38 Burst results for "Guardian"

Fresh update on "guardian" discussed on WTOP 24 Hour News

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:55 min | 3 hrs ago

Fresh update on "guardian" discussed on WTOP 24 Hour News

"Is not the only place or time that this has happened. And it continues to happen often and not only to the LGBTQ I a plus community but too many others in many other walks of life, and sometimes it seems that there's never going to be an end. CBS NEWS Brief. I'm Allison Keyes. It's 1 32, the internal watchdog of the Justice Department says it will investigate that, Trump said Trump Administration seizure of communication records of two Democratic members of the House Intelligence Committee. CBS News Justice correspondent Jeff Peggy's reports former Republican attorney General Alberto Gonzalez says the phone records subpoenas are troubling. So based on what you know was it was that contrary to DOJ policy, what is being reported it certainly if not contrary, to policy, certainly inconsistent with the finest traditions of the department. The inspector general will investigate. The DOJ is use of subpoenas to Apple and Microsoft. Not only to obtain the cell phone and email records of members of Congress but also of the news media in connection with recent leak investigations. Apple is seeking to protect its image as a guardian of personal privacy, maintaining it was blindsided and handcuffed by the Trump administration probe. Saudi Arabia says this year's hajj pilgrimage will be limited to no more than 60,000 people, all of them from within the kingdom due to the ongoing coronavirus pandemic last year, as few as 1000 people already residing in Saudi Arabia were selected to take part in the hajj. Two thirds were foreign residents from among the 160 different nationalities that would have normally been represented. One third were Saudi security personnel and medical staff just ahead on w T..

Jeff Peggy Allison Keyes Apple Microsoft Congress House Intelligence Committee Saudi Arabia Cbs News Trump Administration Donald Trump Last Year Republican TWO 160 Different Nationalities Justice Department One Third Lgbtq Alberto Gonzalez Two Thirds
Fresh update on "guardian" discussed on Saturday Morning Update with Rick Fowler

Saturday Morning Update with Rick Fowler

00:38 min | 10 hrs ago

Fresh update on "guardian" discussed on Saturday Morning Update with Rick Fowler

"Republicans Senator Ron Johnson from Wisconsin has been suspended from YouTube. That's right. He's been suspended from uploading videos for seven days after the company said he violated its covid 19 quote medical misinformation policies. The issue stems from statements Johnson made during a June 3rd Milwaukee Press club event. In his statements posted to YouTube. He criticized the Trump and Biden administrations for working against using cheap generic drugs to treat Covid 19. YouTube spokesperson says the sites medical misinformation policies don't allow content that encourages people to use hydroxychloroquine or other drugs to treat Covid 19 the video was removed. Johnson says YouTube's censorship proves the company has too much unaccountable power. Apple is seeking to protect its image as a guardian of personal privacy, maintaining it was blindsided and handcuffed by the Trump administration probe that resulted in the company handing over phone data from two Democratic congressman. Apple delivered its version of events on Friday that in response to news reports detailing the U. S. Justice Department's aggressive attempts To use its legal power to identify leaks tied to an investigation into former President Trump's ties to Russia. Apple provided a limited amount of personal information in response to a 2018 subpoena from a federal grand jury, but said it had no way of knowing all the circumstances. 6 32. It's time for a check of traffic and weather show Murray's in the W email Traffic center this morning on the absolute the Beltway at the Legion Bridge. Watch out for a disabled vehicle in the right lane. Step Your left in news. Caution. Also watch out for some accident. Activating McLean he spent on the Georgetown Pike Get tips. Lane empathy. Esther Remember that on the South bound lanes of the Rockville Pike routine Locust Hill Road in Cedar Lane, Only one left, Lane is squeezing by due to ongoing water made repairs to watch out. Let's slow down now from grassed repair, calm the W maelstrom..

Johnson Esther Friday Apple 2018 Youtube Wisconsin U. S. Justice Department June 3Rd Locust Hill Road Legion Bridge Rockville Pike Cedar Lane Republicans Georgetown Pike Mclean Senator Seven Days Democratic Donald Trump
Fresh update on "guardian" discussed on Radiosurgery NY with Dr. Lederman

Radiosurgery NY with Dr. Lederman

01:01 min | 11 hrs ago

Fresh update on "guardian" discussed on Radiosurgery NY with Dr. Lederman

"Because our kids are turning from a nice kids into a bad kid with all the drugs coming over from China, And as I say, I kept walking forward and the other young sailor was beside me. Just kept crying. But the punk who kept backing up he wasn't coming toward me. He was afraid and we got to my apartment. And then, uh, I went to give him $5. If you're not getting my guardian. God bless you. I don't need to cut you off. And I'm just that's okay. I'm already taking people and that was only the home. I gotta go. Amen. Protected me because I could No way I'll see you in the future. Yeah, Tomorrow night By Bronzino tonight it was delicious Was the 171 W l I r.

$5 China Tomorrow Night Tonight Bronzino GOD 171
Buckingham Palace Barred Minorities From Office Jobs in '60s

AP News Radio

00:39 sec | Last week

Buckingham Palace Barred Minorities From Office Jobs in '60s

"The guardian newspaper has reported at Buckingham Palace barred ethnic minorities from office jobs in the nineteen sixties the revelations citing documents in Britain's National Archives was published on the newspaper's front page it was based on papers showing that Queen Elizabeth seconds chief financial manager told civil servants in nineteen sixty eight but it was not the palaces practice to hire colored immigrants or foreigners for critical posts and other office jobs the palace replied forcefully to the historical allegations stressing that the queen and her household complied in principle and in practice with anti discrimination legislation Sarah shockingly London

Buckingham Palace The Guardian National Archives Queen Elizabeth Britain Sarah London
Roxana Preciado on Facing Your Trauma, and Speaking Your Truth

Influx Collectiv: The Podcast

01:54 min | Last week

Roxana Preciado on Facing Your Trauma, and Speaking Your Truth

"Just is the preface to my last book trauma for sale. This is the whole and their parts. I am responsible for telling my truth. I cannot hide behind my accomplishments and still future fails in achievements to come. I have to tell my whole truth. I do not wanna tell an incomplete story. This is not braver fair to others who have survived similar struggles and see me thriving. I am scared. But i wanna be brave. I will never be a coward in this book. I include personal photographs and some of my artwork to me and telling my whole truth. I wanna be free. I wanna be honest. The past summer of twenty nineteen. I spent in recovery. Trying my best to heal yet again. Healing is a lifelong process. I am no exception to this. Sometimes i am thriving while other times. I fall apart just like any other. No one is above their flocks humanity yet. i can never be completely healed. The trauma endured is not easily mended. However it gets better. I wanna share the pieces of me that i fear most the naked truth of the trauma that haunts me here is a quick glance. At what got me here at age twelve. I started writing poetry as a coping mechanism to deal with life's challenges. I grew up in a family where my mother was often cold and distant. She was more of a guardian than an actual parents to me. I also had a stepfather and was the eldest of four siblings. Me being the only stepchild to my stepfather. Needless to say i was the black sheep of the family. Growing up i had endured many trials and tribulations. I suffered from mental physical and sexual abuse from those who are supposed to love and protect me. The most

Iran's Presidential Candidate Slate Leans Heavily Toward Hard-Liners

All Things Considered

02:05 min | Last week

Iran's Presidential Candidate Slate Leans Heavily Toward Hard-Liners

"Government has approved the final list of candidates for that country's presidential elections. Voting day is coming right up June 18th. Iran has a very short campaign period. Now the slate is seven approved candidates. It gives the upper hand too hard liners and this election could have an impact on relations between Iran and the U. S. And whether negotiations resume on the 2015 nuclear deal. There are ongoing indirect talks in Vienna focused on restoring the talks over the deal. That now former President Trump withdrew from NPR's Peter Kenyon is tracking all of this from Istanbul. Who, Peter Hi, Mary. Louise. Okay, So how does it work in Iran? How did they get down to these seven candidates? Well, you know, it's pretty wide open when it comes to who can sign up who can register to run for president in Iran, and this year, nearly 600 people took the opportunity to sign up. But there is this group. It's called The Guardian Council. It's got 12 members, six of them appointed by the Supreme leader, Ayatollah Ali Khamenei, and that counsel is in charge of vetting the candidates. The criteria have never really been explained. But this year, the council eliminated all but seven of those several 100 presidential hopefuls. And I guess we should note that the incumbent Hassan Rouhani, he's finishing his second term term limited. He's not eligible to run this year. Okay, So who made the cut who got weeded out? Well, a former President Mahmoud a. Medina Jod was rejected again. He's becoming known as a perennial candidate. To no one's surprise. The early hardline favorite Abraham racy, was approved. He's a conservative cleric head of the Iran's judiciary. He ran against her honey and 2013 and lost. He's been linked to The infamous so called death panel that in 1988 sent thousands of political prisoners to their death s O. That's the front runner, and there are six other candidates, including the former nuclear negotiator, a central bank governor. But analysts say no one although there's some prominent names in there, no one looks likely to defeat right, you see, unless there's a surprise During this very short campaign,

