18 Burst results for "Guatemalan Congress"

"guatemalan congress" Discussed on Democracy Now! Audio

Democracy Now! Audio

03:40 min | 3 months ago

"guatemalan congress" Discussed on Democracy Now! Audio

"Harm to society and that's why we demand the resignation of alejandro. Get out your monte. Thousands of people also led a protest in guatemala city saturday with vows to continue mobilizations until the president and other government officials step down meanwhile amnesty international condemning the excessive use of force guatemalan police against protesters and journalists at a massive action last month triggered by retracted budget pass by the guatemalan congress which proposed cuts to health and education in news from capitol hill. A number of major corporations including apple nike and coca cola or opposing a bill to ban goods made using forced labor by leaguers and other muslim minority groups in china's xinjiang region..

alejandro guatemala city guatemalan congress amnesty international capitol hill coca cola nike apple xinjiang china
"guatemalan congress" Discussed on KOMO

KOMO

02:31 min | 3 months ago

"guatemalan congress" Discussed on KOMO

"On news time. 5 36 more than 100 people turned up at central market in Millcreek over the weekend to protest Governor Jay Inslee's mask mandate. Half of those in attendance were members of the proud Boys stores had heavy security just in case there was trouble. It was advertised on Social media as a peaceful protest with Christmas songs. Today, the Seattle City Council will decide how to spend its $6.5 billion in its budget for next year. Comas Lee Stoll has a preview of a big vote today City leadership under pressure from the pandemic and months of protests. Come up with a budget to get Seattle through. 2021 Council members made a syriza of changes to Mayor Durkin's proposed Budget Council budget committee chair person, Theresa Mosqueda. Outlined what should and should not be changed earlier this month instead of a 50% cut to SPD mosquitoes package would strip 20%. The money would come from moving the 911 call Center in parking enforcement out of the SPD budget, taking advantage of a record number of officers leaving the force this summer. 35 out of order layoffs and not filling 93 other positions. Durkin's plan would give 100 million to communities of color. Council trimmed it to 30 million, but says more money will come from other investments who spends it will either be a Durkin task force, the council or community groups. The council's plan also adds millions more than darken wood to help people who are homeless, intense now overflowing in some downtown parks. Weekend construction along I five year Linwood wrapped up early this morning. Some lanes were closed for work on the supporting columns of the link. Light rail crews will install a deck for the train. The project is expected to wrap up in 2024 When it's done, passengers will be able to ride between South Snohomish County to U Dub and downtown Seattle all the way down. To see Tak airport and that's cool. Most Kelly Koopmans Canadian officials are issuing an unusual warning. Authorities in Jasper, Alberta, have posted signs asking drivers to not allow moose toe lick the salt off their cars. Animals find it hard to resist the salt that ends up on vehicles after it's been spread on winter roads, But officials say this could be dangerous. When Moose are too close to cars. When that happens, they asked. People have simply drive away. I never knew. That was the thing it is. It's 5 39 just a minute away from a coma Sports update. Being home for the holidays means more this year and at Lowe's,.

Seattle City Council Mayor Durkin Budget Council Seattle Governor Jay Inslee Millcreek Lee Stoll Snohomish County Theresa Mosqueda Linwood Kelly Koopmans Moose Tak Lowe Jasper Alberta
Protesters burn part of Guatemala's Congress building

BBC World Service

00:46 sec | 3 months ago

Protesters burn part of Guatemala's Congress building

"Anti government protesters in Guatemala have set fire to parts of the Congress building before being dispersed by riot police. Elsewhere in the capital, Guatemala City, thousands of people took part in largely peaceful demonstrations against the new budget. Leonardo Russia, reports, some areas off the building were completely destroyed. An important documents were burned by the fire. Several people were treated for the effects of smoke inhalation. The violence marred an otherwise peaceful day of protests against the new, controversial budget, which was approved by the Guatemalan Congress on Wednesday. The opposition accuses President Alejandro Yama off allocating too much money for big infrastructure projects, which they say will be awarded well connected private companies.

Anti Government Guatemala City Guatemala Leonardo Congress Guatemalan Congress Russia Alejandro Yama
"guatemalan congress" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:06 min | 1 year ago

"guatemalan congress" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Is celebrating what analysts national more in the day with the band Merenda Linda shell of who the family band from the Maryland suburbs its founder Robert you're on senior did not start playing the marimba until he arrived in the United States because he missed it so much that something he says he has in common with so many members of his audience the people listen and they carry they claim that the feeling the music from then on may twentieth was declared a national day of the marimba by the Guatemalan Congress in nineteen ninety nine the holidays not exactly widely celebrated by young watermelon Americans but Jennifer Flores Robert your own daughter looks forward to it every year for us it means a lot because we personally plan around us so it's going to be a great day just because it's music it's good for the soul a poem when so much news about Guatemalans trying to come to this country now is so sad net is living and on the plane they'll show talk doesn't just mean talking it also means listening it's a challenge to allow different points of view to be heard and still keep the strong grip on the truth we do our research if we hear lies masquerading as opinion we have to call that out to bring their show weekdays ten AM to noon on ninety three point nine FM and AMA twenty W. NYC.

Merenda Linda shell Maryland founder Robert United States Guatemalan Congress NYC Jennifer Flores
"guatemalan congress" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

02:07 min | 1 year ago

"guatemalan congress" Discussed on KCRW

"As soon as they could hold the balance the album like instrument arrived in Central America from Africa to the slave trade it became an integral part of indigenous cultures but for hundreds of years colonizers try to keep people from playing at then came the twentieth century genocide of the Maya people during which my rental players were sometimes targeted and disappeared the Guatemalan government was trying to suppress a lot of the traditional native art forms and the members one of them Hey slot this program's cultural affairs for the Smithsonian's national museum of the American Indians there was one that was so ingrained with the people of Guatemala that they would not give it up the government eventually relented and name them or in bulk one of all us national instrument in nineteen seventy eight here in Washington DC museum of the American Indian is celebrating one of all us national marine that day with the band marimba Linda shell of who the family band from the Maryland suburbs its founder Robert you're on senior did not start playing the marimba until he arrived in the United States because he missed it so much that something he says he has in common with so many members of his audience the people listen and they carry they claim that the feeling the music from them because on February twentieth was declared a national day of the marimba by the Guatemalan Congress in nineteen ninety nine the holidays not exactly widely celebrated by young watermelon Americans but Jennifer Flores Robert your own daughter looks forward to it every year for us it means a lot because we personally plan around us so it's going to be a great day just because it's music it's good for the soul a.

Central America Africa years Guatemalan government national museum Guatemala Washington DC museum Linda shell Maryland founder Robert United States Guatemalan Congress American Indian Jennifer Flores
"guatemalan congress" Discussed on The Beat with Ari Melber

The Beat with Ari Melber

03:08 min | 1 year ago

"guatemalan congress" Discussed on The Beat with Ari Melber

"On the investigation that the Democrats launched that he says went on for two years unjustly it is perplexing to me. Why would McConnell not support something like this why I think he does? I'm I'm speculating here right. I know more about Russian politics. I do about American politics but I just was on Capitol Hill a couple of days ago talking to senators about what is going on with the many bills by the way there's a couple that are ahead in the queue but there's lots of really good legislation to help protect the vote and I think he doesn't want to prolong the story about what the Russians did but I think it's a real political mistake for Mitch McConnell and the Republicans for two reasons one. This is not about partisan issues for the future. Why are they assuming that the Russians might do this? Why might the Iranians might not do this? Why might not high school Silicon Valley Hackers Club here where I live might disrupt the elections? We need to protect our elections for all adversaries and number two. Some of the things are very part bipartisan. The deterrent for instance is co signature by Marco Rubio last. I checked. He's a Republican and by the way it's a great idea. The legislation says something very simple. If there is new intelligence that shows that Russians or any other foreign actor interfered in our election automatically sanctions will go into place. Tell me how that's partisan that sounds pretty straightforward American to me well and in fact there was a piece out today. Believe The New York Times talking about how Iran was doing just that and I think seven thousand accounts have been shut down on twitter where Iran has been sowing discord acting as if they were literally an Iranian American woman in Seattle a Harvard University diversity a student and so on and so forth certainly it says the article says that the disinformation campaign that Iran is involved in is is not as sophisticated as Russia yet but they believe it is headed in that direction ambassador mcfaul. Thank you good talking to you still to come to Democratic senators just toward the controversial detention center in El Paso and they will be on the beat revealing exactly what they saw plus why revelations about Richard Nixon's tax returns could undercut undercut Donald Trump's attempt to keep his secret tonight new fallout from the trump `immigration agenda moments ago trump announcing. He's reached a deal with Guatemala to restrict asylum applications from Central America. We should note however the Guatemalan Congress likely needs to sign off on the agreement. I so it's unclear whether this would go into effect if at all this as N._B._C.. News is reporting active duty U._S.. Troops now stationed inside a Border Patrol facility in Texas some saying they may be close to violating federal law which prohibits the military from acting as a police force and the Border Patrol chief in El Paso was just reassigned following report showing unsafe and unsanitary conditions in nearby border stations in a moment..

