36 Burst results for "Gucci"

Fresh update on "gucci" discussed on Power 105.1 FM Programming

Power 105.1 FM Programming

00:20 sec | 7 hrs ago

Fresh update on "gucci" discussed on Power 105.1 FM Programming

"Chopsticks like a root tree. I'm a filmmaker movie seeking tired of the Gucci courage to Spanish by once a high favorite rapper is Gucci. Favorite Trouble is duty. I'm a legend like to see the general engine. It's just kids with no music as no one. No one but me. Okay? Why'd you do see Bennett's favorite rapper is coaching favorite chopper. His future. I'm not filming this whole moving from a very freaky girl. Get it from my mama. I'm not with the game. I went out of you. Don't give me give me being the person that my don't give me give me in the first year. Very freaky girl. Get it from my mama. I'm not with the game. Went out of drama. Make them give me give me bigger. Proceed out of her mind. Make them give me give me the first count them down from number 20, but no, we can't let the breakfast club.

Gucci Bennett
"gucci" Discussed on Gucci Podcast

Gucci Podcast

02:42 min | 3 d ago

"gucci" Discussed on Gucci Podcast

"Innovation equity would also profitability. There is no rationale for continuing to exist within a system has been in place forever so you see hope when what. What is it that gives you hope to keep going on and keep giving back to the community in wanting to make this world a better place. That sounds almost like a song. But i think as jeremy said you know we are both off the generation that is not your sadly the we try and do. Skincare retains trying to allow us. But no and you look at the generations who are behind us and you look at their absolute confidence. That change is possible. They many ways don't feel not even hindered by the biases that exist there's acknowledgement of the systemic challenges and oppression which continue to exist but they are absolution their desired either fight for those changes or whether it is queuing for eleven hours in the us to vote whether it is writing to those of power in order to create change whether it's looking at a film like the witches challenging the disability representation in a film like that. Who does that come to be in an era of this era. But i think oakland is looking at the changes that have been made. You know whether that is thinking about kerby. Jean raymond creating your friends in new york with carrying. I think it's the individuals were leveraging the power of the entities to create tangible results. That ince change. But there's so much more to talk to you. I'm snapping now. I totally agree. Yes i guess that you will keep you know fighting in you. I'm i'm so. I don't i'm so hopeful that you to exist out there in that you keep fighting and you keep thinking about new ways that we can make this happen. And i'm i mean you went to the house and i think that's you know you have studied to to remake people here you and i'm really looking forward to see the changes to this has been amazing. This has been so great alina. Thank you so much thank you. Thank you for everything so real nice talking to you. Thank you for listening to this episode of the gucci podcast featuring sinead burke and jeremiah harris. Find out more about china chained and their work in the episode notes..

Jean raymond Skincare jeremy kerby ince oakland new york us alina sinead burke jeremiah harris gucci china
Designer Willi Smith: Life in New York in the 80s

Gucci Podcast

02:39 min | Last week

Designer Willi Smith: Life in New York in the 80s

"Today with my guest will be looking back on what life and the fashion scene was like in new york city in the nineteen eighty s and discussing legendary black american designer woody smits he's brand winnie way is currently in exhibition dedicated to his work. And he's all kinds will stay up through february two thousand and twenty one. It's sponsored by good chee. And it's the cooper hewitt smithsonian design. Museum in new york exhibition is the first of its kind to celebrate his work would he. Smith was regarded at the time of his death in nineteen eighty seven during the eighth democ as one of the most successful black designers of his time. According to vogue dot com curious spent two decades winnie where the company was launched in nineteen. Seventy six at a closed. Its doors in. Nineteen ninety in a time spent shorter than a decade willie smith while he was still alive in designing for the brand managed to create designs which conquered the american market at the height of his success is closed Edible in five hundred stores and was stopped by all the major department stores like macy's bloomingdale's was often the guest of daytime talk shows. But first and foremost would smith wasn't old american designer. He's closed appealed to every man and woman and have been described as being made for day but truly unique. Dna of weedy way was fueled by and calibration the strategy which is quite common now was unusual in the nineteen eighties in one thousand nine hundred three. Willie smith collaborated for a show in new york city with the father of video off nam june paik when the parents Enough was -rupt fabric in nineteen eighty. Five by environmentalists autism. Crystal would design. The uniform of the team will king at the unveiling. Would he wear the company through. Its collaboration philosophy and approach is often credited a screeching the blueprint for what is called today streetwear. But he's closed when not inspired him or the bronx where hip hop as a musical genre was being invented instead would he face reality above fantasy in is designed approached and yada moderate price point. East stock could be better described sportswear sheet. Yoke fashioned in the eighties was a great time for black designers and from better katie. Who was the first black designers to show him peres in the first american designer to join with jill to release smith financial success. The industry was all seemed to have been quite supportive of its black talent

Woody Smits Cooper Hewitt Smithsonian Willie Smith Macy's Bloomingdale New York City Winnie Vogue Smith New York Paik Autism Crystal Bronx Peres Katie Jill
Supreme Sells to VF Corp. Will it Sell Out?

Business Wars Daily

04:47 min | 2 weeks ago

Supreme Sells to VF Corp. Will it Sell Out?

"It's an entrepreneur's classic dilemma. Can we keep the culture that makes us unique and made a successful and still sell our company. Nowhere is this dilemma more stark. Then with underground street where companies supreme which recently announced that it selling to fashion conglomerate. Vhf corp you know. Vf the ten billion dollar company that owns nineteen brands including north face vans and timberland well in case she were doomed scrolling in miss the big news last week. Vf announced its deal to acquire supreme. For a couple billion dollars it's bs big acquisitions since it bought timberland and twenty eleven also for just over two billion dollars bloomberg reported. Now you've probably heard of supreme but just in case it's a streetwear company. It sells branded. T shirts hoodies hats and their fashion. Ain't cheap. The label launched with a single skateboard shop. In new york city in nineteen ninety-four the brainchild fashion designer. James jeb jeb. Lia will remain at the helm of the brand supreme at big by doing everything. Mass market brands don't do it. Amplified scarcity in a big way. Supreme spent almost nothing on marketing building. Up word of mouth instead. According to cnbc it opened brick and mortar stores. So slowly that. Today there are only twelve around the world and you couldn't just walk in to make a purchase. No the only way to get supreme. Fashion was to follow them on social media like a hawk waiting for them to announce random drops of merchandise. Today those drops our weekly getting a spot in line for the privilege of buying anything was intentionally almost impossible at the height of their popularity. Wannabe customers would camp out in tents or sleep on the street to get a spot in line. The next morning teens also commonly spent a couple of hundred dollars to purchase online bots that notified in the second clothing dropped but that notification guaranteed nothing products could be sold out in less than a minute that strategy in turn created hot resale market t shirts and hoodies that originally so for sixty to eighty dollars could fetch up to a thousand bucks on ebay and other resale sites. The supreme red and white brand became so magnetic that the company seemingly could sell just about anything by slapping the logo on it from kayaks to a pyrex measuring cup to a brick literally. You can still buy a supreme branded brick resale sites stock x. It'll set you back. One hundred and thirty dollars though according to cnbc and just for fun and unbranded brick currently cost sixty six cents. At lowe's the company also pursued its famous collapse strategy. Working in tandem with the f. Corpse vans timberland. North face to create supreme branded footwear and apparel partners included designers like gucci and louis vuitton even colgate toothpaste has a partnership with supreme for vf. The deal signals a strategic. Step forward in what it is called a transformation plan in recent years. Bef has begun. Divesting less edgy products. Like work. where it's off wrangler into its own company and is building on its prowess in athletic streetwear. Its stock price surged on the supreme announcement. Its biggest gain in more than thirty years according to bloomberg. But here's the really big question. Can supreme keep expanding by making its products. Hard to get under the umbrella of a fortune five hundred company with its eye on global growth. Bfce's the street where market is a fifty billion dollar opportunity. Supreme reportedly earned half a billion in revenues last year the f. plans to add new supreme stores around the world. The new york times asked kent supreme. Stay cool while going corporate seemingly. The answer is yes. After all one of the country's biggest private equity firms the carlyle group bought about half of supreme for five hundred million dollars in two thousand seventeen that deal prompted the same kinds of questions about authenticity but supreme continued to grow. Not everyone sees a smooth path forward. However matt powell is a senior industry advisory at retail consultancy npd group. He told the website high snow by the streetwear market is based on scarcity scarcity and growth are oppositional. Oh and one other challenge ahead for vs. It'll continue to allow supreme to do its famous collapse with partners outside the f- like for instance the f. rivals levi's and nike from the outside. That looks like letting your new spouse still collab- with other partners does it. Not and of course we all know how well that can work out in the end. Success will rest on whether the acquisition will juice revenues and profits for both partners. The f. is confident that supreme can become a billion dollar brand. If that is supreme can hang onto the cool rebellious image it's cultivated since his unassuming launch or than twenty five years ago

VF Vhf Corp Nineteen Brands North Face Vans Timberland Twenty Eleven James Jeb Jeb Cnbc LIA Colgate Toothpaste Bloomberg New York City Bfce
Harry Styles becomes Vogue's first-ever solo male cover star

Colleen and Bradley

00:26 sec | 3 weeks ago

Harry Styles becomes Vogue's first-ever solo male cover star

"History today, becoming the first man ever to cover American Vogue all by himself and on the cover sounds is wearing a custom Gucci ball gown with a tuxedo jacket. The other guys who have appeared on American vote include styles. Former one direction ban a big Zane Malik as well. It's Justin Bieber, who appeared alongside his Hailey Baldwin. Zane was with Gigi Hadid. So there goes Harry.

Zane Malik Hailey Baldwin Justin Bieber Gigi Hadid Zane Harry
New York's JFK Cargo Heists Hauled In $6M Worth Of Goods

Michael Wallace and Steve Scott

02:12 min | Last month

New York's JFK Cargo Heists Hauled In $6M Worth Of Goods

"Accused of stealing millions of dollars of high end goods. WCBS reporter Marla Diamond is on the story. She joins us now. Marla, the Queens district attorney, made reference to an infamous cargo heist at JFK during her announcement. She said. This theft was even bigger. Who's accused and what were they able to pull off What Melinda Katz said that this hall was larger than the infamous Luton's a heist. Portrayed in the movie Goodfellas in 19 seventies, a former Delta employees and to airport truckers are among the six people arrested in this ring. The Cats says they use their inside knowledge of the airport and then forge documents containing accurate details of arriving cargo to haul away $6 million in luxury goods. Well, what were the thieves? After anything, they could get their hands on with the designer label, Gucci, Prada, Chanel handbags, shoes, clothing accessories sunglasses, which they stored at an empty hair salon near the airport. Eventually, authorities were able to get into That hair salon and they found just boxes and boxes of luxury merchandise worth about 2.5 million. That's what they were able to recover. Is anything being done to prevent these crimes from happening in the future? Well, it's it's hard to imagine that much merchandise making it out of JFK with nobody knowing, but apparently it does happen from time to time. Cat said that one, you know thing that people who are at the airport should rely on is safety. And for that reason, she said, that they are increasing surveillance at these hangars. The FBI was also involved in this because of the international scope of the case. They have NYPD monitoring these cargo holds in the hopes that it doesn't happen again. That's WCBS reporter Marla Diamond Hands at

Marla Diamond JFK Reporter Melinda Katz Nypd FBI Queens Prada Theft Chanel Delta CAT
Happy 40th Kim Kardashian

Daily Pop

06:29 min | Last month

Happy 40th Kim Kardashian

"Hey everyone. It is Kim Kardashian West fortieth birthday. We're kicking off the party right here right now on daily Pop Justin is out today's Morgan and I are joined by Kisha Knight Polio he's an actress kick ass mom and of course you know her from house of pain and as Rudy from the cosby show Kisha we're so happy you're joining us. Thank you so much for having me. We have so much to get to today we're going to be celebrating throughout the entire show you're going to hear from Kim's famous family. We're GONNA read breaking down Kim's most shocking moments and we cannot talk about him without talking about fashion. They go hand in hand the celebration is going on all day here on e- with the keeping up with the Kardashians marathon and Kim's fortieth birthday special that airs tonight at ten PM. The first Kim has always been an open book and she's made plenty of surprising confessions along the way watch this. You should just be who you are say what you want entrepreneur makeup mogul wife's mother and all around boss I'm going to do whatever I want Kim K. West confessed. There isn't anything she's afraid to do and her mind she has done it all and her crazy confessions don't stop there I. Love it during a livestream. Qna Kim admitted problem member of the Mile High Club she wants had sex in a public movie theater she goes commando almost all of the time wave TMI and she's still owns though seventy five, thousand dollar diamond earrings made her totally lose it. We Know Kim has been working on getting her law degree, but it sounds like she's mixing a little business with pleasure in a new questionnaire for e she revealed she likes a shot of Tequila with a cheeser when she said he's life with about being happy and when she's not hitting the books, she's heading gym her morning ritual includes a five fifty am start time to work sweat. Obviously, all that hard work has done a body. Good. It's not easy at all, but it's not all work and no play her favorite thing to do during her downtime. Text people with lots of glitter sparkle emojis. You could probably guess who he's in contact with most family I no matter what Kimmy also confessed she likes to treat yourself to a little. TV. But the mom of four go to guilty pleasures aren't exactly what you'd expect. I need your help help MTV's catfish is at the top of our list or she likes to unwind with some hoarders on a any. Other crazy Kim Confessions. Everything is always so public. She claims her hidden talent is smelling cavities and there's one celebrity whose beauty left her starstruck. No need to share Kim loves you. She's proved over and over and over again it's just a vibe and the confessions don't stop there. Kim told people she has models drowned her clothes so she can plan outfits in advance and she's spray tans her scalp. So her middle part has that extra glow. Oh that's a good ted. Have, for years, wargin timoth favorite Kim moment all my God. This is the hardest question I've been asked all year producers brought this up yesterday I'm like, how am I going choose but I think it has to be and I know Chris over this but it has to be when she's taking fees when chloe is on the way to jail like that's just know psychotic Kim to me it is it never gets old it so delusional and it's just amazing and why we fell in love with her in the first place it's the best it's that's definitely one of my top wants Kisha what am I okay I'm I'm going to go on the other end of the spectrum you know Kim. been doing things for a long time but you know I have to say it's all of the work that she's been doing to get convicted. Felons out of prison. The fact that she's taking a completely different turn and really helped us her platform to to affect people's lives in a positive way. One hundred percent. That's that's a really huge one and I'm going to it back to something a lot more superficial. I got. My favorite moment is when we just saw in that lovely package, Kim crying over her diamond earrings because honestly girls I relate if I had seventy thousand dollars, diamond earrings and I lost one that's probably exactly how I would react I've had mad but got ensure your jewels have to China and. Ensure those goals. All right. Well, caves fashion has changed so much over the years. So we're going to go deep into the archives. Take a look at Kim style evolution Ooh can really I am be our L. Y. Kardashian. K.. A. R. D. A. S. H. I. A.. Look. Very nice where do you win? Gucci and Jimmy, Choo Shoes and Louis. Vitton back to mix it up a little bit him style started out young and fun experimenting with Different Designers Have Wearing A. Skirt and a La Perla top a wonderful. Share. That'd be the not shoes I want to find something that is young and fun and fresh but still you know how classy and conservative this is my. She transformed into a sophisticated ladies setting the trends that posing Christian Louis, Vuitton he also, I'm wearing Eliah and Lorraine Schwartz I weren't accustomed gown I'm wearing our Kardashian collection leggings put this big waistband. To do we have favor Lon Max Mara when she became apparent this hot mama put her curves front and center. This is John Paul Go. Ta and I love her sparkly. It was it is. And you know I love it I just wanted to really go for it and be kind of like a robot a Blinky Sexy Robot I'm wearing address from revolve. Long Sleeve and it's hot out here. But whatever looks good. It was distressed by Rick Win. All made this for me and I love it him. You'll trade who you wearing. Where we wearing this evening, I'm wearing Vivienne Westwood now. has become so economy or calling it the Kim effect. This