Iran President Trump Peter Kenyon Peter Hi The Guardian Council Ayatollah Ali Khamenei Hassan Rouhani U. NPR Vienna President Mahmoud Istanbul Medina Jod Louise Abraham Racy Mary
"guardian" Discussed on The Guardian UK: Politics Weekly

The Guardian UK: Politics Weekly

05:59 min | 3 weeks ago

"guardian" Discussed on The Guardian UK: Politics Weekly

"Running to reelection tremendously unpopular abroad including in britain. So the guardian thoughts well. Why don't we try and help his opponent. John kerry in election so got him dreamed of the scheme. Where it's rita's would lobby voters in the polk county ohio which is a crucial battleground states. Persuade them to vote for kerry not to bush Daddy was guarding meters. Would with papa with voters that and look did not go down well. It was seen as a pc ising foreign british arrogance. People recall the revolutionary. War is the british trying to tell us what to do again unsaid. There was a tremendous backlash at crying. Media in blogs of the guardian was Inundated with lesson emails of complaints under eventually had to roll the humiliating me. Back down and Surprise surprise On election day. George w bush actually won the clark county ohio slightly bigger margin than in two thousand. Which as you wrote prompted speculation about there being a guardian effect if anything the guardians intervention possibly helped him and hurt john kerry nevertheless moving swiftly enjoying avail episode. The guardian undeterred deep. Make a push into the united states with the foundation of what was initially called guardian america in two thousand and seven which morphed in two thousand eleven into the site. We know today guardian. Us now based in new york and washington is as the. I had been made an impact. Pretty quickly with the wikileaks investigation. And then with the edward snowden cache of documents in two thousand thirteen joined by. Julia smith conservative. Mp for skin and ripping who asked the prime minister if action should be taken against newspapers quote may have crossed the line on national security. Welcome to the program. Where amazingly for really for british newspaper. The guardian along with the washington post shared a pulitzer prize. I mean the effective all of that being to mean that the garden is is viewed as a kind of regular meetings operation taking its place alongside the washington post or npr all slate or whatever it is do. American consumers see the garden just as part of the media landscape or is it still seen as this british newspaper. Doing something different in america you know. I think it's been the challenge and was found in. What's interesting is that. It's it's often both it stephanie. Seeing now as a player in the us media landscape as is the bbc another's. but it's also sometimes seen as as british as outside a dixie. The i mean. The british thing can be quite funny sometimes in when i was covering donald trump's campaign rallies the fake media tried to stop us from going to.

donald trump new york john kerry america John kerry wikileaks washington two thousand kerry Julia smith today George ohio both washington post united states british rita clark two thousand eleven
"guardian" Discussed on The Guardian UK: Politics Weekly

The Guardian UK: Politics Weekly

04:11 min | 3 weeks ago

"guardian" Discussed on The Guardian UK: Politics Weekly

"We jump over. There's that period between cb scott sitting with woodrow wilson and then max freeman palling around with his mate john f. kennedy that first half century of the twentieth century. You've written very interestingly about this. About how how. Little really coverage their woes of america in the garbage and and and and how it got by tennessee. Little bit about that yes. There was no regular guardian correspondent in the us So the paper was relying on american. John lewis some of them quite well known at the time they were working if a us titles doing the things they were discouraged from funding too often for the garden because of the cost of sending cables across the atlantic site was a tricky operation. A news would arrive very late days late. About a polar opposites that as different as you can imagine from today's Wired internet well of instant news. The first big name i think. The leap sound The is a household name for his coverage of the united states is alastair cooke probably known still to most people as the bbc's man in america because of letter from america but guardian readers know that he was our correspondent for a very long time and and really was a witness to some extraordinary events. Yes addison cook. Is the best known guarding figuring america in the twentieth century. He was in the paper. Twenty five years of hammering away on a typewriter literally smithfield room in his apartment overlooking central pocket in new york. We mentioned max. Friedman in washington on line interesting. Wrinkle lab was that the two of them started out well but then had a spectacular foaling out. There was a cold war between them. They refused to speak to each other. And so Several years ol- aditorial planning. Who's going to cover. Walt story had to be done through the Office back in britain but cook was seen as a a brilliant a brilliant writer. I interviewed his. His daughter is now living in the months and she had strong memories of the nine hundred. Sixty three kennedy.

John lewis new york washington Twenty five years john f. kennedy two twentieth century max freeman woodrow wilson atlantic nine hundred today united states cb scott addison max. Friedman first half century of the twen america Walt bbc
"guardian" Discussed on The Guardian UK: Politics Weekly

The Guardian UK: Politics Weekly

04:56 min | 3 weeks ago

"guardian" Discussed on The Guardian UK: Politics Weekly

"I described the other day as around guardian legend. C scott who took over as editor in eighteen seventy two. and so. you've had some very interesting things to say about the how the guardians position america plays out in the scott period and in a way the incredible access scott enjoyed as the editor and and taught man at the guardian in that incredible fifty seven year span. One of the things that may surprise me with such as article walls that I went into it with the assumption that okay for most of its two hundred year history. The guardian was probably pretty small. Potatoes says in america and not very widely known making small impacts and writing many for british jones. But my my assumptions were turned my head. In the time i discovered the gaudino has carried caught a lot of clouds From the cd skull air onwards was was well known unsubtly at least in Neocon washington correspondents' had tremendous access all the way up to the the white house itself and frankly better access a hundred years ago in fifty years ago. The i do today In the white house briefing room a couple of examples of that. Cd p. sculptor. He had a private meeting with president. Woodrow wilson in matches. Sta in one thousand nine hundred eighteen. The end of the first world war a few decades later. The editor of the guardian alastair hetherington came to washington sat down with president. John f kennedy a major debrief on what had happened during the cuban missile crisis Vice president lyndon johnson was positive that as well. I think that poly happened because the guardians washington correspondent at the time canadian. John is called max. Friedman was a close personal friend of john f. kennedy. I have selected as the title of my remarks tonight. The president and the press so may suggest that this would be more naturally worded the president versus the press. But those are not my sentiments tonight. Joe coating the guardian the message. The guardian. the dead letterbox. Periodic gase could still carry manchester by a huge majority. He said it was a genuine friendship. Even though kennedy knew the manchester guardian was not gonna get any votes For for for him. I have to just keep him with that because that is amazing about the. How many votes in manchester. When i mentioned new hampshire in one thousand nine hundred six. I was covering the new hampshire primary on the republican side. Bob dole still with us. Was the candidate then. He tweeted being a little tour of a small town in new hampshire. I began asking my question the moment he heard a british accent. Come out of my mouth. He snapped no in liverpool and moved onto the next question. There was no point in even hearing my question because he had no voters in liverpool. That's amazing that the he was made jokes in max friedman about carrying manchester. It just shows you. The same logic lives on even if on its head and i think particularly in election season now we still at the guardian can sometimes suffer the.

Joe Woodrow wilson John fifty years ago Bob dole liverpool fifty seven year lyndon johnson eighteen seventy two two hundred year C scott tonight alastair hetherington today america max friedman One new hampshire british manchester
"guardian" Discussed on The Guardian UK: Politics Weekly

The Guardian UK: Politics Weekly

03:01 min | 3 weeks ago

"guardian" Discussed on The Guardian UK: Politics Weekly

"About the founding in eighteen twenty one. We've been covering that extensively across the print newspaper in on the website and and obviously on the podcast. The founding of it has an american league of course because it was founded by. John taylor the son of a cotton merchant and was always seen as being the paper off the manchester cotton trade that automatically had a resonance in an impact in terms of how the guardian sore america and commented upon america. Just talk us through that. Yes the power of big carson. Magister is all regions of the guardian. Mean it would almost Some of the some of its financial back has the cotton textile traders would almost certainly have traded with causing plantations in america that used in slave labor. This was highlighted last year. Join the american global reckoning racial injustice with the black lives matter movement. On the scott trust commissioned some independent research is to investigate to any potential links between the guardian on the transatlantic slave trade. That report is not yet out an A line from this. They just the association of the guardian with bit cotton rights to the american civil war weather the confederacy whilst fighting to preserve slavery the guardian Sided with the. The cult. Males in manufacturers against a wealth is manchester. Who refuse to to handle cotton picked by in people tend to the civil war itself. The garden did not cover itself with glory. It really was on the wrong side of history not to be clear it had always been opposed to slavery itself but it did not think that a victory for the north in the civil would necessarily end slavery. But another stranded. Guardian was always supporting liberation Separatist movements so it felt that the the south had a right to try in the breakaway away from the union and had some pretty nasty things to say about abraham lincoln even after his death his assassination of golsen eighteen. Sixty five at the end of the will you no. But that's you say. The did run these very hostile towards tourelles abraham lincoln in your garden piece quote describing his time in office is a series of acts abhorrent every true notion of constitutional rights and human liberty. Very rare to hear a bad word spoken about abraham lincoln but the guardian manage nevertheless it was only a few years after those events. That the guardian and you wrote the way the guardian of today a more liberal progressive ways began to emerge under the editorship of the man..