Iran Russia Mitch McConnell Marco Rubio Donald Trump Border Patrol El Paso Silicon Valley Hackers Club Guatemalan Congress twitter Texas Richard Nixon Guatemala Harvard University Seattle The New York Times Central America
"guatemalan congress" Discussed on KYW Newsradio 1060

KYW Newsradio 1060

03:40 min | 1 year ago

"guatemalan congress" Discussed on KYW Newsradio 1060

"Van students crowded around the back to remotely operate a robot patrolling league island park as don Gilbreth VP of systems at the wireless firm rage incorporation of Malvern watched robotics is a good example of mechanics meeting electronics with math reading all the things that stems about Jeffrey and muny is a freshman at Esperanza academy control the robot with his friend we got to drive that with their own once he was driving it they got stuck students also saw the bank of TV screens at the network operations center at the micro great energy company amorous co says V. P. will I get that's what the the goal for today was since to bring kids into an environment that's real and they they can so sort of it will trigger an interest that they already have and how they might be able to apply it southwest Philly state Rep Joe and I'm a Clinton help to connect Henry with students who may have been undecided about their career paths for the naval yards to them being here on site being able to see it first hand can help them envision a new goal that maybe they haven't considered before Mike denardo KYW newsradio it's twelve seventy the trump administration has worked out an agreement with Guatemala to allow refugees to apply for asylum there instead of pricking all the way here the board the aid group refugees international quick to denounce that deal arguing that Guatemala is not a safe place for anyone fleeing poverty crime or oppression correspondent Bob Constantini reports for the president it could be a major step to cut down overcrowding at the border a safe third country agreement with Guatemala means people who want asylum in the US from there or another nation can apply in Guatemala and wait there while their claims are investigated and provides safety for legitimate asylum seekers and stop asylum fraud and abuse is on Wednesday the president bad mouth Guatemala whose high court had ruled such an agreement could not be done by president Jimmy moralis without approval from the Guatemalan Congress at that time the president threatened to terra from Guatemala and apparently Morales sent his foreign minister to sign the deal anyway in the oval office Bob Constantini Washington dialing for dollars the twenty six and a half billion dollar merger received the blessing of the justice department of five state attorneys general but ultimately there will be still for major wireless carriers terms of the deal call for the TV satellite provider dish to create a new company over the next seven years the new T. mobile sprint combination will approach the size of the ricin and AT and T. very non CBS news eight Wisconsin teams are in the hospital this morning with severe long damage doctors suspect he was from vaping although it's not clear what they inhale this comes amid growing concerns surrounding team Vapi some members of Congress accuse the cigarette maker jewels of targeting their product the kids wanted chip Reid with more you're nothing but a marketer of the poison flavor lawmakers mostly Democrats blasted Julia co founder James mom sees Thursday blaming his company for feeling what they say is a teen vaping epidemic we never wanted any non nicotine user and certainly nobody under age to ever use jewel Prada six months he's argued that Jewell has taken steps to keep Easter eggs away from kids including shutting down its Facebook and Instagram pages and pulling several of its flavored pods from stores but that wasn't enough for some lawmakers flavors hook kids and though you say that you took all the flavors out of the stores you left the mint flavor nearly one in five U. S..

billion dollar seven years six months
"guatemalan congress" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

10:36 min | 1 year ago

"guatemalan congress" Discussed on KQED Radio

"About the life of musician David Crosby from the birds to Crosby stills Nash and young to today now playing from NPR news this is All Things Considered I'm ari Shapiro and I'm very that was Kelly president trump says he has cut a deal with Guatemala to stem the flow of migrants to the US I think it's gonna be a great thing for water model and they don't want these problems either so what we were able to get this done and we got it done fairly quickly the agreement was signed in the oval office this afternoon it is a so called safe third country asylum agreement and it follows days of threats from the president there had been talk of imposing a travel ban of tariffs on Guatemalan goods of taxing money sent home by Guatemalans living in the U. S. and here's Franco or don't use broke the news of the possible travel ban he's been following all those who joins me now hi Frank time so what happened this afternoon well president trump just announced here at the White House that the administration had signed an asylum agreement you know it really was a big agreement that would force migrants traveling through Guatemala to seek asylum out of the United States applies to Salvadorans as well and hunter and to take a key component of trump's strategy for reducing migration and frankly to quite a turn of events considering that just earlier this month the Guatemalan chi court had said you can't do this kind of agreement but trump didn't believe it and he threatened to take action against them and was it those threats that prompted Guatemala to agree to this which they as you suggested had been resisting well it certainly seems like it had an impact you know this is they were certainly scared of the consequences it's a small it's a poor country that depends on the United States the local business community particularly was very scared of the terrorists and was pushing the president of Guatemala Jimmy moralis to do what president trump was seeking you know we as you mentioned we also reported on the travel ban that was directed a Guatemalan nationals who come to United States legally those are the business peaceable themselves to the point you made a moment ago Franco that Guatemala's High Court had ruled the president can't to do this at least not unilaterally it mean can this agreement even come into force will it be legal in Guatemala yeah I mean I think that's the big question and we still need to be a little bit cautious here the High Court did say the president can't do this unilaterally that's the Guatemalan president can't do this unilaterally and authorize an international treaty such attacks are supposed to be ratified by the Guatemalan Congress so this deal may not quite be done yet you don't have to go back to Congress alright and this would seem to be in terms of how the president has approach this street from from the Donald Trump play broke of how he prefers to negotiate with foreign governments it really does I mean just this morning former bass I was I you know I I heard from some former ambassadors who are in touch criticizing trump for giving up on diplomacy in favor of bowling but his supporters trump supporters that is you know are crediting his hard nose negotiating style with getting results you know it was just a couple months ago that he did this with Mexico he threatened to impose big terrorist that would start at five percent and then go up to twenty five percent if Mexico didn't stop the flow of migrants they acted in trump at the last minute pulled back his threats now Guatemala you know actually acted sooner but as we mentioned there's still a few things that really need to be unraveled in Guatemala and adjusted to situate this in a broader context the goal here for president trump is reducing the flow of migrants at the border cutting down on immigration absolutely I mean that's the goal they want to reduce you know they want to reduce migration and I should also note that look this was a small country that trump can have influence over they depend on the United States very increasingly you know right now trump is also trying to push Sweden pressure Sweden to release a U. S. rapper who's in jail on assault charges there's a big question whether a country you know a larger country a wealthier country that doesn't rely on the United States in the same way will act in the same way you know they're less likely to succeed and pure white house correspondent Franco or Dona is reporting there on the deal signed this afternoon in the oval office between the US and Guatemala Finks Franco thank you when you look at the number of police shootings in relation to the population you find the people of color are shot and killed more often than white people the reason for that disparity has been intensely debated for years especially since an unarmed black teenager was shot and killed in Ferguson Missouri almost five years ago there has been one recurring theory the white cops are more likely to shoot black people because of racial bias now a new study is challenging that conclusion NPR's Martin Costi has more since the Ferguson protests of twenty fourteen we've learned a lot more about fatal shootings by the police news organization started collecting their own data on shootings to make up for in complete federal stats and academic started building on that Michigan State University psychologist Joseph says are you as part of a group that looked at fatal shootings in twenty fifteen they added in the race of the police and then did a statistical analysis the race of a police officer did not predict the race of the citizen shot in other words black officers were just as likely to shoot black citizens as white officers were other studies have looked at this question but this one comes closest to being a nation wide analysis it's also getting extra attention because it's in a prestigious peer review journal the proceedings of the National Academy of sciences and that puzzles Philippa to bug off I'm a bit surprised this made its way into P. and S. given what they actually far out golf is a prominent researcher issues of race and criminal justice and the co founder of the center for policing equity he says he applauds the authors for bringing in new data and trying a new approach but he doesn't think they came up with much it doesn't do very much to move us toward an understanding of how much our police responsible for racial disparities and the things it does sort of lead us to our things that we already knew for instance he says if the study is aiming to do but the assumption that white cop shoot people for racist reasons while black cops don't he says that's a straw man because no one in his field actually thinks that racism is not a thing the white people can have a black people can't and nobody's research would suggest that it does that's a really wild promised based in no research that knows you're a scientist should be able to say out loud and then get it published but the papers lead author David J. Johnson of the university of Maryland says some academics do make that assumption especially in his field psychology and he believes the same assumption is being made by the media I think that you see that in the recording on individual shootings where the mentioned the race the officer and the reason that they mentioned that is because is perceived as being well so what we did was for the first time tested that assumption Johnson takes pains to say that the study is not trying to deny the role of race instead what they're trying to do is narrow down where it's having its effect on policing he says it also raises some questions about a common fix for biased policing the push to hire more minority officers because if this study is right just hiring more black cops will not mean fewer black people get shot and that fits with what implicit bias trainers say people can have biases against their own demographic groups women can advises about women blacks and have biases about blacks it is incorrect to assume that any issue of bias in policing is brought to us by white males lawyers for dell is a criminologist as well as a bias trainer she says academics have been wrestling with this question for decades and this latest paper is not about to settle things the defenders of police of course well cherry pick the studies that show no bias and the other side will cherry pick the ones that do but we don't have any definitive studies on she thinks people should be more open to the idea that bias and demographics can both play a role and that's something that the authors of the paper and the critics both seem to agree on the real question here is not whether race is a factor in police shootings but when is it beforehand and all the things that might lead up to a shooting such as drug laws or racial profiling or does it come down to the skin color of the individual cop holding the gun Martin Costi NPR news there are more than twenty one thousand Kentucky fried chicken locations across more than a hundred and thirty countries among all those many thousands we know of only one that serves housemaid Flon I ate the flown and it was just so good that I went to my dad and said that I think we can solve this one rex Daniel goda second generation owner of a KFC in Hialeah Florida in the Miami area when you go to was twenty three he went to work in the kitchen along side then head chef delta American solace he was older but he was a sous chefs in Cuba Gonzalez immigrated to the U. S. and began cooking for K. F. C. in the nineteen sixties and every morning he would make food for the rest of the staff including stuff that wasn't on the menu he would make a rolls cold for yo chicken fracas she different kinds of homemade lunches from the products that we have every once in awhile he would make flown for dessert now instead of baking that flying in and out of and consolidate used a massive pressure cooker meant for frying chicken turns out the pressure cookers even heat makes the desert firm and silky before it is topped off with homemade caramel sauce all my god is delicious is the best one ever not because I work there anything like that but it is the best phone ever and a lot of customers face so you know they sometimes they go in there just to buy fonts I like using the United you can knock on my check and there are no I just want to climb cloudy of of a a is the general manager of the fly on famous KFC and she has worked with multiple had shift over the years she says chef Gonzalez past his recipe to Isaac Herrera Carrera then shared it with Blanka Ortiz AS Beauvais explains he started laughing fan all you want to try our coupon find coupons and she's I don't want to make sure he does not like this one or to use now works part time but she cooked the foreign at KFC for more than thirty years she was the first to write the recipe down on paper the original didn't call her measurements everything was added by hi including a.

