenheim hires first Black deputy director and chief curator

New Yorker Radio Hour

00:17 sec | 1 year ago

Guggenheim hires first Black deputy director and chief curator

"Guggenheim disappointed Naomi Beckwith as it's deputy director and chief curator. Back with his currently the senior curator at the Museum of Contemporary Art Chicago, where she spent since 2011. The Guggenheim says she will oversee collections, exhibitions and publications. In her new role. Beckwith is the first black woman to hold the

Naomi Beckwith Guggenheim Museum Of Contemporary Art Chi Beckwith
Guggenheim hires first Black deputy director and chief curator

All Things Considered

00:29 sec | 1 year ago

Guggenheim hires first Black deputy director and chief curator

"The Guggenheim has appointed Naomi Beckwith as it's deputy director and chief curator back with this currently the senior curator of the Museum of Contemporary Art Chicago, where she's been since 2011 the Guggenheim special, oversee collections, exhibitions and publications in her new role. Back with is the first black woman to hold the position. The appointment comes after long time Chief curator Nancy Specter stepped down last year following allegations of racial bias in independent investigation found no evidence to support that claim. Liquid begins her position in early June.

Naomi Beckwith Museum Of Contemporary Art Chi Chief Curator Nancy Specter
Bitcoin tops $34,000 as record rally continues

Bloomberg Daybreak: Asia

03:02 min | 1 year ago

Bitcoin tops $34,000 as record rally continues

"Quick look at Bitcoin right now a 3 33,093 in UK trading On Sunday, Bitcoin actually broke above 34 grand for the first time. I want to take a closer look now with Bloomberg's Joanna Haas singer. MMA Cross at team editor Joining us from Singapore. Joanna, I know this Bitcoin has been on quite the rally. I mean, we're up more than 40% over the last two weeks. So what are people saying about this quick rise? It's very impressive. You're right. And people are actually starting to talk about 50,000, which seemed unimaginable just a few months ago. But it was only in the December when it actually broke above 20,000 for the first time, and now we have this Of course, it's been somewhat been trading for the holidays. There are a lot of people who might have done their annual re evaluation and decided they wanted to get into crypto. And so that's been helping as well. But it is a pretty stunning game. Has there been a mine mind shift in terms of the adoption? I mean, are we seeing institutions now participate in a way that the retail trade had been doing before? Definitely, and they're coming in many times via something like the grayscale Bitcoin trust that allows them to have AH registered investment vehicle. But there are people like policy there. Jones Guggenheim is getting into the act and saying they're going tol they might buy Bitcoin with one of their funds. And you just have more and more institutions. At least things are going to consider it if not actually getting in themselves. Is anyone being a little cautious here? Or at least two sounding that alarm? I don't want to say alarm but at least raising the possibility that we may be on thin ice here. Yes, there were definitely people who have mentioned the volatility. For instance, B t i G, which does have a target for Bitcoin of 50,000. But we can still see a lot of downside. Volatility is well and it is just been such a runoff. You do wonder if it's the blow off top if you'll see a big move down. Like we did in December 2017 where it was just such a sudden move up. But then quite sudden move down is all. So we know that good coin is the largest crypto. I'm wondering whether the move that we're seeing in Bitcoin is inspiring interest in other crypto currencies that may not be as expensive. It is for sure. And ether, for instance, just its own record. As of yesterday, it hadn't beaten. It's February 2018 highs yet until yesterday, and now it's above the thousands. And you have even others like Bitcoin Cash, for instance, that are also coming up as people get interested in Kryptos. Whether asset class Joanna Good stuff. Thank you So much for being with us. Bloomberg Cross Asset team editor Joanna Assinger there on Bitcoin joining us from Singapore

Bitcoin Joanna Haas Mma Cross Jones Guggenheim Joanna Bloomberg Singapore UK Bloomberg Cross Asset Joanna Assinger
"guggenheim" Discussed on Jo's Art History Podcast

Jo's Art History Podcast

01:38 min | 1 year ago

"guggenheim" Discussed on Jo's Art History Podcast

"Of <Speech_Female> my art <SpeakerChange> of the do <Silence> series <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Female> on there. You have the <Speech_Female> ends of another episode <Speech_Music_Female> of the jaws. <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> Art history podcast. <Speech_Music_Female> I really hope <Speech_Music_Female> you've enjoyed part. Three <Speech_Music_Female> of my art of the <Speech_Female> deal series. <Speech_Female> And i'd be really <Speech_Female> interested to see if <Speech_Female> you think <Speech_Music_Female> you can. Hey is actually <Speech_Music_Female> a dealer <Speech_Music_Female> or a collector. <Speech_Music_Female> I think she's <Speech_Female> a very nice <Speech_Music_Female> marriage of <Speech_Female> both. In my opinion. <Speech_Female> I feel that <Speech_Female> she really is a <Speech_Female> dealer with hoshi <Speech_Female> promoted and <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> used her <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> to expand <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> the reach <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> of these artists. <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> The <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> i'd be very interested <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> to hear what <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> you think you can get <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> in touch by <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> email. Which is <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> jews art history <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> at genius dot <Speech_Music_Female> com or you <Speech_Music_Female> can follow me on instagram. <Speech_Music_Female> Joyce <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> art history. <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> I mentioned <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> in the podcast <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> any images <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> which i prefer <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> to through speaking. <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> We'll be linked in the description <Speech_Music_Female> below <Speech_Music_Female> or you can find them <Speech_Music_Female> on instagram. Peach <Speech_Music_Female> or <Speech_Music_Female> via my <Speech_Music_Female> website <Speech_Music_Female> swelled. <Speech_Music_Female> Finally thank <Speech_Female> you so much for <Speech_Female> listening. I hope you've enjoyed <Speech_Music_Female> this little <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> chihuahua. <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> Dog on pigging. <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> Hey and that you've <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> learned a thing or two <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> about this quite <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> incredible figure <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> within <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> the history of art. <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> Finally my name <Speech_Music_Female> is jubal glen. I <Speech_Music_Female> have been your host on <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> your friendly art historian. <Speech_Music_Female> And i look forward <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> to welcome us <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> next time on. <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> The jaws <SpeakerChange> are texturing. <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> Podcasts <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> until then <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> keep learning <Speech_Music_Female> and <SpeakerChange> remember <Speech_Music_Female> art as <Speech_Music_Female> for all.

"guggenheim" Discussed on Jo's Art History Podcast

Jo's Art History Podcast

06:36 min | 1 year ago

"guggenheim" Discussed on Jo's Art History Podcast

"I completely digress. Despite success peggy's har- stow belonged europe. And she made the decision in nineteen forty seven to close her gallery in new york. She packed up all her collection on. She sought to make a new start and europe on. She chose venice and when she arrived in nineteen forty seven. She was kind of just in time to be invited to the venice. Biennale which is huge are exposition. Which happens every two years in venison still happens to study on a nineteen forty eight she presented. She was invaded and presented her collection and her own pavilion. So and amongst the the displays from france from etteleat from the uk there was also the guggenheim collection. This where peggy should really for one of the first sign. These incredible works by the abstract expressionists of new york's so jackson paula and mark rothko but also the surrealists and abstract artists that she had been championing since day one when she opened her gallery back in the thirties and london. Peggy completely fell in love with this and after the bonaly found this unfinished palazzo on. Bought it for almost nothing on spent the rest of her life of renovating it and making it into her own gallery which she would open to the public to show her collection note. Nothing was ever for sale when you came to view. Peggy's works with an her pavilion on. So a place where you can go visit to. Of course kicking in venus. But she really just. It became this a safe haven for artists who sought solace and europe and come to pick st for a while. She would buy their work. Could help promote them. She was incredibly generous with her time on her funds on also like i say the public could come visit the collection three days a week which is just thinks an incredibly generous thing to do to again all in the name of promoting these artists and to show that if someone with standing and wealth believed in these artists and champion these artists. It really did have a knock on a fate to society when people were stolen during their grand tours of europe and the was a musi stole on there to see what she had in her collection and she continued to collect through remainder of her life on her collection includes jacket maty but also pick names like niro and condensed Claim this please off a pilgrimage for art lovers on really stella's to the state her eighth and nineteen seventy-nine. She left her home in her entire collection to the can hang foundation now the guggenheim foundation was actually is actually run and owned by her. Uncle solomon can hang who began the guggenheim team. And the nineteen fifties but peggy's collection in europe was really kind of the cornerstone of development. So while he was voting kickin haymond new york. She had her palazzo in italy. And the kind of twin if that makes sense on. There's nice several of these museums across the of. Course you have new york. And you have to get containment fantasy. Of course there's also one in bilbao and there used to be one and berlin for. I'm fairly certain that has closed but more. Interestingly is that they're building one an abi at the moment which is set to open. And i think twenty twenty another really important thing to note as guggenheim actually never paid anything. More than i think. Forty thousand dollars total for her entire collection which today is worth billions onto me again if that doesn't Har is an incredible dealer patron on collector. Then i really don't know what does i think he's an incredibly interesting women and somebody who shooting to see. I really didn't know too much about her. And i really only scratched the surface ever. So lightly here with peggy. She is someone who is such a huge character with an art history on promoting our throats of the pre imposed for eaters and europe and america. And just really so of opening an international art scene in a way by allowing people to to view works from american artists and her palazzo in venus. I think she's so so clever. And what you may have heard of. Peggy can have very briefly. Touched on is that. She's kind of ravaged in history as hot headed lustful vixen. Who really mixed art and six together and you re the couldn't of separate the two on. I haven't touched on that because i just don't think it's important and in my opinion everyone was doing it. It's just because she's a woman. I think the severi classic example of because she is a woman is kind of locked up his osha saucy. Because there's there's a kind that she. She said that she slept for over. A thousand men and peggy was an incredibly good biographer of her own life and when she was alive she actually hired someone to write her autobiography. And it's confessions Still available to buy. Today i would highly recommend if he would like to know a little bit more but peggy than it's only like six or seven pounds on amazon. I would highly recommend me to your local library. If you don't want to if you don't want to spend any money go to local library and see if it's there really what i'm trying to see as for me why haven't gone down this soci- dark cool of an older love affairs as i just thank. It's not important and there's no way that people like the other gentleman. I've mentioned so far in the series pullen whale Didn't have dalliances. I mean i don't know offhand. If the dead. But i'm fairly certain there's a low of scandals going around in the end as just never mentioned it's not important but i think because women people feel that they have to mention it so if you want to know more than please feel free to schtickle pay can and jackson pollock. For example. they're kind of affair is very very well documented. It's important for me really by just to end in saying that. I think she was an incredible champion. For new artists on the avant-garde the surrealists on someone who just used their whale for goods and to promote artists and particularly thank her helping artis escape europe during world war two as as an incredible thing and something that needs to be celebrated. Anyway that is why. I think quite rightly deserves to be part three.