Qna Kim Kim Kardashian Kim Confessions Kim K. West Kisha Knight Vivienne Westwood MTV Morgan Kimmy Kardashians Rick Win TMI Rudy John Paul Lon Max Mara China Mile High Club Vitton L. Y. Kardashian
'Dexter' Revived at Showtime for Limited Series

Daily Pop

01:37 min | Last month

'Dexter' Revived at Showtime for Limited Series

"It almost like TV shows are never really over anymore showtime just announced its reviving Dexter Michael Hall will reprise his role as the serial killer who spoiler alert got away in the end and became a lumberjack. season. Finale. Dateline like every week. Seven years ago. Fan reactions finale was. Fantastic. So why is this necessary pink? Sometimes people want a Redo. Not The women have charmed. I guess I didn't watch Dexter a whole lot but I, feel like it's great. He's coming back. Why not I love it. Enough time that went past finale to now it's when they start rushing shows to come back. Yeah. Like charmed guess I love the new one. Yes it's great. But like watching the reruns. Gucci Lucile the ASS. Should other shows that controversial controversial endings like game of thrones are how I met your mother should they do this idea? Oh No, no no. No. Thanks of thrones. All we back is inaugural of the Twenty First Century Okay Work with that. You can get to to seven back. I would be fine with that. Wow. They're to be so much time that went by the kids on that show are now in clairol commercials trying to harass. Young like like it's the next step in the in the series, not trying to Redo the end. Assume. That's what Dexter will be doing.

Dexter Dexter Michael Hall
"gucci" Discussed on Gucci Podcast

Gucci Podcast

03:40 min | 2 months ago

"gucci" Discussed on Gucci Podcast

"That's good. Yeah I had a great time but I didn't know what to expect 'cause I'd never been to one before you. but it was dazzling but very strange for me because I'm not really a high fashion gentlemen front rule. Yeah, I'm more of. A Gutter rag-tags tap it. Okay. So tell me a little bit about your. Collaboration with Gucci what was the process you worked with psychologists which would combinations? Yeah I didn't know what to expect. It was a surprise to me I mean I was contacted by Gucci a couple of months ago told the. was interested in doing a collaboration. There wasn't any specificity as know how what sort of thing how how would you? What I did would be incorporated into fashion show because you're a man of many times you you started with music. You then with the voids in nineteen, seventy six. which was I, mean it's a it's a legendary punk band with At the blank generation it's it's I an anthem I. See you know and it was very kind of anti fashion fashion exactly. Definitely Style. Associated with the kind of music making, but it was intended to be. Subversive and about. Resisting the manipulation of the people who would dominate the market. Main. About. Yourself exactly. Exactly. So yeah. A bit of fashion skeptic because I believe more kind of Dressing as you imagine yourself rather than dressing as you're being dictated to by the people who have power and. You know what I mean well. But at the same time, it's hard to. You know extricate the too because to say you're anti fashion means you have to acknowledge that there's a fashion A new going against which turns it into. A way of what you complex. So. Yeah. But I had no idea what Gucci now's Andrew, could have in mind because I wasn't told There was just asked to if I would care to meet a person in Gucci Empire and. And and discussed the. Nothing. You know I didn't get any clues to, and then all of a sudden six weeks later, I got a phone call saying we're interested in using these images these particular images. Were created by. Me An artist friend of mine and that was out of the Blue I had no idea and but you know it's funny because when we made original images. My instant. Immediate thought was these would be great. T shirts. Okay. Youthful sort of future you've never followed up on it. Okay Wow. That's Plus I. Wasn't really where Gucci Closed Look Right now..

Gucci Andrew
Nobody wears fur any more

Monocle 24: The Globalist

04:33 min | 2 months ago

Nobody wears fur any more

"It's time to talk business. Now, with Dana Thomas, who's the paris-based? All of fashion operas the price of fast fashion and the future of closed Dan. Thanks so much for joining us. I must tell you that I have a relative who works in fashion and a little while ago. She very generously I thought started gifting me all these beautiful firs which she said she wasn't going to wear again I now understand why nobody's wearing her. Nobody's wearing for it took pita the people for Africo treatment of animals what thirty years to get this message through the heads of fashion industry players. But it seems like they're finally getting with the getting on board and they're slowing down or or banning. Nordstrom the. The American Department Store Big Department Store one of the few that. Actually is not completely shattered by the pandemic they managed to pull through Is Giving up selling furry will not be selling for I don't think for was a huge part of Nordstrom business. Nordstrom is a very middle market, suburban shopping mall kind of department store. So the for that they would sell would have been like the trim on your Parka or a little trim on a cough as opposed to a mink you wouldn't go to Nordstrom to buy a full length mink coat, but nevertheless there there disavowing vote as has macy's and Chanel a lot of brands have finally given up on it. I don't know what this is doing for the for instance, which is powerful and big industry and the for industry has made. Big Advances in over the years because of the pressure from Petah to make sure that that the whole. Farming, side of it was as humane as possible given you know in the end, you're killing animals for to wear clothing. You know more more humane certainly than the industrial agriculture side for cowhide for our handbags. But you know nevertheless, it seems like you know when they banned fog is in certain states. In the United States, this band for first serves feels like the same we're going to ban for not that anyone's really wearing it right now or that any can. Really afford it right now because they've all lost their shirts during the pandemic, but it's a good idea and maybe we should do it. So they're doing it and I think we're going to see a lot less than the streets but I mean all does and you point out that the house bill shoes I mean we're not talking about banning leather shoes. But you know. Gucci famously put out. mink trimmed Mules Apple seasons ago when I said Rubel Kelly took over the house and they were really popular. I remember seeing a woman on an airplane and I thought wow, that's really decadent. and. It feels really calm. It looks like it's probably really comfortable for an airplane to you WanNa you WanNa, wear something cushy on your feet. Right? I thought that is so decorated it feels like Louis Kettles and we won't be seeing at least being sold at Nordstrom. We won't be seeing those shoes anymore more. Then, and we don't have a lot of time but a very quick look at where we are in this case between tiffany and lvmh. Well, tiffany has decided to countersue. So I mean everyone's suing everybody else and it's it's just back and forth and back and forth tiffany says it did not experienced a managed material adverse effect during the pandemic and that basically lvmh trying to get a better deal, which is what we all believe it is and it says the lvmh's specious arguments are yet another blatant attempt to evade its contractual obligation to pay the agreed upon price for Tiffany and you know they're go to just fight this and see what happens I'm I'm interested to see how this plays out absolutely tiffany needs a sale and Wants it. Somebody's going to figure out the middle ground now? Why does tiffany need to sail? It's it's been in play for some time and it's it's kind of an a stuck place. They redid the store somewhat in New York. But it it a point where it needs to grow change or evolve at. It's kind of stuck an lvmh with its synergies and it's and it's specially it's retail network but also its whole marketing department everything would really give the brand a boost in a way that would take it to a new place tiffany's sort of motoring along but not great. Yeah. That's why it's been. The object of you know it's been. Looked at as a possible takeover lvmh just going to swoop in and buy a bowl the stock, and they still just may do that

Tiffany Nordstrom Dana Thomas Lvmh Big Department Store DAN Africo American Department Cough United States Petah Macy Louis Kettles Gucci Rubel Kelly Chanel New York
"gucci" Discussed on Gucci Podcast

Gucci Podcast

02:30 min | 2 months ago

"gucci" Discussed on Gucci Podcast

"Cheetah. UNFINISHED The surreal blueprints are now in the hands of boots. He's equally eccentric nephew marco. Solari. Labyrinth each state today welcoming travelers off the beaten path. So, Larry frequently refers to notes and drawings left by his uncle and believe his fantastical structures were based on an obscure book published in one thousand. Nine. One admired by the great psychologist of the Twentieth Century Carl. Young. A surrealist tale of love in a dreamlike landscape less Katola does indeed appear to have jumped right off its pages. Keeping History Alive through restoration research and storytelling. So Larry has devoted his life to its preservation. The Old Franciscan. Convent to has found renewed importance under his guardianship. Some fifteen years after boots he's passing. Marco. Discovered a thirteenth century fresco while restoring the monasteries old church. This work depicting Francis of Assisi in a state of levitation is believed to be one of the first visual representations of the Saint Weaving Story of art and architecture with one of magic and miracle. If it were anywhere else lescot Sola would be landmark today. But it's remote location tucked away in the hills of Umbria has hit it from the world. or at least from those who aren't curious enough to find it, let it instead being owed to the mad architects who convert their dreams to stone. In places where they do no harm. Where they lend an aura of romance and mystery to the world. If only one could capture that aura inside of a bottle and take it home selected for the very first time for an advertising campaign. Thus got Sola was chosen by Alison Romi Kelly for the new Gucci Bloom Fragrance campaign directed by award winning photographer and director. Floria just Monday the Film Stars Award Winning Actress Director Anjelica Huston singer-songwriter Florence Welch actress Jodie Tournus Smith and designer suzy cave. Thank you for listening to this episode of the Gucci Podcast. Featuring Vanessa. Writer and blogger of messy nessie. Chic find out more in the episodes notes..

Larry Sola Solari director Anjelica Huston Francis of Assisi Vanessa Alison Romi Kelly Katola Umbria Saint Weaving Story of art Jodie Tournus Smith Writer Florence Welch
Tiffany Files Lawsuit Against LVMH To Enforce Merger

Monocle 24: The Globalist

04:42 min | 2 months ago

Tiffany Files Lawsuit Against LVMH To Enforce Merger

"Let's turn to the latest developments in the ongoing legal battle between the US jewelry giant Tiffany and French luxury group lvmh. Last November lvmh agreed to acquire Tiffany, but tiffany has since accused of trying to run down the clock in order to let the deal run out of time. So then now trying to fast track the process well, Dana Thomas is the author fashioned police, the price of I fashion and the future of clothes, and to say, she joins us once again from Paris good morning. Good Morning. So bring us up to date in a story that twists and turns an awful lot. Well. This is this is the third time in my career that lvmh's done this week it's become a big big the deal the takeover deals become a big news story. They did it with Gucci they did it with our they lost both of them, and now they're doing it with tiffany and we'll see what happens the latest news is yesterday. The Delaware Court of Chancery where because they'll tiffany is registered in the state of Delaware. In the United States. Has, set a digital hearing date for four day trial starting January fifth and they're gonNA. They're if they don't settle this beforehand, they're going to go to trial and tiffany is pushing for the trial November while Lvmh, wanted it in March or April. So the courts split the split the difference in set it for January this is important because it's right before the US regulatory approval for the sixteen point two, billion dollar acquisition expires on February third. This is the largest bid for a takeover that lvmh did and it's I think the largest ever in the in the luxury industry. She doesn't want to pay that much now and understandably so. Tiffany is down. Had A first-half operating loss of forty, five, million dollars a loss of forty five in the same time. Last year, it had earnings of three, hundred, forty, five, million. So they feel like, yeah, we made this bid last November before Kovic. Everything else hit and Tiffany was thriving and now it's not worth sixteen point two, billion dollars. We'd like to reevaluate that and Tiffany's like saying too bad for you. Well, neither seemed to be giving any leeway on this because toughen says that it it doesn't see what has to cut its prices. It's ready to go to court and LVMH's saying start rushing us because you know the reason why I'm trying to Russia's you don't want us to look at the way that you handle your books during cove it. Well, it's not even just handling the books. All the stores were closed out around the world and people still ordered online. Could you would you order a ending tiffany jewelry online? Have it delivered to your mailbox? I don't think so unless you really needed to get married and that was that but I think that Tiffany Tiffany is. Really pushing for the most important thing which is that you know if they if they go to court lvmh. Chairman. Bernard Arnault could be deposed in the case and asked if he pressured the French government to help give the French group and out is the with this deal because the French government is the ones who stepped in and said, you know we're not going to you can't do this so. The firm, you know originally said that they were dropping this because of a US trade dispute, which is you know. Not terribly clear. So are no what have to swear you know in the courthouse on a Bible or or not in the courthouse because it'll be digital and say no I didn't ask the government to given how well connected he is with the government and with. President. Matt Cole. I wonder and and I'm not the only one to wonder and obviously tiffany wonders, and so it'll be interesting to see how that plays out. Dana how is this going to play out given the fact I mean you mentioned the fact that Lvmh's attempts to by the likes of Gucci didn't work out. Right well, there's a couple of different scenarios. The first one is it tiffany gets. To close the deal at the original price. I, doubt that's going to happen because Bernardo is a really shrewd businessman and he does not overpay. The second one is that the deal is done at a lower prices previously agreed they get some mediators in there they work it out before you tiffany's a publicly traded company. This could really make their their stock collapsed to a point that you know they're really. Hurting thirties at you know Arno. Tries to go hostile takeover because it is a publicly traded company and starts buying tiffany on the public market at a reduced price and eventually has so much that he says, boom I'm owner of the company too bad for you.

