18 Burst results for "Guardian Australia"

"guardian australia" Discussed on Today in Focus

Today in Focus

06:31 min | 3 weeks ago

"guardian australia" Discussed on Today in Focus

"Is there any positive news. In terms of the scientific world understanding the clitoris promoting education of the clitoris. There is some movement in some good news in pots of medicine for example professor at cornell said that she was in india earlier this year and it was a room full of doctors discussing methods of taking your eighth rapacity and i were discussing the importance of maintaining function. Sorry thinking about way you do that surgery. So you don impact any nerves or impact clitoral function at all but that was incredibly uplifting to see how they're they're doing the rate for plastic beta using anatomy to preserve female sexual function. That was really really good in other words. That thoroughly just looking at how to do these procedures on women without cutting through spouse of nerves that are part of the clitoris. Yes she doesn't sound like it should be through that that should be a given but even in prostate surgery professor technique to main you darn impact. Nerves all impacts functioning anyway. That's that's a pretty new technique so it's great that is happening across genders. I think a really positive development has been outside medicine because there's big names art movements. I saw at the marina in tasmania a great wall of giants. Which were actually always. But you know one step. At a time i earn the vagina. So for mona. I have one of those in my house Oh my god. How wonderful isn't it amazing. I was fascinated. I stood there for laced. Our looking at them. I thought it was so beautiful. And i was that all about women a few years ago and there was a giant gold glitter clitoris. That was like as tall as a human called the glaciers and it was just so beautiful and people were fascinated. You could say women of all ages just stopping staring at it. And i think that has delayed the change for the rest of us. There is his home movement. Outside of medicine around clitoris you can say on. Social media in particular really picks up these young women talking about the clitoris and talking about sexual function. And what's happening in the space. With projects locked the clitoris seed. Enormous gold convinced by australian is always ahead in some ways of what mrs spoke to the peasant who made the glitter and. She told me that she had doctors come to her and be like. I didn't know this until. I saw you dancing with the giant gold. Revision at mardi gra much like the. It is a multi-role thing very good. Laura very we. It's a moldy frog thing we've got science well. The we've got movements all throughout society to try and educate people. Where would you like these to end. What would you like to see. In terms of education around the clitoris going forward. I want sexual health to be saying as part of our health. Our bane cannot be separated from out sexual health. I have very very intricately. Aligned a person's sexuality and whatever that means to you because it is totally individual thing is really a pot of our sense of self and we seem to appreciate this in men but not women like women have just historically been expected to serve men sexuality without any concern for her own. And i think another really important aspect of understanding sexual. Health is understanding. Not just what. S- bad we know is is a bad and ripe. He's bad and horrific porn is bad. But we need to know what's good is. There's a famous psychologist s to parole. Who's kind of a bit of six philosopher quote unquote and she had. She gave this great analogy about food. And she's like everyone knows that to be healthy. You have to eat healthy food. Imagine if you only knew what was bad. So don't eight deep. Fried mars bars donate hamburgers three times a day. But no one ever told you what was actually healthy. And that's what i think. We're missing about sexual health. We don't know what the fruit and veg of sexual health and we need to note. And i think that that is a major priority alley. Sebastian wolf the oddest to made the glitter to describe comment. Which i miss is for up about clitorises to be as pass is about paint. Would bay that she wants to become such common knowledge that it's like every child has been able to draw a painless. Maybe not one hundred hundred comically accurately but has been able to draw the basic shape since like what seven eight younger. And i don't know many adult women who would be able to draw the clitoris. So the measure of success is when we say because the restaurant on school desks around australia. And the world click graffiti. That's what what handful. Okay gibson keller thank you so much. Full this education on the clitoris thanks. I'm sure we weren't tick thanks. Laura and for teaching me that there's not spoke on. That was laura murphy oats with guardian australia reporter. Keller wall quest and associate news editor gabrielle. Jackson do read callous piece on why the clitoris was ignored by medical science at the guardian dot com and also check out gabrielle's book pain and prejudice. You can also read and edited extract on the website. Do also subscribe to the full story podcast. It's fantastic that is for today. This episode was produced by ellen. Lay better charisma law. Three and joe coning guardian. Australia's head of audio is miles. Martin nonni many thanks to all of them. That is for this week of repeats. I hope you've had a fabulous. Christmas and new year will be back on monday..

cornell mona tasmania giants india Sebastian wolf Laura mrs gibson keller laura murphy Australia gabrielle Keller joe coning Jackson Martin nonni ellen
"guardian australia" Discussed on Worldly

Worldly

07:56 min | Last month

"guardian australia" Discussed on Worldly

"Yes if you're a fan of yellow tail wine. I have bad news for you. if you're living in china guests and so they go like this is just been a larger fight happening And this afghanistan worth like if you're china and you've been having this back and forth with australia. Well this report gives you a lot of ammunition right which takes me back to the initial of what does the answer. Troll's gonna troll a troll. Found something on which to hit australia and did And the australian government fought back saying like. Hey you shouldn't have said that you should apologize. Yeah i think to another thing maybe keep in mind. Is that austrailia. Some of their you know researchers there have been at the forefront of kind of uncovering Some of the agreed human rights violations in xinjiang against the workers. And you know. Australia has been out front in terms of criticizing the Treatment of the week in that region. And so this war crimes report gives china an opportunity to kind of draw a false equivalents and to deflect from their own misdeeds. i suppose and one thing. We tend to know about chinese propaganda. It's as much for a lot of outsiders Think it seems really clumsy and bad. And that's because it is. But sometimes the audiences as much for the internal chinese audience or chinese people living abroad and so that's a really important strategy there as well. Yeah i think so. That's like a really important issue. I kind of want to drill down on here. Is this is false equivalency or you know basically i i think alex is put it in your piece. And it's a bit rich that china would be you calling out another country for human rights violations to be clear like this is the allegations of what these special forces soldiers did in afghanistan or really horrific and there was another report guardian. Australia came out with this week. Showing this really gruesome photo of australian soldiers drinking a an a military bar in afghanistan drinking beer out of the prosthetic leg of dead taliban soldier which is just gruesome and horrifying and there are several photos of like posing within dancing and laughing and that wasn't chinese propaganda right like that wasn't a doctor. Dementia this real photo. So even though the chinese tweet was fake and was this computer generated image. The crimes that they talk about that they were kind of pointing to alleged crimes. These people haven't faced a court of law yet. I believe but they're they're real incidents that that they're referring to but at the same time like it's china and they're literally as you alluded to gen locking up thousands of muslims in literal concentration camps And that's just one of the human rights abuses that china engages in among many. So you know. I think it's really interesting that china decided to use this as like a cudgel against the west. But it definitely fits this kind of model of like you guys do worse than we. You know how dare you you know what what gives you the right. You're just as bad all of that and it kind. If you know in some ways they have a point in the sense that like. You're not innocent australia. You're not innocent western countries. You do these things to We were talking about this before the show. I would probably say you know for me like yes. They have a point. But i think there's also the fact that lake this report exists. The australian government like commissioned this like four year long inquiry into what australian soldiers did in afghanistan and publish these results and publish this whole report. And so like the fact that like you wouldn't have that in china right. You're not gonna have the beijing government year long inquiry into what they're doing in john john right right. They're actively hiding it lying about it. So i will say at least at least democracies got that going. Forward it you know. I guess that's me. Yeah i would agree. And i would also say to that you know this gives china. We know that china is has you know wants to have a bigger global presence right and is trying to build relationships and places like latin america and africa and we know that you know western alliances you know have you know with the us austrailia part of the if they can highlight these atrocities and these you know the problematic behavior of you know the western countries than it gives china sort of. I don't know we're not as bad basically because we weren't involved in all of these wars and i don't know again giving china's human rights record which is a grievous from xinjiang and the week there as you mentioned jam but also in hong kong and tibet and everywhere else. It's not really a case holds water. But it's certainly a case that china will try to make to the world. I think you know we're not as bad as these guys that have been. You know pillaging your country for twenty years type thing. Yeah it's just. There's a long standing kind of tactic that we've seen of communist regimes. I mean you can see this going back to the cold war with the soviet union. You know always trying to kind of push this line that they're the the ones who are you providing liberty and protection and all of this and that you know it's the west that's trying to overturn regimes and committing war crimes. Which again to be fair. Those things happen right but they do this while at the same time completely obfuscating the fact that they are doing also horrendous things to their own people and to people where you know in in regions where they're operating and so it's kind of a standing playbook of course again all countries you this to some degree right. We also try to point out crimes and human rights violations of other countries while not acknowledging our own so that that's fairly standard. But i think again going back to the fact that this report exists right like china is still blocking like images of tiananmen square to this day on the internet and like not teaching. Its own citizens about what happened there and trying to crack down on democracy in hong kong and all of that so yeah but i guess i just want to go back to the issue at hand here because like let's be clear about why relations with china and australia. Getting bad right. It is that china is is is like creating artificial islands in the south china sea. It is trying to you. Know have many many intelligence agencies perceive using its telecommunications giants to spy on on foreign countries and it is refusing to allow inspectors and a real sort of reckoning as to what happened in the early days of the coronavirus. Like these are bad. Things that china's do and australia for being one of the regional leaders is calling china on it and all these cases and for that you have. China sent starting a trade war with australia And like hitting them on on this war report which again australian elites service scorn for this and in the leaders et it. But that's why this is and on and it's backfiring because you in as it is back on trailing sense because now we're talking about their war crimes report that no one knew until now ish But it is backfiring on china. Because you're making it worse that year because they're making like the us for example..