peggy europe Peggy jackson paula new york Uncle solomon mark rothko stow palazzo guggenheim foundation niro france stella bilbao uk guggenheim london berlin italy
"guggenheim" Discussed on Jo's Art History Podcast

Jo's Art History Podcast

07:10 min | 1 year ago

"guggenheim" Discussed on Jo's Art History Podcast

"More of a museum and this is where historians seem to think that the idea for her beginning to form her collection really sort of kicked off anyway. What a war to was brewing. And peggy decided that london was no longer safe so you returned to paris. She decided to seek counsel and the artist. Marcel duchamp as deschamp was an incredible free spirit but he was a much sought after authority on contemporary art and he introduced her to a humongous range of artists that we know associate with abstract and surrealist. We're very famous to key men by a picture a day on some of the articles that she collected are the big leagues such as to show up himself from cousy said or dali and monry and even an nineteen forty. When the nazis began to invade paris this did note. Put peggy off the team from a jewish background. She still stayed in paris even when the nazis invaded and actually and some. We plead into peggy's favor because a lot of artists and dealers were delighted to so to peggy before fleeing paris for safer grind on account of alberto giacometti. Who i don't know if he still holds that he holds one of the highest auction records for sculpture. So something like one. Hundred hundred and twenty million dollars for one of walking main sculptures on. She met alberto giacometti before he fled parish during the war and she used this option soup to bargain over prices which might Taking advantage of a bad situation which of course as but i also think it shows that she had a very good business hit owner enemy. To sean Peggy compiled this less of artists which she felt would be the ultimate abstract and surrealist collection on she made it her personal mission to begin working through the list one by one instead of really good job and collecting at least one painting and or sculpture by every artist on the less but name on the foot she own yet was pa- castle and there's s greece. Tony where heavy in the nineteen forties went to visit picasso in his studio and he very much up. Picasso was always surrounded by admirers on lovers people. He was a very famous artist in his day on. I don't think he took very kindly to the leader of shuffling around his studio looking at best looking at that perhaps trying to bargain on prices on a partly this is from her memoirs that he turned to her and said mom. You're in the wrong location. Ladies lingerie is on the second floor which safe to see. She did not by a work from picasso that day. She very quickly left after he insulted her. Which i think also just very good insight into picasso ouragan. that's my boys Again have spoken without enough under previous podcasts. Or shunt shot. Repeat myself Thing is here to remind you of. This was nineteen forty this was just as world were two was really kicking off and paris was becoming less and less safe for people and you have to remember powers at the time was considered the center of the art whether there was a lot of artists that had been an influx through the nineteen twenties. Nineteen thirties really was cultural hub of europe. But it was no longer safe. And this is where a gentleman cold fire in fry enters into the picture and he was actually saint from america to help extract tests that were in danger of being handed over to the nazis and friends on. He initially went over with a small sum of money on the list of a bit. Two hundred names of artists that he had to track down and try and find a way or get an safely out of france and very very quickly. That list escalated to nearly two thousand names and of course has money wouldn't stretch so the obvious solution for him was to contact. Peggy guggenheim seats. Har- please can you help in some way. Now peggy had already been warned of this endeavor by the american consulate in paris and had been warned to stay far away but when fry approached picky and ask for her help she replied. Of course what can i do and she ended up meeting friday in marseille where he had rented a villa on this where comes across the artist. Max ernst note. It was peggy's money which helped a lot of artists escape fronts half safe passage to america but not just the artists themselves their family but also their their entire contents of their studio in some cases where he works. That had been finished in. Works had no so she really was somebody that used her whale and a very very powerful and important we and i think this is something. That's completely overlooked with peggy. If he knew anything about her. And i'll go onto She's kind of an an art dealer and art collector. That's known for having these various a wild love affairs in love triangles. And for me. I just don't think it's important. But i'll go on to that in a minute. So she goes to marcy heart and fry use her money to extract these artists one of them being maxed errands and peggy actually falls madly in love with aaron and is quoted by seeing. He is so beautiful so talented on so famous. So in nineteen forty one. She and max errands. Kim back to the usc the combat to new york and the married and moved into town house. And peggy. say oppa studio for max to work. gained a reputation and was quite popular in america from a previous little tour that he had done before what were too as well as helping countless other artists including air escape one of the other artists of note that pagan him helped provide safe passage to america as an artist called. Andre britain and britain was a french writer and poet. He's best known as the co founder of the group of artists known as the surrealists or surrealism so he was an incredibly important artist and himself an art historically as well as a really fantastic laser which peggy kicked from veteran and says i have certainly not forgotten new york. Nor- marseille at the turn of the nineteen forties. When i was able to escape thanks to you as of course one of the most important dates of my life and i never thank with emotion that everything depended on your generous intervention for me. This is something that i find is. Quaint credible peggy guggenheim as she helped. So many people escape on yet bo. Perhaps as me. Because i had really Her horrendous amount the huge amazing selfless. Act that she that she did as overshadowed by so many other non important things. I e her hall of fiery sex drive and harz of love affairs which really shouldn't even touch this as in terms of importance when you think about how many lifes she saved and not. Only life's much are she also saved by a living. These people.

peggy paris alberto giacometti deschamp cousy monry sean Peggy picasso Marcel duchamp dali american consulate america Peggy guggenheim Picasso fry london marcy heart greece marseille
"guggenheim" Discussed on Jo's Art History Podcast

Jo's Art History Podcast

08:01 min | 1 year ago

"guggenheim" Discussed on Jo's Art History Podcast

"Onto it but guggenheim is no associated with this incredible group of museums which are across the water of course being new york. There's also the guggenheim in venice. Which was where. Peggy actually set herself later in life and spent the remainder for days so interesting to see if i have any of backlash of people coming back to means inc. She's not a dealer argue that she has hi. She used her influence on her money on her connection. Truth to help promote people. If that's not dealer were-they that i don't know what any i will let you decide for yourself so sit back and relax as i get you a very brief overview of the history of peggy guggenheim on my part three of the art of the dealer series. Okay so. I think it's very important to start by saying that peggy guggenheim. Her name is an actually piggy She was born marguerite. Guggenheim on was a collector dealer on socialite who left between eighteen ninety eight to nineteen seventy-nine. She was born to a wealthy family in america. Cold guggenheim's on she was the daughter of benjamin guggenheim. Who with his family had started school on. Steel business and america which then benjamin left to pursue other options and europe when he was After a year he decided to come back to america for. He left his young family on decided to come back in stale booked a one way ticket on the most glorious new atlantic liner called the titanic on saturday. He perished on the titanic in nineteen twelve when it sunk so very very tragic beginning to peggy's upbringing Fourteen years old when she lost her father but porn turning twenty one and nineteen nineteen. She inherited a fortune of almost two and a half million dollars. Which when reading run for this podcast of the equivalent to Sex thirty seven million pounds entities money. So very very wealthy even by nineteen nineteen standards and why she is referred to as picky as because peggy was her favourite name. She decided she was a little older. Actually she was going to drop marguerite uncle ourselves pegging note. Peggy is known for promoting a group of artists that we know as the surrealists and abstract doctors and she dedicated her life to collecting in promoting the works of artists that felons either of these categories. But she didn't actually begin dealing and and collecting art until a little bit later on in life however it was always an interest to peggy. She was actually. She favored old masters. Which if he'd listen to previous podcast old masters are the various classical portraits of of biblical scenes on heroes just can't scraping the barrel as portraiture there so the idea of collecting surrealists or abstract paintings at this time were stove very looked on as a very odd thing to do any. I digress ever-so-slightly so she inherited a massive fortune and nineteen nineteen and nineteen twenty undertook. What was known as a grand tour of europe which is kind of like a muster for any of wealthy americans and mitt and fell in love with her first husband and paris in nineteen twenty. This is the gentleman cold lawrenceville now. He was seven years older than peggy but was completely besotted by him he and she lovingly refer to him as the king of the and he was oxford educated but very artistic he sculpted. He did call is he will poems and more importantly he had an incredible group of off guard. Writers thinkers and artists on Lawrenceville she met the likes of monetary. Who would eventually photograph are countless times as well is becoming friends with our historical begley such as the artists constantin brancusi and marcel deschamp. Who was a friend and artist who she would eventually going to promote within heart collection. And when she do but it was not long and so her marriage broke dine Couple of very tragic life veins 1927. Her favourite eldest sister died in childbirth and nineteen twenty eight. Her other sister lost her. Two children are beloved lawrence. Dr drinking so the marriage was doomed for one thousand. Nine she made fell in love with a gentleman code join homes and moved to central jersey. Just go back to see that. She'd been living in paris with lawrenceville for majority of the nineteen twenties when they make phil of unmarried so in one thousand nine hundred ancient join homes and they moved to san and that was a senior that hard marriage to lawrence fell apart and she was granted a divorce. No it wasn't a happy ending there for peggy either. A nineteen thirty four jordan during a routine operation to reciprocate arm. He was administered on static and unfortunately he never woke up again and attain was was very very new societa. Very tragic wayne t thirty years of her life were immensely immensely sad and in nineteen thirty seven. She was thirteen and she arrived at crossroads and she decided qena need something to do. It was frayn's that suggested that she opened a business. So having a very wade and loving interest of art she decided she would open an art gallery so she moved to london and opened heart gallery. No it's important here. To bring in that peggy. When moving to london had mix the irish playwright samuel beckett who was actually a massive influence on pay and when he entered into her life the kind of saw themselves as candidates spirits away. Becca has various measurable upbringing in ireland. And it's off helpgch soothe pegging with very tragic upbringing until this point on. Yeah like i said. Just kinda phones of kendrick Within their misery on their tragic upbringings but it was some ubiquity that saved to pay when she said she preferred old masters bake is quoted as saying art is a living thing he influenced her very much to look at contemporary office. That spoke to her and it was through Peggy while in london peggy was introduced to a wide of contemporary artists of the day so picky opened her in london. On within a year and a half of the galaxy space opening it became known as the place to go to see the most avant garde and contemporary works of the financially. Was it a success. Not but we should have a good time absolutely yasha remember. Peggy guggenheim was an incredibly wealthy women at this team. So really. the idea of turning a profit wasn't forefront of our thoughts. It was more an exercise and learning on a loving heart to develop a love or art form i e contemporary art that she really hadn't looked at before having already said that she preferred the old masters which of course and no way a surprise having come from a very established family with wealth. Anyway during this time in london she approached art historian and famous art critic Who at the time was the editor of an art magazine. Known as the burlington magazine which actually still runs today and it was trying really really hard to promote contemporary art and peggy offered him a job as the director of her gallery in london and he took it but it was during this time that she kind of realized people wear coming to her galaxy to partic- they were coming to luke she kind of had this conversation with rebuy was.