John taylor last year golsen eighteen abraham lincoln american civil war scott trust today big carson america american eighteen twenty one Sixty five manchester years transatlantic tourelles
"guardian" Discussed on The Guardian UK: Politics Weekly

The Guardian UK: Politics Weekly

04:55 min | 3 weeks ago

"guardian" Discussed on The Guardian UK: Politics Weekly

"Welcome to politics weekly. I'm jonathan freed and on this podcast as you know we talk about the us this week. I thought we talk about something slightly different which is us in fact us and the us specifically how. The guardian has covered the united states of america. All this time. When i say all this time it is of course two hundred years. You can't have missed that. It is the guardians two hundredth birthday. We've been celebrating all month. And i thought it would be good to walk through the history of the guardian with somebody who has pole position in watching it unfold right now and that is david smith who is the washington bureau chief for.

david smith two hundred years two hundredth birthday this week united states of america jonathan freed washington bureau
Environmental Concerns Arise Over Energy Needed To Mine Bitcoin

Environment: NPR

01:53 min | Last month

Environmental Concerns Arise Over Energy Needed To Mine Bitcoin

"Making or mining. Bitcoin requires a lot of energy which can mean burning more fossil fuels now at the same time states are making a push for clean energy. So does something here have to give. Here's von golden from member station w. skg in new york's finger lakes about one hundred. People are walking down the shoulder of a highway overlooking seneca lake. They're heading down to the greenwich generation. Power plant the natural gas-fired facility generates some electricity. Oh what's gotten. The attention of. The activists is their generation of bitcoin. They're protesting today. Because greenwich is looking to expand. Its bitcoin mining. That would probably mean burning. More natural gas emitting more greenhouse gases. Yvonne taylor is vice. President of seneca lake guardian and is leading the opposition to greenwich. We simply cannot allow this ludicrous scheme of burning fossil fuels to make fake money in the midst of climate generating or mining. Cryptocurrency is complicated. there's no actual mining the gist. Is that a whole lot of computers. Do a whole lot of calculations to create digital currency that requires a ton of energy which can mean burning more fossil fuels. And that's the case with greenwich. The plant isn't always producing electricity for the grid so a few years ago. They figured out they could make a profit by using excess power to mind bitcoin. Dale irwin manages. The plant came up to that. It was a very good business solution for irwin. Won't say exactly how much more the plant will emit with its expansion. Only that it'll be in compliance with its

SKG Yvonne Taylor Seneca Lake Guardian Seneca Lake Greenwich New York Dale Irwin Irwin
Inside America's Epidemic of Gun Violence

Today in Focus

01:58 min | Last month

Inside America's Epidemic of Gun Violence

"Today we look at america's gun debate after nearly twenty thousand people were killed in shootings in twenty twenty five huge increase compared to the before. How away you of violence as a child. I was always aware honestly. I remember being in elementary school. Maybe seven or eight. Maybe even younger and my family decided to get double pane windows because a bullet flew through. My goodness flew through the window. Yeah yeah what almost got into the house. It just punctured and made a big crack throughout the window. It was just the thing you know we would even if we saw car making a u-turn down our street to go back the other way we would play a game and we'd call it literally drive by jump behind cars and pretend like oh it's a drive by like but you're outside playing after that got a bit more serious because then you actually start to see friends and peers affected by gun violence. It was something i always knew was a thing. I always knew that people who looked like me and my friends got shot. Up and clayton is a reporter on the guardians guns and lies in america project since her childhood in richmond california. She's been acutely aware of the impact of gun violence communities not the high profile mass shootings. That make it onto news bulletins across the world but everyday incidents but ready made national news and yet according to albany. It is these shootings. That are driving. America's gun violence crisis

America Clayton Richmond California Albany
UK Film Academy Suspends Noel Clarke Over Misconduct Claims

AP News Radio

00:49 sec | Last month

UK Film Academy Suspends Noel Clarke Over Misconduct Claims

"The top British actor and director has been suspended no Clark's career has been put on pause the British motion picture academy is suspended the famed actor and director in the me too case that is starting to heat up and after had snatched back an achievement award it had given him just last month all this comes after newspaper reports that multiple women have accused Clark of sexual harassment or bullying the guardian reported that spoken to twenty women who said Clark has engaged in misconduct ranging from sexual harassment to unwanted touching sexually inappropriate behavior on set and bullying clock is forty five he starred in doctor who and is denying all the me too related claims against him he has apologized if he has made anyone feel uncomfortable or disrespected I'm Oscar wells Gabriel

British Motion Picture Academy Clark Oscar Wells Gabriel
Facebook Introduces a New Miniplayer That Streams Spotify

Daily Tech News Show

01:58 min | Last month

Facebook Introduces a New Miniplayer That Streams Spotify

"The short film co. let from facebook's oculus studios and e as respond entertainment game studio won an academy award for documentary short subject the first project from the game industry to win an oscar. The film was created for the video game medal of honor above and beyond and is available to stream on youtube oculus tv and the guardians website the new york times reports that the indian government ordered roughly one hundred posts critical of the country's covid nineteen response to be removed from twitter facebook and instagram india claim the posts were misleading and could incite panic. The platforms complied with the order with twitter blocking the tweets in india but leaving them available outside the country on monday apple detailed its plans for. Us development over the next five years including investing four hundred and thirty billion dollars building a new campus in north carolina and adding twenty thousand jobs in the us apple also pledged tens of billions of dollars for the development of next-generation silicon and five g. Technology apple says the north carolina campus will support at least three thousand jobs in machine. Learning artificial intelligence software engineering and other fields. Facebook rolled out support for a new spotify. Many player in the news feed which will continue to play content as a user continues to grow their feed part of a partnership that the companies announced last week the features available to free in premiums spotify users. who will now see facebook and facebook newsfeed option when selecting the share option from within the spotify app and a separate blog post. The company also confirmed its building. Its own app. Podcast player was shows having to opt into the service and expected to roll out in the next few months and macrumors confirmed that the revival ransomware group removed all references related to an extortion attempt against apple which previously included images and schematics. Stolen from the odium quanta. The group had pledged additional information through. May i if not paid a fifty million dollar ransom and it's not clear why the information was removed

Facebook Apple Academy Award Twitter Indian Government India North Carolina Oscar The New York Times Youtube United States
European MPs Targeted by Deepfake Video Calls

The CyberWire

01:49 min | Last month

European MPs Targeted by Deepfake Video Calls

"Someone impersonating a spokesman for imprisoned russian opposition figure alexander navalny conducted zoom meetings with european parliament members. The sessions featured. What the guardian and nl times called a deepfake video call purporting to be volley associate leonid volkov which volkov himself said looked pretty convincing. Speculation about responsibility for the incident has focused on vo van and lexus. Two well-known russian prank callers pranksters and such nuisance. Humorous are known. The incident is of course troubling for coming at a time when navalny is imprisoned and on a life threatening hunger strike and it's worth noting that relatively senior political officials were taken in by the scam but to place it in perspective. This is more shock jock stuff than it is a spore of new and devilish lena. Various approach to disinformation technically. It's a cut above the kind of jerk who had called the live news coverage to holler bubba buoy during the slow motion. Chase of oj. Simpson's bronco down the four zero five in los angeles but let's keep it in perspective. The lesson is that video that appears genuine alive call need not be and that some authentication beyond look and feel is necessary but we already knew that it's even become atropine gag insurance commercials where there's a guy video conferencing with his move colleague and so forth. At any rate on balance not very funny and vo von alexis themselves aren't novices. We note. they pranked to name. Just three sir. Elton john the duke of sussex and senator bernie sanders but of their targets have been critics of the russian regime. Mr putin himself has not been pranked and seems unlikely to be

Alexander Navalny Nl Times Leonid Volkov Volkov Vo Van Navalny European Parliament Simpson Vo Von Alexis Los Angeles Senator Bernie Sanders Elton John Sussex Mr Putin
Is Sitting Still Slowly Killing Us?

Today in Focus

01:57 min | Last month

Is Sitting Still Slowly Killing Us?

"Pizza walker your political journalist for the guardian. How did you become interested in inactivity. It's society security through. I mean there's two reasons one of which is a few years ago. I worked book about cycling and part of that was looking into the problem of inactive lifestyles of just early deaths. The estimate is in the uk. Kills one hundred thousand people year. And i was completely shocked to find out quite how dangerous and how widespread inactive living. But there's also a kind of postal reason to it's fair to say that. When i was growing up i was a bit from brunt i had asthma quite quite badly and i kind of didn't have a lot of faith in my body and as happens with a lot of people you know but the time was twelve fifty and fourteen. I kind of stopped doing most activity. Most spoilt wouldn't even ride the bike or anything like that. What else about twenty two for reasons. I still punk quite fully understand on sunday to give up my job which involved just sitting and that's eight nine hours a day to become a cycle courier when those people who kind of in that largely pre email paired with just pick up packages office than cyclamen to another one as quickly as they could. It's fair to say the first few weeks the first few months of quite difficult but transformation was enormous partly and just the way it looks now felt but the most important thing was this kind of assumption at a with growing up in my body was kind of substandard. Really be much good. If put the test was shed in the mental effects completely amazing and it was such a transformative thing. That feeling is always kind of stayed with me. And it's pretty shocking number of deaths you've just linked to inactivate how inactive always the short answer is very inactive. That's the same both in the uk and pretty much most countries around the world and it seems be getting worse. The brewers figure is for the uk is roughly four in ten adults. Don't do enough activity to preserve the health in the long term.