china afghanistan australian government xinjiang Australia taliban Dementia john john alex hong kong beijing latin america tibet africa soviet union tiananmen square us south china sea
Fyre Festival fraudster produces podcast from prison

podnews

03:34 min | 3 months ago

Fyre Festival fraudster produces podcast from prison

"Google jumped up to number three Google podcasts. So we had said it won't point time. We thought the top three would eventually be apple podcast spotify Google happened a little sooner than I thought Google podcast is now the third biggest podcast APP. Lipton's Rob Walsh unveiling the company's download statistics in the feed. It is though still five times smaller than spotify the number two according to lips in which case sixty two percent of its downloads from the US total downloads to pocket casts dropped below one percent. spotify removed four Cunanan related podcasts after insider contacted the company cure on on as an unfounded conspiracy theory launched yesterday quake is a new subscription podcast company with tune a half million dollars in seed funding. It launches with six exclusive shows and will sell access for four dollars ninety nine a month. Loop media? Has. Speaker. That's S P K R. it's a podcast APP that plays short clips of podcasts to help you discover new ones. They've also announced their own podcast studio. PODCAST movement virtual kicked off yesterday with keynote from Edison research is Tom Webster. He unveiled a slide showing the podcasting share of all audio listening is now the highest ever six percent of all consumption. Fittingly, it was also world statistics day yesterday, second keynote session podcast movement virtual emerging podcast markets across the world panelists, Norman Chela from Malaysia. pod Lovers Asia. podcast pull the Rogo from Kenya who runs the pulse for NHS newsletter and neural net from Spain from the Boutique podcast publisher laycock Lara, music currently in the middle of several productions for Dino audible and others. Todd Cochran and wrote Greenlees news media show will be recorded later today at podcast movement virtual. Be joined by among others sounds profitable 's editor Brian bar letter and poured news is. ME. We've an ice page all about imbedded players for your podcast. All the contacted us with an interesting note if you use the embedded spotify plan, if the listener isn't locked into spotify, that play won't appear within spotify for podcasters just measures locked in users. No worries though for podcast hosts with pass through putsches, most of them, it'll still count they're. And podcast newsroom and the Billy McFarland's the convicted fraudster the fire festival he's been in the Elkton Federal Correctional Institution for the last twenty nine months. But with Jordan Harbinger, he's done a podcast from prison cold dumpster fire promising to set the record straight. The Joe Rogan experience is on pause until at least next week after Jamie Vernon show producer tested positive for covid nineteen nobody else's tested positive and Rogan himself hasn't been in the studio for the past nine days. Guardian Australia has launched in the wait a new podcast series telling the story of the forgotten refugees indefinitely stranded in Indonesia as a result of Australia's border crackdown and case closed has returned for season three focusing on an intriguing crime within the Hamish mish community. In Ohio, it's based on the book a killing in a mish country,

Google Spotify Tom Webster Todd Cochran Joe Rogan Guardian Australia Jordan Harbinger Apple Hamish Mish Billy Mcfarland Elkton Federal Correctional In Ohio Lipton NHS United States Norman Chela Cunanan Greenlees Laycock Lara Indonesia
"guardian australia" Discussed on Wait Wait... Don't Tell Me!

Wait Wait... Don't Tell Me!

01:44 min | 10 months ago

"guardian australia" Discussed on Wait Wait... Don't Tell Me!

"People from touching their faces his contribution to the Cova nineteen crisis. Ridden attached four powerful magnets to his wrist and the necklace was supposed to sound an alarm if his hands got too close to his face. The necklace didn't work so ridden did what scientists are trained to do. He started experimenting. What if instead on his wrist he put the magnets on his face quote? I clemson magnets to my ear lobes and then clipped them to my nostril and things went downhill pretty quickly. He told Guardian Australia when reared input two magnets in his nose. They locked together and he couldn't get them out so he googled quote magnets up nose and found the story of an eleven year old. Who had the same problem so ridden tried to remove the magnets by using the other two magnets now. All four magnets were stuck up his nose and he tried to pull them out with pliers quote. Every time. I brought the pliers close to my nose. My entire knows would shift toward the players and then the flyers would stick to the magnet. He said it was a little bit painful at this point. Britain ended up in the emergency room where doctors laughed at him. Remove the magnets and recorded the cause of the injury as quote due to sacrifice Latian and boredom an astrophysicist trying to invent a useful device ends up with magnets up his nose in the Er our final story of someone putting the ASS. Assistance comes from Morocco. With so many waiting out the pandemic.

Cova Guardian Australia Morocco Latian Britain
"guardian australia" Discussed on Here & Now

Here & Now

05:04 min | 10 months ago

"guardian australia" Discussed on Here & Now

"I would say that fifty years ago. I think this is what we would call just moderate cold. It's just goes to show that these really cold winters are becoming less and less frequent as ear forms up. Let's go to Lisa Cox in Sydney Australia where we are painfully aware of the effects of climate change. Their you know since since the fires are out. How do you handle not that? You don't have the interest of the public but it can wayne. You know I mean. How do you keep that going? Yeah that's going to be an interesting challenge going forward and I think the thing that we're all going to have to be aware of. Is that even though these fires out? The affects of them are going to be filled for a really long time. They're going to be felt over. Days weeks months years. So I think it is going to be possible to sustain people's interest in these fires but we're going to be telling a different story and it's going to be the recovery story and making people aware of the fact that they will be some places that recovery but they're going to be places that Fundamentally changed as a result of what's happened here I have is bringing some well. We've watched as your country's leader. I was on vacation when part of this was happening. And he in some of the other government were sort of Pooh poohing. The climate change nature of what was happening when the fires were going on. That seemed to change a little. But what's the attitude you know? We heard from a lot of people who are angry that this wasn't being treated as climate change bigger issue. Has that attitude kind of one over now. Australians they all very aware of climate change and they all thinking about it but our next federal election. He's not for a couple of years so it's really difficult at this point to say how people will. I guess practically respond in a political sense right now. We know that your Prime Minister Scott. Morrison famously brought a piece a coal onto the floor of parliament. He was steadfastly behind the coal industry there. But we've talked to Australians who are very torn about this you know. This is a huge industry in Australia. And I guess I'm going to pivot back to Ryan because Ryan you've been really interested how people in Louisville Kentucky have been willing to acknowledge that that was such an important industry. There it may have to go because of climate change certainly Some similarities there. I mean coal industry here is. It's been decimated over the last decade. Or so I think there are less than five thousand people still working in the coal industry. Here people are certainly recognizing both in you know the eastern and Western coalfields. They really are waking up to to to an understanding. Climate change is taking a toll on this state We had an election last November previously. Our former Governor Matt Bevin denied climate change being real we. Now have a new governor in place governor Andy Bashir and he says Net climate change is real. It's still too early to see how that's going to affect what policies that's going to affect in Kentucky but I will say that have spoken to officials in the state and they feel that they are more willing and able to talk about the reality of climate change in the state and I think that will have an impact here now actually kind of wanted to go off. What Ryan is saying about? Climate Change denial or the opinions about climate change. Yeah go ahead Kevin George there in Alaska I mean I'm sure that opinions range across Alaska but in my reporting I really haven't heard a lot of climate. Denial and I think a large part of that is that anecdotally people see it in their everyday lives. In Kodiak for instance. Someone told me that. They used to tunnel out of their house in snowdrifts. And that's something that we would just never see today. That's actually a really interesting point. That convey th at night because I think we had a similar experience During our reporting on the fire slow we were interviewing people in Seriously affected communities and every person that I started to. I didn't I didn't have to ask them about climate change. They would bring it up. You know you're talking about people living right next rainforest. In some cases you know places that they typically a nation than and people were saying FIS and as places for the first time. Ever Lisa Cox Environment reporter for the Guardian Australia. Kavita George Energy and the environment reporter for Alaska's energy desk in Kodiak Alaska and Ryan van Velde's her energy and Environment Reporter for WFP in Louisville Kentucky. Thank you all thank you. Thanks for having US well. There may be some good news for climate change in this time of Corona virus with traffic. Pretty much a standstill. Air pollution has decreased but climate researchers. Say That's just temporary won't make a dent so we will keep reporting on.