peggy Peggy guggenheim means inc. Cold guggenheim benjamin guggenheim Peggy marguerite america lawrenceville guggenheim constantin brancusi marcel deschamp europe venice benjamin paris lawrence qena
‘Green Lantern’ series headed to HBO Max

Double Toasted

02:56 min | 1 year ago

‘Green Lantern’ series headed to HBO Max

"How? Come. All right. So look I'm not GonNa, hold his movie against the character I just saying that I had to Kinda bad outside experiences without ever getting to the actual. Himself so. Maybe. Hopefully, this will all change when Hbo Max Pulls Over Green on Green Lantern Corps. which is coming to HBO. Max`ed some point I. Don't know when. But Christian news somebody sent a shed you did not look amusement. I you big Green Lantern Fan. I you know he's fine. I like the comics a lot. That's the weird thing like green lantern is one of my favorites, but it also depends on which green lanterns yours like the mythology is. So convoluted at this point that I think it's really hard to make an emotional entry point like if you're not into green lantern at this point in your life, you're probably not going to be into. But having said that I find interesting about this is HBO Max obviously sparing no expense they green lit that Gotham show a couple of weeks ago about the Gotham. PD. And now they're you know jumping into the HBO mce lantern of it all which is decidedly not grounded. Right? Like got them PD law and order in the Batman Universe. Shit. But but green lantern play that's space and you know what I mean like there's a lot of different things going on with that. So they're going to have to throw some real money at it. They Green Lit Marc Guggenheim who Here's an interesting caveat. Guggenheim is the CO creator of era but also one of the original writers on the two thousand eleven green lantern. So you talked about getting a fucking second chance. This guy's going to get a second chance that shouldn't inspire much confidence yet. Like I've been saying for weeks where we talk about these comic book properties that are being turned into television I, think this is the better version of these stories. Especially because they're not going to be telling stories about John Stewart or Hal Jordan like. Some people say Shit. Gum Out I don't WanNa hear that really yes. Some people have already been asking who's going to be how Jordan? WHO's GONNA be John Stewart everybody's got that casting ready and whatnot. So yeah, it looks like they're not going to be in there at all people appealing a fuck bet as all I know that's all I wanted. College some Guy Gardner fans out there I'm sure some some. What's his name Alan Scott Alan Scott fans out there. But I think the reason they're doing this by the way because my biggest question when they first announced this was like but what about the Green Lantern Corps film that they were supposed to be doing right the DC you I mean everything's in up. In the air but they were still planning on doing something like that, and I think they're trying to do a separation of church and state here by doing how Jordan Jon Stewart stories over there in the feature films, and then being able to focus on some of the expanded rosters from the Actual Lander Court. Yeah.

Green Lit Marc Guggenheim Green Lantern Corps HBO John Stewart Hal Jordan Jordan Jon Stewart Gotham Alan Scott Guy Gardner Actual Lander Court
"guggenheim" Discussed on Mind's Eye: A Sensory Guide to the Guggenheim New York

Mind's Eye: A Sensory Guide to the Guggenheim New York

04:00 min | 1 year ago

"guggenheim" Discussed on Mind's Eye: A Sensory Guide to the Guggenheim New York

"Entering the museum we shuffled through a glass revolving door. There's a certain Ambience shift and sound and temperature as we emerge from the open Outdoors into the low ceiling vestibule. The whole Space is small the 7.5 foot ceilings are closed in the sound around us feels compressed. Moving through the small entrance, we're grounded and keenly aware of our human scale. Stepping forward erase texture is under foot almost like crossing the manhole. It's a large bronze medallion for from a wide arcing along the circle circumference bold texts read let every man exercise the art. He knows it was awful news in the center of the seal geometric forms intersect above a relief image of the earth and smaller text reads. This Museum not designed by Frank Lloyd Wright is the gift of Solomon R Guggenheim. We feel The Ridges of The Medallion underneath us. But also may feel the slickness of the bronze gleaming from the packaging of many feet entering and exiting the museum. A few steps forward and the low hovering ceiling suddenly opens. There's an extreme shift in sound light and visual person could go field as an expanse of space open some front of us and above us. A wide Hollow cylinder with the continuous spiraling ramp climbing the walls topped by a large Skylight or Oculus off 96 feet above us. This is the guggenheim's Rotunda. It visually resonates with a town Plaza with people Milling about it's surrounded by the quarter mile concrete ramp and a widening 6 a.m. Or spiral coiling up to the Skylight The Continuous ramp is punctuated by a column of bulging over looks like theater balconies perfectly stacked on each level receding into the open space above. This is not such a tall structure, but it feels Monumental with the expanse of light in space surrounding us. Entering the museum is about the experience of movement the transition from the open Outdoors to a tight indoor space to a page. Now. They're expensive space these compressions and expansions happen again, and it can repeating in the space as scale ships. Standing in the Rotunda. We met immediately tip our heads back to bathe and the brightness of the skylight. The Rotunda in front of us contains space light and sound on full display or drawn forward into the sense of this Cathedral of space the iconic rotunda the heart of the Guggenheim Museum..

Solomon R Guggenheim Guggenheim Museum Cathedral of space us Frank Lloyd Wright
"guggenheim" Discussed on Mind's Eye: A Sensory Guide to the Guggenheim New York

Mind's Eye: A Sensory Guide to the Guggenheim New York

03:50 min | 1 year ago

"guggenheim" Discussed on Mind's Eye: A Sensory Guide to the Guggenheim New York

"High and taller. Traffic Rush by Central Park is on our left. We may hear pedestrians talking or Birds calling above us in the foliage Crossing 87th street. We glimpse a bright long gray curving form a head protruding from the rectilinear shapes around it the trees and buildings partially obscure the view but as we near 88th Street off the circular concrete building reveals itself in full magnificence. It's the Solomon R Guggenheim Museum The Guggenheim occupies the whole stretch of 5th Avenue between 88th and 89th Street. We sensed that the building belongs to this place. It's Doug in the emerging from beneath the ground plane. It's an asymmetrical building on the south side of the block is a large circular form like an inverted for a tiered cake each ring wider than the one below it the base of each layer Cuts in at a sharp angle. So the tears seemed to float with space between them on the north side of the block as a smaller circular form half the others height the structure gives the overall impression of an air traffic control center distinguished by half-moon-shaped windows with dark millions that span one level a rectangular form sandwiched between that level. And the building's top floor circled with Windows in the round. There was a sense that both circular forms are sitting on a deep hovering shelf as a second floor concrete wall wraps around them. We also see some vertical elements securing the building together. The entire building is painted a light gray though on a sunlit day. It can appear bright white The Only Exception is a freeze circling the top of the smaller building which is a greenish tone made of copper. Moving closer our sense of scale changes the structure fuels intimate and contained. It's set far back from the street and look up SEPTA police small tucked between the tall buildings around us yet. The curves of the building reach out towards us gently muscling the city grid to the side. Looking up the bright facade bulges out towards 5th Avenue, the round layers aren't entirely smooth the skin of the paint reveals a diagonal Grid in Chi-Town Crete from underneath. Soft Shadows emerge when the Sun hits at certain angles. As we stepped towards the building the sidewalk widens Street vendors or parked along the way and the Aromas of hotdogs and Falafel drift towards you. The Sidewalk Ends at knee high walls creating a buffer zone between the building and the street where deep Planters embedded in the urban block make a landscaped garden and reveal a ramp to a side entrance below street level year round people perch along these walls taking in the sun enjoying a snack from a street vendor are watching the passing parade of New Yorkers and visitors. Approaching the Museum's main entrance the walls final Ascent of the shadow of the overhang..

Solomon R Guggenheim Museum Th Central Park Doug
Museum Workers Must Decide Whether To Return To Work Amid Pandemic

NPR's Business Story of the Day

04:00 min | 2 years ago

Museum Workers Must Decide Whether To Return To Work Amid Pandemic

"Back, in the spring New York City with the epicenter of the coronavirus outbreak. But recently, case numbers there have stayed low and New Yorkers are trying to get back to a life that's as normal as possible during a pandemic the big museums the met the Whitney in the Guggenheim have started reopening. Some people are thrilled but some museum workers are not hear Sally herships on the sidewalk outside the Museum of Modern Art. A slender man is smugly holding the world's tiniest Chihuahua Torres climb out of taxis gazing. At their phones with directions and digital tickets, they're wearing interesting glasses and have not haircuts but everyone is masked. Harry Allen is visiting from upstate New York and he's nervous. This is his first big outing since the pandemic began just seeing goes, but for employees on the inside, it's a bit more complicated some of the turmoil from the pandemic has crept into the museum. Lay says for her the problems began in early. March at the time it was her job to help museum visitors learn about workshops and activities. But coronavirus virus cases were starting to spike and she didn't feel safe at work. They gave us hand sanitizer and it was I could have gloves you ought. She was a contract worker paid around twenty one dollars an hour but her hours were capped at thirty per week. So she didn't get benefits like health insurance. What if she got sick spoke to nearly a dozen contract workers likely who said the problems began long before the pandemic it's called the fissured workplace where you end up having to take multiple jobs in order to support yourself and everything is so contracted and then you don't get any safety net from your employer laces. There's another problem too at Moma diverse workers both contract and paid staff or at the bottom of the pyramid in terms of pay and. Power all the front facing staff, the security, the restaurant workers, customer service, and educators are all very diverse, and then I would then go to the cafeteria where all the staff eight and then like everyone else would be why Lisa's us that meant when financial problems from the pandemic it diverse workers were more likely to be affected in March. The museum laid off eighty four people in an email. The museum said quote we did not have to furlough or layoff a single employee of the museum unquote that means all of those laid off were contract workers like lay the museum said it paid those laid off through March. Or heard from full time employees who are afraid to speak out publicly for fear of losing their jobs they say, they feel under intense pressure to return to the museum when they can do their job safely at home. But moma has told almost all staff they need to be at the museum. Here's museum director Glenn, lowry explaining his thinking during an online staff meeting. We must show solidarity with each other that our place of work is the museum, and while some of US might be able to argue, we never need to be museum to still do our work that's not equity. opposite. A spokesperson from the museum said, it's taking every precaution and workers are only required to be onsite part time but the workers I've heard from say the logic doesn't make sense. For example, the Metropolitan Museum of art is only allowing certain staff to work in person Makita flowers worked with visitor engagement at Moma but as a contractor, she was also laid off in March. She says, lowry is out of touch with workers like her with his multi-million dollar salary. He's the highest paid museum director. In the country I had a chance to speak to Glen I would just feel like. Roll like look at your family look at what you call the family. How are we doing now? Where are we as for on lay she has a new shop working with the city to help other Southeast Asians navigate resources during the pandemic