David Crosby ari Shapiro trump Guatemala Nash NPR Kelly president twenty five percent five percent thirty years five years
"guatemalan congress" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

10:53 min | 1 year ago

"guatemalan congress" Discussed on KCRW

"Of the possible travel ban he's been following all those who joins me now hi Frank time so what happened this afternoon well president trump just announced here at the White House that the administration had signed an asylum agreement you know it really was a big agreement that would force migrants traveling through Guatemala to seek asylum out of the United States applies to Salvadorans as well in hunter answer take key component of trump's strategy for reducing migration and frankly to quite a turn of events considering that just earlier this month the Guatemalan chi court had said you can't do this kind of agreement but trump didn't believe it and he threatened to take action against them and was it those threats that prompted Guatemala to agree to this which they as you suggested had been resisting well it certainly seems like it had an impact you know this is they were certainly scared of the consequences it's a small it's a poor country that depends on the United States the local business community particularly was very scared of the terrorists in was pushing the president of Guatemala Jimmy moralis to do what president trump was seeking you know we as you mentioned we also reported on the travel ban that was directed at Guatemalan nationals who come to United States legally those are the business peaceable themselves to the point you made a moment ago Franco that Guatemala's High Court had ruled the president can't do this at least not unilaterally it mean can this agreement even come into force will it be legal in Guatemala yeah I mean I think that's the big question and we still need to be a little bit cautious here the High Court did say the president can't do this unilaterally that's the Guatemalan president can't do this unilaterally and authorize an international treaty such packs are supposed to be ratified by the Guatemalan Congress so this deal may not quite be done yet you don't have to go back to Congress alright and this would seem to be in terms of how the president has approach this street from from the Donald Trump play broke of how he prefers to negotiate with foreign governments it really does I mean just this morning former in bass I wish I you know I I heard from some former ambassadors who are in touch criticizing trump for giving up on diplomacy in favor of bowling but his supporters trump supporters that is you know are crediting his hard nose negotiating style with getting results you know it was just a couple months ago that he did this with Mexico he threatened to impose big terrace that would start at five percent and then go up to twenty five percent if Mexico didn't stop the flow of migrants they acted in trump at the last minute pulled back his threats now Guatemala you know actually acted sooner but as we mentioned there's still a few things that really need to be unraveled in Guatemala and adjusted to situate this in the broader context the goal here for president trump is reducing the flow of migrants at the border cutting down on immigration absolutely I mean that's the goal they want to reduce you know they want to reduce migration and I should also note that look this was a small country that trump can have influence over they depend on the United States very increasingly you know right now trump is also trying to push Sweden pressure Sweden to release a U. S. rapper who's in jail on assault charges there's a big question whether a country you know a larger country a wealthier country that doesn't rely the United States in the same way will act in the same way you know they're less likely to succeed and pure white house correspondent Franco or Dona is reporting there on the deal signed this afternoon in the oval office between the US and Guatemala thanks Franco thank you when you look at the number of police shootings in relation to the population you find the people of color are shot and killed more often than white people the reason for that disparity has been intensely debated for years especially since an unarmed black teenager was shot and killed in Ferguson Missouri almost five years ago there has been one recurring theory the white cops are more likely to shoot black people because of racial bias now a new study is challenging that conclusion NPR's Martin Costi has more since the Ferguson protests of twenty fourteen we've learned a lot more about fatal shootings by the police news organization started collecting their own data on shootings to make up for in complete federal stats and academic started building on that Michigan State University psychologist Joseph says are you as part of a group that looked at fatal shootings in twenty fifteen they added in the race of the police and then did a statistical analysis the race of a police officer did not predict the race of the citizen shot in other words black officers were just as likely to shoot black citizens as white officers were other studies have looked at this question but this one comes closest to being a nation wide analysis it's also getting extra attention because it's in a prestigious peer review journal the proceedings of the National Academy of sciences and that puzzles Phil petit bug off I'm a bit surprised this made its way into P. N. S. given what they actually file golf is a prominent researcher issues of race and criminal justice and the co founder of the center for policing equity he says he applauds the authors for bringing in new data and trying a new approach but he doesn't think they came up with much it doesn't do very much to move us toward an understanding of how much our police responsible for racial disparities and the things it does sort of lead us to our things that we already knew for instance he says if the study is aiming to do by the assumption that white cop shoot people for racist reasons while black cops don't he says that's a straw man because no one in his field actually thinks that racism is not a thing the white people can happen what people can't and nobody's research would suggest that it does that's a really wild promised based in no research that knows you're a scientist should be able to say out loud and then get it published but the papers lead author David J. Johnson of the university of Maryland says some academics do make that assumption especially in his field psychology and he believes the same assumption is being made by the media I think that you see that in the recording on individual shootings where the mentioned the race the officer and the reason that they mentioned that is because is perceived as being well so what we did was for the first time tested that assumption Johnson takes pains to say that the study is not trying to deny the role of race instead what they're trying to do is narrow down where it's having its effect on policing he says it also raises some questions about a common fix for biased policing the push to hire more minority officers because if this study is right just hiring more black cops will not mean fewer black people get shot and that fits with what implicit bias trainers say people can have biases against their own demographic groups women can have biases about women blacks and have biases about blacks it is incorrect to assume that any issue of bias in policing is brought to us by white males lawyers for dell is a criminologist as well as a bias trainer she says academics have been wrestling with this question for decades and this latest paper is not about to settle things the defenders of police of course well cherry pick the studies that show no bias and the other side will cherry pick the ones that do but we don't have any definitive studies on she thinks people should be more open to the idea that bias and demographics can both play a role and that's something that the authors of the paper and the critics both seem to agree on the real question here is not whether race is a factor in police shootings but when is it before hand and all the things that might lead up to a shooting such as drug laws or racial profiling or does it come down to the skin color of the individual cop holding the gun Martin Costi NPR news there are more than twenty one thousand Kentucky fried chicken locations across more than a hundred and thirty countries among all those many thousands we know of only one that serves housemaid Flon I ate the flown and it was just so good that I went to my dad and said that I think we can solve the swan that's Danya goda second generation owner of a KFC in Hialeah Florida in the Miami area when you go to was twenty three he went to work in the kitchen along side then head chef Baldomero Gonzalez he was older but he was a sous chef in Cuba Gonzalez immigrated to the U. S. and began cooking for KFC in the nineteen sixties and every morning he would make food for the rest of the staff including stuff that wasn't on the menu he would make overall scope for yo chicken Fricka see different kinds of homemade lunches from the products that we have at every once in awhile he would make flown for dessert now instead of baking that flying in and out of and consolidate used a massive pressure cooker meant for frying chicken turns out the pressure cookers even heat makes the desert firm and silky before it is topped off with homemade caramel sauce all my god is delicious is the best line ever not because I worked there anything like that but it is the best one ever and a lot of customers face so you know they sometimes they go in there just to buy flowers like skews me United chicken no contact right chicken they're not not just one line cloudy of of a a is the general manager of the fly on famous KFC and she has worked with multiple had shift over the years she says chef Gonzalez past his recipe to Isaac Herrera Carrera then shared it with Blanka Ortiz AS Beauvais explains he started laughing fan all you want to try our coupon find coupons and she's I don't want to make China's not like this one Ortiz now works part time but she cooked the Florida KFC for more than thirty years she was the first to write the recipe down on paper the original didn't call offer measurements everything was added by by including a closely guarded secret ingredient in order to keep the phone on the menu the restaurant had to share the recipe with KFC's corporate owner yum brands according to the Miami Herald which first alerted us to this story when yum brands bought KFC they gave this franchise a special exception to keep making its famous fawn owner down your go to it says it's popular with the corporate bosses to I mean when people from care C. come and visit us almost always they take some home with they're not the only ones Floridians come from all over just for the fun we have people that bring their own containers and we cut the whole form for them when they take the whole line which is a service that probably would feed sixteen so if you are a fan of full on how easy to Hialeah then maybe packet Tupperware or to you're listening to All Things Considered from NPR news case your W. sponsors include Netflix presenting the original series.

president White House Frank trump twenty five percent five percent thirty years five years
"guatemalan congress" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