Pizza Walker The Guardian Asthma UK Brewers
Tui Plane in ‘Serious Incident’

Airline Pilot Guy - Aviation Podcast

01:49 min | Last month

Tui Plane in ‘Serious Incident’

"Are at first item in the news notebook Tui plane in serious incident in quotes after every myths on board was assigned child's weight. This is from the guardian and let's see a software mistake caused a two flight to take off heavier than expected as female. The title miss m. i. s were classified as children. An investigation has found the departure from birmingham airport to majorca with one hundred. Eighty seven passengers on board was described as a serious incident by the air accidents. Investigation branch an update to the airline's reservation system while its planes were grounded. Due to the coronavirus pandemic led to thirty eight passengers on flight being allocated a child's standard weight of thirty five kilograms as opposed to the adult figure of sixty nine kilograms. This caused the load sheet produce for the captain to calculate what inputs are needed for takeoff. The state that the boeing seven thirty-seven was more than twelve hundred kilograms lighter than it actually was. Investigators described the glitch. Everything's glitch as a simple flaw in an it system. It was programmed in an unnamed foreign country where the title miss m. i s s. is used for a child and m s for an adult female ms despite the issue thrust used for the departure from birmingham an off birmingham on twenty one. July twenty twenty was only marginally less than it should have been and the safe. Operation of the aircraft was not compromised The same fault. 'cause to other two flights take off in the uk with inaccurate inaccurate. Load sheets later. That day