Museum Of Modern Art United States Metropolitan Museum Of Art New York City Moma Sally Herships Chihuahua Torres Whitney New York Harry Allen Director Lowry Glen Lisa Makita Glenn
NYC museums reopening: Everything you need to know

Bloomberg Businessweek

00:18 sec | 2 years ago

NYC museums reopening: Everything you need to know

"Room. After more than five months in hibernation, the museums of New York are slowly starting to reopen today. The Metropolitan Museum of Art greeted the general public after members were allowed back on Thursday. Museum of Modern Art just opened this week. The Whitney Museum of American Art will reopen next week in the Guggenheim plans to return in

Whitney Museum Of American Art Metropolitan Museum Of Art Museum Of Modern Art New York
Google's challenges

The Economist: The Intelligence

06:58 min | 2 years ago

Google's challenges

"In terms of users Google is the biggest of the giants four billion people worldwide probably at least one of its services from search to g mail to maps. But yesterday despite beating expectations, it reported a drop in revenue for the first time since it listed on the stock market down to a mere thirty, eight, billion dollars for the quarter. Alphabet and its cash cow. Google are facing challenges and not only from Congress they could be heading toward something of a midlife crisis. I can clearly remember in the late nineties when I lived in San, Francisco a small company called Google or service called Google came up a search engine. Of course, LUDWIG IS OUR US technology editor and it was so much better than what we had before really could find what you're looking for. You didn't have to spend a lot of time searching and so that great. That was step one, and then a few years. Later, they found great business model search ads, little ads you find on the search result pages and that turned out to be a gold mine. But. Made them very successful is their culture was bottom up people could spend twenty percent of the time on their personal project. It's more like a campus a university Hogan Ation was very innovative and I think that combination may google success. That was then what what about now, what has Google become in the intervening twenty years? This beautiful economic there developed let's the culture allowed them to be very experimental invest in lots of projects, and so what you have today is basically Google. Alphabet, is companies today called is less one sing accompanied by any ron that. Business, you have all kinds of services with Android, your surge of course, you have youtube and plus dozens of smaller services and around that an ultra belt of other bets as school calls. MOONSHOT companies. So high risk companies investing in in very far our projects like health data self driving cars. So the whole thing is is kind of a Google verse that has sprouts and actually is quite impressive if you look at it. So to your mind, is Google going to continue with this success even though it sort of branched into so many things. Recently, went down to mountain view where Google's headquarters are based and Google building this new kind of very fancy headquarters there when that happens often then kind of the company goes downhill. That's kind of the edifice complex had happened with IBM and sears and a few other companies. But in the case of Google I don't think that's the case I mean you're not gonna go. We'll go into steep. Decline still being there are some developments that I'm were structural, which will make life more difficult. Google is an optimized system with the AD engine, but now the environment is changing. So it's makes it more difficult to grow in their core business. They have to look for other businesses to grow into but I think the main problem they face is cultural one. What is it changed about the culture then? Several levels to that. The idea of this culture was also to keep the the company's small sense field small, keep it agile, avoid that the big company syndrome bureaucracy and all that and that worked for a long time. Now, one hundred and twenty thousand full-time employees. As many on the eve, more a temporary ones, and so the place has become very, very big mix of people become much more heterogeneous and that has led to conflicts. Rightly. So kind of people are worried about certain things, for example, gender politics. So you had this guy young Google James Damore write a memo about why perhaps of female engineers and not as good as male engineers and that cost a huge stir that thing was leak and management had to fire more, and then there were. Other conflicts and so it became an mouths throw him that then culminates in in a walkout of twenty thousand. Kugler in November when it emerged that Google management had paid some managers accused of sexual harassment millions of dollars to leave the company I. Think that was inflection point where we're really became apparent that was old culture was breaking down to. So those are the the issues, the problems that concerns internally but I mean there there are also some externally right as we certainly saw the congressional hearings. Yes. Of course S Guggenheim's bigger. It becomes more talkative. And Address Action Regulation in general though I. Have to say compared to cultural problems or the business problems. I think antitrust problems are not as imminent. I mean nobody's GonNa Break Google tomorrow if tekkers continues and really either. Legislative action or lawsuits it's GONNA. Take Years Willing that's the antitrust question but I mean that's not the only one that's being tackled. There are issues for instance, around data privacy that's correct and that's maybe even more problems or Google has always kind of aura fine line between protecting people's data because collect data at the same time people are getting more. Conscious. About their date I WANNA protect it. There's a movement to get these companies to pay for people stayed. So these things will change right now the default is if you collect personal data, you kind of own it facebook Google and whatever and I think that default is going to change somewhat and and kind of ownership will move back to to users and that will make things more expensive. Thinking more generally tattoo alphabet though the giant umbrella company that includes Google and everything else you mentioned what are the prescriptions what should do to tackle these cultural problems to deal with the concerns that are coming from from inside and outside alphabet to find a new balance between different constituencies, the workers customers, regulators. and has to do all that in a way that awards what the founders of Google segue bringing. Gary Page always wanted to avoid that Google becomes a conventional company. Becomes a boring company, a company with lots of the rookie in innovative so that so that's a challenge. I. Think in a way if you look at what Microsoft is done, of course, different company different problems much older than forty years. Old is such an Adele of their that the CEO is just managed to give this company in you his own data in the sense, let's let's no longer protect windows any prize kind of move into the cloud be more open company be politically responsible and I think that that's the model alphabets replicate. Replicate that one one but you have to give Google at some point or alphabet in the near future he kind of a new inspiration and I think data personal data is maybe one possibility why not offer services that don't collect a lot of data or don't target you with ads. Subscription for that or why don't you try to become a data bank quote unquote like Ben Keeps. Your money. would. Alphabet would manage your data and perhaps sell other people. I know that suggestion may make analysts at Wall Street or even tricks. Google Cringe Westwood the devil being charged data but but I think that's the type of thing Google has to or ultimate has to think about.

Google United States Midlife Congress SAN Microsoft Editor Hogan Ation Youtube Francisco RON CEO BEN S Guggenheim Facebook Kugler IBM
Fed sketches dim outlook for US economy amid pandemic and signals it will keep rates pinned near zero

Bloomberg Businessweek

00:36 sec | 2 years ago

Fed sketches dim outlook for US economy amid pandemic and signals it will keep rates pinned near zero

"S and P 500. Extending its July rally is the Fed left rates unchanged near zero and again vowed to use all its tools to support the US economy amid a shaky recovery from the pandemic. Scott Minored, his chief investment officer of Guggenheim Partners, he was interviewed moments ago on Bloomberg Television definition of the market is the federal service. They have made it clear that where interest rates are going to be made clear that they want Dr. Credit spreads tighter on. They've made it clear that their reaction function is in response to the progress of the virus and its impact on the economy.

Chief Investment Officer Scott Minored Guggenheim Partners FED Bloomberg Television United States Dr. Credit S
What to Do When Scared Workers Don’t Report to Work Due to COVID-19

Marketplace with Kai Ryssdal

02:17 min | 2 years ago

What to Do When Scared Workers Don’t Report to Work Due to COVID-19

"Other three million people. As I'm sure you've heard made first time claims for unemployment in the past week that brings it to thirty six million plus in the past couple of months there's a whole slew of second order effects out of that of course and one of them is that the Labor Department has told cities and states they have an obligation to detect waste and fraud in the unemployment system and there are reports of states that have been pushing companies to disclose when employers refused to return to work then as marketplace's Justin Ho reports. That is putting a whole lot of business is in a pretty tight spot about two weeks ago. The Vermont Labor Department launched a Web page for businesses to report employees. Who declined offers to return to work by doing so? Employers could effectively kick those workers off of unemployment insurance though there are some exemptions mark. Fryer Cohen's restaurant called the reservoir in Waterbury Vermont. He says he isn't happy with the tough choices that may force him to make. It makes it very difficult to think that we would have to turn to the state and tell them that they should pull their aid. Prior laid off all of his employees and mid-march he also took out a paycheck protection program. Loan which can be forgiven if he brings his head count backup during the loans. Eight week window restaurants are allowed to take out but Vermont hasn't allowed them to fully reopened. Friars restaurant is closed. We're not rushing to bring people off on employment will can't reopen our doors because of state order one of friars former employees is sage. Guggenheim had chef at the reservoir. She says she'd love to get back. But given the safety issues of returning to work she understands that others want to stay at home. We don't want to force people into a difficult position where they have to choose between what they want to do and what they have to do. Businesses want to keep good relationships with their employees says Labor Economists Teresa Ghilarducci at the new school. They also have the loyalty and relationship of trust that builds up over time. Several other states have set up similar websites for reporting employees including Montana Oklahoma Tennessee in South Carolina. Frank NAP is the president of the South Carolina Chamber of Commerce. He says many businesses are realizing a hard truth about their P loans. Despicable low may not be forgivable. He says some may decide to give back their PCs loans rather than force their employees to return to work. I'm just in how for marketplace

Fryer Cohen Vermont Vermont Labor Department Guggenheim Labor Department Frank Nap Justin Ho Teresa Ghilarducci Fraud South Carolina Chamber Of Comm South Carolina President Trump Montana Oklahoma Tennessee
"guggenheim" Discussed on KTRH

KTRH

02:30 min | 2 years ago

"guggenheim" Discussed on KTRH

"And then he came through and promptly began to tell them how we communicated with them said these things called ABC's or after death two indications that term first coined by bill and Judy Guggenheim and they're both close from husband and so it's you know communication without the use of the medium of for example this young guy used to produce images on the TV screen and he would turn the screen blue he would make impressions on the answering machine you do all kinds of phenomena like that and all of this was verified so that was quite an interesting reading and particularly with proving the continuity of consciousness she really wanted to communicate to me he did and you know I find it so it's very calming George when young people pass another thing that there's been a huge influx with us and it has in my practice has husband opioid addiction deaths yes and that's been a real after damage and I wrote about it extensively and the new book and there's been spirits have come through and they talk about their mental and emotional state what was going on prior to the overdose and sometimes they'll actually talk about and I found this quite fascinating the recovery that they go through on the other side and they'll describe that and they'll talk about being wrapped in late two different frequencies of light for ceilings and also going through the life review of downhole process which a lot of your listeners have probably read the invoice and I can tell you that it is absolutely true we do get a review of life and more importantly the caramel or the cause and effect that our life count and also the the specific lessons that we came here to to learn shows some of them come in and relate that as well there's been so many things as you can well imagine and.