Australia Ryan van Velde Louisville Kentucky Lisa Cox Alaska Kodiak Alaska Sydney reporter Kavita George Energy Morrison Kodiak Matt Bevin Louisville Prime Minister Guardian Australia Kevin George Andy Bashir snowdrifts
"guardian australia" Discussed on WCBS-FM 101.1

WCBS-FM 101.1

01:50 min | 11 months ago

"guardian australia" Discussed on WCBS-FM 101.1

"Yard about cops and then you put in ninety nine percent rubbing alcohol yeah you put it in that's two thirds of a Cup of that then you can also toss in you know a few drops of grapefruit lavender or peppermint essential oil not not just the Jews don't put things right they get single use and then there's yeah but again the sensual oils you can get at the drug store and get a whole foods most places a lot of places selling sensual oils in them and the folks at Tito's want you to know don't use your vodka and their vodka to make that the hand sanitizer because it's only forty percent alcohol yeah I know I wouldn't use it to make this hand sanitizer but for me I used it on the plane because it was my only option I didn't have anything on this because it smells a little bit like something that will it is alcohol it just isn't as a higher content or as the isopropyl in the meantime an Australian newspaper is I come up with a way to combat another problem that the Australian newspaper the Northern Territory news printed eight extra pages to help with the toilet paper shortage in Australia so yeah but you have a fill the bottom there they call it the loo paper I think it's blank input blank all they or it scores right on the road on your by now yeah the advertisements for toilet paper that doesn't exist the editor Matt Williams of the guardian Australia newspaper said it was selling well and certainly not a crappy addition hang on their flights with robin remember and remember the folks at north shore animal league put together a an.

Tito Northern Territory news Australia Matt Williams north shore animal league editor guardian Australia robin
"guardian australia" Discussed on The Guardian's Science Weekly

The Guardian's Science Weekly

04:24 min | 1 year ago

"guardian australia" Discussed on The Guardian's Science Weekly

"Think. It's really clear in those moments that the desire to be there for someone else's not just just driven by the dislike of saying somebody else in trouble you get such a positive experience for yourself out of being there for somebody else that the amount of money that the people gave to charity appeals over that Christmas New Year period with astronomical and. I think they did that because in a lot of ways they felt like they didn't really and nowhere else to put that desire for community. They wanted to be and I didn't know how else to do it. We were told at one point by the Premier of Victoria had Daniel Andrews not to give Cloyd of food not go down to the fire fronts anymore to kind of parse that stuff out to people and I think that frustrated some people because they really wanted to to help they really wanted to help. It's a it's a sense. I think that is not well channeled in today's society. So when stuff like this happens there's an outpouring of it with the bushfires in Australia linked global heating and themselves adding vast quantities of carbon dioxide into the atmosphere. These FIS lies pose a stark warning of the future. I asked John If some of the ideas he talked about could help create a group identity around the existential the threat we face from the climate crisis where perhaps it isn't so much of an identity at present yes or no yes because the notion of shared social like density is the fundamental principle behind all forms of collective action if you think about any social movement of any any protest any direct action is based upon people seeing themselves as a group and acting as one and so. It's it's obviously the right strategy for anybody trying to bring about a change in norms for any leader Greta tune burgo ago. Somebody like that to invoke an ass invoke a shared plight to motivate people to act. So that's the yes and the no is that not everybody will see themselves as equally threatened me to be blunt. The rich have ways of buying their way out of the climate crisis so win the tides and the start building up they will move. They will build build homes and places that protect themselves. Everybody else will be in the signed boat that to be blunt the rich won't be whilst is don't necessarily sally come with a disregard for the climate crisis is an important consideration. In the extent to which individuals can mitigate its effects on themselves and this could make it harder to bring people together if I can take an analogy from protests in collective action and relating which is my other area of research. Sometimes people distance distanced themselves from the roast radical. I suppose in this context we'd say no the radical all those calling for drastic action to prevent climate crisis enclosed emergency. So what needs to happen is that people would need to become more aligned to the radical okay and preps Nazi the radical as other and to see the most us again to the extent of the rich can position themselves as able to buy their way out of things than the limit to that strategy. That's it for this week. Thanks to John. Jewelry and Stephanie Conference from Guardian Australia will include links to Stephanie's writing and to some of John's work in the episodes description at the Guardian Dot Com. This episode was presented by me. Nicole Davis and was produced by Madeleine Finley. We'll leave you with a little glimmer of hope from Stephanie. Personally I think Australians are really looking for community in a way that I probably haven't for a long time I think I think a crisis really crystallizes what's important to people and what's important went to paypal is community. That's what that's what you come back to. That's what helps us understand who we are and what we value is other people for more great podcasts. From The Guardian. Just go to the GUARDIAN DOT COM slash.

John Stephanie Guardian Australia Daniel Andrews Victoria Australia Nicole Davis Greta paypal Madeleine Finley
"guardian australia" Discussed on The Guardian's Science Weekly

The Guardian's Science Weekly

04:24 min | 1 year ago

"guardian australia" Discussed on The Guardian's Science Weekly

"Think. It's really clear in those moments that the desire to be there for someone else's not just just driven by the dislike of saying somebody else in trouble you get such a positive experience for yourself out of being there for somebody else that the amount of money that the people gave to charity appeals over that Christmas New Year period with astronomical and. I think they did that because in a lot of ways they felt like they didn't really and nowhere else to put that desire for community. They wanted to be and I didn't know how else to do it. We were told at one point by the Premier of Victoria had Daniel Andrews not to give Cloyd of food not go down to the fire fronts anymore to kind of parse that stuff out to people and I think that frustrated some people because they really wanted to to help they really wanted to help. It's a it's a sense. I think that is not well channeled in today's society. So when stuff like this happens there's an outpouring of it with the bushfires in Australia linked global heating and themselves adding vast quantities of carbon dioxide into the atmosphere. These FIS lies pose a stark warning of the future. I asked John If some of the ideas he talked about could help create a group identity around the existential the threat we face from the climate crisis where perhaps it isn't so much of an identity at present yes or no yes because the notion of shared social like density is the fundamental principle behind all forms of collective action if you think about any social movement of any any protest any direct action is based upon people seeing themselves as a group and acting as one and so. It's it's obviously the right strategy for anybody trying to bring about a change in norms for any leader Greta tune burgo ago. Somebody like that to invoke an ass invoke a shared plight to motivate people to act. So that's the yes and the no is that not everybody will see themselves as equally threatened me to be blunt. The rich have ways of buying their way out of the climate crisis so win the tides and the start building up they will move. They will build build homes and places that protect themselves. Everybody else will be in the signed boat that to be blunt the rich won't be whilst is don't necessarily sally come with a disregard for the climate crisis is an important consideration. In the extent to which individuals can mitigate its effects on themselves and this could make it harder to bring people together if I can take an analogy from protests in collective action and relating which is my other area of research. Sometimes people distance distanced themselves from the roast radical. I suppose in this context we'd say no the radical all those calling for drastic action to prevent climate crisis enclosed emergency. So what needs to happen is that people would need to become more aligned to the radical okay and preps Nazi the radical as other and to see the most us again to the extent of the rich can position themselves as able to buy their way out of things than the limit to that strategy. That's it for this week. Thanks to John. Jewelry and Stephanie Conference from Guardian Australia will include links to Stephanie's writing and to some of John's work in the episodes description at the Guardian Dot Com. This episode was presented by me. Nicole Davis and was produced by Madeleine Finley. We'll leave you with a little glimmer of hope from Stephanie. Personally I think Australians are really looking for community in a way that I probably haven't for a long time I think I think a crisis really crystallizes what's important to people and what's important went to paypal is community. That's what that's what you come back to. That's what helps us understand who we are and what we value is other people for more great podcasts. From The Guardian. Just go to the GUARDIAN DOT COM slash.