14:40 min | 2 years ago

"guatemalan congress" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Anza Beulah tomato memorial fund established to strengthen NPR's commitment to training and protecting journalists in high risk environments. And from listeners like you who donate to this NPR station. Back now to our conversation with Brian winter professor, Greg Grandin and professor Elizabeth Oglesby. I know this is complex. There are lots and lots and lots of moving parts with this that our economic and after do with fighting communism and corrupt governments in rebel groups in the drug trade, it's incredibly complicated. So if you're feeling a little loss. Now's a good time to get your questions answered no judgments for trying to break down these tough geopolitical issues because they are tough to understand. So please share your questions with us one a acts W A M, U dot ORG. Or maybe I'm just the one who's confused, but joining us now is one more person tells unconfirmed used me who you may recognize from the Friday news roundup from time to time Franko or the White House. Correspondent at McClatchy is Washington bureau. Franco, welcome great to be here. Am I alone and feeling like this is wildly complex stuff to understand? It is so complex. I I spend our speaking to the your other guests asking them. What does this? Mean what is the impact I talked to lawyers what are the legal ramifications? I talked administrations asking them. Why is this happening? What are you gonna do about it? And you talk from one administration to another administration. You get often times you get a completely different answer. You talk from one agency to another agency to NFC talk to department of state. Everyone's got a different philosophy of how to approach this problem as you pointed out, it is so complicated. There's so many moving parts it's hard to find the right answer. Is that part Franko of why maybe policy for the US policy toward Central America may be hit or miss maybe causes more problems than it solves problems. Is that part of his well because there are so many moving parts. Absolutely. It's absolutely an issue there. You also obviously got the politics of it. I mean, Obama he faced this as well back in two thousand fourteen when you had that when we had that historic rise of unaccompanied children that were coming in. There was also obviously families that were coming in at this time, and he also sought to respond to public outcry to address this. He did some of the same things that Trump did maybe with some of the less rhetorics. But you know, he sent the national guard down to the border. He erected tent cities. He did a lot of these things. But then in two thousand sixteen at the end of his administration in his state of the union address. He also acknowledged that this is not a quick fix issue that we need to be as he said patient. We need a long-term solution. And we gotta we gotta stick with this. If it's going to be sought we've heard from some of you about past policies from previous administrations, STAN rights I worked in the State Department on Central American affairs during the Reagan administration in the eighties. Reagan's Central American initiative poured billions into the region, but did not press economic and political reforms while supporting the contras took priority. A lot of wasted money was the result and a great opportunity to achieve progress was missed one person who does know Central America. Very very well is John Kelly who is the former White House chief of staff he was. Also before that the secretary of homeland security and before that he was the head of southern command SouthCom, that's the kind of unified military command based west of Miami that overseas military operations in central America, South America, and the Caribbean. We interviewed him on one a back in June of twenty seventeen when he was still DHS secretary regarding Central America. Here's part of what then secretary Kelly told us know one of my first conversations with the president might have been when he was still the president elect of the southwest border. There's numerous ways to secure to gain control of the southwest border. At one of those is to work with our great partners one thousand fifteen hundred miles south of the Rio Grande if we are trying to stop everything purely on the one yard line. So to speak a goal line. Stand day in day out we've lost that was former homeland security secretary John Kelly speaking in June of twenty seventeen Franko that that goal line stance. That secretary Kelly talked about. Feels a lot like the strategy at the border everything we discuss in that interview. I remember very vividly. He was very serious about partnering with Mexico and the northern triangle nations. So that we could prevent people from even wanting to get to the one yard line. How far is that strategy gone with this administration since then? You know? I mean, they got they got all the defensive linemen right up at the line. And they're trying to block Trump wants to obviously put more defense defensive lineman. They're bigger defensive linemen and probably pump them up with more steroids. So. Get even bigger. But as John Kelly has said, you know, there are and your guests have said there are so many structural issues going on that this is is an issue that you just it is very very hard to address this and a short term solution. I was talking to a foreign minister of Guatemala yesterday about this. And he's like look his concerns with the Trump administration are are just that that they want a quick fix. They want an answer now. And you're just not going to get an answer. Now, there are so many complicated factors. I pushing it you guys have talked about the history the Cold War, the violence the economic. There's also the family reunification back in two thousand eight I was covering poultry plants poor points, and they're just thousands and thousands of Guatemalan and Salvadoran men who came over to work in those plants because frankly, a lot of Americans don't necessarily want to do the work. Also, the Pay's not that high and it's just ugly work. Two thousand fourteen in two thousand fifteen what he told me you are seeing then. And now is the family reunification that it's the magnet of people coming here to be with their families to be with their husbands to be with their parents. Then obviously the economy. The United States is doing pretty good right now. And the economies of those countries are rough. You can't get as many jobs, let assists evolve Franko over time. Whereas we mentioned earlier with the border. It used to be basically kind of open. You can come into the US do seasonal work. Oh back as the border has gotten more secured and more militarized the incentive to go back and forth lessons because it's just harder to cross the border. Does that make it even more appealing for someone over time as the policies changed to come into the US find work in poultry plant put down roots and try to bring the rest of the family, which brings all the attendant problems with smuggling rings and so forth. A problem that gets worse over time. No, absolutely. I mean appealing is one way to put it in other ways like necessary for these families. If you wanna stay with your family. They many many members of these communities have told me that they felt they had no choice. They would much rather. Just go back and forth. They are communities out rural communities that you were guys we're talking about in Guatemala in Mexico where you can see from back in the day old US money, helping build those infrastructures while those men now can no longer go back because they don't have that ease of flexibility to go back. So they need to bring their families if they want to be together to the United States, and they're kind of stuck here because they can't go back and forth. We're speaking to Franko or Donas of McClatchy is Washington bureau before I go back to the panel Franko what you said that you were speaking to a Guatemalan foreign minister just yesterday. What are the countries in Central America saying about what they would like to see happen? Are they? They and the Trump administration seeing eye to eye on where we go from here. Are there things they are requesting or requesting less of that just aren't being heard? I mean, it's it's it's definitely a mix of things. I was with the foreign minister that I was talking to a former form a very recent former foreign minister, I don't want to say that it was tipped as foreign minister. But he he certainly was wanting more sustainable more assistance in USA ID money. More federal aid the agency for international development, absolutely. And more kind of economic support to provide more sustainability a lot of times they will point to what Plan Colombia, which was the ten billions of dollars ten billion dollars that the United States funded over a decade to help Colombia come out of some of these kind of similar problems had to do with violence and drugs, stabilized the courts, stabilize law enforcement, kind of build the economy. So that they so that people would not need to to come to the United States. A lot of people think that that is what is necessary. But there's not necessarily the will. And you need a lot of will to do something like that. Speaking of economy that gets to a few more comments that came in from our audience out bring the panel back in after I read a few of these Angie tweeted, I am a Honduran who migrated to the USA when I was eight years old. This was back in nineteen ninety nine and the reasons are still the same the lack of employment the level of crime. For decades, the USA has intervened in Central American policy to the interest of the US and US based companies that come and use the land and resources and later leave. I travel often to visit family and can clearly see that the rich get richer and the poor get poorer. There is no middle class. Richard tweeted since those three countries regimes depend on remittances from ex patriots. Could it be that by not enforcing our immigration laws? We end up supporting those corrupt governments and in the way sustaining the misery of their population. Prof? Oglesby. That's an interesting question. What do you think of Richard question? I think that what's going on right now this week in Guatemala is a very deep crisis in which it the it's a constitutional crisis. And. No solution is possible in Guatemala on less. There is progress in addressing the underlying issue of impunity in removing the criminal networks that control the Guatemalan state. So I think that any talk about a large-scale economic aid program like a plan Marschall or is. Is useless at this point on less? There is a deeper reform in the Guatemalan state. Now, it's not hopeless. Guatemalans have been struggling really hard to build a viable judiciary to build the rule of law to prosecute corruption to prosecute organized crime. They've got the support of the United Nations through the international commission against impunity which works in Guatemala to seek up until this year. The United States has been very supportive of that commission, the anti impunity commission. Secede. But in the last year, the Trump administration has turned its back on secede as Guatemalan President Xi moored allies has gone after the commission and finally just this week expelled the commission unilaterally terminated its mandate. Illegal. I might add because this is the treaty between the Guatemalan congress in the United Nations. Nations-supervised I hate to cut you short. I know time was limited. I just want to make sure that we hit Richards question right on the head. It sounds like what he's also asking about with regard to these corrupt governments in and I hear what you're getting out in terms of government transparency. It sounds like kind of what he's asking is that by not enforcing our immigration laws people from these countries make it into the US earn revenue send money back, and they're sending money back to corrupt government. So maybe enforcing our laws at the border can help stem the flow of money that keeps these corrupt governments in power. Actually, the militarization of the border. That's happened. Since the nineteen ninety s has generated an increase in migration. So the family reunification issues. One issue not being able to go back and forth. The increased cost of the passage now cost ten or twelve thousand dollars in these routes are controlled by criminal networks in Mexico. So what that means is that people go into debt to be able to get to the border if they're deported. So if we are in so increase for enforcement means increased deportation of people who have gone into debt and sold their lands in order to make that journey. People have no choice, but to return to the United States. So what people in the US have to understand is that the militarization of the border that's gone on since the nineteen nineties generates more migration. Gotcha. Gotcha. Let me get to Brian winter. And professor granted. I know our time is short, but give me a sense, professor grand and just briefly of one policy shift that you would suggest that the US consider in order to deal with the underlying issues in the northern triangle. It's one thing that you would like to see the government at least consider well if we worked at have an aid program because I know oftentimes aid programs in thrown out as a solution that we have to solve the problem at the source. We have to. Create us. They have to be they have to be economic policies that actually people Centric and community Centric that rebuild local markets. I'd rebuild regional economies. Right. When will often times, and this was true under Bush was torn to bomb. It'll be true. Under Trump is what passes as development aid is really good at building the infrastructure of dispossession and dislocation that drives the migration forward. So we have to get out of this idea that the United States needs to do more in just in general terms, it has to actually rethink its whole economic policy. I mean think about NAFTA just to step back the North American Free trade agreement displaced five million Mexican families because they couldn't compete, which sheep US Cohen. And that's the reason why the militarization of the border and the implementation of NAFTA went hand in hand, they knew people after an ablation knew that this migration was going to be driven forward in terms of remittances remittances, don't uphold Krupp governments..