ABC Judy Guggenheim George
Novel coronavirus sparks massive stock market losses as cases spread worldwide

Bloomberg Daybreak: Europe

03:37 min | 2 years ago

Novel coronavirus sparks massive stock market losses as cases spread worldwide

"Well this week has been frankly a blood buff for markets the stock route looks set to continue as we heard from Caroline so one of the biggest market move today thanks Roger as you say it's just not looking very good for markets right now you mentioned the the the the the kind each in the markets and Japan says closed the topics had entered a correction phase yesterday and we what we I say so in the other markets the key we fell one percent after back country found his first case of the corona virus treasury treasury yields a set new record lows and traders are betting that they'll be at seventy five basis point cut in fed rates this year Deutsche bank's chief economist told us that the speed of the client over the past week even beats the black Monday episode in October nineteen eighty seven wow that some historical tax isn't it I'm without concerns there over the economic impact of the virus and you know you're driving sentiment love what what's the latest when it comes to the outbreak you know it is about sentiment about anxiety mood in the markets as much as the economic impact to unfortunately we're not seeing him any any positive news we've had a number of developments I've night is mention USILA reporters for this case there's a fan the virus in Nigeria and that's the first one for sub Saharan Africa the more cases in Italy Iran and Kuwait and you know the the the name fictions in in South Korea suppose two thousand over here in Japan where I am that the government yes they said they're gonna shut schools down for a month and take your Disneyland will close for two weeks yeah and the the Africa case I think is one the three setting alarm bells ringing just because the state of the health facilities that exist on that constant but that way that the one very interesting thing I wish we had Guggenheim CIO Scott Minerd he's been really talking this up saying central banks in fact com do very much to mitigate the impact other yeah it is saying the fed is fairly impotent his chords to to to blunt the impact of this virus he says the outbreak is possibly the worst thing he's seen as a money manager if he does say the fed may lower rates in March but that that will try to avoid stirring for the fees if if if the if the virus spreads in the US he reckons that stocks could fall as much as forty percent from the peak yeah of course although the number of cases in the US still very low and even in Europe you know you I think we should be alarmist about on the other hand you know that that also there is still sort of tied to deal with things but let the turmoil in the markets is also really galvanizing AIPAC officials they've got that meeting next week in Vienna we understand that Saudi Arabia is actually pushing now for an even bigger production cuts explained that's right so all prices have been suffering and and you know it's supposed biggest weekly loss since twenty eleven is down about fourteen percent this week they have a a pick and his allies have a meeting in Vienna next week and the sickly general has said that the H. the the the parties involved are showing a renewed commitment to reach an agreement for production cut we face I said analysts such as a C. B. C. saying that any production cut right now maybe just too little

Inside Bill Gates' Brain with Davis Guggenheim

The Vergecast

09:47 min | 3 years ago

Inside Bill Gates' Brain with Davis Guggenheim

"Bills Brain three part documentary. Nfl I just watched it this week. Tell me how this project got started because you have you got a lot of access to gates and it's obviously Dan netflix unusual structure. You know three one hour episodes. Don't tell me how it came together so I was making the film waiting for Superman and we were almost it's done but it felt like he was missing. Voice and waiting for Superman was about public education's like how does this sort of failure of our public schools effect business and you know what better the thing to talk about. Someone who's in Silicon Valley or at least the business of Silicon Valley. He's obviously in Seattle but what does that do to growing the best business in in in America. How do you find talented educated. People had at his failure of our schools of some of our schools. I should say many are do really well but how does that effect are growing economy in in in the tech business. So I went up an interview bill. He was so great and so surprising that that I was like wait a minute this this person the needs to be reconsidered a because to give us the backstory. I was a I got a Macintosh nineteen eighty-four. It was the first person in my dorm Brown to get one. I think it was like ten had arrived at Brown in everyone of my floor huddled around this magical computer so I was a Mac. I was an apple guy and I always thought Steve Jobs is cool and Microsoft was just like for the business people and so I sort of held Bill Gates in my mind at arm's length that was like he just business guy. Maybe he's a monopolist. Maybe he's not but but you know I like. I like Mac and so what I finally met him. I was like wow. There's something he's doing right now. That needs to be understood. He is he's really changed his public image and I don't WanNa get into into that part of it because the weight inside bills brain is structured literally inside of every episode. It's almost like a thriller of the project that the bill and Melinda Gates Foundation is doing doing whether that's toilets or nuclear energy or vaccinations then there's like the history which is what most people kind of assume you're going to get right. We're GONNA GONNA tell the story Bill Gates from start to now but there's this like thriller component of the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation happening inside of it. How did you decide to like like musicnet structure. Go started filming and I actually got lost. I don't know how to make this because a lot of the work. They're doing a super complex. In also initially dramatically. It's not just add water in the story tells itself right and so I was experimenting with this kind of way of cutting back and forth between his biography in the work that he's doing and the first time it worked was when I in its in episode two I think is when he's trying to figure out why cases of polio keep popping up all over Nigeria in Afghanistan Pakistan and why past efforts was it failed and how he used sort of his brain had he delvin to sort of like crack that because people been trying for years they thought they were getting close and then it doesn't work it. Would I thought I'd do is show bill in the early days in highschool cracking the class schedule. It's sort of a famous story where his private private school asbill a sophomore. I think ask him when he's a software and then he does it in his junior senior year but they say you're. You're good at this computer thing. You know there's a famous terminal school only one terminal any school in State of Washington say. Hey you're good at this coatings and can you code the class schedule at lakeside aside and so he and Paul Allen Staple night figure out how you know because his lakeside had merged with girls school so they had all these different classrooms different for campuses and Bill Paul us sort of their brains and they're sort of algorithms to cracks in the same way he cracks the algorithm or tries to crack the algorithm for a radical polio he did things like digital mapping in predictive analysis on where cases of polio would show up so the story telling the whole story retelling for all three episodes follows that one example where we cut back and forth between something some way in which his brain worked or or something revealed in his character actor is historical story with what he's doing now to reveal how his brain works and how you know how he solves problems so you obviously got all this access testable to Melinda. You got a bunch of archival footage. I guess you would call it of them. When they were young when they were dating there's Video Ville hugging kids when they're babies as which broke me like you don't ever see that side of him. How did you go about getting access to build. The product was kind of the condition that I make for any movie. When I flew complained to commit to page talk him into doing it might get loud. It was like if we're if we're GONNA do this. You got to open up to me. I won't ask any questions to ask. I will put everything on the table because that's you know that's what if you're going to do a movie forgot to go make make that effort you open yourself up and the same thing. I did with bill and I have to save all the people I've ever made a movie about. He was the most open in the least concerned about Oh. Don't go there. Don't get this right. I mean I went. I went right into you. You know the depositions for the case. You know there's pretty harsh stuff in there about how the world sees him and I put all if even if you go and watch the trailer of the trailer in the opening of the move of the series is is this guy a good guy bad guy you know one. One voice calls him the devil I really wanted to say I want to put it all table. Say who you know. Let's let's put everything on the table and let's let's consider this man. Today did bill get any edit control. Do they get to say they didn't want anything in there. Now what I do is for every movie all when I get a cut that I like I'll go show it to people so I showed to Jimmy page edge or anyone else or Bano or Malala just because I wanna make sure that I didn't miss something or it didn't miss categorize something and often in every case you sort of. They say oh well. You know what there's another another piece that story that entail you and usually gets better but nothing was. I didn't take anything out that I didn't WANNA put in so there's sequence your time in the antitrust apiece. There's a sequence where you ask him if he was arrogant in step position. This is great because you know. This is a heavy topic now. We actually talked about it on this podcast. All the time like like are these companies to powerful should get broken up. Microsoft was arguably the first the current president of Microsoft Brad Smith. He's just read a book about basically asking being the government to regulate tech companies. It's very interesting but it he bill gates was the first as you note in the documentary. He's he stepped back from the operations operations of Microsoft to handle trial he gave this famously bad deposition and you ask him if he's arrogant and he he was like well look when you're a twenty year old billionaire. Maher sometimes when when you were getting answer. Did you sense that he was that he was shading or was he just telling you what he thought. Who's absolutely shading you. You Watch it. What's what's fun about watching. The movie and we put the full answer in is that he didn't WanNa say he was hacked arrogant. The Fun thing about making a movie is one of my agree. Teachers taught me this about storytelling is that you know that the filmmakers job is to plus two. The audience's job is for that sounds like a really pretentious film film school way of saying it but the idea is I ask if he was arrogant. He gives an answer. It's up to you and the audience to say and decide whether he's arrogant or not so I like to put that in there and let the audience decide for himself or herself. Do you think that arrogance however he wants to think of it is an asset to him and his current work. That's a good question. That's a really good question. I'd have to let him answer that. I mean I think intense focus. I think being very certain I think maybe with a touch arrogance. Get to this place where you're cutting through a Lotta bullshit so that is an let me let me qualify this answer by this is my answer not his answer but I do think that affect of people in the world have to cut through bullshit they have to cut through group think in their own group in their own company they have to cut through how the bureaucratic nature of a big company slows things down so if arrogance Y- like five percent or twelve percent arrogance and certainty and bull headedness it is effective. I wouldn't mind that I think sometimes a director of documentaries has to be bull headed and arrogant sometimes but then you have to sort of you know put guardrails ells on yourself. You have to have a few on that so that you don't go too far and I think clearly see footage in there. From the early days of Microsoft will they'll clearly went too far. Your gifts and that's actually the one the one piece of documentary that I I don't know how interesting it would be to everybody. I kind of understand why it wouldn't be there but it's very interesting to me is Microsoft soft was a ruthless company with gates at the helm and you you wave at it a few times right by their competitors date they crush them obviously netscape and eh interest trials there but there was lots and lots of other stuff they did to ruthlessly destroy their competitors along the way and that was all bill. was there a moment where like. I need to focus on that that stuff more or say. I just need to say at once and move on. There's other stuff. That's more important you I mean the the the the focus of the series is really not about that. I put enough enough in there to acknowledge it and say this happened but it wasn't an expose of the tactics. Microsoft in this period of time and so did just like the movie doesn't get into who all the details of the entrust case it doesn't get into all the details of why bill thinks that they were maligned nor does it get into all the details of why people think Microsoft is wrong. That wasn't the focus of the series. The focus of the series is a character study of a guy in in what is he doing with his life.