John Stephanie Guardian Australia Daniel Andrews Victoria Australia Nicole Davis Greta paypal Madeleine Finley
"guardian australia" Discussed on The Guardian's Science Weekly

The Guardian's Science Weekly

04:24 min | 1 year ago

"guardian australia" Discussed on The Guardian's Science Weekly

"Think. It's really clear in those moments that the desire to be there for someone else's not just just driven by the dislike of saying somebody else in trouble you get such a positive experience for yourself out of being there for somebody else that the amount of money that the people gave to charity appeals over that Christmas New Year period with astronomical and. I think they did that because in a lot of ways they felt like they didn't really and nowhere else to put that desire for community. They wanted to be and I didn't know how else to do it. We were told at one point by the Premier of Victoria had Daniel Andrews not to give Cloyd of food not go down to the fire fronts anymore to kind of parse that stuff out to people and I think that frustrated some people because they really wanted to to help they really wanted to help. It's a it's a sense. I think that is not well channeled in today's society. So when stuff like this happens there's an outpouring of it with the bushfires in Australia linked global heating and themselves adding vast quantities of carbon dioxide into the atmosphere. These FIS lies pose a stark warning of the future. I asked John If some of the ideas he talked about could help create a group identity around the existential the threat we face from the climate crisis where perhaps it isn't so much of an identity at present yes or no yes because the notion of shared social like density is the fundamental principle behind all forms of collective action if you think about any social movement of any any protest any direct action is based upon people seeing themselves as a group and acting as one and so. It's it's obviously the right strategy for anybody trying to bring about a change in norms for any leader Greta tune burgo ago. Somebody like that to invoke an ass invoke a shared plight to motivate people to act. So that's the yes and the no is that not everybody will see themselves as equally threatened me to be blunt. The rich have ways of buying their way out of the climate crisis so win the tides and the start building up they will move. They will build build homes and places that protect themselves. Everybody else will be in the signed boat that to be blunt the rich won't be whilst is don't necessarily sally come with a disregard for the climate crisis is an important consideration. In the extent to which individuals can mitigate its effects on themselves and this could make it harder to bring people together if I can take an analogy from protests in collective action and relating which is my other area of research. Sometimes people distance distanced themselves from the roast radical. I suppose in this context we'd say no the radical all those calling for drastic action to prevent climate crisis enclosed emergency. So what needs to happen is that people would need to become more aligned to the radical okay and preps Nazi the radical as other and to see the most us again to the extent of the rich can position themselves as able to buy their way out of things than the limit to that strategy. That's it for this week. Thanks to John. Jewelry and Stephanie Conference from Guardian Australia will include links to Stephanie's writing and to some of John's work in the episodes description at the Guardian Dot Com. This episode was presented by me. Nicole Davis and was produced by Madeleine Finley. We'll leave you with a little glimmer of hope from Stephanie. Personally I think Australians are really looking for community in a way that I probably haven't for a long time I think I think a crisis really crystallizes what's important to people and what's important went to paypal is community. That's what that's what you come back to. That's what helps us understand who we are and what we value is other people for more great podcasts. From The Guardian. Just go to the GUARDIAN DOT COM slash.

John Stephanie Guardian Australia Daniel Andrews Victoria Australia Nicole Davis Greta paypal Madeleine Finley
"guardian australia" Discussed on Today in Focus

Today in Focus

07:09 min | 1 year ago

"guardian australia" Discussed on Today in Focus

"Little? Could you ever imagine what's happening at the moment. Well I should have been able to imagine it because I've reported on the global climate emergency for a lot of my career but now it's happening here and now it's almost unimaginable. Lenore Taylor is the editor of Guardian Australia. It's terrifying and it's exhausting and it's Kinda physically and emotionally shattering and it's really difficult to imagine that something like this could be happening. Even though scientists told us that it would be. How would you describe the crisis? Well there's kind of in fact some figures that can describe it. We've had twenty four people die in these fires we've had about seventeen hundred homes destroyed but both of those numbers. This will probably go up because there's lots of places we haven't been able to get back into yet that way. We know the towns have destroyed at the last count. The fires is had burnt through about eight point. Four million hectares of forest. And that's like twenty one million acres which I think is a sixty percent of England your England and these guys that you can't really put out. Let them burn. And just try to protect people and property. But there's also this sort of Shia terror of it I mean as thousands and thousands of people evacuating their homes and then not having any idea if they'll have a harmless got back to the crush to get out by any escape route. That's still open. After out of control. Flames destroyed home after home. Supplies is the series. It's more than one hundred and forty thousand residents told to evacuate on newsy. There were thousands of people up and down the cause sheltering on beaches thousands of people flee to the beaches as far as ben in two of Australia's most populous states. New South Wales and Toria internal Austrailia now where thousands of people are trapped on ocean beaches surrounded rounded by wildfires that continued to burn out of control. Because they couldn't get out of the little beachside hamlets that I was staying in so they would just sit on the beach all night under blankets with the kids as Rain down and the fires burnt through their houses. Some of the houses survived some. Didn't you know there's this all all sorts of little everyday. Bits of TERRASSA people. Who told you've got a day to evacuate from your beachside suburb? Because the fires will be back tomorrow so they lied the kids kids in the pits into the car but the electricity is down. So then there's no petrol so you can't put any can't buy anything because the items down because they run on `electricity electricity as well there were lines of people outside darkened supermarkets with very little food in them. There were huge traffic jams on the roads trying to get out of the fire zone with people sort of stuck in their cars in a forest that might burn. People have been evacuated multiple times from their homes. I think the sort live the terror and the anxiety and the trauma of it is just enormous. And you know it's not just in country. Regions of the cities are affected affected as well. You Know Sidney in some Sydney suburbs. The air quality was almost ten times worse than Beijing. This morning and Melvin. Well the impact of the bush fires is now now being felt in Melvin with a heavy blanket of smart choking the city hambrouck errands woke to an orange glow. But it wasn't the sunrise more had terrible. Oh bushfire smoke so bad that it sets off smoke alarms in restaurants so bad. That ash rains down out of the sky. You know you can't put washing on the line. 'CAUSE Asheville full on it. They're shutting institutions in camera. Because the smoke you so bad we've been wearing mosques. Since the beginning of December you go swimming in the surface full of Ashen these Asha along the beach. And then there's the effect on wildlife so for example this lovely island off. Satellite Kangaroo Island burnt almost entirely on the wakened Massey five voting on kangaroo island is virtually unstoppable creature. There must soup Yokota done. That's the only replace it lives and these guys. I mean we've always had fires but nevertheless big a never for this long and never across this kind kind of area and because it happening so much more frequently so they used to be there were always part of the way that the bush regenerated but not because they're happening more frequently and at much higher temperatures in and much more ferocity. We don't know what's going to happen to these ecosystems. It's but scientists design. They don't think that some of these ecosystems will ever recover so I mean it's just a giant national trauma. It sounds like a war zone. It sounds apocalyptic. I mean one person who I was listening to you talk about transport minister in New South. Wales said it was like an atomic. Oh make bomb had been dropped. The phillies Lottie rule. Yes rule for a reason on the I always hear Molo by the other day and it was just hell on earth breath. I mean how do you go about reporting on something like this. I mean it's really really difficult. We see things that are just almost just crazy crazy. These fires create their own weather systems. It's called pyro Cumulus Nimbus these a massive massive clouds that go ten twelve kilometers up in the sky hi and they create thunderstorms and those thunderstorms create lightning and that can strike and create new fires twenty or thirty kilometers away from where you thought the Phya was the other terrifying thing that these fires are doing is creating phya tornadoes and one of the volunteer firefighters who was killed was killed when a fire tornado flipped his fire truck. I mean that's that's unimaginable. And tell me about some of the stories that have stuck with you. I mean at college in Australia. You've been reporting on this for months now. Well there's so many stories I mean. There's some lovely stories of people offering offering help. I mean the response is heartwarming in some ways people loading vans and just driving places where they don't know anyone but they just WanNa to help people offering rooms to strangers people who save their neighbors houses even when they own houses burnt down volunteer firefighters. who a still fighting fires when they lost their own home? There's a lot of sort of firsthand stories coming out of how people got out what they had to to do. People who had to sort of seating a little dug out because the fire swept out of their house up people who were rescued by little Ahmad or private private boats that sort of went down the coast and helped to get people out of their homes. There are so many extraordinary stories.