Birmingham Airport TUI Majorca Boeing Birmingham UK
Singleness: Burden and Gift

Modern Anabaptist: The Conversations that Shape Us

35:47 min | 2 months ago

Singleness: Burden and Gift

"Join us today as we talk about singleness as well as what it means to be single and life in the church join us in having the conversations that shape us greetings tobin. Welcome to another conversation. Come listeners this amount of baptist. Podcast how you doing tobin. I'm doing good. How are you doing doing all right. It's been a tough week for for us. Say you recently lost a loved one in your family anthem. I'm mourning the loss of a friend. So you know different times during cova de wouldn't you say oh for sure. It's definitely a tough time to lose somebody during covid because you don't exactly get to see them funeral plans start looking different and there's a whole bunch of other different support. Networks are starting to look differently than they did before hand right. I was even thinking we talked about death last week. And then it kind of hits you personally so it's very interesting right. It's it's just part of our lives and when we don't think about it don't deal with it sometimes for caught unawares but yeah it's good to have to have that background and even as we are recording this we are almost at where death also plays a central role in the story and to defeat of death. Of course as well so yeah. It's very interesting. Yeah very much so. We had one of our recommendations to talk about singleness this week from a listener. Yeah it's quite the switch from death and there's quite a few ways we can take this conversation right so we'll kind of see how it unfolds. We'll see how the cookie crumbles but we could talk about singleness as an experience of individuals within the western culture right. We're probably talk about in our second half singleness as it relates to biblical values and and and culture and what the bible says there right and then we can also talk about a little bit in the beginning now about how singleness in psychology relate to one another. Yeah that's a good idea. Why don't you start us off with that Even as you're talking about it's interesting to even think about what is singleness right because singleness can be so many different things depending on how you define singleness and not being singled. So what do you think right. So single head is if we were to come up with something like a working definition here i would say. Single single hood is defined by not being in relation with another person. And i think the traditional idea of cygnus is in a romantic setting okay and you had some statistics on singleness in canada. As well which. I found fascinating i did and when i read these statistics. They're not exactly using the same definition. I am right and from what i understand. These are talking about single households so in canada. there there was an article in twenty nine thousand nine that wrote that compared to nineteen eighty six in two thousand sixteen. We had approximately double the amount of people who lived alone and so that means that we have about four million canadians across canada. Who who are single. Who who live alone and now with someone who provides that romantic so seventy percent of the four million have previously been in a relationship which would include widowed divorced or separated by any other means twenty percent of this four million are currently in a relationship with somebody but they just don't live in the same household right and then fifty percent of these individuals also have a child. Roughly speaking two million canadians live in a single parent or guardian household and are pulling triple or quadruple duty in order to support and care for the children or the dependence and simply don't have the same resources that we do with having an extra person there right fascinating. So when i asked you about the definition singleness you talked about not being in a meaningful relationship or romantic attachment to someone but then as you're giving us each statistics you already seeing a little bit of a clash with how you defined versus how perhaps canada or society defines it right because society defines this as just romantic attachment. I was just thinking about singleness before we even we even talk today and How we just assumed that you have to be part of a meaningful. You have to report a meaningful romantic relationship or attachment in order to not be single whether that's married or living with somebody or at least being boyfriend girlfriend whatever we wanna do whatever we want to call it but the experience of singleness goes beyond just that right. I mean The i was reading some articles about this author deborah hirsch. She's a christian author. She's a little bit out there because she talks about sexuality but she talks about homosexuality is not just a sexual expression within a sexual relationships ship between two bodies but that sexuality transcends also into every relationship we have because we we can't just separate parts of our being. We can't just say this part of me sexual in this. Part of me is relational. And this part of me is spiritual we are one hole and so it transcends. I heard a talk by her. And so she talked about what that means for single people and and celebrate people people who choose to be celebrate in that setting. And that doesn't mean that these people don't need community or meaningful relationships of attachment even if they're not romantic attachments over shirt and i like that idea of the embodied whole as you can't we can't segment like like you said sexual the the spiritual whatever that it all comes together as one person right that being said there are individuals out there who would find they can be in a non sexual relationship. That'd be classically to find a single but aren't troubled by that Right so you're looking at the asexual community where relationships with out that sexual component still fulfilling and meaningful right right and the flip side to that is you have people who have this meaningful community. Who who have lots of deep meaningful attachments to other people but are longing for would consider themselves being single and lonely and longing for a deeper expression for deeper romantic and sexual attachment to someone exactly while there are some that. Do not need that romantic or other person attachment to the same level. There's other people that crave and need it and desire so talk to me a little bit about what that means in terms of how how you live life and how you engage life as a single person. Well okay so growing up in canada as this as a single person who is wanting a relationship and can't find it what is what is that. Psychologically like and i would i have. I think i have a few friends who would fit this category and i just from conversations with them it's not a enjoyable experience Even in my own past bake as someone who from eighteen onwards wanted to have like girlfriends and wanted to be in those in in in relationships with other beings who felt that long. I've had a taste of how powerful that loneliness and that drive four relationship can be right and then there's a certain amount of feeling of rejection and isolation loneliness from not having that being fulfilled so as you're talking my question comes up. What's the. I am trying to word this but where maybe i'm using the wrong words but where does longing turned into obsession or or need so so what i mean by that is can you have that long. Can you desire something and still be content. With present circumstances. I mean that comes down to how you define contentment I would say that if contentment means you're all right with the circumstance. Then no because you still desire that relationship okay We talked quite a number of episodes back about the dark night of the soul right about longing for something how You desire of reality of presence to be with in in my circumstance was to be with god and how reality circumvents that there then becomes a conflict between what is felt. And what is known. That being said you've already touched on this with the obsession component right but then there is also that danger of it becoming an obsession of turning that pain right into something negative such as is found in some communities such as the involuntary salvator the in self community online right and then what you find in those communities is that a lot of this pain and turmoil gets turned outwards against other communities where they start blaming other people and other things for their own loneliness and rejection and in doing so their reactions become a negative coping mechanism an unhealthy behavior to try and alleviate the discomfort or rationalize it so then that goes back to my original question so because because my worry is that that we're kind of setting up a binary in the sense that i want to be in a more committed relationship of one sort or another. Let's call it romantic for for better for lack of a better word. So i want to be under romantic relationship. I'm either in the stage of wanting that and the more i wanted to do the closer i get to it being an obsession in my life or i get it and then i'm fine but there is no room to to to live a. Is there no room then to live a life. That says hey i would really desire this but i will also be content. Happy with where i am right now and and live into that to the fullest. And that's that's tricky because we don't have a lot of social narratives that kind of give us that framework to experience singleness in a healthy way. So if i were to break that down a little bit when we watch movies in rome these romantic movies and stuff. It gives us a lot of even you even say it's either healthier unhealthy. That's not me to judge right now but it still gives you those narratives to kind of go and say oh. This is what it's like to be in relationship. This is how i can experience relationship and and dating and being with another person. We don't have movies about what it's like to be alone at least not popularly right right or if they are they're fairly depressing right. There fairly depressing. It's all about not being in that relationship and own. Maybe i'll get into that relationship. There's the whole trope in the late. Two thousands of the manic pixie dream girl where it's all about these writers hollywood writers that use women and relationships to give men character growth in arcs in the movie right so it's all about being relationship pure like it's not about the expression of singleness as healthy in itself. It's about relationship as fixing your problems so that not then create problematic relationships as well. In the sense that i'm finding all my fulfillment than in that relationship once. I do find a relationship where i where i haven't grown as a person or don't have enough emotional intelligence to be content with the person that i am because the person that i was always looking for someone else to to complete me exactly. It creates problems both in relationships expectations for relationships and for people who also want to enter relationships. Right and even individually it creates a learning process or provides an opportunity for a healthy learning environment. Where you start to empathize with your partner where you can put yourself. In their shoes and learn that your flaws also have to be negotiated with their flaws and that there's a balancing act and interpersonal dynamics. Come in and i mean that turns even so now. We're talking about dating but that that that's the same thing with with friendships as well right. If you're i can see a scenario. I've seen lots of scenarios where where you're not content. You're not necessarily content with who you are and so you're you're expecting a lot of out of that friendship relationship for your happiness for your contentment even for your self esteem for the way you Assess your own value that kind of stuff And that can even come out in familiar. Familial relationships as well right where you depend. It's about on another to define who you are and to give you that esteem right and so i mean maybe we're getting off track but that's kind of what singleness conversations are in the sense. Is that the healthiest relationships in our lives are are where we have Some sort of independence isn't it. Yeah yeah independence crates freedom. Authenticity for who you are. In relation to the overall relationship that being said we also live in a society that needs us to be in relationship so to further expand on this point there is there has been studies. I was just scrolling passively I love read it i. I'm on it all day while just pathway scrolling on read it and they were talking about how people live longer when they're in hell in healthy relationships. Oh interesting and lots of articles in the medical community about how people who come in with their partners rent have better treatment results and partly to have somebody to talk to and somebody else to gather information. Yeah whatever the reason is another person there right even just as a tax bonus is is beneficial. So we have. We live in a society that set up for couples and yet the dangerous. become too codependent. And while there's this whole codependence piece talked about but then how as a single person do you live right right so if your approach this as as a single person you see the i live in a society that needs couples that needs you know somebody to stay home and clean the house or look after the kids while somebody else needs to go work. How do i be both people. Yeah or even attach detaches. I think in our society we attach maturity to to relationships as well right so a part of adulting is to be in a meaningful relationship. I always found that whole areas adulting if being an adult but somehow of verb but anyways You know like you are considered writes so you are considered to be a more mature adults in comparison to other people your age if you're in a meaningful relationship and on top of that if you do certain things if you have a certain job if you have a house and if you have kids right over sure i even feel that in school like what. I'm twenty five now. But because i'm married all of a sudden that puts me in a whole nother brand right of society all of a sudden i'm more mature i'm responsible and i'm sure if i had kids out even put me in another bracket above 'cause now i'm looking after little right little little children but as as we're talking i'm just wondering if we wouldn't have a healthier society if we we would learn what it looks like to live healthily in singleness for a time of our lives even just a how we talk about singleness it would be helpful for the individuals who are signal Because we are seeing a rise in people who live alone or who aren't conventionally married or unconventionally being with somebody else and just to harry healthier narratives for them to us and to understand themselves and even understand ourselves with. Kate will greatly benefit us as a community as a as a broad social community as christians and canadian. A do well. Let's transition a bit into the bible here. where So where have if. I'm a single person. And i wanted and i'm and i'm just lonely as all can be. Have you found that. Most people find their strength. I think were most people go in terms of the bible. At least we can talk about how we talk about church. How about single isn't church. And how we treat single people insertion. That's a separate thing from how the bible talks about singleness. I mean jewish culture. Very much thought that you had be married that that's just you know that that's the purpose of your life is to be married if you're mad at your purposes to have a have a wife so that your wife can have children and and your family line keeps going and if you if you were a woman you know your goal was that for your family to find to find the man or family who would take you i mean as a patriarchal society is but there is no. I don't know if there's a real allowance The only time there is conversation is about widows right and how you treat widows and so in that sense. The old testament is much more progressive than the surrounding cultures of its time and makes allowance for widows and treats them well and in that sense even relationships are still political. Yeah in that. It's not about so much being with somebody else. As it is a way to further your lineage as a way to get some gain right and not saying that there isn't a component. Alright love between why. Perhaps there is some counter cultural stories even embedded within the old testament to see the story of of ruth and her mother-in-law. Ruth naomi. i mean ruth's story restoring does end in marriage but it's very much naomi who makes it happen and they owe me you know. She kind of becomes a mother kind of surrogate mother to son that ruth bears. I mean that's how the story ends in the bible. Were supposed to see that image. Even though she's not married so it's a fairly counter cultural story there is rahab the prostitute who becomes part of israel. There's the story of tamar who forces kind of what we would call a constitutional crisis. It's not a constitutional crisis but it's a crisis of the law for for for one for for one of the for one of the men that was supposed to marry her. Her father in law's supposed to marry her according to the law because her husband has passed away but he refuses and so eventually she she forces her way into this. There's the story of astor who who kind of becomes part of this abusive kings. Well she's the she becomes the queen to disabuse of king and rescue the people of israel. I think all of those are somewhat counter cultural in the sense that that they're describing to us non normative relationships within that paradigm but also some of these women become not all of them that i mentioned but some of them are part of the story of jesus right so matthew mentions for women in the genealogy of jesus and even though clearly there had to be men for those four women to have borne children has not the men that are identified. It's the women that are identified. And so it already kind of focuses more on the person under relationship that that they were in jesus himself never married according to the gospels. All of a sudden you have these single people doing things right. i mean we. We don't we don't know of mary. Martha lazarus or married. We never find out. They are just people right. The assumption probably is that they would be. But but even when lazarus dies. we don't hear about his wife morning right. We we hear about his sisters. Mary magdalene she married. We don't know right. I mean you go down the list of all these characters and somehow we don't often find out about their familial relationships and isn't there a passage in there somewhere about how it it in summary. It's like get married if you want to. But you know your your relationship with the lord is i and you gotta serve that primary. I corinthians that where it is. I post writing. Yeah i mean. Paul paul is also single. There's a hint there. in first. Corinthians read the passage wrongly sometimes. But there's a hint there. In first corinthians step maybe at one point paul was married and he considers himself a widower. I've never heard preached in church but there is a hint there because he's talking to the widows and widowers and he's co counseling them to stay single and he says be as i am so he identifies himself with them. He doesn't leader. He talks to to what he calls the virgins which would be the single people who are potentially also engaged to be married which is different than the widows widowers and so there he doesn't say as i am because he's not. He doesn't see himself like that. He sees himself like a widower. So but in that passage. Basically what paul is saying. Yeah Marriage is a good thing and if you want to be married be married and if you don't wanna be married you have a gift to bring to the conversation as well and the way the we paul seasons in that conversation is gift that single people bring is is an attachment to church and into the work of god. I mean this comes out of paul of paul paul's idea anyways is that jesus coming back soon. You know. And so he saying why. Why waste your time getting married. We have so much stuff to do. Let's go get working and proclaiming. Jesus christ but that's the gift that single people that that's the gift that he sees himself bringing to the church as well right. I'm single so i can go and serve god and i can go and proclaim and so So he very much kind of trying to tell people. Stay in whatever situation you are. Don't get divorced if you're married. Stay married and have sex. He literally. I mean literally what he says. Don't don't all of a sudden now because you think that you're that you're christian. Stop having sex. If you're in a marriage you know. There's no you're not holier if you're in a celebrate marriage with somebody then if you're in a sexual relationship with somebody and so That's kind of his frame of mind right and so what. I take that passage. Don't i think what we should take a passage is that there's legitimate calling and gift to singleness within our congregations and we haven't really acknowledged that ever or very rarely and as as you're talking here. This is reminding me of a story that. I read quite quite a quite a few years ago when i was taking a family and marriage class. I believe that was the course. I was in for this. Where was talking about An evangelical preacher who was off doing missionary work off off in the boonies somewhere and then his daughter right was or his family was having trouble and distress and their daughter. I think even commit suicide over his lack of involvement. Yeah this is a story that i read in a book called sweet surrender by dennis hiebert and the question raised is what becomes more important family or missionary work right well. My critique on this was that he shouldn't this this preacher guys should not have even gotten married in the first place if he couldn't have committed to the relationship as a whole right right. And you know. I i mean before we talk. Today i went and reread some of this stuff. And i corinthians seven and you you can go and read yourself there paul saying that. If you're married you are committing to that relationship and you need to give it a significant amount of energy. That is your calling by god within marriage so you you know the the the calling that god puts on you cannot supersede that calling that god has put on you for that marriage. Because you're asked to be in this relationship of mutual self giving love so you have to kind of buy into that but if you don't need to be in a relationship like that then you can give some of that energy to the work at hand or two one way to one way to to translate it. There has to present necessities. Paul says And so that's that's how paul would put would address it. I don't think paul would understand. I don't think. Paul understand our fascination with saying hey To be to be a good human. I need to be part of a relationship. I need to be in a marriage any to have kids. And then i'm going to dedicate all my energy to my work or to my church. You know for pastors or or to this and ev- this relationship that i've committed to is going to take second place to another relationship i've inserted into it and then using jesus own words to kind of To support that is weird. I don't think paul would ever do that exactly. And i think we put this pressure on missionary work that It becomes the one and only calling for a christian to be part of god's works in the world. Yeah and what. Paul is trying to say i think is hey. If you're single now you can do mission or missionary work. You're not attached to the work of your marriage covenant relationship so why not not stay the way you are. He's trying to tell these people in corinthians why not stay the way you are and do missions work. If that's what you feel like god is calling you to see in our mind. We have turned completely around. We often how we are. We have such distrust of single people especially single men that we say. Hey no-no before you can do ministry worker before you can do missionary work and this is very much agenda conversation because it's not the other way around. We don't distress single women we asked him. and then. So that's an noticing this even as we speak right here. I've been hesitant to talk about this call. That paul has and says. Hey you're single and you can work for the church because to me. It sounds abusive. Make single women do often. We send them out to be missionaries. We asked him to serve. You don't have children. you can do this right. We don't do the same thing for single men or very scared of single men and if want men to do any kind of ministry. We want men to be married and have children because that safety as so. That's that's even the gender dwayne which we approach singleness right. And i think you're in a very unique position at thirty to even speak about that because of your work now with Generation rising coming up and with your older work at in out of town or you did that sort of abroad. Work right where you've seen students and individuals who either as a couple or who are dating or who are single going off and doing this work in in in africa or or wherever you sent them thinking of even thinking about who hires churches in terms of pastors right. It's okay for youth pastor. It's okay for a youth pastor to be single sometimes right because they're young Oftentimes if men right they're young. That's alright we prefer a single woman or a married woman to our children's ministry because they're just more approachable to children. Once you're past you get into a more. An associate pastor position or a lead pastor position. We really want that pastor to be married whether they're a woman or a man we really would like them to be in a committed relationship because that to us is the highest ideal. The highest value within the congregation. Right i mean. I don't think i've been to a church where we've had a single lead pastor. I have. I have not attended a church like that anyways. No i'm trying to think. I don't think i've ever had lead pastor as a single person. i've had associate pastors. Who were then in a divorce relationship or in a separate relationship right and that could be a whole nother podcasts. But yeah yeah. And i can't speak to their experiences. No no but within at least within the evangelical world that i've grown up in yet it's marriage seems to be this high ideal and so any time we talk about singleness and we talk about singleness even as a calling or as an opportunity We tend to think in our minds we tend to think about singleness calling opportunity for women not so much for men and we also tend to not put enough support around single people So we're tend to not give them the same community and while we say. Hey we value your singleness and if that's what god calls you to. Do we want to embrace that and you you can. You have something to give to us. We still want to celebrate mother's day and church and get frustrated when we celebrate we. Don't we still want to celebrate. Father stay in church and get frustrated when we don't and I can just. I mean i make a point of saying something to that effect every mothers and fathers day and i can just hear the roles you know i know the is aren't actually rolling but i can just hear that there's that pressure on you with the congress within the congregations like there there goes rafael again. Trying to be all politically correct not politically correct. It's an acknowledgment that our humanity is not just defined by our roles as fathers and mothers in within that attached relationship And committed relationship of of of marriage. I mean are not the only vision for for humanity not even in the bible. You know i mean. Let's talk about men. That aren't that that we wouldn't consider being fully men. I mean there's daniel and his three friends there most likely unix. Because that's what would happen in the bible. Once they were once they were taken as prisoners in palace. We have a whole book stories that we love to tell our kids about daniel right and we talk about the end times. We love to go to daniel and talk about you know that kind of stuff. There's there's a whole church in ethiopia that today still claims and traces their lineage. Back to a conversation with an ethiopian eunuch on-road from jerusalem Who's who has converted and baptized than an the ep ethiopian. Church still says. That's where we come from because he goes back right but somehow we've said that the highest ideal value is marriage is is being committed marriage with two children and suburban suburban right. Right right. I mean even within our culture. We do not have father's day and mother's day and a far saying on mother's day or a single people's they right we just don't either and so i would say for maybe the if we were to sum everything up that there's a really deep call. Or there's a really deep spirituality to being single and that there is special and it's needed and it's not any worse of a calling that being said we also need to adjust start cultural narratives and what we say in how we talk. And how he fee with people that needs to shift so that they can also feel that calling especially this has been another episode of the modern anna baptist. Please join the conversation by emailing us. At conversations that shape us gmail.com or joining us on twitter at modern anna baptist. Either way we'd love to hear from you and grow with you and continue to have fantastic conversations.