Bill Gates Microsoft Bill Melinda Gates Foundation Bill Paul Polio Silicon Valley Superman Seattle NFL Dan Netflix Brown America MAC Apple Washington Steve Jobs Nigeria Jimmy
Solid gold toilet stolen from Winston Churchill's birthplace

AP 24 Hour News

00:48 sec | 3 years ago

Solid gold toilet stolen from Winston Churchill's birthplace

"A solid gold toilet has been stolen from the birthplace of Winston Churchill the toilets the work of an Italian conceptual artist Nick had been installed only two days earlier at Blenheim palace after previously being shown at the Guggenheim Museum in New York police said the toilet was taken early Saturday by thieves who used at least two vehicles because the golden toilet has been connected to the palaces plumbing system police said its removal caused significant damage and flooding to the building which is a UNESCO world heritage site filled with valuable art and furniture the toilet is valued around one point two five million dollars a statement on the palace website said the building was closed to the public Saturday because of an unforeseen incidents the palace said normal operations will resume

Winston Churchill Nick Blenheim Palace Guggenheim Museum New York Two Five Million Dollars Two Days
Fed, Chief Investment Officer And Guggenheim Partners discussed on Financial Issues

Financial Issues

00:47 sec | 3 years ago

Fed, Chief Investment Officer And Guggenheim Partners discussed on Financial Issues

"Now turning to the fed forget about rate cuts the fed should be hiking that's according to Scott Meinert chief investment officer of Guggenheim partners he's warning of potential over seating saying a preemptive rate cuts will lead to unsustainably Holly asset prices and that can only make the next downturn worse but it's a few US president Donald Trump doesn't share he tweeted that a small rate cut wasn't enough that the fed has made all the wrong moves the most interesting if you look at U. S. equities Roger I mean there's an article in the blue about talking about the fact that investors have actually been fairly the giving of companies this earnings season third quarter EPS guidance according to Bloomberg day towards becoming the worst since two thousand eleven it was still seeing stocks hitting record highs in the U. S. so it suggests that a lot of the support is coming from the expectation of a fed rate cuts on maybe some progress in

FED Chief Investment Officer Guggenheim Partners President Trump Donald Trump Scott Meinert United States Bloomberg
"guggenheim" Discussed on News Radio 690 KTSM

News Radio 690 KTSM

01:47 min | 3 years ago

"guggenheim" Discussed on News Radio 690 KTSM

"Justice department would support Miller if he decides he doesn't want to subject himself to congressional testimony Muller said to appear before Congress next Wednesday Hong Kong leader Carrie lam says the extradition bill the true millions to the streets in protest is dead and admitted that the government's work on the proposal had been a total failure but stopped short of saying it was withdrawn entirely we will listen more extensively to people from different backgrounds with different ideas that we have a better graphics plans are marks are unlikely to calm demonstrators who have called for the proposal to be scrapped completely over fears the government could table it again any time leading activist Joshua Wong called her remarks another ridiculous lie because the bill still exists in the legislative program until next July eight of architect Frank Lloyd Wright's buildings have been added to the UNESCO world heritage list elevating them to the same status as much a peach show the pyramids and the statue of liberty the new additions include falling water in Pennsylvania the Guggenheim Museum in New York the hollyhock house in Los Angeles in the Jacobs house in Wisconsin writes works for added for their organic architecture open plans and use of materials like steel and concrete wow right there with the pyramids and much you peach you never been there to any of these not to the pyramids not so much a peach you know Frank Lloyd Wright no no no I really I don't know so I'm looking at the list a lot more Guggenheim yes I think I I think a nap during that six minutes apart of the hour this human resources professional is crushing it thanks to Kronos and this is this type song.

Justice department Miller Muller Congress Carrie lam Joshua Wong Frank Lloyd Wright Pennsylvania Guggenheim Museum New York Los Angeles Jacobs house Wisconsin Kronos Hong Kong UNESCO six minutes
Podtrac admits to website error

podnews

03:26 min | 3 years ago

Podtrac admits to website error

"Podcast analytics firm, Poltrak has removed a statement that it made in error on its website. We can reveal today. You'll find more details in our episode notes and our newsletter. The company is working towards certification. The awesome guest for the live edition of masters of scale the podcast hosted by leaked in founder Reid Hoffman has been announced, as Tory Burch, the American fashion designer and businesswoman who owns two hundred fifty stores worldwide following our story yesterday about anchor seeming to bypass the apple approval process anchor half responded denying. That's happening. Meanwhile, other podcasts publishers confirm that they too are able to bypass the approval process. We've updated the story only eighteen percent of podcasts added in new episode in the last three months, that's according to a report, we link to yesterday from amp. Defying media. Tom Webster from Edison research, writing the wonderfully alliterative pointed perspective on the purported pod. Fading problem, also compares this number two TV show, gills adding that the word pod. Fading, his derogatory. Tar Tom top, rob Walsh. From Lipson has released the latest download figures for podcasts hosted on Lipson on mobile apps. Apple podcasts is just fifty nine point nine percent. You'll find all the numbers in our episode notes and our newsletter. It's the first time he knows that apple has slipped below sixty percent lip since podcast, Sant all in Spotify, incidentally, Guggenheim partners and investment firm has released a report on Spotify podcasting strategy. They like it Cabana has published their two thousand nineteen podcast buying guide a guide for brands wanting to advertise in podcast. It's a free download with data advice and case studies storyboards, and Abbott offers private podcast is now. Available in the Dougal play store for Android devices. It's been available for iphone for a while over one hundred and forty organizations are using the product to bring podcasts style content to their companies and teams boss. John junior a podcast app for IOS has had an update. The new version allows the ability to share audio as video with custom artwork title, and byline is crowdfunding the future. French podcasts podcast day. Oh, takes a look, including at French patriots supported podcasts. They conclude that you need an audience that's engaged enough for at least two thousand five hundred followers and fifty apple podcast reviews to fund a podcast talking about apple podcast reviews, any chance, please will be a best friend solving not available in all countries. All stakes when she was not guaranteed and the warranties off. It'll permanency. Applies terms conditions. Apply. Audio boom, and main event media collaborating to produce never thought I'd say this a new. Podcast from Jodi sweeten from fuller house and life, coach Celia Bihar that tackles, parenting, tobu's, the Austin film festival sharing tricks of the trade writing for audio fiction, which contains tips, from the leading writers in the world of fiction podcasts, and Spotify, hiring for an executive producer for a new weekly music podcast, the jobs in Los Angeles in California, in the US. You'll find more details at pod jobs dot net.

Apple Lipson Spotify Tory Burch Poltrak Reid Hoffman Tom Webster Rob Walsh Jodi Sweeten Cabana Los Angeles Dougal Celia Bihar United States Abbott Founder Edison Research California
"guggenheim" Discussed on KDWN 720AM

KDWN 720AM

03:58 min | 3 years ago

"guggenheim" Discussed on KDWN 720AM

"I have been quoting from a Guggenheim study. And as I mentioned you during the break, John Guggenheim's got a recession dashboard. There's a dashboard for isn't it it's tick ticking. I happened twenty twenty is what they say. When the next recession will be the question is whether it's twenty twenty twenty twenty one or twenty thirty eight. Are you prepared behaviorally to deal with the pullbacks? And or the recessions, remember if you hit a recession, the likelihood of you losing some forty one percents pretty high. And so how are you prepared? Again, go back to the probability based way of planning, which is I put my money in stocks and bonds, take my systematic withdrawal and take my chances or the safety first strategy, which we've talked about which is securing perhaps your essential expenses with your social security pensions annuities and so forth or bucket ising. Having an ample amount of safe money stashed away to get you through those seventy nine months as it were because that's what happens on average. When you've got a greater than forty percent decline on average. You're going to be basically hurting for almost seven years. So do you have at least seven years worth of money that you can pull from now the great part about where we are today versus where we were. Back in the early nineties. When I first began the whole bucket strategy thing is today, you have another failsafe if you're over age sixty two and that is you may be able to pull money from a reverse mortgage. Dr Wade fouls written about this many times, it's an expensive loan. But in reality if it keeps you in the game. It's not quite as expensive as one might think. So if you're uncomfortable with a seven-year fifteen years safe and relatively safe amount stashed away. Then maybe you can play the odds by having a free and clear home and having the ability to draw from a reverse mortgage knowing that if you don't use that money, it will have minimal impact on the value of the home uncomfortable because you're not taking enough risk because you might be missing out. Yes. Well. That's what that's what investors do John human nature. Now, you know, me I go the other way first thing. And I I was thinking about this. I learned this in college when I first moved out of my own. Alright I always said to myself. In fact, I figured out how much I needed have the roof over my head to pay the rent keep the lights in the water on and have enough to at least eight MAC and cheese, if I had to every single day, and I came up with a number, and it was like five hundred bucks a month or something way back then I knew that if I made five hundred bucks a month cleared that much. I at least had the essentials covered. And I felt all right. I didn't have to make money that was nineteen twenty. That's that's where that came from. I knew I would not be out. Also, explain I could eat also explains how you got into the radio. That's true. Because I said the radio businesses covering my essentials at five hundred bucks a month. Which is about what I may. And I'm glad you did because you are doing overnight, and I was doing ten o'clock PM show. And you were my man, you know, this whole radio thing was just a lark. I just said let me just do this for fun until I figure out what it is. I want to do with my life. And now it's been thirty four years. Let's do some emails say sit back folks, we're gonna do emails hit it fellas. You've got..