Austrailia kangaroo island Melvin little Ahmad Lenore Taylor Guardian Australia England editor phillies South Wales Beijing Asheville Molo ben Wales New South Sidney Massey Sydney
"guardian australia" Discussed on Today in Focus

Today in Focus

02:33 min | 1 year ago

"guardian australia" Discussed on Today in Focus

"<Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Female> Australia <Speech_Female> has baning quite <Speech_Female> severe drought <Speech_Female> in eastern <Speech_Female> parts <Speech_Female> of the country. <Speech_Female> For at least five five. <Speech_Female> He is this so <Speech_Female> much dry matter <Speech_Female> on the ground <Speech_Female> that can catch a lot <Speech_Female> easily. Are <Speech_Female> the three lightning strikes <Speech_Female> all through <Speech_Female> things like electricity <Speech_Female> power <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> lines falling down Alan <Speech_Female> sparking FIS. <Speech_Female> You <Speech_Female> can't draw <Speech_Female> a direct line <Speech_Female> between climate change <Speech_Female> and these particular <Speech_Female> bushfires but <Speech_Female> climate change will <Speech_Female> make bushfires <Speech_Female> more <Speech_Female> severe and <Speech_Female> more intense and <Speech_Female> they make the bushfire <Speech_Female> season longer. <Speech_Female> So what <Speech_Female> we saw these see for the first <Speech_Female> time is the first <Speech_Female> week of spring <Speech_Female> a subtropical <Speech_Female> rainforest in Queensland Slam <Speech_Female> was on fire. <Speech_Female> That's <SpeakerChange> that's <Silence> crazy. <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> We have a situation <Speech_Female> in Australia where <Speech_Female> the climate change <Speech_Female> debate has become <Speech_Female> really party <Speech_Female> political for for <Speech_Female> ten years. <Speech_Female> The conservative <Speech_Female> government coalition <Speech_Female> has just <Speech_Female> not been able to come <Speech_Female> up with a <Speech_Female> real climate <Speech_Female> change policy <Speech_Female> six years <Speech_Female> ago. They a <Speech_Female> Bait Labor <Speech_Female> on the back of a promise <Speech_Female> to repeal carbon <Speech_Female> tax a Labor <Speech_Female> government had put <Speech_Female> in place. <Speech_Female> A lot of the <Speech_Female> media is <Speech_Female> in support <Speech_Female> of a <Speech_Female> a government not <Speech_Female> having a real <Speech_Female> climate change policy. <Speech_Female> It's hard to <Speech_Female> say how things <Speech_Female> can change but <Speech_Female> the school <Speech_Female> climate <Speech_Female> strikes. I think <Speech_Female> have been really really <Speech_Female> positive. <Speech_Female> In terms <Speech_Female> of how many <Speech_Female> people have turned out. <Speech_Female> And how <Speech_Female> strongly young <Speech_Female> people feel about this <Speech_Female> issue and for <Speech_Female> that reason. I think <Speech_Female> it's not possible. Oh <Speech_Female> frustration governments <Speech_Female> to continue for <Speech_Female> much longer <Speech_Female> without some <Speech_Female> kind <SpeakerChange> of policy <Speech_Music_Male> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> so <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> that was Gabrielle. <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> Jackson Associate <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> News editor <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> at Guardian Australia. <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Music_Female> Before we finish today. <Speech_Female> I want to tell you <Speech_Female> that recently our <Speech_Female> very own Akzo so <Speech_Female> Kakuta won <Speech_Female> the Gold Award <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> for best sound designer <Speech_Music_Female> at the audio <Speech_Music_Female> production <Speech_Music_Female> awards beating <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> an amazing <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> lineup of nominees. <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> I hope <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> you can tell from today's <Speech_Music_Female> focus episodes. <Speech_Music_Female> Just how <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> brilliant he is. <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> We're really proud <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> of him. <Speech_Female> That's it for today <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> but keep listening <Speech_Female> we take you through this momentous <Speech_Music_Female> political <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> week. My thanks <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> to Heather Stewart <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> Rowena <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> Mason and Gabrielle <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> Jackson. <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> This episode was <Speech_Female> produced by Hanna. More <Speech_Female> and Courtney Yousef <Speech_Female> sound <Speech_Female> design was by Axel <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> Kukuchi. <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> The executive <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> producers are still may <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> not and Nicole <Speech_Music_Female> Jackson. <Speech_Music_Female> We'll be <SpeakerChange> back tomorrow <Music>