Canada Tobin Cova De Deborah Hirsch Paul Ruth Naomi Ruth Bears Martha Lazarus Ruth Paul Paul Dennis Hiebert Israel Rahab Rome Hollywood Tamar
Diversity of Voices in Journalism With Nicky Usher

Reuters Institute for the Study of Journalism

02:09 min | 2 months ago

Diversity of Voices in Journalism With Nicky Usher

"Joining us today sneaky. Asha the case associate professor at the university of illinois at college of media. Journalism department keeps work focuses on news production in a changing digital environment blending inside for media sociology in political communications a festive award winning book making news at the time so space a month spent in the new through observing daily conversations meetings and journalists at work. And it's a real study of both the dynamics of a newsroom and power structures within it a second book interactive journalism hackers state-run code focused on the rise of programming and data journalism and her next to be published later this year. It's an incredibly topical. One news for the rich white and blue have placed empower distort american journalism and it examines the challenges facing journalism in terms of place power and crucially inequality while committee. I thank you for being with us today. Thank you so much for having year for that lovely introduction. I'm so delighted to speak with you in your global audience. So thank you thank you. Let's the end. Well the in your new book needs for the rich white and blue touch. Keep touch on a key problem in journalism in that. Sec say large national international outlets of pivoted observing readers. An-and will choose to pay for news and if he end up skewing coverage towards the wealthy white liberal audience in the us and wealthy white publicly less liberal. But i know or the uk could just a bit more about the consequences of that. So what. I really worry about. Is you see essentially The news that's most likely to survive is coming from these extremely large institutions and organizations that help global france right. So you can think of. And i think this is particularly the case when we look at what might be formerly called a newspaper because i don't think the guardian or the new york times of the t- Resembles anything close to a newspaper anymore. It's just kinda archaic name that we call it but what ends up doing. Is that people who can pay for news. In the people producing and writing the content thinking about the content are all members increasingly so of global

University Of Illinois College Of Media Journalism Department Asha SEC UK France United States The New York Times
Officials rush to defend AstraZeneca Covid vaccine after UK, EU blood clot guidance

Today in Focus

02:05 min | 2 months ago

Officials rush to defend AstraZeneca Covid vaccine after UK, EU blood clot guidance

"The oxford astrazeneca vaccine under uncomfortable scrutiny medicines regulators in the uk and the eu have judge that its benefits outweigh any possible risks. But they haven't ruled out a causal link between the vaccine and rare blood clot conditions in a tiny number of recipients resulting. This week in britain's regulator the are recommending alternative vaccines be given two hundred thirty s. All of which is worrying when it comes to competence in this back saying because as the observers science editor robin the key points out the stakes are incredibly high. It is the vaccine which the world depends. Because it's so easy to store and distribute a little cost so it's an incredibly important vaccine for the planet we might in the west. Get away with visors. Madonna's leaves astrazeneca. There's no doubt about it from the guardian. I'm a niche kristalina. Today in focus understanding the risks and rewards of the astra zeneca vaccine robin. When did this start. When did they first notice. But there might be a link between the vaccine and blood clubs. I miss in scandinavia at the leg. Ego muffled memento through dot com the live it will be weakening at astrazeneca seneca walks in norway and denmark. A proper schooners vaccine and they've begun to spot. These links of these tastes on gemini finds. Stop stop stuff. The in china from ministers bondi influence middle astrazeneca forces tiber asthma also advising defiant britain finds cases the british medicines regulator the hra says. It's like done defied. Thirty cases of red blood clots and people who've had the astra zeneca corona virus vaccine.

Oxford EU Britain Astrazeneca Astrazeneca Seneca Robin UK Astra Madonna Scandinavia Norway Denmark Asthma China HRA Red Blood Clots
Scoop: Kids' border surge expected to last 7+ months

Captain Mike Anderson

02:16 min | 2 months ago

Scoop: Kids' border surge expected to last 7+ months

"I Heart radio. You're listening to the daily dive on use radio. Tell you f L, A welcome back to the Daily Dive Weekend edition. Finally, for this week, the surge of migrants of the border continues as expected to possibly less seven months as projections for September by Customs and border protection is anywhere from 22,000 to 25,000 migrants crossing the border. The administration is trying to get control over the situation. But the message is not reaching migrants and smugglers. Reuters recently spoke to over a dozen self identified smugglers to see how and why unaccompanied minors are crossing the border. In many cases, these smuggling operations can cost thousands for the migrants as they're transported by a variety of ways, even by plane. For more on how these smugglers air getting it done will speak to Laura got Steiner, Reuters correspondent based in Mexico, But some of the migration that we're seeing in context I mean, for a number of years Now we've been seeing an increasing number of families and Children coming from Central America. This is something that we saw under the Obama administration to the Trump administration and now under the five in administration. As you mentioned as well. Migration trends tend to be seasonal. So migration tends to pick up in January and February and then go through until you start to get the sub warmer summer months, And then it becomes more dangerous. So you know, it is definitely the case that there are more Migrants, particularly families and unaccompanied Children traveling to the U. S border than we've seen in previous months at the same time, you know, we saw a huge increase in the number of families and unaccompanied minors as well coming in 2019. So this is something that Really spans a number of different U. S administrations from both parties we wanted to speak is as you mentioned two smugglers to understand the trends of how these Children are getting to the U. S. Border. Because it certainly striking. Of course, as you hear stories of unaccompanied Children, Children without their parents or their legal guardians, including some very young Children arriving to the borders we wanted to understand, you know. How are they traveling? Who were they traveling with? How much does it cost for them to be traveling? And where are their parents? Because I think there's often this sense that the parents are all in Central