Tiffany Tiffany Tiffany Lvmh French Government United States Dana Thomas Bernard Arnault Gucci Delaware Court Of Chancery Delaware Paris Bernardo Kovic Chairman Matt Cole President Trump Russia
Inside the BLAST Restructure

The Center Ring esports podcast

09:56 min | 2 months ago

Inside the BLAST Restructure

"Blasts saying corona has hit our bank account a little bit. We gotTA restructure this if we want to really make it beneficial for the long haul. So what they're doing is moving forward, they will be increasing the participation fees paid two teams and reducing the prize money again. The I feel like this was kind of lost in the tweet because their initial tweet didn't really explain very well, the total sum paid by blast will remain identical. Okay. So I think that's important at the end of the day to realize that however the kicker here. Is the players aren't necessarily seeing that payout for participation. They see a lot of times in their contracts, the prize money. So you're taking away prize money to give it to direct payout to the ORG which you're like okay. Well, what's the big deal? It's all going to the same place not necessarily because pending on your contract pending on the Org again they only give you your pay right they give you what you agreed for on a payment and the prize money. So the double whammy here is that they failed to consult the counter. Strike Professional Players Association the CS. On this manner question for you why do they have to do that? That's a very good question which I'm glad you brought it up because I always every time this comes up in the world of counterstrike with. Like the CS PPA. Up We were not consulted about this we will be speaking with them behind closed doors blah blah, blah no one here heard about this at what point do they? Do you think they call an emergency meeting and say guys do people even know were around? Like do they like and I've said this before I feel like they have lost their own way whereas before it came out, it was, hey, we wanna look out what's best for the players while also working with tournament organizers and or gigs. To figure out what's best for like the system right now while then it's kind of turned into well, no, we feel like it should just be this way and we're going to create our own rankings because we don't like the way they do it You know things like that. I? Guess. You know perfect player union world. Yes. You would consult the players if you're going to change the payout. However if they didn't need you to start it, why would they consult you to change it? I'm probably GONNA take like a approach on this that if any players listening, I apologize ahead of time but like in a way what Henry g did by releasing the salary information I, say Henry Cloud Nine as the cloud nine decision right team decision to release salary? Information. Like you're not gonNA get a ton of sympathy from me at least when it comes to a little bit more money going into the owners pockets because what I see like again, this is one hundred percent my point of view I. don't even know if you agree with this what? I what I see in counterstrike right now is a game that is getting to this Odd Breaking Point doesn't mean the game's going to go away or die or nothing like that. I'm just saying it's at a point where. There's just this top end were just really top heavy in the fall off to me is is fairly massive when it comes to the landscape or the overall ecosystem of counterstrike, we're not seeing a ton of new teams invest into counterstrike. We've talked to team owners that have said it's a bad investment other than getting your name out there like if you're willing if you're willing to put in the money to be one of the top five. Great, it's good recognition by kind of beyond that. We see several team owners taking cheaper. Pats just to stay. Around in counter strike, but not necessarily the compete at the highest level because they know. To do that, it's millions of dollars in now we see a contract for the first time right now I know that includes Alex is a buyout but let's just say he's he's making around three four hundred K. annually off of this contract. Plus a buy out fee and then he's getting prize money from the six hundred events that go on throughout the year. Right? It's not like blast has. One. Event there multiple events in including one pretty much. Every weekend at this point, right weather's blast or star ladder ESL or face it. There's an event. Every single weekend at this point players are making really good money. Now I know there's a saying like, well, it's never enough right like you should be able to get whatever you're able to will. This was an opportunity for the elders in blast toward together in make making a little bit more beneficial for the ORG is. A huge problem in that. If they didn't consult with them. It's because they chose not to you know they didn't WanNa do it like we know you guys are making a ton of money. We need ours. Also a blast is still paying out the same amount, but I do feel for ownership groups right now in counterstrike because it is so outrageously expensive ended it's taken away from us a little bit in my mind because of how inflated the cost of Gone We've seen. Teams completely just wipe themselves out of counterstrike together we saw cloud nine one of the biggest stories take two year hiatus essentially from the game because they didn't want to compete at a high level. That's what it came down to. Right. They have the money the one of the most valuable orange but chose not to spend. Yeah. In put all their resources into counterstrike instead don't have two dollar and team cloud nine the just enough to stay relevant. That's it. They did the again that we've seen several teams do let's keep our name in the game refloating around right. If his top thirty we'RE STILL ON HDTV, we're still going to be in a handful of events 'cause re cloud nine a but at the end of the day, they didn't see it worthwhile to invest in the counter strike again, they're coming back now but that's after they have two dollar and teams in they're probably saying good success in other areas. Yeah. Ah Let. Me Tell you where I have a problem with because ultimately I think I leaned closer to you. My problem is not that they didn't consult with the Players Association. 'cause consulting means a conversation. Right? My problem is if there was no heads up given because it's not like this is in the off season of blast there in the middle of the event, right? They are still in the tournament mode four like the main blast that will eventually lead to like their big major, right For blast. That's where I have the issue because if you're if you're changing the prize pool mid tournament and not giving them a heads up I. Understand the reason. Obviously. We don't know all the numbers, but all we constantly hear about. How you know the tournament organizers make barely any money and the owners encounter strike especially, pretty much lose money. Right. Having a counter strike team. And yet. Always see from these players are Gucci watches you know Yeezy. Right like they're doing pretty okay. Not Every player I understand that. But for the most part, they're doing pretty okay with their salaries. Heard. From counterstrike pros saying that they won't go to events unless they're staying five star hotels for the most part like the best of the best tower tournament organizers where the. Name anything here but there's a place will say locally where I'm not even kidding you next door, there is a walkway, a covered walkway that leads from the hotel to the place where they were having the event and the players didn't want to stay at the hotel because it wasn't nice enough and this hotel is a Sheridan. It wasn't like a king to know knock on. Lucina. It's a shared. Sakes. Like. Four Star Hotel Four Seasons or anything but. Still pretty good and they wouldn't do it. So then the tournament organizers had to switch the hotel, right? The players went there and said, nope, this isn't up to our standards then switched the hotels and everything here like don't get it twisted. And it's actress counterstrike I'd say most East sports athletes. For being guys that like have very minimum requirements to get by in life like I've seen your room behind your Webcam right we know how some of these guys live they have very high standards when it comes to like pampering them. So No, I think for blast to take a conscious stand and be like we can't survive doing this. Let me ask the players this would you rather have more prize money? Or. Would you rather have? Would you rather have more prize money and blast fold after this because they can't afford To recoup or would you rather have? A reputable event. In blast payout a little less give your or more money to hopefully that will come back to you in some way and then being able to continue because right now that's the only option you have chances are that money is not going back to them in some way though right like. Chances are the orange will pocket money or use it for their expenses that even if? Up The fridge some you out. You know we upgrade the stream room for you guys our facilitation. Pull a microphone get you that private jet.

ORG Professional Players Associati Players Association Henry Cloud Nine Corona Henry G Alex
Ex-New York Jets WR Josh Bellamy charged in $24 million coronavirus relief loan scheme

The Adam Carolla Show

00:50 sec | 2 months ago

Ex-New York Jets WR Josh Bellamy charged in $24 million coronavirus relief loan scheme

"Former New York jets wide receiver Josh. Bellamy was charged for his alleged role in a twenty four million dollar fraudulent pandemic loan scheme. Oh, the US Justice Department arrested him in in Florida. He's charged with getting loans. Twenty four million dollars with the loans him in ten compadres. The wide receiver, former wide receiver spent it on Gucci. Dior. Jewelry Trips on casino trip I don't know this guy white possession type receiver wes welker Cologne. He's an African American receiver oh former receiver cut comrades. Lame they didn't They didn't know anything about the legal troubles. They just happen to cut them the day before the US Justice Department arrest

Us Justice Department Bellamy Wes Welker New York Dior Josh Cologne Florida
La Casa Matusita

Haunted Places

03:49 min | 2 months ago

La Casa Matusita

"In many ways Lokossa to see sita is more legend than a place whispers surrounded in its neighborhood, Lima Peru and none of the stories about it entirely match they weave in and out of each other never forming a complete picture. Various businesses operated on the first floor of the two story building near the intersection Espana and Gossip Lhasa, de la Vega at us. But the top floor apartment rarely manages to keep an occupant. The each window that lines the wall is surrounded by cheery golden paint and Teal Trim. The Place Somehow always feels dark and closed in. Visitors find themselves assaulted by violent, but unseen forces, tortured cries and flying objects. A priest to attempted to exercise the building was heard screaming before he was found dead due to an apparent heart attack. The name itself derives from one of the legends surrounding. Qasim to see to. The Legend tells of Japanese immigrant by the name of much. Sita who killed his wife and her lover after discovering them in Flagrante. When he realized his children would never forgive him. He killed them as well before taking his own life. There are no historical records confirming this quadruple homicide ever occurred but allegedly, there are property records that Saint Immigrant family did occupy the building. At some point it is likely the name stuck due to rampant xenophobic sentiment in Peru during the first half of the twentieth century. Japanese immigrants began coming to Peru at the end of the eighteen hundreds and their numbers grew in decades that followed. By the nineteen forties however anti-japanese rioting and protests broke out in Lima result of long-standing xenophobia and the pressures of World War, two. The idea of an East Asian, immigrant holding a property like Mukasa, Macho Sita would stick in the minds of xenophobic Peruvians. But the legends of dark happenings at Mukasa Mata. Sita date back centuries before Mr Montecito set foot in south. America. The origin story of this haunting is actually about a very different kind of immigrations. Dare. VASA. Knew they were coming for her? She thought that her neighbors might be more just standing here than they've been in Europe but she learned however that hatred looks the same no matter where she went. When she was little dare Vassilios father told her that her blood, the blood of Persians south of it dynasty was the most rare in the. And while dare boat had been blessed with keen wit and a sharp tongue, she was a long way from Persia and the Peruvian locals had no qualms about reminding her. Not only did they find her form of prayer abhorrent? They resented the fact that she lived alone. She didn't need anyone to provide for her when found themselves in trouble she was the one to help them out with herbs and healing hands. She expected their protection and return, but even they bowed to the KISTA doors. She tried not to blame them. Many of her neighbors could still be calm when the INCA had ruled this land and not the Spanish. Some said, they had seen the fires that burned the Great General Chow Gucci Mock. They had heard that threats of Pizarro to burn their now murdered emperor at two Wolpe to. The Spanish said they were the fires of God and like Derek boats talents, her neighbors called it magic. Their fastball correct them magic was a tool for evil not a way to Allah or to their God's.

Macho Sita Mr Montecito Lima Peru Peru Saint Immigrant De La Vega Mukasa Mata Qasim Lokossa Lima Persia Pizarro Derek America Mukasa Flagrante Vassilios Europe
Cathy Horyn on Why Fashion Media Must Evolve

The Business of Fashion Podcast

05:40 min | 3 months ago

Cathy Horyn on Why Fashion Media Must Evolve

"Ala Kathy. I'm good you. You're in Virginia. Farm. Yeah. You're Minova Farm in Virginia and made avail in. London. and. Roundabout now could be looking forward to seeing each other at fashion shows as we have done for the last. How many years? We. Want to exit. Thirty five. Something, like Nineteen eighty-seven age is not. About you were at the Detroit repress. Short News. used. And I was limited. From magazine in Canada in Toronto Canada. And we could never have anticipated what's happened to the world because? We read about things like this in history and And you know industry is being so savagely impacted. By everything that's happened and it's it's great that we're talking today because I subscribe to new magazine. you write for the. Your magazine and you've just done this enormous piece interviewing designers about the here and now their lives and. The future of the industry, and that's exactly what was supposed to be talking about today. So that's put certain. I can say to you. Tell us what you've been doing with. China's for the last. Well it started out. You Know Stella Buckby at runs the cut we were talking in now late April I think about like what do we WANNA do? For All this book Ended up being part of the. The main magazine in the preview section of what's happening in the fall. But anyway, we started talking about that and I said, you know I really just I want to talk to the the leading designers you know the the big creative minds and. Where we sort of going I, mean, it just feels different even now and I think about how we all felt what on March second and March third when we were still in Paris in winding up with. No the Balenciaga show in the retail show the last days and felt so innocent but then it felt quite different by the end of April. With Europe. All shutdown down the US at least New York Shutdown So, anyway, everybody you know it's it's Raff Simmons Marc Jacobs. Nikola just gear Mutya Rico Kuba. There's there's twelve or thirteen, and all and Everybody was home. So I had lots of time to talk to them, and they had lots of time and we talked in some cases, three times over the summer or rejects dinner we had emails that kind of thing. So it was fun. Now was there a consensus? Among people what the future holds I think you have a different view specifically of how people want will probably want address. Some bring that up pretty clearly like mmj at. I think a lot of people are really concerned You know the the. What's going on with the fashion system people have been talking about that at Nauseam for a while. So that came up a lot RAFF had a lot to say about that I think they certainly spent the month of March and April thinking a lot about this Marc Jacobs a lot and he put some of that up on Instagram to. You know coming off at incredible show that he did in February in New York and just thinking and you know he he had to lay off people on his designed team and others had take salary cuts. That the problem across the industry. And so they were talking a lot about that, and then of course, Allesandro from Goodie. Brought his his instagram out a one was mid may saying we're GONNA go to two meetings to to runway shows a year. So I think a lot of the stuff has been brewing. Yeah, and the bottom line is I, mean to me. I think it comes through in the pieces. It's all an individual choice. You know like you know Michael Kors has made his decision. What he's GonNa do I think Gucci's made their decision to Michael Burke for this piece is the CEO of Vitale and you know. They're gonNA. You know he thinks that the traveling runway shows the future. So all that concerned about you know how big the shows I think I think in the long run we'll see a I mean in the short run will see. Pause, as as we as we deal with the pandemic and we don't know what quite the end game is on that. So I think we've seen a lot of experimentation in the last six weeks two months with digital perform digital shows and presentations and. I think going forward. You know you know it's a huge industry i. think that's the thing is bleak as it seems is a huge industry.

Marc Jacobs Instagram Michael Kors Virginia Raff Simmons Minova Farm New York Canada Stella Buckby London. Vitale Europe China Mutya Rico Kuba Detroit Gucci Toronto United States Nikola Paris
"gucci" Discussed on Gucci Podcast

Gucci Podcast

03:38 min | 4 months ago

"gucci" Discussed on Gucci Podcast

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Ambassador <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> Matvey. <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> Rapper <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> Lil NAS EX <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> singer <SpeakerChange> King? Princess. <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> And <Speech_Female> Echo explorer. David <Speech_Female> Rothschild. <Speech_Music_Female> Find <Speech_Female> out more about the stars <Speech_Female> of the campaign <Speech_Female> and Gucci's commitment to a better more sustainable future in the episode notes.

Gucci Jane Fonda UNHCR Intern David Rothschild.
"gucci" Discussed on Gucci Podcast

Gucci Podcast

04:05 min | 4 months ago

"gucci" Discussed on Gucci Podcast

"I believe. Rapper Lil mass x is the third staff of the grid. He shares how his experience in the campaign changed the way he thinks about fashion and the environment as well as the message he wants to spread about protecting nature. I've seen some ECO friendly fashion in the past but to see a brand is big and well-respected as Gucci taking a stand and create these amazing pieces while still being environmentally responsible is really inspiring. I leave the bags are mad. Nice. I think this pandemic has really made everyone realized that we have to take better care of each other and protect each other by doing the right thing and staying at home. Good things happen when we all work together towards the same goal. I truly believe that. We can do the same thing to protect the environment and I wanna do everything that I can tell to say.