"guardian australia" Discussed on Reliable Sources with Brian Stelter

Reliable Sources with Brian Stelter

11:56 min | 1 year ago

"guardian australia" Discussed on Reliable Sources with Brian Stelter

"Every year that the trump era goes on yeah it is Brian in and you know with with trump you when an individual remarks you never know whether it's the impulsive act of arrested in adolescence psychopath path to acting on impulse or a calculated political strategy but there is clearly there is a long range strategy at play here and it's derived and conquer look trump and we listen interesting on derided conquer derived mock. Make us a laughing stock. Remember number this week. He said we're a laughing stock internationally. That's a little bit of projection. I don't think we're a laughingstock internationally. I think our president is the person who's laughed at internationally but then he called us a joke the idea is to do to the press what trump and his team have managed to do pretty much to the Democratic House of Representatives in mocking them remember back in May when William Bar was with Nancy Pelosi at us and an event and he said have you brought the handcuffs Madam Speaker Balking and then laughed mocking their ability to back up their threats of of of of citing for contempt or their subpoenas. They now mark the house. You saw it this week. Corey Lewandowski spit in the face of the house and there's nothing going to happen to in fact if you read the right wing media he was a hero. They WANNA do that to the press if they can do that to the press if they can amok us to the point where people don't take seriously and we don't back up our effort if we don't show integrity if we don't have some teeth in our reporting they they will do it and Brian. We are the last best hope between trump in an imperial presidency. You know seventy-three. Arthur slesinger wrote a book called the Imperial Mariel Presidency was based on FDR Lbj but it was written during the Nixon administration and it said they have expanded the powers of the Presidency so so far beyond what the framers of the Constitution intended that they're trying to make him into a king lasting the framers King George as you remember. That's that's what's going on here. When trump said this week that he said nothing inappropriate in that conversation with Ukraine he said highest level highest level. We'll never inappropriate or appropriate. That's him and you know we've got William Bars attorney general in his ear. A guy who has spent his life writing about about the powers of the presidency should be expanded. That's where all of this is going. That's the long game short game. He needs an enemy during during this campaign to get reelected and he doesn't have Hillary Clinton and talk about the radical Democrats Socialists on the left isn't going so well he he gets automatic praise from his base when he pounds depressing fights with US Brian as you said on this show it is only gonNA get worse. It's going doing the get awful in coming months. David I could talk to you for years. Maybe we will but we're out of time for now. David thank you so much. Quick break here reliable sources and then then the view from outside the US foreign journalists see trump two words alarmingly incoherent hi everyone poppy harlow here. I'm excited to share some inspiring interviews coming up on boss files. This week's guest Dick Parsons is it having steadied time-warner. Co after its merger with AOL and writing the ship as former chairman of Citigroup during the financial crisis arsons is facing perhaps his biggest challenge yet as he battles cancer what his story career has taught him especially the importance of having a sense of humor. I hope you'll check out our interviews and subscribe the boss files. Today you wafer the Champions League and Europa League back in action this in every match on beyond is hey welcome back to sources. I'm Brian stelter journalism. A fresh rush set of is is always helpful to have. That's why an op Ed from Guardian Australia editor. Lenore Taylor has gone viral among reporters. She describes a recent visit to the United States where she was struck by the way is that American reporters right about President trump she says reporting about this president can mask and normalize trump's and go herranz well the nor is back in Sydney and he's joining me now. When did this strike you. When did you realize this. I was just in my hotel remittance Remittance York and listening to the news listening to Cable News and there was a full press conference of the president down the border opening or talking to a new census that said it's section of renovated border wall and I was kind of transfixed because he was so meandering I was surprised at how he junk from what it was made from discussing how powerful the concrete was how they were twenty bull mountain climate who tried to climb climb this wall and hadn't been able to he was jumping around a lot. When you write a one thousand word story or you're right a tweet summing up the president's comments a lot of that stuff around the edges left out isn't it yes so I guess as reporters and editors are job usually means making sense of and editing down and crystallizing. What people are saying? That's what we do but I realized that in this sense by doing that what kind kind of Moscow on normalizing what is often quite rambling proposal quite incoherent statements and I just wondered about whether that was doing our readers or listeners a real service right and the people that bring up the president's fitness for office the people bring up his mental health. They are watching these long rambling exchanges exchanges and wondering about him. I noticed on Friday when the president had another one of these. QNA's with the Australian Prime Minister and the Oval Office one of the Australian stroman reporters looked over to a Western reporter and said is it always like this and yes in America now. It is always like this so it's helpful to hear your perspective saying that was a really strange trip to the United States yeah. I think some of the reporters that are traveling without Prime Minister Scott Morrison here really has got the red carpet pit treatment in the United States from the president were a bit flummoxed about how to take some of the things that the president said he casually mentioned that Australia might join a coalition action of the Willing in Iran and no one talked about that before and then in the same context he started talking about nuclear weapons and that was sort of looking around thinking is seriously Arista he announcing something he hit by the end of the day he hadn't made a request for Australia to join the coalition of the willing and he was back to talking about the need eight for restraint. I think if you're not used to that type of dialogue it's quite it's quite hard to know how to interpret it and you realize is that in interpreting it your editing out a lot of of the actuality a lot of the reality and that's that's what I was really thinking about but I don't pretend and haven't says autism have some wild expert opinion. You know I know in the two thousand sixteen campaign season a lot of networks really criticized for taking some of then candidate trumps rallies just straight and showing them front to end and so I think we we do have to edit. We do have to pass. We do have to analyze in fact check. I guess I was just wondering we also sometimes should show our listeners in our readers and unedited section of transcript orientated type of footage so that they can make up their own minds what they think about the way that the president communicates yeah. I've been thinking the exact same something this week watching these events. Here's an example from Friday when the president looked at the reporters in the Oval Office and really attacked them. Here's what he said. The media of of our country is left at all over the world now. You're a joke okay. What else lure you are halfway around the world in Sydney. Australia is is the American media being laughed at around the world absolutely not I think the American media is doing biologic a good job in very difficult all circumstances and I think what we're talking about. He today is an example of the dilemma of reporting on President. That doesn't respect the institution shouldn't the media. It's a real problem but no. I don't think the American media joy coping left at around the world flying home from the United States where you worried about America. Were you worried about president trump yeah. I was a bit on well. I'm worried about democratic institutions. I'm worried about the whole way that the world has been organized and the extent to which that's going to continue. Yeah was quite worried about that actually uncomfortable to hear you say that but I'm glad you heard to say thank you so much. Thank you so it's not just the line. It's also the incoherence something to think about about of next year a Sunday morning exclusive the authors of that brand new book about Brett Cavanaugh. They're here to address what went wrong with the New York Times excerpt from the book. That's next the New York Times picking up after another trip up this week. It involves this new book title. The Education Brett cavill book adaptation that was published in the Sunday Review Section last weekend left out some information there was also an inappropriate tweet about it that that caused an apology from the Times here talk about that or the authors of the book Robin Pogrebin and Kate Kelly the book is the education of Brett cavenaugh and this is a fascinating fascinating book and I want to start by saying there's so much nuance in this book if people buy it and read it in detail but there was this adaptation in the paper last weekend the left out information about new accusations against Kevin all here's what the editor's note later said it said the book reports the female student who the center of this declined to be interviewed and friends say that she does not recall the incident. We're covering all allegedly harassed her. That information was belatedly added to your article so what went wrong here. It seems to me that your initial adaptation set a narrative. The narrative was there is new damning evidence against brick half and all but then this editor's note undermined that new claim yes we we think it's unfortunate that that has upstaged the new claim and some of the good work which thank you for acknowledging it that we feel like we've done in this book and presenting a much more nuanced nuanced complex account of this these events that flew by in real time last year and basically what happened was that we had a line in the book where we did name the victim and we also had the fact that three. That's her friends Wednesday. She doesn't remember it. The editor felt it was best to take out because we don't typically name victims in the New York Times when they took it out the whole sentence was omitted so when we realized that they put it back could they wrote an editor's note and they acknowledged the omission victim others would say only accuser the alleged victim. That's right. It's worth noting also that a television reporter spotted her this week at her house and ask questions about it and she said words to the effect of if you have questions ask bread so it's been redirected back to him by I her and we feel like this is a valuable new piece of information that we're trying to put out there and the reason we thought it was credible as we have a credible witness a Washington a person named Max Dyer who runs this good.

president Brian stelter US trump New York Times editor David Sydney Australia reporter America Dick Parsons Hillary Clinton the Times Democratic House of Representa Madam Speaker Balking Imperial Mariel Presidency Corey Lewandowski Nancy Pelosi
"guardian australia" Discussed on Conversations