Daily Dive Weekend Reuters Obama Administration Trump Administration Steiner Central America Laura U. Mexico
Exploring the Controversy of Branding in Disney Parks

1923 Main Street: A Daddy Daughter Disney Travel Podcast

01:46 min | 2 months ago

Exploring the Controversy of Branding in Disney Parks

"Today we are going to be exploring the controversy between disney themed rides and non disney themed rides pseudo controversy. Yes zuhdi controversy. I created yes. There is some truth to that. But i'm really curious to hear what listeners. Think this week because this is something that bugs me. And i want to know if it bugs other people and i don't know why it bugs me i can't even say it bugs me when i kept a little bit in the dark because i wanted to get her opinion on some of these things that bug me and it is about disney. Themed rides versus non disney. Themed rides is too much disney theme ing bad. You added disney part. Yes or is it a good thing. And here's what i'm getting at. Over the past little. While there has been a trend among disney imagine years and the powers that be who seemed to be on some sort of relentless pursuit to tie everything in the parks to some disney movie characters et cetera et cetera. And i'll give you a couple of example nna vendors land in what you think of these things for example. Here's what i mean. Twilight zone tower of terror california adventure. No it must have a disney character theme. Let's make gardens of the garden. Gardens would have been better okay. Guardians of the galaxy mission. Breakout injury need to do that. Well let me ask you this and you have evidence that says otherwise. Don't you prefer mission breakout all right. That's if that were one. Isolated example

Disney Zuhdi California
Samra Habib on Being a "Queer Muslim"

Chosen Family

01:25 min | 2 months ago

Samra Habib on Being a "Queer Muslim"

"Our guest today as samra habib. She's a writer journalist and photographer based in toronto last year. She released the critically acclaimed. We have always been here. Acquire muslim memoir and it was the winner of. Cbc's canada reads twenty twenty. I love this book so much. I think i cried at least three times. She's a leading voice in canadian. Literature for writing and photography has been featured in publications like the new york times the guardian the washington post and vanity fair. We spoke to her at the beginning of the year. I actually saw an astrologer a month ago with a seven arlen session not yet to take a bunch of breaks and she told me that When i was born my father was having his saturn return so he was going for law was really released of inches bow. How was gonna support a child and we just moving from basically but a new kid would arrive you know. That's kind of like a consistent theme through meisters for home I think that is very much shaped by the fact that growing up. I didn't really have this stable home way.

Samra Habib The Guardian The Washington Po CBC Toronto The New York Times Arlen Canada
From Foster Care to VA Teacher of the Year Feat. Anthony Swann

Teachers in Americ?a?

09:05 min | 2 months ago

From Foster Care to VA Teacher of the Year Feat. Anthony Swann

"Read anthony that you grew up in the foster care system when you you think about growing up in foster care. How do you share getting past the trauma than seeing and knowing all the other potential you had. Do you have a moment in time. Do you have a person who influenced you question. Most definitely so. When i was taken to fall secure i was taken abruptly in the middle of the school day and i was sitting in fourth grade classroom and are distinctly. Remember social services Door and telling my teacher that they needed me to come with them and this was in front of all of my friends and saw felt embarrassed fell devastated and so ma teacher. I'm sorry i'm trying not to cry. My teacher came out in the hallway and she grabbed me and she hugged me. And she whispered in my ear and social services didn't even hear it but she whispered in my ear. She said anthony. Everything is going to be all right in that same teacher years down the road. She found me when i was fourteen years old and she began to pour into me as she began to. Just say i don't want you to grow up to be like your parents. I don't want you to get up to the system. I don't want you to go to jail. I want you to make something of yourself. And so by that time. I had started claims school. Because i'm gonna take all of my trauma and just put it into my academics loss to start playing school. I told her. I wanted to be a teacher. And she said that what you want to become. I'm going to support you in any way. That i can and so once. I was going to school and going to college and put amount self through college. My senior year did not have a car to get to my student teaching placement and she picked me up every single morning to take me to school before she had to be at school herself and to this day she still calls me and she still reminds me that. Everything's gonna be alright and she still tells me. Do you remember that. I told you at now get you. And so that was one of the persons who geared me. Because i was going the deep end because i didn't understand alive. I hated my life. Which that i was dead a. She took the extra mile because she saw something in me. So that i would not become part of the system as she pushed me to be great. Oh the love of a teacher in for her to recognize an anthony. I didn't wanna cry either. But the ability for that teacher to recognize into know and to see your face and to take that moment to run out and whisper that in your ear. That's everything right. That is just a moment. that probably is why you did not display school. You did school. You earned those achievements and wanting to become a teacher. Do you mind sharing her name. I would love for her to hear you give a shout out. Her name is mrs gerardo wilson. And she's still alive today. She's a retired educator for public schools. And she's just that's her name. Miss wilson we give you lots of hearts in love because that's a skill set anna an intuition that we all want to possess in hope that we can be that for that student in any student when you think about yourself now anthony and even before becoming teacher of the year. Do you see that you have that ability that other teachers see there something that he possesses that would benefit me had any encounters with other teachers where they want in are seeking out your advice. Yes a have. You seen before. Became virginia state teacher of the year or or even. Maybe it's happened since your name's been out there in your story is out there. There may be teachers. And i think i read this in one of the articles where a teacher heard. Your story heard your work with students and it's like how is he breaking barriers with students. In how can he help me. Yes so i was contacted by a teacher retired teacher. She was a mentor to a young male student and after her reading must stores. She contacted me and she said know. I just really have this student. I feel like that you can reach him because they're certain areas. I can't reach him in. Your story is so similar to history and so with the permission of the guardian traveled to meet with him. One one Share with him a story and he shared with me historic and at the end of that conversation. Before i left we have similar stories but before i left he looked at me and he says just more you know what anything is possible and that statement right there made all the difference because that is my platform is virginia teacher. The years to give hope to those students who find themselves in dramatic situations and emotionally disturbing homes to let them know that no matter the pieces that you may have been dealt. If they're broken take those broken pieces and build a bridge to better life in in heart of your platform you have. What i believe is part of your cooperative culture initiative of guys with ties. How did you create guys with ties. And can you share with our listeners. What the program is yes. So one day mock principal just came to me and she had this idea. She's just like see how you dress up every day. I think it'll be a program if we just have the fifth grade boys to dress up. Enticing me with him so she just really just threw something out there. So i kinda picked it up like a fumble and iran with an from of develop a curriculum that respect and integrity and cleanliness in. It's okay to be organized as a male is okay to to help and they also in the group we have those those hard conversations because a lot of the males do not have a father figure in the home. And so we talk about how you can overcome rejection in las share with the story. We do service projects when we're talking about the cleanliness in the organization. We take time out with. We are meeting. We have a day where we go around. And we help the audience in the school to pick up trash to attack him the rugs and the school. We also have done a service project where we give all of. The girls are carnation a bag of chocolate to let the boys know how to treat a lady so we also we just recently did one where the guys designed their own tie. And i'm going to have someone someone actually reached out to leeann. They're going to create that tie so just letting them know that it's okay to be guy. Mb sophisticated but at the same time teaching them those life skills teaching them about. What would your legacy be if you were to die today. Will people say about you. And i got that particular lesson when koby bryant passed away over year ago out of the blue but so many people have so many good things to say about him and so on and steal that the guys as well would let us here you leaving. How will people remember hugh if you were to pass away and that was a very powerful lesson is ill on. The group is safe haven. The guys have cried before especially the guys who feel neglected a male figures. So i've hit the other students. Who had the fathers in the home to console those students to let them know. It's okay you're going to be you're going to make something of yourself. So those are the types of things that we do in the

Anthony Mrs Gerardo Wilson Became Virginia Miss Wilson Anna Virginia Iran Koby Bryant LAS Hugh
Orlando Bloom Makes Back-to-Back Shocking Confessions

Nightly Pop

00:28 sec | 2 months ago

Orlando Bloom Makes Back-to-Back Shocking Confessions

"Orlando bloom is catching some heat after telling the guardian he and fiancee katy. Perry aren't having enough sex but that's not all everyone is sleeping on his other shocking confession. He was asked about his best. Kiss ever spoiler you guys. He didn't say it was from katie. He said it was from a girl named debbie when he was seventeen. Okay if you were his partner. Are you pissed. Debbie in america's like yes. I was the one that gave him the best kids. You know that

Orlando Bloom Katy Perry Katie Debbie America
"guardian" Discussed on The Guardian UK: Politics Weekly