Gucci
Black Lives Matter supports looting in Chicago

WGN Nightside

01:38 min | 4 months ago

Black Lives Matter supports looting in Chicago

"To the loop will be limited tonight until 6 a.m. tomorrow morning as city officials try to stop a repeat of last night's chaos, But some activists say they support what happened. W jeans Dana Ravic joins us to explain Dana Well tonight We're hearing reaction to the events downtown last evening from city and civil rights leaders who are speaking out against it while members of black lives matter. Are condoning the looting Anything they want to take. Take it because these businesses have insurance. They're going to get their money back. My people aren't getting anything. Except police. Except here. Gas in front of the first police district. Members of black lives matter justifying the actions of looters last night. Glass could be heard breaking throughout downtown at one point multiple rounds fired at police near the Gucci store on Michigan Avenue as hundreds ran into stores and left with armfuls of clothes and other goods. To those who engage in his criminal behavior. Let's be clear. We are coming for you, Mayor Lori Lightfoot and police Superintendent David Brown, addressing the chaos after the smash and grabs in much of the mag, Mile and portions of River North and Goose Island. This was not an organized protest. Rather, this was an incident of pure criminally Reverend Jesse Jackson tweeting. Today this act of pillaging robbing looting in Chicago was humiliating, embarrassing and morally wrong. It must not be associated with our quest for Social justice and equality.

Dana Ravic Jesse Jackson Mayor Lori Lightfoot Gucci Store Superintendent David Brown Chicago Goose Island River North
Michael Kors on Why He Left Fashion Week

The Business of Fashion Podcast

03:59 min | 4 months ago

Michael Kors on Why He Left Fashion Week

"Hi this is Imran Ahmed founder and CEO of the business fashion and welcome to the podcast. This week our editor at large sits down with the American designer Michael Kors discusses his plans for Fashion Week September in fact Michael Kors won't be doing a normal show at all like some of his counterparts in Europe including salary in Gucci Michael is questioning. The efficacy of the current fashion show drill calendar, and so he's decided to present in a completely new format launching globally on October fifteenth on the brands social and digital platforms. He talks to Tim blanks about all of this including the confusion around the nomenclature various seasons and how he wants to clean up to. Here's Tim blanks with Michael Kors inside fashioned. Hello everyone and welcome to the live today with told me to micro-costs from New York. Hello Michael Hello. Bear Ray to cedar great to see you and we are doing this instead of actually seeing each other in September. Yes. That's that's that's the God's honest truth. Unfortunately, what are you planning to do in September when we would have been seeing each other? Well I have to tell you long before. The pandemic. I really kept thinking to myself. I'm screeching in next year to my fortieth anniversary. So it. It has been time me to sort of reassess think about things and I and I just after forty years Tim I've seen that I really think the system has certainly been broken. We can't always just do things the way we've done them in the past. I fake. You, know everyone I think realizes that the whole systems mixed up doesn't make sense. So I certainly have my wheels turning about that prior to the band. And then of course, being in lockdown, you really start to analyze and I go back as someone who has been doing this for so long and once in a while back to the future is a good thing. And you know for many decades the New York collections were after the Paris collections ended. In fact, they were a week after Paris ended. And I think we never whenever inundated the consumer with too much information just as in September. Here, in the states, we have Labor Day, and it's you know the world opens up again hopefully, right? At why are we confusing the consumer? And the press with a new season when they haven't even absorbed the one that has just arrived in the shots. Adjusted it makes sense to me. And you know more than ever of course where people are they're not planning months and months ahead. You know we really are living in a time where fashion is very much always has been though it's about the emotion that you're in. So. Are you starting to land your wardrobe in May I? Don't think so I don't know who you are. You don't have a life. So I thought to myself. Well, we used to do this after Paris it allowed or journalists and retailers. And consumer to have a breath. And then. In October, it really became the perfect moment. To show a new collection without cutting off the previous collection that had just arrived shots.

Michael Kors Tim Blanks Gucci Michael Founder And Ceo Paris Michael Hello New York Imran Ahmed Europe Bear Ray Editor
2020 Emmy Noms & Reactions

Daily Pop

02:43 min | 4 months ago

2020 Emmy Noms & Reactions

"Daily pop. It's a very big moment in Hollywood this morning. The emmy nominations were chest revealed moments ago, and we will be celebrating with some of the nominees. Though surprise, guests are coming up, so you will not want to miss it. You guys, but we got to start off with the ladies up for lead actress in Drama Series Right? The category is Stack Jen Aniston. Sandra Oh's and those are just some of the big names who is going to take the win. What do you guys think? I just think Zendaya is GonNa take you was this show that everybody was talking about? It was unbelievable and not everybody got to watch the morning show with Jennifer Aniston because. Apple TV was not readily available so I think Zendaya is going to take this I was not paying the fourteen ninety nine. GD! There was so many submissions one hundred thirty five submissions. This year for this category lost those. So things I think women I'm kind of with you. Just although ozark for me has been one of my favorite shows forever and ever and. Laura Linney could take it out that. Could get in I. could not get into. It was like I. Really Try just I couldn't do it, but that's just me. All right we gotta talk about snubs and surprises, though big little lies when pretty much everything? Last time it was nominated. But this year came up short. No Best Actress nomination, no best limited series. I'M GONNA. Ask what you guys think about. These into getting snubbed a little bit. Should've been made, I thought. Was Okay, but they should've kept it at season one. They should have just wrote it out, but you know what Merrill got nominated. Laura Linney got nominated. She is Gucci ever. Reese Witherspoon as a producer of this show. This is a win for her, so she is as though she got snubbed. She is nominated because two of our actresses were. Absolutely. Strong enough season two. Why did you like season two as much Morgan I know you were saying earlier before the show? Why you're putting me on glass. Scott, I mean maybe I didn't want to hear that I just felt like. The first season was just too hard to top to be honest. It was so good everything was everything about it was so hook line and sinker. Everyone was invested as I just feel like. They wanted to ride out that high season two was okay, but you never want to have your second season just. Just be okay I just felt like even though Merrill we all bow down to Merrill. She can handle any role. I just felt like she wasn't going to save it. And although she got nominated, she gets nominated. It's just that's just what you do. She acts that well. She deserves it all the time. I just what Jessica said I. Don't think it should have been made I think we should have just. Episodes in the second series. I love the song. The second series is still a Mike Finish shoot and I'm never finished it, so I thought.

Merrill Laura Linney Zendaya Jen Aniston Reese Witherspoon Emmy Sandra Oh Hollywood Ozark Apple Morgan Jessica Scott Producer
Sandworm: A New Era of Cyberwar and the Hunt for the Kremlin's Most Dangerous Hackers

The Vergecast

46:42 min | 4 months ago

Sandworm: A New Era of Cyberwar and the Hunt for the Kremlin's Most Dangerous Hackers