John Guggenheim twenty twenty Dr Wade seven years seventy nine months thirty four years fifteen years forty percent seven-year
"guggenheim" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

15:56 min | 3 years ago

"guggenheim" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"The arts becoming new front line in a public relations war over greed and corporate misdeeds. The sound of protests at the Guggenheim museum in New York back in February joining an exhibition by the photographer NAN Goldin, the four hundred thousand shouting about the estimated number thought to have died in the US after becoming addicted to prescription drug Oxycontin, Oxycontin was produced by perje farmer, and that firm is allegedly linked to the very wealthy Sackler trust which sponsors the Guggenheim museum, then golden herself as it happens is a former Oxycontin addict, well, the cycler trusted Nuys any direct connection to the drug, but the protests have had an effect Guggenheim says it now no longer is taking Sackler donations, nor in fact is take gallery in London, the British art critic and broadcaster Sarah United has been reflecting for the BBC on how this scandal has fed into a well established history of cash and corruption in the arts Sackler money. Is everywhere in the art world the N A seventeen National Gallery. Nan golden has self announced that she would withdraw from a planned retrospective of her work at the national portrait gallery, unless it refused million pound donation on offer from the family. The Sackler donation was indeed dropped it remains to be seen. How many other institutions might follow? The has also been a demonstration at the British Museum last month. Protesters invaded the central hall the opening of an exhibition on a Syrian culture cooling out its main sponsor B P for what they claimed was it involvement in the carving up of the Iraqi oil industry after the two thousand three war. It's environmental record. And it's rolling climate change. The thorny relationship between culture and the money that supports it is not new think of the battle of tobacco sponsorship in sport. Those old days of billboards plastered with cigarette. Brands around Formula one race tracks and football stadiums are long gone, but it took time pressure and government action to bring it about politics as EPA is in bedded and all of this. The only way galleries and museums can bring in extra revenue these days is to mount superstar exhibitions which pulling punches and raise profile such blockbusters Costa fortune crowdfunding, violet of art lovers wouldn't come close. But their Honey to the sponsorship wing of many big companies away to soften what could be a problematic corporate image that could be p oil may have been literally the fuel on which we built maternity but that sticky crude river has. Never quite lost its rotten eggs smell as we walk through diesel fog into the horrors of climate change. It isn't going to get any cleaner and yet and yet a whole CU American museums charitable foundations. Art galleries were all built on oil fortunes Guggenheim Getty Carnegie Rockefeller, mining smelting. Henry Ford's caused in run on water. How far back? Do we go? No, one would defend pudgy farmer's actions over Oxycontin. The Sackler family have been giving to the art world long before this scandal. One of its biggest office chocolate died over thirty years ago should his name come off the boards. Should we get back the money as well? Fifth centuries. The Catholic church was the only global multinational in town. Art was one of its central tools propaganda advertising. You might call it and selling salvation was license to print money. All this is soaked into the fifteen chapel as decorated by Michael Angelo, pope Sixers before after whom it is named ran one of the most nepotistic papers of the age. The building was financed by new taxes. The brain child beset and cardinal Borgia and MichelAngelo's work was commissioned by two popes, neither of whom let their valid celibacy get in the way of their carnal pleasures. There's no doubt that without all of this lamb into corruption. We would not have many of the greatest works of art. The world has ever seen when faced with a last judgement. My instinct is to listen to history the wonder of God's sparking life into Adam on that sublime ceiling can never be separated. From the fact that man lives on earth. And it is decidedly monkey down. Here. Always was. And I fear always will be Sarah, Jane, and you're listening to business daily from the BBC World Service with me at Butler. So there's some context what I wonder too super-rich philanthropists these days. Make of all of this debate Sarah mentioned donations from companies and individuals constitute an ever-larger slice of funding used by arts institutions, but it's not necessarily always their purest generosity. That's behind it. Critics argue the firms and individuals get something in return using their gifts to burnish an otherwise tainted reputation oil companies in drugs companies, for example, some of the largest charitable folios whilst enjoying some of the lowest public approval ratings as firms so what's going on. I ask James Chen. He's a Hong Kong businessman, and billionaire who now deploys a big slice of his wealth. Not in arts funding as it happens. But in a develop developing world charity, clearly which promotes better eyesight for. The poor most people practice what I would call patronage philanthropy, which is very much about being very generous with their checkbooks giving money, but really not understanding deeply about issues rather than the type of philanthropy that people like Bill Gates myself trying to do which I would categorize something different development for Paul world, which is really focusing on on issues that affect either the society, we live in or the or the larger world, those who are marginalized, you know, and how to tackle those issues. Right. And I think the key there is to ability to take risk in your philanthropy and able take risks right? You really have to develop this deep understanding of the issues failing learning from failure. You know, that's a very different type of land repeating patronage that most people are practicing really change it. Chain move the dial right talk about the phrase that some of us is something called moral licensing, which is basically they can do what they like in business specifically how you made your money, but they've done whatever they wanted in business, and then they are giving themselves sanctions reputation reputational sanctioning by simply throwing a small subset of that money towards a good cause. Yes. That may or may not be the case. But I think there's an expectation in society that have done well, give back more taxes or by doing something that helps deeply to change society for the better. And so I think that unless the wealthy really get that and get behind that, you know, those who have more we can really do more do more. I mean, you're a Hong Kong businessman, you presumably a surrounded by a bizarre. I don't know how many of those around you who you see are involved in charitable activity, but some of them, I guess Joe look pretty cut throat today. They involve themselves perhaps in the types of business that are not morally exactly transparent. Do you think any of them are involved in in giving money away in order to somehow cleanse reputations? I'm sure that that that would happen. But you know, there is one black and white line is around what's legal, and what's not legal, right. And then there is the issue of morality that gets a little bit of morally ambiguous when we do see this a lot in particular in China would say, you know, where people are using charitable giving as a way to buy insurance in the way. I really when again into trouble they can show you this happened, historically happens. But if we can differentiate that kind of giving, right? It's fairly easy to see that. Right. What are you actually utilizing your philanthropy Ford? What kind of impact are you really achieving? Right. That's I think a deeper don't tar the whole sector of philanthropy there. Lots of wonderful people who deeply deeply care and really want to do something meaningful. Right. But unfortunately, they're often drowned out by the media others would kind of focused on the number of zeros rather than on. What is being accomplished the Hong Kong billionaire and philanthropist, James Chen? Well, let's get back to the arts then with which with its liberal profile has for decades, become a focus for activism these days. The protests were not about opioids targeting oil companies firms like BP, for example, sponsor several the UK's leading cultural institutions the British Museum national portrait gallery, Royal Shakespeare Company. And so on campaign is like just worth of the UK pressure group culture unstained say that his problem in the area of climate change. She reckons big oil should be exiled from the arts. But Claire FOX director of the UK's academy of ideas, sit RAV differently. I put them together to debate this subject Jessica's first cultural organizations doing when they choose to partner with BP or shell or whoever they are actually promoting ongoing. Use of these fossil fuels at the moment when we really really need to be going in opposite direction the Edinburgh. Science festival which has long been sponsored by variety of oil companies actually announced that it's dropped his appeal sponsors. It's committing to no longer taking any for Seville many and its justification is quite with climate change ever presence, and we feel increasingly compromised by the conflict between accepting sponsorship from fossil fuel companies and programming events. This tonight's the main causes of climate change. So this this increasing challenge to institution's legitimacy if they're seen to be too close to or promoting oil companies in this way player FOX, what do you think about? I think that largely autistic organisation should take money from wherever they want from whoever they want as long as I dent into fair in autistic freedom. What I think I'm most concerned about I understand that Justice activist on fossil fuels in. That's fine. But you could be having a conversation with an activist against big pharma all the recent Sackler controversy, which was in relation to in fact, whether they. I should be sponsoring the Tate because of that. The legislation with the. Code crisis. Exactly, I suppose my question is what is clean money, and who gets to decide should it be a group of activists who kind of lobbied shamed. Organizations into not taking the money. The not in the end denies the public. Great way of all just why are you setting a high bar or your pay to be for cultural organisations than perhaps other parts of UK society? I think cultural organizations assertive unique -ly trusted by the public and play really important role as classes not just in sort of giving us access to wonders of the world. But also in education in reflecting the big shifts going on in the world, and helping people engage with and understand them. So they really need to maintain that public trust. Yes. So we're gonna do need money, but they also need to protect themselves from risks to their reputation, and that means doing. Actually. So we're gonna have already been fighting for longtime which is having a right bust ethical funding policy. That says, okay, where are red lines over the last maybe ten twenty years since very concerted shift away from tobacco sponsorship, they've increasingly been seen as inappropriate partners. I think the same can be said for the arms industry. So there's already red lines. I think what we're arguing is that the scale in urgency of the climate crisis. Now should all say beyond that red line? You talk about risks to reputation, but the restaurant protection actually, don't come from that sponsorship that come from people who oppose sponsorship now people, for example, in the public health world will say that sugar, for example is the new tobacco. So where do you stop any organization that wishes to sponsor the ours or a science festival or what have you as long as they don't interfere in the editor the artistic integrity of that oak. Nisaan? Pose a challenge to the reputation of arts organization Justice or any evidence of these companies interfering with their. There is actually I should say mention that he is shelves pumps it. The science museums exhibition on climate change could atmosphere and move recently came to light that they had actually watered down some of the language around pollution say that is direct interference in stick integrity. The British Museum BP is allowed to pick and choose which exhibitions it sponsors strings attached. I've already made the point that I think that's appropriate. But these are not evil organization. G you have a particular political problem with them without fossil fuels, regardless of the row about it. You couldn't turn the lights on. We couldn't actually do this very intimate. What you're saying? Is that reputation is enhanced by being associated with the ours. Why shouldn't bay because that giving money to decide whether they are morally pure enough or criteria that can actually decide whether that. Good enough to give money. Well, this isn't just coming for me the Edinburgh. Science level of ready mentioned his dropped all of its fossil fuels says as has Tate as has the international festival in terms of the science museum, which is currently sponsored by three oil companies recently forty-eight, incredibly well respected. Scientists put a formal complaint into the science museum arguing that its promotion of those three companies conflicts with scientific integrity. This is a shift is happening across the whole sector. Sorry, very compelling with me. Would you have it every arts institution and science festival wouldn't as say not tight money from another big corporate big pharma big alcohol. I mean, where do you draw the line? That's my question. Really all the ready corporates that you think they should take money from big banks today. Okay. I think the one of the great riches that we gain from having excess money made from profits and even the state. Eight gets its money. That's it pays to also is Asians from taxes that come from not only all of us. But guess what? Big corporations. Yes. Increasingly organized Asians needing to look to the private sector in order to find that funding. But to me that makes it even more important that they have strong, ethical fundraising policy. So that they don't find themselves being compromised by association with companies.