United States Franko Guatemala Trump Central America Mexico Richard John Kelly secretary professor Brian winter State Department NPR Elizabeth Oglesby United Nations Washington bureau president Anza Beulah tomato memorial
"guatemalan congress" Discussed on Here & Now

Here & Now

02:20 min | 2 years ago

"guatemalan congress" Discussed on Here & Now

"Transparency, unlike China's opaque authoritarian ways, and that's exactly what Taiwan's president citing win, has done in recent swings through the region aimed at pre-empting more diplomatic defections like in this address to the Guatemalan congress last year. We're. Taiwa stressing the two countries. Similar struggles from war democracy side, declared the friendship between Taiwan in Guatemala firm and stable. The White House has worn China about interfering in domestic politics of nations in the western hemisphere, even though the US doesn't formerly maintain ties with Taiwan either it does have robust trade and sells arms to Taipei in protest last month over the diplomatic defections. The US State Department temporarily recalled three chiefs of missions from Panama, the Dominican Republican el-salvador. This isn't a permanent recall. It's certainly not a break in relations, but it's a shot across the bow, Eric Farnsworth, vice president of the council of the Americas, a Washington DC based think tank says, China has an infamous record of burdening poor countries of huge debt, and then taking over strategic infrastructure as collateral for the unpaid loans. He says, it's one thing when China does this in Asia or Africa, but another in places. Like Central America countries where that that have had a very close relationship one or the other with the United States. That's different to particularly from the view of Washington that now it's getting pretty close to home literally and figuratively. And that's why I think alarm bells are starting to go off former US ambassador to Panama. John Feeley says, US officials should worry about China's growing access to key allies in sensitive information. Not that China will stage military bases in the hemisphere. What we are talking about is a steady increase in diplomatic throwaway throughout the region that will compete in spaces where previously the United States was very clearly the partner of choice before the US hand over the canal and nine hundred ninety nine a huge American flag stood on a spit of land at the Pacific entrance to the Panama Canal. China's hoping their flag will soon take up that symbolic spot. They've let the Panamanians. No, that's where they want to Iraq their new. Chinese embassy. Carrie Kahn NPR news..

China Taiwan United States US State Department Eric Farnsworth Panamanians Washington Americas Guatemalan congress Panama Canal president John Feeley Carrie Kahn Iraq White House Chinese embassy vice president Taipei Guatemala Asia
"guatemalan congress" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

08:31 min | 2 years ago

"guatemalan congress" Discussed on KQED Radio

"We conclude our series of EMMY nominees with each array who's been nominated for, her starring role in her HBO series insecure, Peter Morgan creator and writer of the historical drama series the crown nominated for thirteen Emmys and with Trevor. Noah host of the daily show, nominated for two Emmys join us fresh air at one o'clock this afternoon with a repeat broadcasts at seven o'clock this evening here on k. q. e. Public. Radio sunshine inland, temperatures, low to mid nineties up, the coast clearing temperatures in the upper sixties seventies around. The, bay this is morning edition from NPR news I'm David Greene in Culver City California and I'm Steve Inskeep in Washington. DC the stock market hit a, record high the other day employment is also running high they. Have been for years the very conditions that tend to push up wages so. Why isn't that happening David Wessel is here to talk with us about that he at the Hutchins center at the. Brookings Institution welcome back David Steve a couple of years ago it seemed that wages. Were finally climbing what's happened since well I think a good yardstick is to look at what happens to the wages, of people, who work, full-time year round and according to the. Census bureau the typical man earns about fifty four, thousand dollars a year the typical woman earns about forty. Three thousand dollars a year adjusted for inflation the typical man who works fulltime is earning. Less today than his counterpart did in One thousand. Nine hundred eighty eight at think that's extraordinary now more recently as you, point out wages, have begun to go up but they, haven't gone up much more than inflation it depends month-to-month. What's happening so adjusted for inflation wages. Are basically flat even though we, have, unemployment in eighteen year low why would that be well that's a good question. It's one that economists in academia all the. Way up to the chairman of the Federal Reserve have been asking recently and. I think there are a? Couple possible explanations one is that the unemployment rate is. Misleading there are a lot of workers on the. Sidelines of the, economy, and they're being pulled in, by the recovery another is that productivity has been growing. Very, slowly rising productivity growth is the way that employers can afford to raise wages and maintain prophet so you would expect. Wages to be growing sluggishly when, productivity growth is low but in many ways I think what's. Going on is that workers simply have less bargaining power today than they once. Did unions are weaker there's an explosion of temp agencies and outsourcing the gig economy And, in lots of communities across the country very few. Employers dominate the labor market. So that workers have, no choice but to. Work for them and some communities for instance the, hospital so that means? Employers, aren't competing for workers. By raising wages and that depresses, them a non gear to DASA writer who is on the program the other day, put out a book about inequities in the economy. And suggested that essentially productivity is going up. But the economy has changed in ways that people at the top are able to hold onto more and more. And more of those games and not share I, think that's true productivity is growing is just growing at a disappointingly slow pace but it's. True that the benefits of the growing economy are being increasingly claimed by people. At the top so, what does this mean if your Jerome Powell running the Federal Reserve or any number of the. Other people who are. In positions of power and are supposed to influence the economy Well what they referred to as. At the fed as the wage puzzle is really central to their decision making on. Interest rates today usually history tells us that went in unemployment rate goes, way way down wages start to go up, and then, businesses start. To raise prices and you have more inflation but that relationship, isn't holding now so the fed has to decide is something really different in the, economy is this, a permanent change or are wage increases just around the corner in which case they should be. Raising rates more rapidly than they are is this wage stagnation the same for every kind of person no of course we're talking about averages wages actually are. Going up a little. Faster at the bottom than they are for people, at the, middle yes the best paid people CEO's lawyers are big law firms the best ball players they're doing very. Well but when we look at the data it turns out that things like raising the minimum wage which has happened in eighteenth states this year that's beginning to lift the wages of The pay people in the economy. A little more than the typical worker at the metal David Wessel of. The Brookings Institution and the. Wall Street Journal thanks very much you're welcome the president of Guatemala, Jimmy Morales came into office promising. To end corruption but he's also under investigation by an anti-corruption commission backed. By the United Nations and so he took things in his own hands and decided to shut the commission down NPR's John Burnett reports the international? Commission against impunity in Guatemala is known by its Spanish acronym? Sieg, it was created twelve years ago in concert with the United Nations around the idea that military and government elites cannot continue plundering public funds. If, this enfeebled country was. To move forward after three decades, of savage civil war, since then the commission. Has racked up an impressive record three, hundred and ten convictions thirty four legal reforms submitted to the Guatemalan congress to former presidents currently in. Jail on corruption charges and the sitting President is under investigation, for campaign finance shenanigans he gets this great international experiment in. Criminal investigation and. Judicial reform. And there's not been. Anything like your anywhere in the world hate Doyle, is a senior analyst at the National Security Archive at a veteran of human. Rights work in Guatemala president Morales decisions to cancel mandate and essentially order its investigation to come to a grinding. Halt is a terrible blow to the hybris that Guatemala has made injustice president. Morales announced Friday he will not renew the mandate of secede when it expires in twelve months and that it's time to transfer their mission. To the Guatemalan attorney general's office Morales appeared in front of a phalanx of dozens, of stern military officials and shortly before his press conference, a column of olive green. GPS with soldiers and machine gun turrets rolled past headquarters the US embassy which gave the armed vehicles to the police Crimefighting warned Guatemala not to misuse them the also reaffirmed its support for the United States is a major financial backer of the anti-graft commission watermelon observers consider the use of security forces. In these two instances on Friday, to be a menacing replay of the battle days of the nineteen eighties with military, coups make Wata, Malla a pariah state in Latin America look Lisa president the president. Has chosen to take the side of illegality says longtime Guatemalan human rights lawyer Alejandro Rodriguez this is extremely grave the message the president. Has sent us basically a coup d'etat the military procession clearly rattled workers inside Sieg but he has plenty is their spokesman us our international organization. You know we, have the immunities on. We expect that the government protect our headquarters and if you see a Militares outside is not a. Good sign, for an international body president Morales has accused of sewing judicial terror he's being investigated for using illegal campaign donations to bankroll his twenty fifteen election and his, brother in one of his sons were arrested for. Fraud Gauging from a dozen interviews in the plaza in. Front of the greenstone national palace yesterday the work of Cecik remains popular in the president's decision to kick them out of the country is troubling Condo is working correctly to. Combat all, the, corrupt, government officials says Dora. Sali's a sixty four year old housewife it's lay who stand, to lose secede continues to do. Its work in Guatemala to bring, it home, to, Americans, one longtime, Guatemala watcher put it this way imagine a President Trump wakes up one morning and announce, his he's shutting down the molar investigation that's what just happened in Guatemala John Burnett NPR news Guatemala City This is NPR news. We have at perspective part of our daily listener commentary series coming up I it's a look at the roads and traffic.