"Everybody from the British. Ask this week's interview. Episode has any Greenberg senior writer at wired. He just SORTA book called Sand Worm New Era of cyber war in the hunt for the Kremlin's Miss, dangerous hackers, it is all about hacking group inside of the Russian government called San Worm. They were responsible for the most damaging cyber warfare attacks over the past year there behind not PECI. The hackers took out in the mayor shipping line hospitals across the U. K San has totally escalated. What we think of Cyber War, and he's book gets all into how they were discovered how they were flushed out the. The intricacies of these various hacks. It's super interesting. The book is a thrill ride. If you're looking for something that isn't the virus. This is like a thriller, a highly recommended. It was really fun to talk to her about the stuff. one thing I. WanNa know we're all at home so during this in every might hear some kids in the background. I asked you just be a little forgiving that we're all. We're all dealing with it and he was a great interview. Check Out Sandy Greenberg of sand worm, a new era of cyber war and the hunt for the Kremlin's most dangerous hack. Any Greenberg your senior writer at wired you're also the author of Sand Worm, new era of cyber war in the hunt for the Kremlin's most dangerous. Welcome glad to be here so even writing about cybersecurity frontier I think you just said two thousand six and writing about Cybersecurity, but this book sand worm as I was reading it. It seems like it's called the new era of cyber war. It seems like there's been a huge turn in sort of state-sponsored. Particularly Russians sponsored cyber attacks. How did you come onto that notion? How did you begin reading this book I'm I'm very curious how you see. See that turn happening well. In late twenty sixteen, my former colleague Kim Zetter she had been the one who really covered state sponsored hacking in cyber war stuff, but she left wired, and this was also at the time. When you know Russian hackers were meddling in the US election, they'd hacked the democratic. National Committee and the Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee and the Clinton Campaign, so my editors were really primes on face, mantra hacking all of a sudden, but what they? They really what they told me they wanted was a actually like a big takeover of the whole magazine. All about cyber war, but cyber war to me is different than those kinds of espionage election, meddling tactics so I went looking for no real cyber war story, which means to me like a actual disruptive cyber attacks, and as I looked around. It seemed like the place where that was really happening was in Ukraine not really in the US in fact maybe. Maybe what was happening in? Ukraine seemed to me like it was in some ways, the only real full blown cyber war that was actually occurring where Russian hackers were not just attacking the election which they had done, they tried this spoof the results of a presidential election, but they had also attacks media and destroyed their computers. They had attacked government agencies and tried to like destroy entire networks, and then they had turned off the power for the first time. In December of two thousand, fifteen, the the first actual blackout triggered by hackers, and just as I was look into this happened again the the effect, the seem hacker group caused a blackout this time in the capital of Kiev so I wince looking in Ukraine for this cyber war story that. Turned into a cover story for wired that kind of gave editors what they wanted, but then also kept unfolding This cyber war kept growing in scope and scale and. The original story written for wired was kind of about the fact that you could look to Ukraine to see the future of cyber war that will what was happening. There might soon spread to the rest of the world. And that is actually what happens to like just after we publish that cover story to same hackers released this climactic terrible cyber attack in Ukraine. Called Not Petiot that spread beyond Ukrainians became the worst cyberattack history cost ten billion dollars, so when that happened, that was when I saw that there was potential to do a book about this that it was not just a kind of case study about Ukraine or even kind of predictive story, but a an actual full story arc about this one group that had carried out the what I would say was not only the first. First Real Cyber War, but the worst cyberattack in history and the you know I wanted to capture the the Ark of that story in the effects, the real experience of cyber war. Yeah, so the group is called sand worm in this is just one of the the sort of opening arcs of the book is how they've come. They come to be named this because references and code walk people through just like it's so. relatable that like even these hackers are using using this language that leads them recalled Sandwich Tell people about it. So when I started to look into the origins of this group after that second blackout attack I I found that this this company called eyesight partners which have been acquired by fire I I, said partners was the first to find these hackers in twenty, fourteen, basically using fishing in kind of typical espionage tactics, plant malware in the networks of typical Russian hacking targets like groups across Eastern, Europe and NATO in a look like what they were doing was just kind of typical espionage. They were planning. This by wear calls lack energy buds will first of all they could see that they were rushing, because they had this server that they were using to administer some of these attacks and they. They left the server, so anybody could look at it in. There was a kind of Russian language to file for how to use black energy on the service, so these guys seem like they were rushing, but even more interesting in some ways. was that they to track each victim each instance of black energy? This malware has little campaign code in each campaign was a reference to the science fiction novel Dune and you know so like one of them was something about Iraq is, and then one of them is about the sutter cars, these like imperial soldiers in in that SCI FI universe so I said partners named this group sand worm, because well just because it's a cool. Name associated with doing, but it turned out to me. It became this very powerful because a sandwich miss this monster that lies beneath the surface, and occasionally arises from underground to do terribly destructive things. partners didn't know that at the time, they they soon afterward realized what sand. was doing was not just espionage, but they were actually doing reconnaissance for disruptive cyberattacks. They were also hacking power grids. They were planning black energy, not only in the European Eastern European targets in the US power grid networks as well. The Ultimately Syndrome was the first twenty fifteen to cross that line in use black energy as the first step in a multi step attack that led to a blackout. So this was not just espionage really was kind of like you know this monster that rises from under the ground to do terrible acts of mass destruction that came to pass so one of the things that comes up over in the book. Is this growing sense of dread from security researchers and analysts? Oh this is an imminent threat to the united. States just Ukraine, but like this is happening here and then there's a sense that the United States actually open the door to this kind of warfare with stuxnet. which was an attack on Iran? How how did those connect for you that it seemed like there's a new rule of engagement new set of rules of engagement for cyber warfare that actually the United States implicitly created with with stuxnet by attacking Iran. Yeah, I mean I tried to highlight. Clearly sand worm are the real bad guys in the story, they are the actual hacker group that did these terribly reckless destructive attacks that actually in some cases put people's lives at risk, the kind of in some parts of the story they actually shutdown medical record systems and I. Think may have cost people's lives with cyber attacks today they are the actual antagonist here, but I also want to highlight the ways that the US government is is partially responsible for the state of Cyber War, and there are a few ways that that's true. I The US! Open the Pandora's box of cyber war with stuxnet. This piece of now where that. That was used to destroy Iranian nuclear enrichment centrifuges that was the first piece of our that actually have caused that physical disruption destruction, and we now see Sandra doing the same thing in Ukraine. In in fact, in some ways around the world, also the the US hordes, these kind of zero day, secret hacking techniques, some of which were stolen and leaked and used by sand worm, but then I think the in fact, the biggest way that I tried to highlight that the US is responsible or complicit or negligent. Here is that we did not call allows what Santorum was doing in Ukraine and say to Russia. We know what you're doing. This is unacceptable. Nobody should be turning out the lights. Two civilians with cyber attacks. There wasn't a message like that I. mean the Obama White House sent a message to Russia over this kind of cyber hotline to say your election hacking is not okay. We see what you're doing and we want you to stop, but they said nothing about a tube blackout attacks in Ukraine, and that was kind of implicit signal to Russia. They could keep. Keep escalating, and even as all the cyber security, researchers and Ukrainians were warning that what was happening to Ukraine, would soon spread to the rest of the world, the US government ignore this both Obama, and then the trump administration until that prediction came to pass and a sand worm cyberattack did spread to the rest of the world, and it was too late, and we all suffered globally as a result, so let's talk about patch it. WAS CATASTROPHIC IN SCOPE, right? It took out the mayor shipping line, which is a massive business. It took out some hospitals in UK like it was huge in scope. I don't think people really put it all together. Talk about how it started and how big it grew. Yeah, so not too was kind of like big apotheosis sandwich, where all of these predictions of the terribly destructive things they were doing to the rest of the world came to pass but it did it started in Ukraine. They hijacked this. The the software updates of this accounting software called me doc that is basically used by everybody in Ukraine. The quicken turbo tax of Ukraine. If you do business in Ukraine, you have to have this installed, so sanborn hijack the updates of that news to push out this worm to thousands of victims mostly in Ukraine, but it was a worm, so it's spread the mmediately end quickly kind of carpet bombs. The entire Ukrainian Internet's every computer at spread to would encrypt permanently. You could not recover the computer, so it very quickly took down pretty much every. Every Ukrainian government agency twenty two banks multiple airports for hospitals in Ukraine that I. could count and in each of these cases. What is eight took them down. I mean it destroyed essentially all of their computers, which requires sometimes weeks or months to recover from, but then as you know, this is a worm that does not respect national borders. So even though it was, it seemed to be an attack intended to disrupt Ukraine. It immediately spread beyond Ukraine's borders. Borders to everybody who had this accounting software installed? That was doing business in Ukraine and some people who didn't so that includes Maersk. The world's largest shipping firm and Fedex and Mondelez, which owns cadbury, NABISCO and ranking manufacturing firm that makes tylenol in Merck. The Pharmaceutical Company in New Jersey on each of these companies lost hundreds of millions of dollars. The scale of this is kind of difficult to capture but I in the book I tried to. To I focused in part Maersk because it is just a good company to look at because you can. They had this gigantic global physical machine that is they have seventy six ports around the world that they own as well as these massive ships that have tens of thousands of shipping containers on them. And I told the story of how on this day seventeen of their terminals of were entirely paralyzed by this attack with ships arriving with just. Piles of containers on them. Nobody could unload. Nobody knew what was inside of nobody knew how to load or unload them with around the world of seventeen terminals, thousands of trucks, Semitrailers, carrying containers were lining up in Lyons miles long because the gates that were kind of checkpoints to check in the these trucks to drop something off or pick it up. They were paralyzed as well. This was a fiasco on a global scale is responsible for a fifth of the world's lable shipping capacity. They were truly just a rendered brain dead by this attack, but yeah displayed out at all of these different victims MERC had to borrow their own each vaccine from the Center for Disease Control because they're manufacturing. Manufacturing was disrupted by this, and it ultimately spread to a company called nuance, nate speech to text software. They have a service that does this for hospitals across the US to dozens of our possibly hundreds of American hospitals at this backlog of transcriptions to medical records that were lost because of this, and that resulted in patients, being do for surgeries or transfers, other hospitals in nobody knew their medical records were updated. I mean this was scale where hundreds of hospitals each of which has thousands of patients missing changes the medical records. We don't know what the effects of that work, but very well could've actually harmed people's health. Our lives I mean the scale of not petty is very difficult to. Get your mind around, but we do know that you know monetarily cost ten billion dollars, which is by far the biggest number we've ever seen, but it also had this this kind of harder to quantify toll on people's lives, so it it you know you read about it at length and wired. Obviously these companies go down of ripples in mainstream sort of general press, but I don't feel like people really not like Oh. This Russian group called San Worms sponsored by the Russian government. Unleash this attack in it caused this cascading effect of failure and disaster cost in that because we know what we can attribute it to the government, our government. I don't feel like that connection got made for people. What is the gap between other as a hack and Oh, this is actually a type of warfare engagement, because that that connection seems very tenuous. I think for a lot of people. Even as sort of the more general mainstream press covers this stuff. Yeah, you know. I don't think that that's is just like the nature of. Of Cyber War I think that was a failing that that lack of connection is a failing on our government's parts, and on you could say even on the part of some of these victims like these large companies I mean I at the time did not pitch it happened. I was fully on the trail of standard within days. I was talking to cyber security researchers who? Who had piece together? Some of the forensics to show the not petiot was Sandra that it was a Russian state-sponsored attack in yet none of those companies that I mentioned mercker Mondelez or Maersk or Fedex, or any of them wanted to say the Russia had done this to them and know governments were talking about either like the Ukrainian government was. They're always willing to point. Point the finger at Russia, but the US government was not, and you know that to me seemed to be just kind of I mean I felt like I was being gas. Let's at that point. I had watched Russia due to Ukraine for a long time at that point tonight. I sort of understood that NATO in the West. We had this kind of cruel logic that. Ukraine is not us. Russia can do what it likes to Ukraine because they're not NATO not e you. They are Russia's sphere of influence or something I think that that's very wrongheaded, but at least it made sense. You know to have that that viewpoints, but now this attack had spread from Ukraine to hit American soil American companies in many cases and yet still the US government was saying nothing I just thought this was bizarre and you know so i. For months I was like. Trying to get any of these companies to tell the story of of their experiences, not Peta I was trying to figure out why the US government wasn't talking about the fact that this was a Russian cyberattack and ultimately I. Think it was I. think it was kind of I know partly disorganization negligence. I think it may have something to do with the fact that the. The? Trump administration doesn't like talking about Russian hackers for obvious reasons, but eight months after it took eight months ultimately for the US government to finally say not that it was a was Russia it was the worst cyberattack in history, and then a month later. The White House impose consequences in put new sanctions on Russia and response, but it took nine months and more importantly it took. Multiple years this without was the first time this was twenty eighteen, and the Russian cyber war in Ukraine had started around the fall of Twenty fifteen, so that's just incredible span of negligence when the US government said nothing about these escalating unfolding. Acts, of Cyber Award that there should have been unacceptable from the very beginning I mean these are the kind of quintessential acts of state sponsored cyber attacks on civilians, trying out the lights. You know that's the kind of thing that I believe that the US government should have called out and drawn a red line across at the very beginning took ears, so I do think it was a big failing. Of of diplomacy, it just seemed like that part of the problem, and this is kind of an expression is it's so hard to describe like if the Russian government sent fighter jets to America and live their support. Okay, like everyone understood, you can see it. You can understand what happened there. In the you know, there's like a however many decades of movies about how to fight that war. This is a bunch of people in a room typing. Like it there's just an element of this where the dangerous Oh federal where the attack is invisible, and while the effects might be very very tangible, the causes are still sort of mysterious people so. My question is who is sandwich. What what do we know about them? Where do they work? What are they like? Do we have a sense of how this operation actually operates? In some ways the the biggest challenge of reporting this book, and I spent essentially the third act of the book, the last third of the reporting of the book, trying to answer the question of who is in worm, who are these people? Where are they located? What motivates them and I guess to partially spoil the ending here. They are a unit of the year you. They are a part of Russia's military intelligence agency, which is responsible for you know, this is not a coincidence. They are responsible for election meddling responsible for the attempted assassination of You. chemical weapons in the United Kingdom they're responsible for the downing of a seventeen as commercial passenger jet over Ukraine were three hundred innocent people died on the G. R.. You are this incredibly reckless callous out military intelligence agency, but they act like kind of almost just cut through mercenaries around the world. Doing Russia's bidding in ways that are very scary, so I threw essentially like a combination of excellent work of a bunch of security researchers who I was speaking to combined with some confirmation from US intelligence agencies, and then ultimately some other clues from the investigation of Robert Muller into meddling all these things combined created the trail that led to one group within the JERE. You that were you know I? Eventually had some names and faces even address of this this group, and all that was actually only finally fully confirms After the book came out Justin in recent months when the White House finally actually was the State Department's. End as well as the UK on Australian and other governments together finally said yes, sand worm is in fact that this unit of the year you so this theory that I developed in positive near the end of the book was finally basically confirmed by governments just in recent months. So one thing that strikes me at that is I, think of the Russian military things. Gru is being foreboding being obviously, they're very very good at this other a buttoned up in then they have like a incredible social media presence that kind of POPs up throughout the book that distracts from what doing. They set up Gucci for two point Oh when they were doing the DNC hacks that fed to wikileaks in the. That account insisted it was just guy. They set up the shadow brokers which was. I read. It is just like your some goof-balls like they wanted to seem a lot dumber and a lot smaller than they were. They were very effective at it to people I. Talk About those that strategy, and then I guess my question have is like a re better at seeing that strategy for what it is well. You make a really interesting point. The uses these false flags like throughout their recent history that we I should say we don't know that they were responsible for shadow brokers. In fact, nobody knows who shot a brokers. The shadow brokers truly are, and they are in some ways the biggest mystery in this whole story, this one group that hacked the NSA apparently and leaked a bunch of their zero day hacking techniques, or maybe they were even say insiders. We still don't know the answer to that question, but the other other incidents you mentioned. That are you are responsible for this Guja for two point zero fake hacktivists leaked a bunch of the Clinton documents. They're responsible for other false flags like they at one point to call themselves the Cyber Caliphate pretended to be Isis. They've a pretended to be like patriotic pro. Russian Ukrainians at some point they they're always like wearing different masks ends. They're very deceptive. in the a later chapter of the book, some of the biggest one of the biggest attacks they. They did was this attack on the twenty thousand Olympics where they not only wore a false mask, but they actually had layers of false flags where as cyber security researchers W. This melwert was used to destroy the entire back end of the two thousand eighteen winter Olympics. Just as the opening ceremony began, this was a catastrophic events. The aware had all of these fake clues made look like it was Chinese or North Korean or maybe Russian. Nobody could tell it was like. It was this kind of confusion bomb almost designed to to just make researchers throw up their hands. Give up on attributing mallards. Any particular actor was only through some amazing detective work by some of the analysts that I spoke to the able to cut through those false flags identify that sand was behind this essentially, but yeah, it's it is a one very real characteristic of the jury you that they are almost they seem to almost take pleasure or like be showing off their deception capabilities to and their evolving those capabilities they are getting more deceptive over time as fake gets more, destructive aggressive. Advertising content when I say Utopia what comes to mind? Birds Chirping lush natural beauty dialed up and vibrant technicolor. Is it within reach. Your world. World. explained. You are an essential part of the Pathak social body. Everybody in that place. Everybody happy now. While the peacock original series brave new world takes place in a scientific futuristic utopia. The concept is nothing new Sir Thomas more. I introduced the theory five hundred years ago, but we keep looking for that community identity stability of aldous. Huxley's Utopia and not finding it. Americans are the unhappiest they've been in decades and we're increasingly lonely. whereas in a utopia, everyone belongs to everyone else. In nineteen, forty-three, the psychologist Abraham Maslov developed a theory of Yoga. One that allows total self determination in basic terms. maslow's theory says that in a utopia we decide for ourselves what we need and how we're going to get it in Huxley's Utopia. Citizens always get what they want and don't want what they can't get. Sounds pretty good right then. Why can't we make it happen? For a Utopian Society, to work, we might need to disband some of the things we hold dearest marriage government privacy individualism, even family. See for yourself if a utopian world is as perfect as it seems watch, brave new world now streaming only on peacock. This is advertising content. Hey. This is bowes I'm a podcast or By, I, a Gamer Five G. is changing the gaming world in really unexpected exciting ways with the help of Samsung Five G. I'm getting a peek at how gaming is getting faster smoother and can even improve our lives well. Let's dish some secrets about the future gaming. Dr Jean Mechanical Direct Route Game Research and development at the Institute of the future. She's also a bestselling author game inventor. She's optimistic about gaming impact on us and our minds. The biggest thing that we've seen in research is that. We need to be able to game in the moment wherever we are. So, what happens when when you're playing when your favorite games is that it fires up than her logical pathways, it's kind of like having a of caffeine and a pet dog from your favorite coach, and you've just meditated for an hour. This emotional neurological power up is called the game transfer effect, and that effect is heightened when using five. Five G. The game transfer fact requires you to be totally immersed in the game, so you want to have the most amazing graphics and the most immersive audio and with five G. to do that anywhere anytime, be one of the first to harness the game transfer effect with Samsung Galaxy Five G. now available on Galaxy, S Twenty-five g and a seventy one five G. feels good to be I with Samsung. I love to play the game of like. Imagine the meeting and imagine that the one set of meeting which is like the actual hackers finding the vulnerabilities figuring out how to jump from Windows, eight computer to some sort of physical hardware controller that actually runs like that. That's a very hard problem in and of itself, and then the other meeting. They're like what we're GONNA do is claim to be a guy called Gucci for two point, Oh and like those are. Not Connected Right, but the way they throughout the book the way they execute East campaigns they're deeply connected, and that seems like not only just a new kind of warfare, and you kind of craft, but some just consistently seems to work in surprising ways like the tech press is GonNa. Be Like Gucci. I says this and we're. There's never that next step of also we think it's Russian government, and that seems like first of all I'm dying. I imagine the meeting right. I would love to be a fly on the wall of the meeting where they decide what their twitter name is going to be today. I'm very curious how they evolve those attacks in such a way that it just seems to be more and more effective time. Yeah, I mean. I also love to have been those meetings in. It's my one kind of regret in this book that I never actually got. Interviews, it's almost an impossible thing to do. They liked find defectors from the R., you or something. He will tell those stories at a knock it murdered I mean. It's kind of a possible, but but. In some cases? I think your earlier points. They almost seem kind of bumbling in these things they do them in a very improvisational way. for two point Oh seemed almost like it was a justice thing they invented on the spot, tried to cover up some of the the accidental ups like they had left russian-language formatting errors in the documents that they had leaked from the DNC, so they admitted this guy who appeared the next day and started. Talking about being a Romanian. Friends as motherboard Lorenza, Franceschi decry he started this conversation. Align with with Guja for two point, oh basically proved at the guy could not actually properly speak Romanian. BE Russian speaker. In fact, it was. It was almost comical at the same time. They're using very sophisticated hacking techniques doing destructive attacks on a massive scale, but they're also. They seem like they're kind of making it up as they go along. They do things that don't actually seem very kind of strategically smart. They kind of seem like they're trying to impress their boss for the day. Sometimes with just like some sometimes, it's just seems like the Jere. You wakes up in asks themselves. Like what can we blow up today? Rather than thinking like? How can we accomplish the greater strategic objectives of the Russian Federation? So they are fascinating in that way and very stringent colorful group. That's I think one of the biggest questions I have here is. We spend a lot of time trying to imagine what flat and Mirror Putin wants. You know when he grows up, but it. None of this seems targeted like what is the goal for Russia to disrupt the Winter Olympics right like. Is there a purpose to that? Is that just a strike fear? Is it just to? EXPAND THAT SUV influenced. Is it just to say we have the capability furious is there? has there ever really been the stated goal for this kind of cyber warfare? That one is particularly mystifying. I mean you can imagine why Russia would want to attack the Olympics. They were banned from the two thousand Eighteen Olympics doping, but then you would think that they might want to attack the Olympics and send a message maybe like eight deniable message a message that you know if you continue to ban us. We're GONNA. Continue to attack you like like any terrorists would do, but instead they attacked the winter. Olympics in this way, that really seemed like they were trying not to get caught, and instead like make it look like the was Russia North Korea? And then you have to like what is the point of that was? The could kind of. Sit there in Moscow and kind of like rub their hands together in gleefully. Watch this chaos unfolds. It almost really does seem like it was petty vindictive thing that they just for their own emotional needs wanted to make sure that nobody could enjoy the Olympics if they were not going to enjoy them I that was, but that one is i. think outlier in some ways for the most part you can kind of see. The Russia is advancing. The G. R. You that sand worm is advancing something that does generally make sense which is that. In Ukraine for instance, they're trying to make Ukraine look like a failed state. They're trying to make Ukrainians. Lose faith in their security. Services are trying to prevent investors globally from funneling money into Ukraine trying to create a kind of frozen conflict, as we say in Ukraine where there's this constant perpetual state of degradation. They're not trying to conquer the country, but they're trying to create a kind of permanent war in Ukraine and would cyber war. You can do that beyond the traditional front end. It is in some ways the same kind of tactic that they used in other places like the US which. which here we saw more than influence operation that they were hacking leaking organizations like democratic campaign organizations and anti doping organizations to kind of so confusion to embarrass on their targets. They're trying to influence like the international audiences opinion these people, but in Ukraine, it is in some ways, just a different kind of influence operation where they're trying to influence the world's view of Ukraine. Influence Ukrainians view of their themselves under government to make them feel like they are in a war zone even when their kid hundreds of miles from the actual fighting. That's happening on the eastern fronts in the eastern region of. Of Ukraine so in a book you you you go to Kiev. You spent time in Ukraine. Is there a sense in that country that while sometimes light goes out sometimes our TV stations. Their computers don't boot anymore. Because they got rewritten, the Hydros got Zeros like. Is there a sense that this is happening? Is there a sense the defy back is there does Microsoft deploy you know dozens of engineers to to help fight back. How does that play out on the ground there? Yeah, I mean to be fair. Ukrainians are very stoic about these things and regular. Ukrainian citizens were not bothered by you know. Know a short blackout. They didn't particularly care you know. This blackout was the first ever. Hacker induced blackout in history but Ukrainian cyber security. People were very unnerved by this end, people in these actual utilities were traumatized I mean these attacks were truly like relentless sins very kind of scary for the actual operators at the controls I mean in the first blackout attack. These poor operators Ukrainian control room in western Ukraine they were locked out of their computers, and they had to watch their own mouse cursor. Click through circuit breakers, turning off the power in front of them I. Mean They watched it happen? At these kind of Phantom hands to control of their mouse movements, so they took this very very seriously, but yet Ukrainians as a whole I mean they have seen a lot. They are going through an actual physical war. They've seen the seizure of Crimea and the invasion of the east of the country. You know the the date hits. A Ukrainian general was assassinated with a car bomb in the middle of Kiev, so they have a lot of problems, and I'm not sure that cyber war is one of the top of their minds, but not patio I. Did, actually reach Ukrainians normal. Ukrainian civilians to it. It shook them as well. I talked to two regular Ukrainians. who found that they couldn't swipe into the Kiev Metro. They couldn't use their credit card at the grocery store. All the ATM's were down The Postal Service was taken out for every computer that the postal service had was taken out for more than a month. I mean these things really did affect people's lives, but it kind of. A until that kind of climactic worm. Not Patio for I think for this to really reach home for Ukrainians. who have kind of seen so much. How do you fight back? I, mean I one of things that struck me as I was reading. The book is so many of the people you talked to people who are identifying the threat. They're actually private companies. Eyesight was the first even detect it. they are contractors to intelligence agencies the military in some cases, but they're not necessarily the government right like it's not necessarily Microsoft. Who has to issue the patches from the software not necessarily GE which makes simplicity, which is the big industrial controls talk about a lot. How does all that come together into a defense because that seems like harder problem of coordination? Yeah, I mean defense in Cyber. Security is in an eternal problem. It's incredibly complicated, and when you have a really sophisticated determined adversary, it know they will win eventually ends I. think that they're absolutely lessons for defense in this book about you know. Maybe you need to really really think about software updates for instance like the kind that were hijacked to a with this medoc accounting software. As a vector for terrible cyber-attacks. Imagine that like. Any of your insecure apps that have kind of updates can be become a a piece of Malware, really unique to signature networks need to think about patching on. There are just an endless kind of checklist of things to every organization needs to do to protect themselves so. In some ways that just like a Sisyphean task and I don't. I don't try to answer that question in the book because it's too big, and it's kind of boring as well, but what I do really hammer on is the thing that the government's really could've done here. which is to try to establish norms tried to control attackers through diplomacy through kind of disciplinary action through things like kind of Geneva Convention for Cyber War if. If you think about a kind of analogy to say like chemical weapons, we could just try to give everyone in the world a gas mask that they have to carry around with them at all times, or we could create a Geneva. Convention norm that chemical weapons should not be used in if they are than crime, and you get pulled in front of the Hague. Hague and we've done the ladder and I think that in some ways should be part of the the answer to cyber war as well we need to establish norms and make countries like Russia or like organizations like the G. Are you understand that there will be consequences for these kinds of attacks, even when the victim is not the US or NATO or the? The EU and I think we're only just starting to think about that. One of the questions I had as reading is it seems like a very clear red line for almost everyone you talk to is attacks on the power grid right? That is just unacceptable. You should not do it if you do it. You've crossed a line and there should be some consequence. Is, that clear to governments. Is that something that our government says? It's something that the says it has been established. It seems like it's it's the conventional wisdom wants to salvage, but I'm not unclear whether that is actually the line that exists. It definitely has not been established, and when I kind of did these I managed to get sort of interviews with the top cyber security officials in the Obama ends trump administration Jay Michael Daniel was the cyber. Cyber Coordinator for the administration was the kind of cyber coordinator boss in the The Homeland Security Adviser for trump and both of them when I asked him about like wiped. Why didn't you know to put it bluntly like? Why didn't you respond? When Russia caused blackouts in Ukraine? Both of them essentially said well. You know that's not actually the rule that we want to set. We want to be able to cause blackouts in our adversaries networks. In their power grids when we are in a war situation or when we believe it's in our national interest, so you know that's the thing about these cyber war capabilities. This is part of the problem that every country. Absolutely the US among them isn't really interested in controlling these weapons, because we in this kind of Lord of the rings fashion, we are drawn to them to like we want to maintain the ability to use those weapons ourselves and nobody wants to throw this ring in the fires, of Mount Doom. We all wanted maintain the ring and imagine that we can use it for good in out. So that's why neither administration called that Russia for doing this because they want that power to. Make the comparison to to nuclear weapons but Negotiated drawdown and treaties with Russia in the past we count warheads where aware that the United States stockpiles can destroy the world. Fifty Times over today maybe tomorrow one hundred hundred like what we have a sense of the the measure of force that we can. Put on the world when it comes to nuclear weapons, there's a sense that Oh, we should never use these right like we have them as a deterrent, but we've gained out that actually leads to his mutually assured destruction like there's an entire body of academics. There's entire body of researchers. Entire body is got scenario planning with that kind of weapon. Does that same thing exist for for cyber weapons. There are absolutely. Know community is of academics. Policymakers who are thinking about this stuff now, but I don't think it's kind of gotten through to actual government decision. that. There needs to be kind of cyber deterrence in how that would work. In in the comparison to nuclear weapons is like instructive, but not exactly helpful. In fact, it's kind of counter-productive because we cannot deter cyber-attacks with other cyber-attacks i. don't think that's GonNa work in part because we haven't even tried to establish it yet. There are no kind of rules or read lines, but then I think more importantly. Everybody thinks that they can get away with cyberattacks that they can. They're going to create a false flag. That's clever enough that that when they blow up a power grid, they can blame their neighbor instead, so they think they're. They're gonNA. Get Away with it, and that causes them to do it anyway. A not fear the kind of assured destruction so I think that the the right response, the way to to deter cyber attacks is not with the promise of a cyber attack in return. It's with all the other kind of tools we have, and they've been used sometimes, but but they were not in the case of Sand Werman. Those tools include like sanctions which came far too late in the story indictments of hackers. In some cases, we still haven't really seen syndrome. Hackers indicted for the things that they did in Ukraine or or even not petty. And then ultimately just kind of messaging like calling out naming and shaming bad actors, and that has happened to some degree with Sandra, but in some cases there have still been massive failures there there has still been no public attribution of the Sandwich attack on the twenty eighteen Olympics I mean. My Book has been out for months. I think show pretty clear evidence that syndrome is responsible for this attack. The very least it was Russia and yet the US and Korean War, These Olympics took place at UK, none of these governments have named Russia as having done that. That attack which almost just invites them to do it again whenever our next Olympics are going to be, I guess maybe not this year, but if you don't send that message than you're just essentially inviting Russia to try again so I think might my big question is what happens now? I mean right we you write about. The NSA has tailored access operations, which is their elite hacking group. We are obviously interested in maintaining some of these capabilities. We've come to a place where people are writing books about how it works. What is the next step? What is the next? does it just keep getting worse or does this kind of diplomacy you're talking about? Is that beginning to happen I? Think there is some little glimmers of hope about the diplomacy beginning to happen I mean this year in February I think it was the State Department's called out a sand worm attack on Georgia, where a worms hackers basically took down a ton of Georgian websites by attacking the hosting providers as well as a couple of TV's broadcasters in the US. State Department with a few other governments not. said this was sand. Worm named the unit of the GRU. That's is that was confirmation that I've been looking for for a long time, but they also made a point of saying that we're calling this out is unacceptable, even though Georgia. Georgia is not part of NATO or the U. so that's that's progress. That's essentially creating a new kind of rule. That's state-sponsored. Hackers can't do certain things, no matter who the victims and that's really important. Also, it was kind of interesting because federal officials like gave me a heads up about that announcement before happened, which they have very very rarely do and I think they were trying. To say was in we. We read your book and we. Got The message okay like Stop attacking us about this like we're trying. We're doing something different here I. Don't want flatter myself that I actually changed their policy, but it did seem interesting that they wanted to tell me personally about this so i. I think that like maybe our stance on this kind of diplomacy is evolving, and we're learning lessons, but at the same time we also see the attacks evolving to. To and their new innovations in these kinds of disruption happening, we've seen since some of these terrible Sandra attacks. You know other very scary things like this piece of our called Triton or crisis that was used to disabled safety systems in a oil refinery in Saudi Arabia on that was you know that could have caused an actual physical explosion of petrochemical facility? The the attacks are evolving to okay final last real question. Tell people where they can get your book. You can find all kinds of places by on indie Greenberg Dot net. Written another book as well previously, yes. That's right. I wrote a book about wikileaks. Cypher punks and things like that. That's right well. I'm a huge fan. It was an honor to talk to you. Thank you so much for coming on I know it's. It's a weird time to be talking about anything, but the coronavirus I was very happy to talk about something else, which is that it seems a little bit more in control Even if it is quite dangerous, a thank you for the time. I appreciate it. Yeah, I'm glad to provide people with a different kind of apocalypse as a distraction.