Hong Kong Sarah United UK Guggenheim museum British Museum NAN Goldin Art BBC James Chen Claire FOX National Gallery Edinburgh Costa Oxycontin science museum Guggenheim Getty Carnegie Rock
"guggenheim" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

03:15 min | 3 years ago

"guggenheim" Discussed on KCRW

"Press plan. KCRW I'm Madeline brand. The name Sackler is starting to have the same negative connotations as Philip Morris. The Sackler family owns Purdue pharma, which aggressively marketed its drag Oxycontin to doctors and patients there are thousands of overdoses tied to that drug every year. Now, there are also lawsuits six hundred cities counties, a native American tribes filed a joint suit this month and today Purdue pharma agreed to settle a two hundred and seventy million dollar loss in Oklahoma. Some museums are refusing to accept Sackler money. The Sackler is have donated a lot to lots of museums, including the Guggenheim the Smithsonian. The Metropolitan Museum of art the Tate modern now say they're gonna stop all their charitable giving entirely here to talk about that. And what the effect may be in the art world is Peggy McLean. She's an arts reporter for the Washington Post high high. So why are they saying they're gonna stop all their charitable donations show Dame, Theresa Sackler whose share of the secular trust, which is one of the giving groups of in in the family sort of larger family put out a statement that said that they were becoming a distraction the current press attention about the legal cases in the United States. It's with making it difficult. And so they expressed it as a temporary pause on all philanthropic giving. And what does that mean? Monetarily? Well, they are generous benefactors for many many cultural organizations both in in Europe in London, especially in also in the United States. So I mean that that represents millions of dollars a year. So I imagine these cultural institutions the ones that hadn't stopped accepting the money. They're a little worried, you know, I mean, it is a pickle their donors reflect their values. And if you know, you you are associated by the company you keep and so they'll have to decide whether taking these gifts is worth it. The metropolitan, for example, repeated that it is undergoing a review of its policies Daniel waste, but statement yesterday that basically said, you know, cultural institutions, and hospitals and education institutions rely extensively on private philanthropy. And you can't walk into a museum or library without being reminded of. Of that. And so this is a difficult thing that they have to work through well on top of that. There are actual art centers and wings, and escalators and all sorts of things within the museums themselves that have the name Sackler on them. Like, right, right. There's one in the Smithsonian. There's one in the Tate, you know. Right. And so that's the second part is. So the the national portrait gallery in London and the Tate last week announced that they were not gonna take money and the Guggenheim then came and said, they weren't going to take future gifts. But the Guggenheim, for example, has an education center name for Sackler. It didn't say it's going to take that name down the Smithsonian has the Arthur m Sackler gallery, which opened in eighty seven. It says that it has no pending gifts from the Sackler family, but it's not planning to return that gift or those artifacts or change the name of its museum. What is the between charitable.

Theresa Sackler Arthur m Sackler gallery Sackler Purdue pharma Metropolitan Museum of art United States London Tate Madeline Philip Morris Peggy McLean Oklahoma Washington Post Europe Daniel Dame seventy million dollar
"guggenheim" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

04:52 min | 3 years ago

"guggenheim" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Tracy bash Goff is the curator of the Helmuth Clint exhibition at the Guggenheim she would have been trained as a traditional painter done sort of classical drawing and painting exercises making landscapes portraits. I mean when she studied at the academy, she got a gold medal for history painting, which is absolutely extraordinary for women in the eighteen eighties. So I think that would have been a career pass there. But she wasn't interested in nineteen nine six. She starts completely new thing. So in one thousand nine hundred six Helmuth Clint begins a whole new artistic and professional venture one. That would be a total, right. Turn from her strict academic education. But what's interesting is that the timing isn't coincidental. There is a lot going on at this moment. The turn of the twentieth century was a time of rapid change and huge scientific medical and technological advances. The telephone in eighteen seventy six way with Alexander Graham Bell and the radio was invented in eighteen ninety four the X Ray was invented in eighteen ninety five the discovery of atoms and small particles opens up the idea that the world is made sort of more than just meets the eye and helmet doesn't shy away from this new world progress she jumps right in putting her academic artistic training to youth. She gets work illustrating medical. Journals, but all of these scientific developments. Inspire Hilma and many other artists and thinkers to start questioning other things about their world, and the possibilities beyond it, the nineteenth centuries sort of people were still very religious. So the idea that there is the highest fear is kind of coming to everyone in every sort of the majority believes in it. The question is how can it be reached? And suddenly sort of science says, you know, we might be the ones we might be the ones who can reach it. And that is fascinating not only for scientists. But also for artists if we can send a voice through a wire, or if we can see inside our bodies, which are made up of tiny particles. If these things are possible, then maybe maybe there are Auras and some special people are able to see them. Maybe we could have spirit communicating with us telepathically and telling us what to paint toward the end of the nineteenth century and well into the twentieth. A whole spiritualism movement fueled by the scientific discoveries of the day starts to spread across Europe and America, the spiritual movement took off and became very popular in society, and there were regularly spiritualists events that took place, lectures and demonstrations that would be held in different. Towns and cities the main attraction at these events was contacting the dead. People held seances conducted trances sought out mediums who claim they could tap into the spiritual world, mentally or physically some of the most avowed believers were those who lost a loved one Mary Todd Lincoln famously organized a seance in the White House after the death of her son Willie, but spiritualism, and the many branches that sprang from it had other famous enthusiasts including writers like, Victor, Hugo and Sir, Arthur Conan Doyle and artists. Like, Pete Mondrian facile convince Katie and Hilma off Clint an eighteen eight t that is when she's eighteen her younger sister dies before it might have been sort of Yasser to or it might have been sort of something you're interested in. But as soon as you have lost a person, you want to be in touch with again, I think it becomes a kind of higher importance, and you get more. Attentive to everything that could point in the direction that it's possible to connect with the dead. But that grief over her sister's death blossoms into a desire to communicate with a whole astral plane of spirit guides. In the late eighteen hundreds Hilma forms her own spiritualist group with four other women. They call themselves the five or defend them. And this is actually something that a lot of women are doing at the time. The spiritual group was a place where women had quite a bit of agency and women were regularly giving these lectures, the spirituals were also associated with suffrage in fact, and so the forming of her own spiritualist group as well as being interested in this. These ideas really clues her into a world where women had had a voice in a in a different way than she may have been experiencing in other parts of her life..

Hilma Helmuth Clint gold medal Goff Alexander Graham Bell Tracy Mary Todd Lincoln Guggenheim Europe Arthur Conan Doyle Pete Mondrian Yasser Willie White House Victor America Hugo Katie
"guggenheim" Discussed on The Art Newspaper Weekly

The Art Newspaper Weekly

04:28 min | 3 years ago

"guggenheim" Discussed on The Art Newspaper Weekly

"Bill Olympic landlord life death. Rebirth is at the Royal Academy from the twenty sixth of January to the thirty first of March, you can read an interview with both Martin Clayton and repair of in the January printing of the newspaper or at the newspaper dot com. We'll be back to about Robert Mapplethorpe at the Guggenheim after this. The images taken by the photographer. Herbert Ponting June captions got ill-fated exhibition to the south pole in nineteen ten to nineteen thirteen the Terranova at the ice. Kate Evans is probably the most celebrated the huge slab of ice which dominates the four grams of the composition appears to loom over the fragile ship serving as a metaphor for the unequal contest between man and nature wonderful printed the photograph originally, so by the finances appears in Bonham's travel, and it's beret sewn in early February Ponting's adventure supposed to photography combined with his meticulous attention to detail in fruits the generation of Tokyo's, his work. When the exhibition has never lost its capacity to excite and leave us to find out more. Visit Bonhams dot com. Welcome back. Now, the good high museum in New York is organized a year long exhibition of photographs by Robert Mapplethorpe, one of the most acclaimed yet controversial artists of the late twentieth century, titled implicit tensions Mapplethorpe now. The show's conceived in two parts starting with the one opening on Friday, which focuses on the entire length of Mapplethorpe photography career from nineteen seventy two nine hundred ninety eight the artist died in one thousand nine hundred nine from aids related complications, a senior editor New York. Nancy Kenny went to the Guggenheim this week to walk through the show with Lauren Hinxton, one of the show's, creators. Tell us Lauren how did this exhibition come about? So twenty nineteen marks the thirtieth anniversary of Mapplethorpe's, death and with this exhibition. We're hoping to show the full range of his extraordinary artistic contributions and the impact that the Robert Mapplethorpe foundation gift has had on the Guggenheim's photography exhibition program. So my co curator's than I Susan Thompson associate curator here at the Guggenheim and our curatorial assistant Levy prom. We're hoping to represent the kind of nuance and complexity of Mapplethorpe's art, and we're hoping to engage audiences who may only know me before the person and not actually his production and bring them in to see kind of the wide ranging career and subject matter that he addressed with his practice. And for those that know his work. Well, we think that they're going to be quite a few discoveries to be made in the show, especially the early works that we have in our collection, everything on view is drawn from the Guggenheim's collection. As I said is from the Robert Mapplethorpe foundation gift which came to us in nineteen Ninety-three. We received some two hundred works at that time, and it really catalyzed are photography collecting practices here at the museum. So the themes that you'll see in the exhibition. Ranging from expiration of identity through self portraiture to race and gender and the kind of censorship of sexually explicit imagery. All of these kind of complex topics are are looked at within our broader collection Mapplethorpe has really had a profound impact on the field of contemporary photography. And so in the second part of this exhibition program, we're going to be highlighting that impact and looking at the complex conversations that have arisen around his work. Several of these kind of threads in the practice from exploring identity through self portraiture to his representations of race and gender are reflected in works that have been acquired by the museum through our photography council. And so we really view this moment as an important one to tease out some of these conversations and critical. Silence's that contemporary artists have brought to Mapplethorpe. So we'll have a selection of contemporary artists on view from our permanent collection starting in July. And the title implicit tensions. What's

Robert Mapplethorpe Guggenheim Lauren Hinxton Herbert Ponting Bill Olympic Royal Academy Kate Evans Martin Clayton Susan Thompson associate curator Terranova New York Nancy Kenny Bonham senior editor Tokyo four grams