Guatemala president Jimmy Morales Brookings Institution Federal Reserve David Wessel writer United Nations NPR EMMY Sieg David Greene Steve Inskeep John Burnett Noah host Culver City California HBO
"guatemalan congress" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

08:22 min | 2 years ago

"guatemalan congress" Discussed on KQED Radio

"They are Monday and. There will be clearing, at the, beaches later on sunny inland temperatures upper sixties at the coasts some seventies around the bay and low to mid nineties inland kinda same. Story for tomorrow and then a little bit a cooling starting on Wednesday getting into. The mid to. Upper eighties inland this is kick you we d. public radio This. Is morning. Edition, from NPR news I'm David Greene in, Culver City California and I'm Steve Inskeep in Washington DC. The, stock market hit a record high the other day employment is also running high they have been for years the very. Conditions that tend to push up, wages so why isn't that happening David Wessel is here to. Talk with us about that he is at the Hutchins center at the Brookings. Institution welcome back David you Steve a couple of years ago it seemed that wages were finally climbing what's happened since well. I think a, good yardstick is to, look at what happens to the wages of people who work full-time year round and according to. The census bureau, the typical man earns about fifty four thousand dollars a year the typical, woman earns about forty three thousand dollars a year adjusted for inflation the typical man who, works fulltime is earning less, today than his counterpart did in nineteen, eighty eight at, think that's extrordinary now more recently as you. Point out wages have. Begun to go up But they haven't gone. Up much more than inflation it depends. Month to month what's happening so adjusted. For inflation wages are basically flat, even, though we have unemployment in an eighteen year low why would that be well. That's a good question it's one that economists. In academia all the way up to the chairman of the Federal Reserve have. Been asking recently and I? Think there are a couple of possible explanations one is. That the unemployment rate is misleading there are a lot. Of workers. On, the sidelines of the economy and they, are being pulled in by the recovery another is that. Productivity, has been growing very slowly rising productivity growth is the way that employers can afford to raise wages and maintain prophet. So you would expect wages to, be growing sluggishly when productivity growth is low but in many. Ways I think what's going on is that workers simply have less bargaining power. Today than they once did unions are weaker there's an explosion of temp agencies and outsourcing in the gig economy and in. Lots of communities, across the country very, few employers dominate the labor market So that? Workers, have no choice but. To work for them and some, communities for instance the hospital so that means employers aren't competing for workers by raising, wages and that depresses them a non gear DASA writer. Who was on the program the other day. Put out a book about inequities in the economy and suggested that essentially productivity is going up but the economy has. Changed in ways that people at the top are, able to hold onto more and more and more of those games and not share I. Think that's true productivity is growing is just growing at a disappointingly slow pace. But it's true that, the benefits of the growing economy are being increasingly claimed by people at the top so what. Does this mean if. Your Jerome Powell running the Federal Reserve or any number of the other people who are in positions of power. And are supposed to influence the economy Well what they, referred to as the at the fed as the wage puzzle is really central to their decision making. On interest rates today usually history tells us that went unemployment rate goes, way way down wages start to go up, and then, businesses start. To raise prices and you have more inflation but that relationship isn't holding now so the fed has. To decide is something really different in, the economy is, this a permanent change or are wage increases just around the corner in which case they should. Be raising rates more rapidly than they are is this wage stagnation the same for every kind of person no of course we're talking about averages wages actually. Are going up a. Little faster at the bottom than they are for people at, the middle yes the best people CEO's lawyers are big law firms the best ball players they're doing very. Well but when we look at the data it turns out that things like raising the minimum wage which has happened in eighteenth states this year that's beginning to lift the wages of The least paid people in the economy a little. More. Than the typical worker at the middle David Wessel of the Brookings. Institution and the Wall Street. Journal thanks very much you're welcome the president of Guatemala Jimmy Morales, came into office promising to end. Corruption but he's also under investigation by an anti-corruption commission backed by the. United Nations and so he took things in his own hands and decided to shut the commission down and pears John Burnett reports the international commission? Against impunity in Guatemala is known by its Spanish acronym Sieg? It, was created twelve years ago in concert with the United Nations around the idea that military and government elites cannot continue plundering public funds if. This, enfeebled country was to move forward after three decades, of savage civil war, since then the commission. Has racked up an impressive record three, hundred and ten convictions thirty four legal reforms submitted to the Guatemalan congress to former presidents currently in. Jail on corruption charges and the sitting President is, under investigation for campaign finance shenanigans he gets this great international. Experiment in criminal. Investigation and. Judicial reform and it's. Not been anything like anywhere in the world hate, Doyle is a senior analyst at the National Security Archive had a veteran of. Human rights work in Guatemala president Morales decision to cancel mandate CC and essentially order its investigations to come to a, grinding halt is a terrible blow to progress that Guatemala has made injustice president. Morales announced Friday he will not renew the mandate of secede when it expires in twelve months and that it's time to transfer their mission. To the Guatemalan attorney general's office Morales appeared in front of a phalanx of dozens, of stern military officials and shortly before his press conference, a column of olive green. GPS with soldiers and machine gun turrets rolled past headquarters the US embassy which gave the armed vehicles to the police For crimefighting warned Guatemala, nut to misuse them the also reaffirmed its support for. The United States is a major financial backer of the anti-graft commission watermelon observers consider the use of security forces in, these two instances on Friday to be a menacing replay of the battle days of the nineteen eighties with military coups make water. Malla a pariah state in, Latin, America look president. The president has chosen to take the side of illegality says longtime Guatemalan human rights lawyer Alejandro Rodriguez this is extremely grave the message the president has sent is basically a coup d'etat the military procession clearly rattled workers inside Sieg. But he has plans say is, their spokesman us our international organization you know we have immunities and we expect the, government protect our, headquarters and if you see a Militares outside It's not a. Good sign for an international body president Morales, has accused of sewing, judicial, terror he's being investigated for using illegal. Campaign donations, to bankroll his twenty fifteen election and his brother in one. Of his sons were arrested for fraud Gauging. From a dozen interviews in the plaza in. Front of the greenstone national palace yesterday the work of Cecik remains popular and the president's decision to kick them out of the country is troubling Condo is working correctly to. Combat, all, the, corrupt, government officials says Doris. Lease a sixty four year old housewife it's they who. Stand to lose secede continues to. Do his work in Guatemala to, bring it, home, to, Americans one, longtime Guatemala watcher put it this way imagine the President Trump wakes up one morning and, announces he's shutting down the molar investigation that's what just happened in Guatemala John Burnett NPR news Guatemala City This is, NPR news, this is public radio good morning welcome to Labor Day I'm Beth heisinge us anywhere from Elmore let's go to. Mount Baker for bay area traffic.

president Guatemala Jimmy Morales David Wessel Steve Inskeep NPR president Morales Federal Reserve Brookings David Greene John Burnett Culver City California United Nations Washington DC Mount Baker
"guatemalan congress" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

08:14 min | 2 years ago

"guatemalan congress" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Is morning edition from NPR news I'm David Greene. In Culver City California and I'm Steve Inskeep in Washington. DC, the stock market hit a record high the other day employment is also running high they have been for years the. Very conditions that tend to push, up wages so why isn't that happening David Wessel is here. To talk with us about that he is at the Hutchins center at the. Brookings Institution welcome back David could deduct you Steve a couple years ago it seemed that wages. Were finally climbing what's happened since. Well I think, a good yardstick is, to look at what happens to the wages of people who work full-time year round and according to the census bureau the typical. Man earns about fifty. Four thousand dollars. A year the typical woman earns about forty three thousand dollars a year adjusted for inflation the typical man who works fulltime is earning less today than his counterpart, did in, nineteen eighty eight, mile at think that's extraordinary now more recently. As you point out wages have begun to go Yup but. They haven't gone up much more. Than inflation it depends month to month. What's happening so adjusted for inflation, wages, are basically flat even though we have unemployment in eighteen year low why would. That be well that's a good question it's. One that economists in academia all the way up to the chairman of the. Federal Reserve have been asking? Recently and I think there are a couple possible explanations. One is that the unemployment rate is misleading there are. A lot. Of workers on the sidelines of the economy and. They're being pulled in by the recovery and other is. That, productivity has been growing very slowly rising productivity growth is the way that employers can afford to raise wages and maintain. Prophet so you would expect wages, to be growing sluggishly when productivity growth is low but in. Many ways I think what's going on is that workers simply have less bargaining. Power today than they once did unions are weaker there's an explosion of temp agencies and outsourcing. And the gig economy and in. Lots of communities, across the country very, few employers dominate the labor Market so, that workers have no? Choice, but to work for. Them and some communities for instance, the hospital so that means employers aren't competing for workers by raising wages and that, depresses them a non geared DASA writer who was. On the program the other day put out. A book about inequities in the economy and suggested that essentially productivity is going up but that the economy has changed in ways that people at the top are able, to hold onto more and more and more of those games and not share I think. That's true productivity is growing is just growing at a disappointingly slow pace but. It's true that the, benefits of the growing economy are being increasingly claimed by people at the top so what does. This mean if your. Jerome Powell running the Federal Reserve or any number of the other people who are in positions of power and. Are supposed to influence the economy Well what they refer to as at the fed as the wage puzzle Israeli central to their decision. Making on interest rates today usually history tells. Us that went unemployment rate goes, way way down wages start to go up, and then, businesses start. To raise prices and you have more inflation but that relationship, isn't holding now so the fed has to decide is something really different in, the economy is, a permanent change or a wage increases just around the corner in which case they should be, raising rates more rapidly than they are is this wage stagnation the same for every kind of person no of course not we're talking about averages wages actually are. Going up a little. Faster at the bottom than they are for people at the, middle yes the best paid people CEO's lawyers are big law firms the best ball players they're doing very. Well but when we look at the data it turns out that things like raising the minimum wage which has happened in eighteenth states this year that's beginning to lift the wages of The beliefs paid people in the economy a. Little more than the typical worker at the middle David Wessel of. The Brookings Institution and the. Wall Street Journal thanks very much you're welcome the president of Guatemala, Jimmy Morales came into office promising. To end corruption but he's also under investigation by an anti-corruption commission backed by the United Nations and so he took things in his own hands and decided to shut the commission down NPR's John Burnett reports the. International commission against impunity in Guatemala is known by its Spanish? Acronym, Sieg it was. Created twelve years ago in concert with the United Nations around the idea that military and government elites cannot continue plundering public funds. If, this enfeebled country was. To move forward after three decades, of savage civil war, since then the commission. Has racked up an impressive record three, hundred and ten convictions thirty four legal reforms submitted to the Guatemalan congress to former presidents currently in. Jail on corruption charges and the sitting President is under, investigation for campaign finance shenanigans is this great international experiment in. Criminal investigation and. Judicial reform. And it's not been. Anything like your anywhere in the world Kate Doyle, is a senior analyst at the National Security Archive at a veteran of human. Rights work in Guatemala president Morales decision to cancel mandate and essentially order its investigations to come to a grinding. Halt is a terrible blow to the progress that Guatemala has made injustice president. Morales announced Friday he will not renew the mandate of secede when it expires in twelve months and that it's time to transfer their mission. To the Guatemalan attorney general's office Morales appeared in front of a phalanx of dozens, of stern military officials and shortly before his press conference, a column of olive green. GPS with soldiers and machine gun turrets rolled past CC headquarters the US embassy which gave the armed vehicles to the Police for crimefighting warned Guatemala not, to misuse them the embassy also reaffirmed its support for the. United States is a major financial backer of the anti-graft commission watermelon observers consider the use of, security forces in these, two instances on Friday to be a missing replay of the battle days of the nineteen eighties with military coups make water Malla a pariah state in Latin. America, look president the. President has chosen to take the side of illegality says longtime Guatemalan human rights lawyer Alejandro Rodriguez this is extremely grave the message the president has sent is basically a coup d'etat the military procession clearly rattled workers inside see Sieg. But he has plenty is their, spokesman us our international organization you know we have the immunities we expect that the government, protect our headquarters and if you see a militarize outside Is not a good. Sign on for an international body president Morales has, accused Sieg of sewing judicial terror he's being. Investigated for using. Illegal campaign, donations to bankroll his. Twenty fifteen election and his brother in one. Of his sons were arrested for fraud Gauging from a dozen interviews in the plaza in. Front of the greenstone national palace yesterday the work of Cecik remains popular and the president's decision to kick them out of the country is troubling Sixties that that are condo is working correctly to combat. All, the, corrupt, government, officials says Dora so. Lease a sixty four year old housewife it's they who stand, to lose seed continues to do. Its work in Guatemala to bring, it home, to, Americans, one longtime, Guatemala watcher put it this way imagine a President Trump wakes up one morning and announce, his he's shutting down the molar investigation that's what just happened in Guatemala John Burnett NPR news Guatemala City This, is, NPR news And good morning it's, four forty two now and you can keep the public in public radio by participating in perspectives is our series. Of daily listener commentaries you could share your thoughts on the topic of particular interest with other listeners of the San Francisco Bay area as well as Sacramento throughout northern California for information on how, to provide a.