Conversations

13:11 min | 1 year ago

"guardian australia" Discussed on Conversations

"This is an ABC podcast. Gabriel Jackson is an editor with Guardian Australia a few years ago. She decided to to write a personal story about health condition. She'd struggled with since she was a teenage up. Gabriel began the article with these words. I feel sad that this is the hardest story either written and that I'm embarrassed that people will read it and know the intimate details of my life. Gabriel was writing Ching about her endometriosis. Thousands of women got in touch with the Guardian with their own experiences of Indo after the article and what came up again and again regardless of where women lived how old she was how rich or poor was that women with endometriosis commonly really wait for years to get a diagnosis and are often not believed by doctors when they seek help for their pain in looking into the treatment treatment of Indo Gabriel has cracked open a big story about women's health. Her book is called pain and Prejudice High Gabriel Hi Sarah Looking back with me. I hit with the symptoms of endometriosis. It really started in my teen teenagers to be honest. Probably from from the time of about fourteen I would have really bad period pain the pain that went down into my legs and I would feel really heavy and and then I would have really bad back pain and you know I was that girl in the sick bay every month and my mom was picking me up from school month after month and so what did you pain down to as a teenager well. I didn't know eventually I was diagnosed when I was seventeen with chronic fatigue syndrome looking back now at the criteria and knowing how the people who have corning take syndrome. I don't think I did have it but studies studies now show that women with endometriosis are one hundred and eighty times more likely to report chronic fatigue syndrome than other women so you know I think that was probably understand now but that fatigue that incredible about a fatigue I was having at the time I was diagnosed with that is actually just a symptom of my indoor deed Alpha women or Frayn's teachers say oh look it's just period pain. Oh yes is what happens yeah. My famed. J told me constantly look. Some women have not bad period pine. That's life you know put up with it. What accident did you have a nineteen that further complicated. I guess the symptoms you are feeling wing years so I was typical stupid. Nineteen year old end went skiing for the first time and thought I was just brilliant and decided to go off a jump on my third day of ever skiing in my life I had accidentally swapped ski with a friend which I didn't when I hit a bit of rockies and the skaters fell off and then I was plant plowing down this hill and I ran into a rock I just hit my back came into contact with this big rock night some assaulted in the air and kind of fell on my back and I didn't know her blood was streaming down through the snow and anyway I ended up having a compound fracture of my sacred POW which is that triangle bone at the base of your spine and so of course that's going to leave someone in in pain did that that sort of become the explanation for some of the pain feeling absolutely so thin blamed all my back and hip pain and pain down the front one of my right leg which seems to have accompanied me my whole life all of that just got blamed on that skiing accident and that's where I would tell physiotherapists and that's what I would tell L. doctors about so. How did you finally get diagnosed with endometriosis so I just I just realized that no no one else suffered from their periods like I did. I would have vomiting and diarrhea every month incredible headaches. I just couldn't leave my bed. It was incredible and I just said My. Ap I don't actually think this is normal and I really want a referral organic allergist place and she reluctantly often gave me one and did that caller. Just how how could they tell was it was it just by talking to evacuate symptoms within five minutes of May talking you know he just said tell talk about your life basically within five minutes he said. I think you have endometriosis. This is the thing a lot of people keep saying all symptoms of very generalized. It's very hard to dino well. It's not if you listen if you know what you're talking about. It's actually not that. Difficult is anything clinical that are gone college. Store doctor does does to formalize that dog endometriosis Kanani Bay officially diagnosed at laparoscopy but so that's in the surgical surgical for Ceja that's right but some endometriosis can be seen on some other tests so if you have into matriarch which was in the ovaries in Demetrios stories that can sometimes be seen at pelvic ultrasound. 'EM ARE I can show Adna my isis which is another disease like endometriosis but that's in in the muscle wall of the uterus that can be seen on so what is it. What exactly is happening in your body? You've got into matressses with endometriosis. That's when parts the intimate freedom which was the lining of the worm that grows outside the uterus mostly in the pelvic areas but it's being found in the lungs. Actually I think the lungs and diaphragm system is more common than once thought even has been found in some people's brains and so what happens there is those that that in Dmitry the yield tissue reacts bleeds when you are menstruating and forms cysts and Asians and sometimes people's organs can all become stuck together from this material so it follows like oh it follows the same circle as your uterus does when you're home hormone send out messages messages each month that it's time to to bleed those that tissue wherever it is in your body thinks ups what has to happen to believe but still a lot more research that needs to be done on and and my trio so once you got that diagnosis at twenty three did that immediately changed things view was was live suddenly easier after I was really lucky that this these stock to refer to a gynecologist who was a specialist in endometriosis he was very knowledgeable and he was also a really skilled leopards compete the excision surgeon so there's lots of various ways that doctors can get rid of endometriosis but excision is now being found by all the studies is the best and that just made actually cut it out. Some people use lasers to get rid of so wherever it scoring on those other pubs and also it's really hard to see so unless you are a trained sometimes you'll just get the most obvious endometriosis lesions and if you're not really skilled in understanding what under look like they might leave behind on some of those but I had this really great surgeon and he was for a caring doctor actually true and he did a great surgery so my my my periods were great for a long time after that and he did explain to me that a quarterback what about your pain so was all that resolved in the wake of surgeries or that kind of pain nausea that I have with my periods was really much better off to that. I would still get pain but not would not interrupt my life as it had before what I didn't realize this all the other symptoms I had the still had back pain which I'd always put down to my skiing accident still had his leg pain. Still you'll have these bouts of fatigue that would sometimes last few weeks and then just go away. I would really suffer from everyone gets busy and then gets tired the same to pay for my bouts of energy more than I saw other people around me. How did it start affecting you. Censor Sophy Self Gabriel like did you start to think autumn. I we call wide is why is this going mind while my friends seem to be able to party lines to get up and go to work yeah. That's exactly what I thought I thought of myself as a wake person and I started to jerk about being hypochondriac because I didn't want it it to be something people said behind my back and you look back now could not ever stay in a job because I would end up just so exhausted. You know it'd be job for a year Eero two years and then I'd leave and I'd have few months off and and yeah as I said I never saw my friends suffering. I would be doing the same thing as them but they weren't suffering in the same way so I just thought of myself as this really wake kind of sick and right person you still forged ahead with your career and you're living overseas and win to India India in two thousand twelve doing in India. I became obsessed with Kebabs. I love all sorts of Cabal. Souvlaki Gyros seen our don't Costa cab and I just thought I'm going to write a book about where it came from because they're not just like in some parts of Turkey and other parts of the Middle East capacitor a really important mm festive occasion and you'd go out for them. It's a big deal and when you've had a good cab you realize what you've been buying after a big night out and a van is not appropriate correctly so I decided to raise such come from India nor well no they came from the Middle East and probably from the time where the Persian empire was in India so I was there. I wanted to go to a place called luck now. You're doing deep Kabri. John was fantastic. Yes and what happened to you. In Mumbai SARS raped. I actually arrived in India. I decided I admit some people at the guest Palestine with them. We decided to get trained into the center of Mumbai and everyone's saying these pictures of the Indian trains with people. Oh you know hanging out in nodules tried to get on but just didn't seem to be anywhere to get on so I was running from one door to the other in Thun's uh-huh never good idea and then the train solid leaving the platform and this woman I was we thought was saying to me. Get on jump on and I don't remember I obviously stupidly did try to jump on the train as it was leaving and I must have fallen in the gap between the train and the platform and I had this sense of being like kind of tossed around in a washing machine you know this back and forth back and Forth Bang Bang Bang you fill between the PLATTE TWAIN THEM PLATFORM YEP train was moving your sword yeah at the first thing I remember is people hearing voices yelling out. Don't move move stay steel and I thought Oh a bit and not moving case they're talking to make because I was about to see top but then I open my eyes and there was a train kind of over over the top of me. I was flat on my back. How got there and then the train was traveling over the top of me and I just thought Oh this is it this. I'm dead did like there's no way to survive this hottie nor by some amazing luck but I remember people jumped down the train passed away and not have to wait and I was at the fluck I carriage. I should say so. The time has felt very long. I don't know just here at coming over here. It was touching body at all nor wasn't touching my body but I kept thinking. Something's going to be hanging down there ladder at the end of the train. That's going to just take me out but then people junk down and an obviously everyone thought I was paid. The woman told me Oh my God. I thought you did it for sure or at least had lost a leg and then people on the platform touching me I think I was Tarsha so you were pulled up from the from the train track in what shape we even physically yes oh terrible shape but I didn't quite realize that I you know what was was happening also confused and I remember touching my face and then looking at my hands and covered in blood and then I looked down I was just ballade all over me and and kind of being a puddle so I was wet with dirt and mark and thinking Oh God if I don't have a broken hip because my hip and control or incredibly sword and my whole right arm but I thought Oh my God if I don't die from that I'm going to die from a wound pain. And what kind of injuries did you did. Leave you had lots of cuts and scrapes and bruises. I had a broken shoulder and some torn ligaments and a bit of a head injury which thankfully awfully wasn't didn't do any permanent damage..

pain Sophy Self Gabriel India chronic fatigue syndrome Gabriel Jackson leg pain ABC skiing Mumbai vomiting editor Guardian Australia Kanani Bay India India Thun corning Middle East Costa Dmitry Frayn
"guardian australia" Discussed on The Signal

The Signal

03:20 min | 1 year ago

"guardian australia" Discussed on The Signal

"Okay so at last count more than seven hundred twenty thousand Australians were receiving the new stop payment also known as as the Dole. There are already a bunch of hoops. You have to jump through to qualify for that payment and style on it yeah. There's things like proving looking for work that you're looking hard enough and if you don't find work in a certain amount of time showing up job training right and those hoops that you have to clear have been multiplying for the last forty also years and that could could be about to happen again if the government can convince enough senators devoid for its plan so we called Ameera makers to explain. She's a political reporter for the Guardian Australia. We we do have a government that wants to drug test welfare recipients but only it seems those who are on job seek payments so what forms of of welfare will be subject to this new style and why those two forms of welfare that you WanNa make subject to it because these are the areas where we're trying to get people off if will fit into Jones so it's not everyone on Welfare just those who are looking for a job and they say that this is to try and tackle the nation's is drug problem. They want to identify people who have addiction issues and be able to point them in the direction with resources to get help. I mean we're trying to help. People get off drugs and get into work and trawl innovative new ways of doing that. I think it's worth a try now. Critics sort of saying well you sort of limiting that to a select group of people who happen to be on you. Stott if this was really about help you wouldn't be further stigmatizing people on on on newstalk or or looking for work. You would actually be putting money into drug rehabilitation centers. The government says well you know we'll get to that and so this is the argument that we're currently in and as well as the drug test and we've also got these cashless welfare card. The government wants to expand that program. Can you give us a rough. aww How that how that works so basically instead of guessing your welfare payment into your bank account the government quarantines eighty percent of this onto a special card which can only be used at retailers who have signed up to be part of the program so that limits weight. You can spend spend your money now. The government says that they are doing this in communities where they have had problems with drug and alcohol with had problems with gambling that sort of thing. I think it should be seen for what it is and that's genuine tip to do things that help people in these situations to help them better manage the resources that they have and to ensure that this food on the table label for the people who depend on these pilots that are going into these families and that they can get themselves into position to deal with issues in their own lives and they can go and find themselves unemployment and billion even greater control of their own lives so what they're saying is that it stops people from being able to spend money on those vices. which is you know how the government commit labels it and instead spend it on a on food and accommodation and and the necessities of life but again there is a flip side to this in? I'm not really really controls. The spending of people and critics say that again further stigmatizes people on welfare but it also takes away like their own their own choices and how they live.