Ukraine United States Russian Government Nato Olympics Kiev United Kingdom Sandra Cyber Award State Department Kim Zetter Barack Obama Clinton Russia San Worm Sandy Greenberg NSA DNC
Crash Landing On You + Fate with Joe Gunawan

First of All

05:23 min | 4 months ago

Crash Landing On You + Fate with Joe Gunawan

"Thank you so much for tuning in for this week's episode. y'All better be still doing the mass and the washing your hands and social distancing especially. If you're in America, because we are the worst, we're actually not technically the worse I think we're like the third worst depending on what data you're looking at, but considering how much we front about how great we are. In America where the worst and it's a humbling moment, it's a lesson learned right very important time to take responsibility for all of the nonsense and grow up and move on. We're going to be better yeah. If guys. Thank you so much for tuning in for last week's episode, it really means a lot to me as a third anniversary episode of first of all and a pretty intense one on inner child, trauma, and healing, and letting go of the past and I just really appreciate anybody who tuned in and. Listened politically with compassion and shared space, because that was a doozy a lot for me to let out but I'm very grateful that I was able to do that. Share that with you, all and I'm really really moved by the response. I got some messages of of gratitude and very vulnerable. Sharing and I just want to say know I'm not. I first of all. I didn't think I was GONNA, be here. I didn't think it was gonna do this many episodes. I was just giving it a shot. See where it goes and I didn't think that I'd be sharing so much of myself in terms of like my. Past in my what was happening in my life real time and it's been really really liberating really. Just eye opening for me and I just didn't know that I'd be here. And I didn't ever aspire to have millions of listeners. That idea actually scares me. Slash scared the crap out of me to think that that many people would listen to what I had to say. So, yeah anyway. That actually. That's next week's episode on. Stop playing small, but. Suffice it to say I just I didn't know really what I was aiming for when I started this, I didn't know what kind of reach I would have I. don't have a gazillion followers. Our listeners and I don't even know if that's what I I once per se, but what I care about is making an impact and what I care about is having something valuable to share with somebody else because I have. Learned so much from other things that other people have shared. That's all I wanted to do so when I get these messages of gratitude it genuinely. Like I'm shook. You know I didn't I didn't? I didn't like would have that kind of impact and to know that it is doing that. It's somebody else's life and making somebody feel less alone and like they're not crazy and that you know that their wounds in their traumas are not. that. They're not Something to isolate themselves with that. It's usually means the entire universe than some to me. It really motivates me to share more and not give up on this thing you know not used all these issues factors as measuring sticks of whether something is successful or not. Genuinely makes me feel like. I have succeeded. I've done something really valuable and worthwhile, so thank you, thank you to everybody who took the time to listen and thank you to those who took time and energy and effort and vulnerability to share their story with me. It's really touching I truly appreciate it. And now we're going to talk about K. Dramas. I think it's so funny that I've just done this energetic shift from like a huge one eighty going from inner child trauma, which is very real. I hope that you tune in for that when you're ready. To Talk About K dramas because. I'm just laughing. Guys You'll hear about in this episode it's it's quite a lengthy one, but I'm all about crash landing on you. It is a reintroduction for me after fifteen years of not watching any K dramas of having a lot of prejudices and issues with my identity, my culture that I'll share with. My guest and yeah I just want to dive right into it. This week's guest is my friend Joe. GonNa one who is a longtime first of all listener. He's a patriotic supporter. He's a dear friend of mine in the industry in La, and he's just a bright soul like he and I. Talk about so many different things, different movies and The industry itself, and about our personal lives and as we've grown in our friendship I've just come to value his voice because he's so insightful. Right Not right you'll, you'll get to hear. So a little bit about Joe, he is I first assistant camera and a camera operator, so he's the guy carrying all the big year in handling camera equipment on set and his journey as as a camera operator has just been really fascinating for me to learn terms of the life as production crew, and the person kind of behind the scenes watching making everything happen. And he's done incredible work over the years. He's worked on projects with OPRAH WITH BTS future dial Lauren Conrad Dumbfounded Disney Jaguar Gucci like Victoria Secret Heat. All from very humble beginnings like Joe is such a wonderful person.