president Guatemala Jimmy Morales NPR Federal Reserve Brookings Institution David Wessel United Nations Sieg David Greene Culver City California DC Steve Inskeep John Burnett Hutchins center San Francisco Bay Washington
"guatemalan congress" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

07:51 min | 2 years ago

"guatemalan congress" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Morning edition from NPR news I'm, David, Greene in Culver City California and I'm Steve Inskeep in Washington DC the stock. Market hit a record high the other. Day employment is also running Hi they have been. For years the very, conditions that tend to. Push up wages so why isn't that happening David Wessel is, here to talk with us, about that he is at the Hutchins center at the, Brookings Institution welcome back David could deduct. You Steve a couple of years ago it seemed that wages were finally. Climbing what's happened since well I think a good yardstick is to, look, at what happens to the wages of people who work. Full-time year round and according to the census bureau the typical man earns about fifty four thousand dollars a year the. Typical woman earns about. Forty three thousand dollars a year adjusted for inflation the typical man who works fulltime is earning less. Today than his counterpart did in nineteen eighty eight I think, that's extraordinary now more recently, as you point out wages have begun to. Go up but they haven't gone up. Much more than inflation it depends, month, to month what's happening so adjusted for inflation wages are basically flat even though. We have unemployment in eighteen year low Why would that be well that's a good question it's one that economists in academia all the way up, to the chairman of the. Federal Reserve have been asking recently and I think. They're a couple possible explanations? One is that the unemployment rate is misleading there are. A lot of workers on the sidelines of the economy. And they. Are being pulled in by. The recovery another is that, productivity has been growing very slowly rising productivity growth is. The, way that employers can afford to raise wages and maintain prophets so you would expect wages to be growing sluggishly when. Productivity growth is low but in, many ways I think what's going on is it worker simply. Have less bargaining power today than they once did unions are weaker there's an. Explosion of temp agencies and outsourcing and the gig economy and in lots of communities across the country. Very few employers dominate the labor market, so that workers have, no choice but to work for, them and some communities for instance the hospital so. That means employers aren't competing for workers. By raising wages and. That depresses them a. Non gear to DASA writer who is on the The program the other day put out a book about inequities in the economy, and suggested that essentially productivity is going up. But that the economy has changed in ways. That people at the top are able to hold onto more and more and more of those games and not share. I think that's true productivity is growing is just, growing at a disappointingly slow pace but it's true that the benefits of the growing economy. Are being increasingly claimed by people at the top so what does this mean. If your Jerome Powell, running the Federal Reserve or any number of the other people who are in positions of power. And are supposed to. Influence the economy what they referred to as the at the fed as the wage puzzle Israeli central to their. Decision making on interest rates today usually history tells us that went unemployment, rate goes way way down wages start to, go up, and then. Businesses start to raise prices and you have more inflation but, that relationship isn't holding now so the fed has to decide is something really Different in the economy is this a permanent change or, a wage increases just around the corner in which case they should be raising rates more rapidly, than they are is this wage stagnation the same for every kind of person no of course not we're talking about averages wages actually are going up a little. Faster at the bottom. Than they are for people at the middle yes the best, paid people CEO's lawyers have big law firms the best ball players they're doing very well but when we. Look at the data it turns out that things like raising the minimum wage which has happened in eighteenth states this year that's beginning to lift the wages of the beliefs paid people, in the economy a little more than the typical worker at the middle David Wessel of the Brookings Institution and the Wall Street, Journal thanks very much you're the president of Guatemala Jimmy Morales came. Into office promising to end corruption but he's also under investigation by an anti-corruption commission backed by, the United Nations and so he. Took things in his own hands and decided to Shut the commission down NPR's? John, Burnett reports the. International commission against impunity in Guatemala is known by its Spanish acronym Sieg it was created twelve years ago in concert with the. United, Nations around the idea. That military and government elites cannot, continue plundering public funds. If this enfeebled country. Was to move forward after three decades, of savage civil war since then the commission has racked up an impressive record three hundred and ten. Convictions thirty four legal reforms submitted to the Guatemalan, congress to former presidents currently in jail on corruption charges and the sitting president is, under investigation for campaign finance shenanigans is this great international experiment. In criminal investigation. And judicial reform and it's. Not been anything like your anywhere in the world, take Doyle is a senior analyst at the National Security Archive at a veteran. Of human rights work in Guatemala president Morales decision to cancel mandate And essentially order its, investigation to come to a grinding halt is a terrible blow to. The progress that watermelon has made injustice president Morales announced Friday he will not. Renew the mandate of secede when it expires in twelve months and that it's time to transfer their mission to the Guatemalan attorney general's office. Morales appeared in front of a phalanx of dozens of stern military officials and shortly, before his press conference a column of olive green GPS, with soldiers and machine gun. Turrets rolled past CC headquarters the US embassy which gave the armed vehicles to the police for crimefighting, warned Guatemala nut to misuse them the embassy also reaffirmed. Its support for the United States is a major financial backer of, the anti-graft commission Guatemalan observers consider the use of security forces. In these two instances on Friday to be a menacing replay of the battle days of the, nineteen eighties with military, coups make Wata Malla pariah State in Latin America look the president has chosen to take the side of illegality says longtime Guatemalan human rights lawyer Alejandro Rodriguez this is extremely grave the message. The president has sent is basically, a coup d'etat the military procession clearly rattled workers inside see Sieg but Ponce is their, spokesman us at international organization you know we have the immunities and we expect, that the government protect our. Headquarters on if you see a Militares outside is not a good sign on for an international body president. Morales, has. Accused sec- of sewing judicial terror he's being investigated for using illegal campaign donations to bankroll has twenty fifteen election and his brother in one of his sons were arrested for fraud Gauging from a dozen interviews in the plaza in. Front of the greenstone national palace yesterday the work of Cecik remains popular in the president's decision to kick them out of the country is troubling Condo is working correctly to. Combat, all, the, corrupt, government officials says Dora. Elise a sixty four year old housewife it's they who stand, to lose seed continues to do. Its work in Guatemala to bring, it home, to Americans, one, longtime Guatemala watcher put it this way imagine the President Trump wakes up one morning and announce his, he's shutting down the molar investigation that's what just happened in Guatemala John Burnett NPR news watt Amal city This,.

president Guatemala Federal Reserve NPR David Wessel Jimmy Morales Brookings Institution president Morales Steve Inskeep John Burnett Sieg Culver City California United States United Nations chairman greenstone national palace Washington Hutchins center
"guatemalan congress" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