reporter Dole newstalk Stott Jones Guardian Australia eighty percent
"guardian australia" Discussed on Impaulsive with Logan Paul

Impaulsive with Logan Paul

01:51 min | 1 year ago

"guardian australia" Discussed on Impaulsive with Logan Paul

"Are killing prisoners. Taking dead prisoners and harvesting their organs to sell them on the black Faulk mole my God. Do my worst. Fear is having my organs harvested. I need them for survival and imitate homeo- stasis. I can't imagine the people in China right now. If they go to krizner's fear for their lives. And their organs. Right. Like US prisons TV. Did you lose a heart? I'm going to mess that up. Did you say? Chinese people are sending people to orient in. No, they're playing organ. Like the orange harvesting the organs like playing, they're playing the organ taking away the organs, one of those big ones pipes in there. Oregon and Oregon. There. Y'all. Got it should stop. What's. Scientists have found the most earth like Exo planet ever, hold up. I'm really into this back. It's nearby. What though how many years it's the twenty four nearest star. So it's a star. It's excellent planets around the star. Okay. Okay. So it's the most most earth like so we got a chance guys. We got a chance to call the Mughal on my head. Why swing call cold. And I just throw 'em is obese four two. Xena phobia, Forty-six, Clemencia five nights. It's called tea-garden be tea-garden be got it fuck. They always come guard dope names, the guardian. Australia tea garden. How many light years is Spencer? This is very important to me by the garden dog, not guardian. Listen, I understand. Anyone on? I'll tell you what. You're so explain light moves out of certain speed. It's called the Speedo light, and, yeah, in physics is known as C and the speed is a huge, huge.

Oregon Faulk Spencer US China Clemencia krizner Australia
"guardian australia" Discussed on GSMC Music Podcast

GSMC Music Podcast

01:38 min | 1 year ago

"guardian australia" Discussed on GSMC Music Podcast

"Alot, an eighty hectare project near pits worth on Queensland's darling downs. Speaking to guardian Australia, Paul Curtis regurgitates manager talks about, and actively engaged citizens, citizenry embracing a more optimistic and progressive approach to the future, lend for wanted to tap into the creative drive of her industry to find a solution to a complex problem. She says the environmental movement often lacks a positive premise for action. It is exciting to own a piece of a solar farm to do that collectively. We can leave a lasting tangible infrastructure legacy and say, we built that together. So you may be wondering how this works money artists. Invest in two feet is put into a portfolio, which is managed by future super and can be used to buy ownership stakes in solar farms, or loaned to build their infrastructure, the land that Brig h-a-l-o solar farm is being built on, was previously used as a sorghum grain farm. It is now being leased from the land owner to build the solar project whose. Progress is closely monitored by impact investment group, which manages the underlying fund investing in Brig h-a-l-o artists can put forward as much as they can afford. So feet says the thirty four point five five. Megawatt Brig, alot solar farm could power the equivalent of eleven thousand three hundred homes for thirty years or looked at another way, it could generate more than two thousand cloud control tours in renewable.

Paul Curtis Queensland Australia eighty hectare thirty years two feet
"guardian australia" Discussed on WJR 760

WJR 760

02:25 min | 2 years ago

"guardian australia" Discussed on WJR 760

"Seven sixty WJR Detroit. Seventeen degrees and snow showers at six o'clock. I'm dick Hafner WJR. News giant hole in the pavement of a ramp from the Southfield freeway to the Jeffries is blocking that ramp. We'll get the details. Coming up with Tony Briscoe, Kim Jong owners in Vietnam. He'll meet with President Trump. They'll try to reach an agreement for the north to give up its nuclear weapons, at least that was the initial reason for President Trump wanting to have this meeting, but advocates are alleging there are indications that the president may accept a deal that will do less to curb the regime's arsenal. Here's a story line here and the North Koreans could potentially use that to their advantage. They're bringing a bigger team of negotiators and they did for. For the summit in Singapore back in June. All of these people have been preparing to try to get the best deal possible out of President Trump. So there is some concern that he will give large concessions without getting much in terms of meaningful progress on the key issue of denuclearization. That's correspondent will Ripley. And of course, nothing is known because the meeting hasn't taken place. Trump will arrive in the Vietnamese capital in a short while they'll meet for a one on one conversation on Wednesday evening, followed by a social dinner, and they'll be guest and interpreters. According to the White House spokesperson, Sarah Sanders. WBZ news time six oh one. The house begins the official challenge to President Trump's declaration of a national emergency on the border by voting on a resolution of disapproval. Here's correspondent Linda Ken. Congress says the president went out of bounds when he declared a national emergency to gather money appropriators refused to give him in the last budget. The power of the person they remind him is the purview of the legislative not the executive branch of government. If the vote in congress prevails Trump says he will veto it. And then it's up to congress to override that veto. But despite the constitutional and legal challenges that will follow the president remains steadfast about his wall. If you don't have it, you're not going to have borders, you're not gonna have a country. Linda Kenyon, Washington Catholic church seeing one of its most powerful figures found guilty of sexually abusing children in Australia. Here's the story. It's a fall of biblical proportions. Australian cardinal George Pell convicted of sexually abusing children, David marr is a reporter with guardian Australia. It.

President Trump president Congress Tony Briscoe Detroit Australia Southfield George Pell Linda Ken Singapore Kim Jong David marr Jeffries Linda Kenyon White House Sarah Sanders Vietnam executive reporter
"guardian australia" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:44 min | 3 years ago

"guardian australia" Discussed on KQED Radio

"The scenes it's become a moment which to assess the health of the transatlantic relationship something that has moved into uncharted waters with the arrival of donald trump in the white house mr trump still provokes a good deal of unease in european policymaking circles this highlevel us team here including defense secretary james mattis and the national security adviser h r mcmaster backed up by strong congressional delegation but despite the galvanizing threat from a resurgent russia or does not well in nato the syrian crisis has pitted turkish interests against those of washington britain's planned withdrawal from the european union is raising questions about both its and europe's trajectory questions that the british prime minister theresa may hopes the answer in her keynote intervention on saturday morning now justin has some of the other stories from ottis desk european leaders the gathering in vilnius to celebrate lithuania's declaration of independence a hundred years ago the celebration comes amid growing tensions with neighboring russia over its deployment of nuclear capable missiles in kaliningrad an and clave neighboring lithuania unaustralian commentator has come under fire on social media a seemingly suggesting that old chinese people look the same but the commentator jacqui cooper a fivetime olympian said she was referring to the skiing routine being similar not the skills appearances and hollywood couple jennifer anniston and justin through a separating off to two years of marriage the pass said the mutual decision was lovingly made at the end of last year the australian deputy prime minister bombie joyce has described as inept the australian prime minister malcolm turnbull in a row over extramarital sex mr tumble had accused mr joyce his coalition partner of a shocking error of judgement for conducting an affair with the media adviser the prime minister also declared a ban on sex between ministers and staff amy remake this is the guardian australia's political reporter as you told us more listens unprecedented language australian politics can be quite rough and tumble at times but even for us this is unusual the prime minister came out and made a moral judgment against the japanese prime minister who he's he's coalition partner and the deputy prime minister returned fire by calling the prime minister's comments inept and unnecessary he just remind us how we got here it seems like a lifetime a gonna last wednesday the rupert murdoch tabloids the daily telegraph published a photo allbaugh deputy prime minister a former stafa a 33yearold woman named vicky campion and she was pregnant with.

partner amy hollywood skiing kaliningrad washington nato james mattis vicky campion rupert murdoch reporter australia prime minister donald trump malcolm turnbull bombie joyce jennifer anniston jacqui cooper