JOE America K. Dramas Lauren Conrad LA Oprah
Gucci Launches Off the Grid, Its First Sustainable Collection

Pop Fashion

03:46 min | 5 months ago

Gucci Launches Off the Grid, Its First Sustainable Collection

"Is kind of like a fun story so Gucci is releasing a new collection. It's called Gucci off the grid. It is the first from its circular lines. which is, it's the name of the larger like group of collections, but it's also like a fashion term right so something that is circular means that it's designed with recycled and organic and sustainable materials in mind, and it's used as many times as possible before hitting the landfill as its final resting place, so if we think about buying secondhand clothing that's contributing to these circular cycle fashion instead of the the linear path because you're helping things, stay within our little ecosystem. Anyway science lesson over. Gucci's collection is let's see recycled organic bio based and sustainably sourced the main material for the collection. According to fashion united is one hundred percent regenerated nylon. It's called economy. I. Think I'm saying it right? It's made from recycled yarn that's made from nylon scraps, and those on scraps come from everything from like old fishing nets to carpet to like scraps from Gucci's own facilities It can be recycled allegedly infinite times. Who Knew Mind? My mind other materials include metal, free, tanned leather, recycled polyester, thread and linings recycled brass, recycled gold coatings for hardware am solvent free adhesive, so they're throwing every sustainable trick in the book at the stuff in this collection. The company also has two programs through which it saves scraps from its factories along with other sources to be able to recycle them us again, so they do this for nylon and leather. The collection was designed by creative director, Allesandro Michelle and the line features genderless luggage, accessories, footwear and ready to wear items. You've got jacket sneakers. CAPS tote bags, backpacks belt bags. That's you can get it off There's a lot of orange and a vibrant blue and some basic items, so there's something for every style. If you have the money I was checking out some of the online and noted that they don't have prices that are particularly higher than Gucci's standard products at the collection will be sold on Gucci's website, and on the far fetched website for the first two weeks before it starts to spread from there Carin. What do you think of this whole? This whole circular sustainable effort? It's a good shot. More companies need to do it. I'm glad to see. Fashion houses are starting to engage with it. I don't know if this makes up for the sins of the past for Gucci, but credit where credit's due like. If they're trying, also if it's catching on, it becomes more normalized that this can be done and I am. I hope other fashion houses see it as a challenge and the the best sense of the term that people can kind of rise to the occasion. As what can we recycle what can be used? What can we experiment with so although I around? I think it's great I liked it. It's going to be a little. Limited at first with Gucci and far fetched, because it builds up awareness to that it is about marketing technique that people can kind of like focus on that. They're doing this this experiment so I. I'm glad that fashion houses are starting to take this on.

Gucci Allesandro Michelle Director
"gucci" Discussed on Gucci Podcast

Gucci Podcast

04:52 min | 6 months ago

"gucci" Discussed on Gucci Podcast

"With power or companies and organizations with power and collaborate with them and make a difference Dr. We'll be immeasurable in many ways that will create change overnight. You couldn't work on for decades and I know one of the ways that you have done this perhaps done this in previous vice before is collaborating with different organizations and when I heard that you were going to of Kuchis Campaign for off the grid. My immediate instinct was. That's really smart both of them and of you. And I just wondered. If. You could describe that to me what it is a while you thought this was something valuable for you to participate in. You know it was It's such an interesting. Interesting brand and you look at its Abbot flood any. Look at dejected trainee. Look at Menton is and you look at the voice that has any look at the power has to convene as you're saying, it's like. We can sell outside and pointed what's wrong. All we can look at the. Other side of the coin, which is what people trying to do to make things. Better, right. No. One's profit myself included and I think when I started to really I had an opportunity to go and speak at your Gucci headquarters about a year ago. And I. It was the end to my tolkien's wrapping up being a little bit cheeky and the question asked about influence on corporations and how they can. Affect a more sustainable of living. Since what you just awesome annoy I've always believed that you know the assistant that was created and now there's a chance to recreate and to online rely. And brands all communities and they have an ability to guide chequered. Narratives much more quickly. Sometimes, we can is environmentalist suicide of maybe an asylum. They have a much broader reach Florida following passionate. And I think we're getting to point where individuals won't to wear. Feel engage with something that is more than just the product experience. It's more than just profit planet. It's people it's it's got substance..

Menton Gucci trainee Florida
"gucci" Discussed on Gucci Podcast

Gucci Podcast

05:24 min | 8 months ago

"gucci" Discussed on Gucci Podcast

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"gucci" Discussed on Gucci Podcast

Gucci Podcast

05:19 min | 9 months ago

"gucci" Discussed on Gucci Podcast

"Forty five seats with this young chef Karima coming from Mexico because she felt protected, she was his Presi, even more the capabilities like everybody, the creative awards because the more they feel protective that threaten in angle they can express themselves because they feel comfortable and that there is a why we were able to to to become more and more. The. Better. Of course, always supervisory Massimo throughout the day advocating mix cetera but giving the possibility to feel protected and. Especially for a young woman calendar says sensible etcetera. Is absolutely key choosy only women chef awarded the Michelin Star? The first female Mexican female chef who got the Michelin Star you know like That's big. That's a big big message immediately. Any. Not In Mexico in Italy. Is because you have to also think about that. You know what? He said the to Karima he went to Karima. He said this is my private mobile phone. So, everything you need if you don't get it, call me directly if you have any problem. So, Kareem man failed so protected because shed Marcus. Mobile phone. So everything that happened. Bad you know Eka she could immediately not this brass to me and me call Marco whatever but go directly to him. So everything changed. Everything chained to that moment. The reaction. The quick reaction. Really make us. Feel, much more comfortable confident in ourselves and what we were doing you know and I have to say. Irina and Damiano the two Matra that they're managing the room they made the difference your day really made the difference. Okay. Like one last question markle. What does Alexander? Mackay's creative vision bring to Gucci Study Idea Massimo him about twitter to the most important that brought to this kind of project like in many other things is the openness that he has any idea that Massimo's bringing only stable. That is the most important because. When you go to someone. And the first answer is not know that is typically the Aso anything new that you pretend to people in general but these may be let's see or yes I mean the the next time you can be even. More risky go. More crazy because you you you you feel. More comfortable in proposing some may be is too risky. The person in front of you makes a difference makes a huge difference. But you know like to me, I would never have done something like this because I'm very protective of what we are built and the name. Now we're name wide. But We start in data. Creating, incredible events. With no limits to creativity you know we were creating this. Idea of putting together leather past I has leather crossing around and make Theorem Isu- compress inner of yellow there looks like a bag. Then, move to Gucci. The first thing Marco proposes like why don't we start going around the word and put together dinner and join with the most amazing talent in visionary mind the..

Massimo Karima Marco Michelin Mexico Kareem twitter Alexander Irina Mackay Damiano Italy
"gucci" Discussed on Gucci Podcast

Gucci Podcast

03:55 min | 9 months ago

"gucci" Discussed on Gucci Podcast

"GonNa Leave Marco answer that because you know after after the the the the fashion show in Milan in Milan that I met with Messiah No us look at me and the first thing is sad hug me and he said. We got the Michelin. Star. I can't believe that I said Yeah I can't believe too because if you think about Italy and In eighteen months. Win The damage lands star is something big that you know es to tell you something very special because he was protecting. That all team. Of Austria Gucci. Against everyone no, the the. the fact that we were we are. So proud about if other, they got the last time, he's not just because Michelle start any self is that because it's a kind of recognition of Iraq war that has been has been created from scratch from zero the beauty about this dream is that. When A certain point I wanted to to create something different in Florence because we had these a kind of a museum of is a shop. In Florence, scenario close to Passover can amazing squad beautiful location we're losing tons of money does not location when I joined Gucci five years ago and the the perception and image was patio the that the excess that say I i. so many things to do I need to you know to bring to the south of speed eleven. Essay I'M GONNA close it why it should be bothered about just single shot that doesn't represent US anymore spend lots of money to change. Then, then I was thinking about this Ak. Yes. But these in East Flores where the company was more. The North is more accessible. We need to change the so discussing. Sound say now we can do differ way you're thinking about the museum immoral retrospective touches with the new artists, etc chain shop we could their biggest show where weeks justice cousy products, etc. But then there's restaurant there was a restaurant already that was super. Say the Super Normal at the moment that is a good thing or bad thing by the way I did like it that's all and it it was nothing says nothing exceptional nothing. Nothing that there is why go to Florida to go twitter. So thinking or maybe even the basketball say my massimo but we're not we're not in the food industry we have still not in the food industry. And so how can I talked early sandrine convincingly Sandal to the restaurant because I mean of course I mean you know the different creative people together? I mean, I, know the guys. So I organized a blind date for lunch I invited both maximum. Alexandra. Telling them that were going to meet each other. So. I I said these table for launching. in Milan and and of course, apple was expecting so. So amazing talent. They started talking about amendments, the actors or paintings and art. But what do you think about doing a restaurant the blesses Julia. Do is tight as it was already done. So was that were. Just add A. Good idea. Let's go that. We decided to go on. And of course, as I said that to me was I, it's always I mean. Create Italians always periods and everybody's different time that the reason why you need to super be super flexible with your mind open minded because I mean everybody's is is working in their process meant a person a different way. That I learn India's Corp because I'd be working with many different creative director saying everybody's different. Everybody's super talented. But because we are not in the food industry with a company of like twenty thousand people have sat procedural to expect accessible we created is more restaurant..

Milan Florence Julia Michelin US Marco Italy Michelle East Flores basketball Austria India twitter Iraq Florida director sandrine apple
"gucci" Discussed on Gucci Podcast

Gucci Podcast

03:48 min | 9 months ago

"gucci" Discussed on Gucci Podcast

"He said, no, like Picasso was always say that. Ten percent of Talat and our work. The our work makes express your talent. But if you're not in that kind of mind you know. Trust what what he said because is. Is exactly the secret of success. These amazing friendship you both have and creative partnership that you now have. You've both said it's the start of a beautiful. Janney. So where is it going to go next? What do we have in store? With them, you know everywhere because Zach this is just wait for a phone call sometimes because. Every time he's challenging with new ideas so I don't know in our future they're gonna be always future because we are born like this. We are born with future in our mind. So what we are doing now is already done. You don't what we're going to have in mind is going to be the next. You know I know where where we going next the by the I cannot tell you. Dr. Plus. So time. Jane that. Massimo what is good? He was demolished I'm Beverly Hills bringing to the food scene in. La. What set apart. first of all as I said. To every journalist that wears out king the question. This is a project. That is not a standard. This is not a format. These is the expression of the mind of the most amazing young chef that I met during my journey. So. In Florida we have Karima and we have Marco faster and we have there on the they bring. The food like if you WANNA give title of the tasting manual could be come to the were with me. Because one is from Mexico the is from China. The other is from Venezuela the other American, and there are altogether their in Florence bringing using local products and and expressing their on personality and taking you to a journey around the world in Louisiana's is Los Angeles, we have to pay respect for. The Santa Monica Farmers? Market. And the MAZING. you know farmers, fishermen, cheesemakers we forager that we have in Los Angeles. So it's going to be come to Italy with me because there are few touches of Italian product extremely important like for example to. That we grew up with Parmigiano reggiano cheese and bus. Hammock. Vinegar but. Like in a very Italian ironic way to express. So it's completely different from what we do with the same. Spirit and the same quality of the cooking that we're going to do. Okay and How do you feel about the Australia winning a Michelin style like how different is?.

Santa Monica Farmers Los Angeles Talat Zach Marco Picasso Michelin Janney Beverly Hills Jane Dr. Plus Florence Venezuela Australia Italy Florida Mexico China Karima Louisiana
"gucci" Discussed on Gucci Podcast

Gucci Podcast

04:52 min | 9 months ago

"gucci" Discussed on Gucci Podcast

"His contemporary if it's fried or Asia not. Italian. It's good or bad. That's it. The ball. Okay. We're ready for the CONDO, the main cause of the PODCAST K. Mark or it's a big question. How did you become what you are today? What is the secret ingredient? we talked about this feeling of love. I think that. being I think studied a lot in the sense that of course I think I some. Potential. Characteristic. But they need to want one to one hundred I. Mean The the part of my success I located to. To the fact that they were very odd, it's ninety percent. Ten percent of talent and the rest is being walking Berry Berry Heart. And and and and the the other thing I really believe that is is being Trusting people believing in people and supporting people before knowing that I cannot know everything is impossible and if you soon as realize that the possibility of leveraging in with other people so even in. Way Even if you don't believe in people but it's not my case. But in any case, I mean you you need to rely that your brain can not be as I mean as as powerful as the some of the other brand that you worked with. So he felt able to do so you tried to. Not just to understand, but also to belief in other people ideas. and to feel that these people have a vision that maybe you don't tell what they cut sensibly that you don't have. Use upon them even betting in certain cases because I mean if you have if you want to have great research live need to bet a uterus and so maybe you can you can fail that is is part of the game I don't know why you want to you. You're going to be some much more morning, and that is why we as Muslims were saying before our journey sent point they they went from different different path that we we we got along together again. Is. Chris. Perry that is is is is enormous. It's huge. With characteristic on site complete different from Mine Alexandra the created the rhetoric Gucci Santa Michaela..

Berry Berry Heart Mine Alexandra Asia Perry Chris
"gucci" Discussed on Gucci Podcast

Gucci Podcast

05:47 min | 9 months ago

"gucci" Discussed on Gucci Podcast

"First impression is the welcoming the people because they knowing this love your Massimo, the energy mass that is remember what's his was doing his mother is the way in which he says born Jarno the welcome is the way you feel welcome and immediately the kind of. Spirit in which you face new thing is very different because then you open to to taste different things because you feel open your satirize the people in mentally the you get close and as bad is more details. That works only if you feel them because you cannot teach this kind of things, people don't feel them. That's so it's like. In. The meantime he was speaking. I got so emotional because I? Felt exactly what he was talking about. That is like. It's for us is like growing up A. Big family with big always dowse fool of friends You know I was with I had like five brothers and one sister and. Dowse was always full of Fran. And this kind of atmosphere really made the difference. And one thing that I said even today. Is My grandmother was cooking because chef the cook my mom was cooking because she loved to cook is what makes a different life you know? This vision is the secrets of of success is that. You know I wake up in the morning going to bed in the night, and in the meantime I do what I've chosen to like. Bob Dylan always say that that's the secret of success and what what what is the Tortellini name is I see? This story of the Tortellini they're going to be in ZANDER's is the most amazing story you can have any managing. The Guy was responsible for the handmade pastor. Tortellini is a a guy half Italian half Iranian it was born in Tehran. Move. To Brooklyn. A work in a handmade, the pasta shop. Is Dream was to work. You know Syria Francis Garner. Is Sanders SEAVY IN MODERN And Rica was looking at seavy and he said. Are you in New York based and e- answer yes. So we're going to open LASAGNA'S YOU WANNA go immovable in one second from Brooklyn to La and now is making the most amazing Tortellini. And that we're going to serve at in a good jobs la that's the story. That's what really the people we want. That's the people that..