07:44 min | 2 years ago

"guatemalan congress" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Edition from NPR news I'm? David Greene and Culver City California and I'm Steve Inskeep. In Washington DC the stock market hit a record high. The other. Day employment is also running. High they have been for, years the very conditions that tend to push up wages. So, why isn't that happening David Wessel is here to talk with. Us, about that. He is at the Hutchins center, at the Brookings, Institution welcome back David could deduct you Steve a couple. Of years ago it seemed that wages were finally climbing what's happened since well. I think a good yardstick is to look at what happens To the wages of. People who work full-time year round and according to the census bureau the typical man earns about fifty four thousand dollars a year the typical woman earns about forty three thousand dollars a year. Adjusted for inflation the typical man who works, fulltime is earning less today than his counterpart did in nineteen eighty eight I think that's extraordinary now more recently as you point out wages have begun to go up but they. Haven't gone up much more than inflation. It depends month to month what's, happening, so adjusted for inflation wages are basically, flat even though we have unemployment in. Eighteen year low why would that be well. That's a good question it's one that economists in academia all the way up. To the chairman of the? Federal Reserve have been asking recently and I think there. Are a couple possible explanations one is that the unemployment. Rate is. Misleading there a lot of. Workers on the sidelines of, the economy and they are being pulled in by the. Recovery, and other is that productivity has been growing very slowly rising Activity growth is the way that employers can afford to. Raise wages and maintain prophet so, you would expect wages to be growing sluggishly when productivity growth. Is low but in many ways I think what's going on is that workers. Simply have less bargaining power today than they once did unions are weaker there's an explosion of temp. Agencies and outsourcing the gig economy and, in lots of communities, across the country very few employers, dominate the labor market so that workers have no. Choice but to work for them and. Some communities for instance, the hospital so that. Means employers aren't competing for workers by raising wages, and that depresses them? A, non geared DASA writer. Who is on the program the, other day put out a book about inequities in the economy and suggested that essentially, productivity is going up but that the economy has. Changed in ways that people at the top are able to hold onto more and more and more of those games and not share I think that's true productivity is growing is just growing at a disappointingly slow pace Case but it's true that the benefits of the growing economy are being increasingly claimed. By people at the top so what does this mean if your Jerome Powell. Running the Federal Reserve, or any number of the other people who are in positions of power and are supposed to. Influence the economy what. They referred to as at the fed as the wage puzzle is really central to their decision making on. Interest rates today usually history tells us that went in unemployment rate goes, way way down wages start to go up, and businesses, start to. Raise prices and you have more inflation but that relationship isn't, holding now so the fed has to decide is something really different in the, economy is this, a permanent change or a wage increases just around the corner in which case they should be, raising rates more rapidly than they are is this wage stagnation the same for every kind of person no of course we're talking about average wages actually are going. Up a little faster. At the bottom than they are for people at, the middle Yes the best paid people CEO's lawyers are big law firms the best ball. Players they're doing very well but when we look at the data it turns out that things like raising the minimum wage which has happened in eighteen states this year that's beginning to, lift the wages of the beliefs pay people in the economy a little more than the typical worker at the metal David Wessel, of, the Brookings Institution and the Wall Street Journal thanks very much you're. Welcome the president of Guatemala Jimmy Morales came into office promising to end corruption but he's, also under investigation by an anti-corruption. Commission backed by the United Nations and so he took things in his. Own hands and decided to shut the commission down and peers John Burnett reports the international commission against impunity in Guatemala is known by its Spanish. Acronym Sieg it was created twelve years ago in concert with? The, United Nations around the idea that military and government elites cannot continue plundering public funds if this enfeebled country was to move forward after three Decades of savage civil war since then the commission has racked up an impressive record three. Hundred and ten convictions thirty four legal reforms submitted, to the Guatemalan congress to former presidents currently in jail on corruption charges and the, sitting president is under investigation for campaign finance shenanigans he is. This great international. Experiment in. Criminal investigation and judicial, reform and there's not been anything like your anywhere, in the world hate Doyle is a senior analyst at the National Security Archive. Had a veteran of human rights work in Guatemala president Morales decision to cancel mandate and essentially order. Its investigation to. Come to a grinding halt is a terrible blow to progress that watermelon has. Made injustice president Morales announced Friday he will not renew the mandate of secede when it expires in twelve months and that it's time to. Transfer their mission to the Guatemalan attorney general's office morale Appeared in front of a phalanx, of. Dozens of stern military officials and shortly before his press conference a, column of olive green GPS with soldiers and machine gun turrets. Rolled past headquarters the US embassy which gave the armed vehicles to the police for crimefighting warned Tamala not to misuse, them the embassy also reaffirmed its support for the United States is a major financial backer of the anti-graft commission Guatemalan observers consider the use of security, forces, in these two. Instances on Friday to be a menacing replay of the battle days of the nineteen eighties with military coups make water Malla a pariah state in Latin America look President the president has chosen to take the side of illegality says longtime Guatemalan human rights lawyer Alejandro Rodriguez. This is extremely grave the message the president has sent is basically a coup d'etat the military procession clearly rattled workers, inside but he has plans say is their spokesman us at international organization you know we have the immunities. And we expect the government protect our headquarters and if you see a meters outside is not a good. Sign, on, for an international body president Morales has accused of sewing judicial terror he's being investigated for using illegal campaign donations to bankroll his twenty fifteen election and his brother in one of his sons were arrested for. Fraud Gauging from a dozen interviews in the plaza. In front of the greenstone national palace yesterday the work of remains popular in the president's decision to kick them out of the country is troubling Condo is working correctly to combat. All, the, corrupt, government, officials says Doris Elise. A sixty four year old housewife it's they who stand. To lose seed continues to do. Its work in Guatemala to bring, it home, to, Americans, one longtime, Guatemala watcher put it this way imagine the President Trump wakes up one morning and his, he's shutting down the Mueller investigation that's what just happened in Guatemala John.

president president Morales Guatemala Federal Reserve David Wessel Steve Inskeep NPR David Greene Culver City California Washington United Nations Guatemalan congress greenstone national palace Brookings Institution chairman Fraud Hutchins center
"guatemalan congress" Discussed on 710 WOR

710 WOR

02:01 min | 3 years ago

"guatemalan congress" Discussed on 710 WOR

"The israelis were blocked from going the s saudi arabia that's supposed to have a new attitude a new um look at the middle east visavis israel and everybody else so it's the same old stuff uh when when we when we bowed you know boil everything down uh the israel is the is the best ally the united states has and of course the united states the best ally that israel has and so i think that um moving the embassy is just a fact of life jewish limbs the capital of israel its function as the capital of israel since nineteen forty eight when israel was formed uh they're they're parliament their knesset there could be a seat of government the prime minister of the dg judiciary they're all there and it's a part of jerusalem that so undisputed and the united states embassy can be in that part of jerusalem and by the way i think want a mile as well so good for the guatemalan congress and here's a question i have for you i had a lot of uh friends on the on the last and have really adopted a very strident anti israeli stance sometimes i think bordering on antisemitism now you're your congressman the democratic party you're on the left can you explain this hatred on the left for israel to me well i i really cannot explain it other other than to say that um if if they uh they they look at the situation now from from just one time in history but she's right now and they don't know the history and they don't go back to the history they see israel in a pretty good position they tv the palestinians not having their state and they just kind of look at it and somehow or other they look at israel as the as as the goliath and the palestinians is these as the david i when it's quite the opposite way you've got twenty two or twenty three uh arab nations all surrounding israel only a handful have diplomatic relations with them and uh you know the worst anti semitism uh get spewed from from rallies and and and and miles of leaders.

israel united states prime minister congressman democratic party diplomatic relations guatemalan congress
"guatemalan congress" Discussed on NPR News Now

NPR News Now

02:20 min | 3 years ago

"guatemalan congress" Discussed on NPR News Now

"In beijing president trump held a series of meetings with chinese president xi jinping and other leaders and pierre scott horsely reports the talks focused on trade and the nuclear threat posed by north korea china is north korea's number one trading partner than trump's been urging she to use that leverage to help put a stop to pyongyang's nuclear program trump thinks she for the steps china has already taken like suspending coal purchases from north korea and severing banking ties with that country but trump says all nations must do more time is quickly running out we must act fast and hopefully china will act faster and more effectively on this problem that anyone trump also wants to enlist russia's help with north korea is expected to meet with russian president vladimir putin at a summit in vietnam later this week scott horsely npr news beijing the number of americans to fall for unemployment has risen more than expected the labor department has posting an increase if ten thousand applications filed last week which put the overall number at a seasonally adjusted two hundred thirty nine thousand the uptick suggest the government is getting through its backlog of unprocessed claims stemming from backtoback hurricanes at last check on wall street the dow is down nearly two hundred points this is npr saudi arabia is telling its citizens not to travel to lebanon and if they are there to leave because securities become so much of a concern lebanese prime minister saad alhariri resigned over the weekend and he announced it while he was in saudi arabia that is now fueling speculation among lebanese at the saudi arabia forced the lebanese leader to resign the guatemalan congress is considering a proposal for amnesty for former military personnel implicated in human rights violations during the civil war that ended twenty years ago mattia martin has the latest from guatemala if amnesty disapproved former and current members of the military would be absolved charges of genocide torture and forced disappearances during the country's nearly four decades of civil war its proponents including members of president jimmy motorola's this party say they wanna put an end to ideological divisions in the country.

civil war human rights guatemalan congress saad alhariri lebanon beijing nuclear program pierre scott horsely president jimmy motorola guatemala mattia martin north korea prime minister saudi arabia labor department vietnam vladimir putin russia china trump pyongyang partner four decades twenty years