Brooklyn Massimo Dowse Jarno Bob Dylan Tehran La Fran Syria Francis Garner Rica New York
"gucci" Discussed on Gucci Podcast

Gucci Podcast

05:19 min | 9 months ago

"gucci" Discussed on Gucci Podcast

"Some of them, they're still part of our life, and there are still for me and him part of our everyday life you know and counter friend another, and the it's is this kind of friendship does forever. And you know gives me goosebumps when I think about this kind of stuff because this. is so important and you cannot buy these things. About this kind of friendship is that I think is come to everybody that is knows what I'm talking about is that you cannot. You can even not to talk a person for a long time not a for a long time but very firm on where you you meet the person again, it looks like they were was was who for the last last life? Yes. It was supernatural and that is something that is very difficult to build something that grow. Day by day and something that is going to remain for A. The period of life that is where you're younger. I have to add something. The quickness of ideas that comes out from his mind. You know I'm telling you a story because he's related to this. What happened now in? Los Angeles. Is here for a dinner that we were planning with you know with With the good she America in increase this. And I walk into the store there where restoring. And there was like this therapies. That now is those three. But you know at that time, there was nothing we just open. in gathered scenario. Influence so. I I was like I don't know I had the vision to see what? The potential of this. I call him immediately I said. Michael. There's a terrace here in. Los. Angeles. They're like building the VIP. Almost. finished. The Room has had. Imagining this? Piazza della scenario Florence. Rodeo drive. Los Angeles Ginza Tokyo Three. Unexpected places for Assyria Gucci. You know. Fifteen seconds maybe less he said why not? That's the quickness of the answer. Division. Is like this. His mind is like already they're even.

Los Angeles Piazza della scenario Florence Los Assyria America Michael
"gucci" Discussed on Gucci Podcast

Gucci Podcast

05:33 min | 9 months ago

"gucci" Discussed on Gucci Podcast

"Mark Bizarre. The Sea of Gucci and the maximum. It's very difficult to not laughing when I talk about. That these Michelin Star, Chef three-star clean and my friends from a long long time. We got to Los Angeles because Muslim open, the with Gucci the second, just the world steadier by maximum tour. That is going to be on the top of our shop zero day drive in. Beverly Hills Crate well, welcome both of you. So we're going to do with podcast a bit like a dinner at a restaurant with the different causes. So we're going to start with the ANTIPASTA. We're going to go back to the table where you both met the desk in September nineteen, seventy five. So NOCCO. What did you guys? He's to eat together on your school breaks. That's that's a good question we are the. Artichoke. artichokes. Mata. There was this kind of means means factory, for students. and. We were me used to sneak away from the latest and going together to have some food. Amazing for that was for us who was amazing that time and we were playing cards and that. was winning was getting the snack for free so that Sandwich for free. To and and artichokes. Today. And Salami. And should though and whatever else like. Anybody else. Was Amazed at the end at the end we were talking about So what you GonNa, do you going back home and eat or you're going to come stay with me? So he was calling my mom because you. It was kind of Lazy. The bus to go back home and call him my mom. All Louisa Mayor Louisa was my I'M GONNA say. Lads. So that's it's something that you cannot describe you know. Those kinds of moments. was about about a natural because I mean I, was living a little bit far away from this call maximum was living exactly more than so. I mean taking the bus every morning six o'clock six o'clock in the morning going they're going to school wait for the by going back. It's not like today that you have everything that time it was nothing that you have one. If you lose that bachelor, you miss the school so and so and and also knowing knowing the Mama, Mama Mama similar she was amazing everything totally anything past everything she loved cooking I mean I mean between the siding taking the bathroom going to tweet that House be the great team. Is Really Tuesday because. Also they are in the afternoon, right? So usually Tuesday was like. So what Marco, what's your favorite memory of Massimo when he was a kid? So many memory. Some of them cannot.

Mama Mama Louisa Mayor Louisa Michelin ANTIPASTA Mark Bizarre Gucci Beverly Hills Los Angeles Mata Marco Massimo House
"gucci" Discussed on Gucci Podcast

Gucci Podcast

06:46 min | 1 year ago

"gucci" Discussed on Gucci Podcast

"I. It has been described to me as a venture capital fund that is A. Of Head and heart, and one of your advisers told me that he considers you the top venture capitalists in the world under the age of thirty two. He's my advice. Welcome she'll. She'll you were here yesterday at the innovation. Festival, talking about a panel that we call generation. A generation of younger digital natives who grown up very comfortable with technology and increasingly comfortable with artificial intelligence machine learning virtual reality augmented reality. Tell me a little bit about the role that you think technology plays in the lives of the under thirty set and increasingly the under twenty one set. Technology historically if you look at generations throughout the older generations saw technology as a tool for various tasks whether that was work or making their life a little bit better. But you look at generation X. Generation Y. Generation Z.. Many of those folks see technology as the only tool for creating social change. Often, young people will prefer activism virtually as opposed to activism physically, and it's a trend that we will see reverberate in terms of its impact, not just in what is the latest after April are using but who gets elected and how did they get elected and what are the tools that folks used to reach voters so it's it's becoming increasingly important, and so how does the technology community respond to that? If there is an understanding that young people are going to use these platforms to organize soon, bring voice to the voiceless to. Protests. Does that mean that the current technology tools need to adapt to that mindset or is that an opportunity as an investor to create a whole new set of platforms? I. Think it's a little bit of both I think. Historically young people will Taylor platforms for their own liking and often many of the new products that are created are created as a result of the users demanding them. And I also think that there will be new platforms merch and many people think social is done because they can't think of another idea but I heard the same thing five years ago and seven years ago. People always say I don't know what more innovation could happen because I can't think of anything myself but inevitably something interesting is created. She'll. There's a sense that this younger generation coming up is more open, minded more progressive, more inclusive than the generations that have come before what are the impacts that this inclusive mindset will have on technology One thing we spoke about yesterday was racism and. Unfortunately. As you and I both know racism is around the beginning of time. been largely driven by this mindset of. We are different than them. and. Therefore, we must be superior. That was driven by lack of knowledge and one thing that technology has done it as an optimist. One thing I'm hopeful for is that as future generations. Get access to more technology are online and have the ability to peer into other people's lives through social media and other platforms. Folks will start to realize that we are actually far more similar than we are different the end of the day you and I want the same thing we want. Better life for ourselves. We want a better life for our families and once folks realized that my hope is that barriers will drop. And so in this war utopian future where barriers fall down, people realize that we're more similar than different. Do you think that the questions around bias in facility in technology will sort of start to take care of themselves as the population has more inclusive mindset will the subsequent technology more be more inclusive I hope. So although your point earlier was actually is an an important one where. Having diverse creators is critical. And there are a couple of reasons for that. You know in in some cities in America, judges in the criminal justice system are now using algorithms to figure out whether defendants should be granted bail or not. Those algorithms are only as good as the Inputs III as what the creators have decided should be inputs and having a diverse stop process around what goes into the creation of algorithm is critical if we want the result to be just and right. How do people from seemingly different worlds find each other online. Part of the challenge that we have right now in the Western world. But even in other parts of the world is that it does feel like communities are talking to their own tribes but to achieve the kind of cross cultural understanding that you talked about earlier, I need to be able as a Caucasian person living in. Estonia find everyday, Africa, which is a wonderful instagram. Page that shows the lives of everyday Africans and the beauty of the continent. How am I going to find that an and build those bridges that you talks poignantly out? It's a it's a really good question. I think this is where a we as a society have a responsibility to. Work with our technology companies. To help them or help us together realize that we don't want to be more silent I mean right now the news that we see is the news that are friends post and usually our friends in general think the same as we did that's not constructive or useful. Having being able to see diverse opinions is the only way that we aside, you're going to peer into the lives of others and realize that we're actually not as diverse or as as different as we might. necessarily. Shield thanks so much for your time today. Thank you I appreciate it. Thank you for listening to this podcast. The latest from the first company series featuring venture capitalist she'll tall. You can listen to other interviews from the festival channel and more details can be found in the episode nights..

Estonia Africa America
"gucci" Discussed on Gucci Podcast

Gucci Podcast

07:15 min | 1 year ago

"gucci" Discussed on Gucci Podcast

"Innovation Festival hosted empowered by Gucci Hint editor and writer Casey Finey Interviews Explorer an environmentalist David de Rothschild and research scientist Africa flurries after their panel titled Unnatural Selection, Cam Machine Save the planet. They examine some of our most troubling blind spots when it comes to the planet environment and livelihoods if those affected by climate change. Please night, there may be some background noise in this episode as it was recorded live from the festival. This is Casey I am an editor and writer as Fast Company magazine, and we're here in the Gucci Hub and Milan, and just her a fantastic panel have some of the panel is here with me today. So allow you to introduce yourselves. I am Africa Florida's research scientist at the University of Iowa inconceivable I'm David Rothschild Ventura. An environmentalist but must look so good on a business card. I feel like if you said venture, you sound like you have a goal tax package. Can do these one on the shops and I'm kind of more than moisturizing adventure like I'm definitely not the guy he's hanging off declare for an end and doing the. Rough. Stuff that most people think it's kind of more I should take scorer. Storing, for my understanding. Of. The relationship between humans and Asia absolutely and David mentioned something during the talk aren't interested in you said, and it's true that we know. So little of earth and I want us both of you. You know, what are those most? What are your most troubling blind spots when you think about environmentalism and the things that? People are wanting to address the problems you feel like aren't being addressed. What are those blind spots easy. I mean. I think I'll biggest lines is. This. The concept that growth success? Right it we have to somehow impassioned more. and seeing. We've created a planet that is. Old Sorry I should say. We live on a planet that is taken any when you think about it foreign hall in. Know to evolve. To where we are today, you know with the recipients of an oxygenation event happen to know. What you've been in years ago. Right we're living in a time where we're about to move out from the Holocene. Into the answer, the this human fingerprint right moving to time weather the this epoch will be defined basically. Human fingerprints right in a short period of time since the nineteen fifties if it gets approved so I think I'll blind spot is. Fortunately that we have. You know kind of put this. This lens on that says that the planet was his solely for us that we can consume consuming consuming. There will be an endless horizon at one point maybe hunter-gatherers it might have been. Mysterious. Given that gave us. Wow this and it was endless. Endless it's finite rules and we consume consume consume with. Blinds for all of us, we're all recipients of a device that allows us to buy stuff that we didn't know. We even needed in Iraq before we even know we bought it. You know we're living in a time where we just. told. Success is gross. It's just about growth rather than. Saying actually what about improving or not improving the quality of lives that everybody? With access to water and access to food access to sanitation and access to education. All the things that we can do. Those that's the thing that gets me is that we put consumers fussed. We've become somehow consumers. Thus has been citizens with citizens on spaceship. Earth. But we're only binding if we spend money and if we don't have money to spend, we'll give you a call that allows you debt yourself. And we do it at a country level and we do. Individual level, right. So we taking more than we're giving. and. Biggest and the biggest antagonistic relationship. We have this as either like this. kind of rampant consumption of the natural wild at all costs. To just profit for a few companies. And that is just Yeah it's Sasha blinds. INSCI-. We manage these big misconception that technology scientists are going to be able to Seoul by themselves. These global environmental issues without taking into account, the people who are suffering and who are living these. They're these big eagles. Scientific. Eagles that. Have to feel daily and I hope I never become something like that. But. I think he's a very big misconception. Because in order to change what is happening, we have to work with the people who are at the core of December mental issues. Whatever did this it is and. They are capable to find solutions. We enabled them. So something along the lines of the democratization of data knowledge. and. A team that that's one of the things that the talks that had been a happening yesterday today have road life a little bit of light on these that we may be also eating an era where inequalities can grow on I feel a social responsibility, a human responsibility. Knowledge to A and. To bridge that gap that kind of. because. We had losing knowledge by the way by known including these people who know what is happening and you know they are. A component that we don't understand that we don't know they are part of this. They are no part of the problem, our program saw. I think another blinds part is. The bill on that. is saying is that? As. As a citizen. Of. Above. I am amazed. At how we disregard the data the scientific. We've had in the last year, some of the most condemning reports on the state of nature. Yet, we call get weld need to stand up and take responsibility because they're interested in short is interested in getting reelected they're interested in profit before planet. Interested in exploiting metro sources, indigenous communities, exploiting the land, and so it's not in our interest to validate science. Whereas in their interest to discredit decides to on the fund the cise to tell us.

Casey Finey research scientist editor writer University of Iowa David Rothschild Ventura David de Rothschild Florida Fast Company magazine Asia Milan David Holocene Africa Seoul Iraq Eagles
"gucci" Discussed on Gucci Podcast

Gucci Podcast

05:37 min | 1 year ago

"gucci" Discussed on Gucci Podcast

"The PODCAST. EMISS- short interview. Morin. Surf. Former hacker and cybersecurity expert. Now, newer scientists and business professor speaks with Stephanie Method Editor in Chief of Fast Company. They meet at the gate hub in Milan for the first ever global thought leadership summit of its kind. The first company European Innovation Festival Morin participated as a panelist speaking at the festival. We're here at the fast company European Innovation Festival at Gucci Hub and I'm speaking more in Surf, who is a neuroscientist and a business professor at the Kellogg School of Management at Northwestern University, and you're also affiliated with the neuroscience department there welcome Morin. One of the interesting conversations that has been emerging around. An automation is whether or not machines will ever be able to replicate the creativity of humanity. We know machines can take the mundane parts of work out of work, but ten machines ever learn to be creative. Can a machine replicate the genius of Allesandro mckelway? So I think that's Because creativity award humans invent describe a process. I think machines all being creative in winning convictions against humans in creativity. There's. A. Year in Cannes, the Kinda. Advisor Festival in South France in the always have people on the spot complicated idea last year in the one this one. So this is humans looking at a creative in judging how good it is and then learning who the person behind the TWAS turns out. The president was a sheet. That's. A big. Four for the economy humans against machines we created at the same time I think. If we redefine creativity in some ways than I think that there's human straits the always gonna be humans in some the. To be lost if it is just coming up with an answer, a problem that wasn't there before machines amazing in doing that even now they're going to get better. If it is. Something that is experiencing feelings or thoughts that before machines are not there yet. So we we are. not seeing that, but also humans are. Very little it's getting that. So I think if what is about Simos brain that? is able to copy things. There are many answers. A could be the correct one and we don't know whether he was born with a different mind whether he was trained over time to out of the box this allowed or whether he actually is the perfect thinking in the box and his digging box allows him to just be the best I, get a lot of people in he just thinks people want. That's the perfect creativity voss because he's able to understand all of us is a collective well, each of those things would be called creativity but you. Because, it's a new thing but some of them are easier to replicate others you have an interesting analogy of. Creativity that you relate to traffic and you talk about that yes. The the statement that I say sometimes is that you're not stuck in traffic you all. And that to me is a way to illustrate the fact that it's not in our brain does one center that is under and if you..

Morin European Innovation Festival M professor European Innovation Festival president Gucci Hub Chief of Fast Company Kellogg School of Management Cannes Milan Simos Advisor South France Northwestern University Editor