The Guardian UK: Politics Weekly

04:32 min | 6 months ago

"guardian" Discussed on The Guardian UK: Politics Weekly

"The guardian boris johnson suffers largest tory rebellion since winning last year's general election. I'm jessica l. Got deputy political editor of the guardian. And this is politics weekly. Older members have it in their power in our power to help move our areas down the tears. England demerged from its second national lockdown. Today heading back to a three tiered system which was voted three bhai. mp's in parliament. On tuesday but boris johnson will feel wounded by the fifty five conservative. Mp's voted against the new measures if labor and join the rebels. instead of abstaining. The prime minister would have failed to get the restrictions past. So how many more. Mp's johnson afford to lose. How should ministers navigate of a bunch with talk of a possible third lockdown in the yet now labor has supported the.

jessica l boris johnson the guardian England johnson
"guardian" Discussed on The Guardian UK: Politics Weekly

The Guardian UK: Politics Weekly

02:42 min | 8 months ago

"guardian" Discussed on The Guardian UK: Politics Weekly

"Up in lots of forms, their the I and I think underneath as well. Willing. Some of the versions is this notion that all right maybe trump will lose maybe biden will be trump but we've had four years of trump ism and that's left a lot of damage and been very polarizing and scarring these last four years and I sort of feel undertaking people thinking. Okay. I'm allowing myself to imagine him winning, but maybe that won't be enough. What do you think I think that say very real and lasting concern. You know if you talk to people at the Lincoln Project, for instance they they will say that their effort is not just a defeat trump. It's has and I'm afraid that were saying the Republican Party move further to the rights where the keen on conspiracy is now seen as the the outer edges of the spectrum as opposed to trumpism. So I do think a lasting challenge there and the the most recent example we have of people trying and failing to bring the country together was President Barack Obama in two thousand nine he comes in he puts Republicans in his cabinet. He goes in the stimulus negotiation in January to restart the economy as to Republicans look take a third of this billion dollars a trillion dollars excuse me three, hundred, million dollars do what you like On. Cuts spend as like he still couldn't get any votes for it in the Senate. So I think I think the prospects of reuniting the country even with someone who's in institution less than a moderate like Joe. Biden even with Republicans in his cabinet are are narrow and small and and it will take a very long time to recover domestically and internationally I think in terms of reestablishing the norms that have been destroyed last year's. Huge thanks to Daniel Strauss Lauren Gambino and Richard. Wolf for making that guard Eli. Then such success. There'll be another live event on November the fourth we may or may not know who the next president of the United States will be our remind you of that near the time I'll be back in your ears tomorrow morning with Richard Wolf as we stay up to watch tonight's presidential debate how big a player that button We'll have to wait and see the producer is Daniel Stevens I'm Jonathan Freedland thanks so much for listening. For more great podcasts from the Guardian just go to the audio dot com slash podcasts..

biden President Barack Obama Richard Wolf Republican Party Lincoln Project Senate Jonathan Freedland Daniel Strauss president Daniel Stevens United States Joe Lauren Gambino Eli producer
"guardian" Discussed on The Guardian UK: Politics Weekly

The Guardian UK: Politics Weekly

05:56 min | 8 months ago

"guardian" Discussed on The Guardian UK: Politics Weekly

"That Joe Biden as as much of an institution list as years takes the court from nine to eleven and it becomes a six five still conservative leaning, and he says that's redressing the balance but not actually packing the cooler the you know the has changed its composition of a time to get started out at six justices. It's now nine. It's not defined by the Constitution, which is what the Supreme Court is supposed to rule on. It's not defined by the constitution how many seats that should be it may take an act of Congress, but you'd be a seeming here at this case that Democrats are actually in control of Congress. in addition to what the president might be able to do by simply nominating someone at using the traditional path, they could have a safety net of having an act of Congress to to cement that as well. So I think. It's inconceivable that the Supreme Court would stop or Daniel I. Bet you've got views on that, but I just want to make sure we get some of the things that our readers view is. Coming in with the they've been. There's one tonight about how significant is the Hispanic. Vote in Florida of Hispanics, for trump and he's that because Republicans have persuaded them that the Democrats are socialist like they've been left behind in Venezuela and Cuba and central. Florida trump but lots of people have been especially in advance have been writing in variations of this question about whether either about Latino Voters orb African American voters particularly asking this question of kind of how on earth are people of color voting for Donald Trump and there are these numbers that suggest at least some people in those groups are and the the Guardian, a listener is a bit mystified. Can you enlighten them for US Daniel? Wise this happening Because every voter is different and no party or political movement has a monopoly on any kind of any gender or race or ethnicity like I am a little weird out by that question to be honest there are going to be African Americans who vote for trump. There are GonNa be Hispanics and Latinos who vote for trump the women who vote for trump they're going to be men who vote for trump. The difference is that they will probably remain a minority. Now.

Donald Trump Supreme Court Joe Biden Congress Florida Daniel Congress. Guardian president Venezuela Cuba
"guardian" Discussed on The Guardian UK: Politics Weekly

The Guardian UK: Politics Weekly

03:01 min | 8 months ago

"guardian" Discussed on The Guardian UK: Politics Weekly

"I'm wanted to kick off. The avoid risk of treating this like some kind of therapy session. It may become that and that is to say a question to three of you that has come to me a few times, which is tell me the truth is your gut instinct. The Joe Biden actually has this election in the bag and the only thing preventing you saying that. is some kind of superstition stroke post traumatic stress disorder inflicted by what happened in Twenty Sixteen has made all journalists fearful of making any predictions even to themselves in the quiet of the night I'm seeing you smiling there Lauren Gambino's if you are a kindred spirit on this. Tell me the truth. Do you privately think he's guilty about Biden's the winner? That you're still in the grip of what happened in twenty sixty can caveat my answer by saying? Tonight two, thousand sixteen I was in the Javid Center waiting for, Hillary? Clinton? Come? Out. As a night went on little little girls dressed up in pantsuits were crying tears you know it it will his traumatic just to be in that sort of environment. So that's my memory of four years ago So I honestly don't think. Is is over over but I will say the two elections are different and this does seem like Biden has had a steadier lead for a longer amount of time so. At the risk of being very, very wrong again of it does seem like Biden said the good place. And Daniel People can you know As I say they can rob me of several hours. Night's sleep by showing me projections and polling from exactly this point out in two thousand, sixteen, two weeks out in two thousand sixteen. I think the now notorious need Silvis or prediction gave Hillary Clinton A. One percent probability of winning. Even when you look at those battleground polling. Crucial States of Wisconsin Pennsylvania Michigan. Yes. Joe. Biden is ahead of those states now, but people can find the slides that show you, Hillary Clinton was behead but pretty similar amounts in twenty sixteen. So where are you on this question of gut instinct and post traumatic. Stress from. Well I actually try and stay away from the prediction business in the in my professional life but You know those discussions always lead into questions about how similar this race is to twenty sixteen and it's not Joe Biden's lead over Donald Trump has been incredibly static despite a range of news events that you would expect would append the race and they haven't. And then beyond that pollsters, a have figured out have recalibrated how they poll and to factor in what they missed in two thousand sixteen, and we know that's been pretty effective because they were to a greater extent than twice sixteen on the ball in twenty eighteen..

Joe Biden Hillary Clinton Lauren Gambino Daniel People Javid Center pantsuits Donald Trump Wisconsin Pennsylvania Michigan
"guardian" Discussed on The Guardian Books Podcast

The Guardian Books Podcast

15:48 min | 1 year ago

"guardian" Discussed on The Guardian Books Podcast

"The Guardian hello and welcome to the Guardian Books podcast with me Clar- armistead emission Kane This week we speak to Lucy ellman about her booker shortlisted novel ducks newburyport a thousand pages of first person stream of consciousness in won the Guardian Fiction Prize in nineteen eighty eight for her debut novel sweet desserts her eighth novel. Docs newburyport is a challenge to summarize he's it's an encyclopedic stream of consciousness from the mind of a middle aged woman in Ohio that's rich and associations and word play she malls over everything in her life from him healthcare to Cartwheel's gun control to see chins her thoughts only interrupted by passages told from the perspective of a Mountain Lion Manchester met Lucy Lee she began reading from the book the fact that I just realized when this monologue in my head finally stops I'll be debt or at least totally unconscious like a vegetable or something the fact that they're seven and a half billion people in the world so there must be seven and a half billion of these internal model dog's going on apart from all the unconscious people the fact that that seven and a half billion people worrying about their kids or their moms or both as well as taxes and window sills and medical bills shut in Shutout dugout open the fact that that's not counting the multiple personality people who must have several internal monologues going on once several each Mama Logs Mama Obama blah blogs F- logs log cabin feebis Christmas marks the fact that animals must have some kind of monologues going on in their heads to even if it's more visual than verbal may be the fact that Bald Eagles always seem to be thinking about something when you want Shimon Eagle Cam the fact that we have Lisi Elman author of Docs new report on The Guardian Books Podcast Lucy thank you for coming thanks for her joining me I wanted to start with another thank you actually because ducks new report was the most invigorating reading experience the I can recall in recent years and I am someone that is very cavalier about giving up on books and I'm also someone is easily daunted by big books one of the first things I wrote for the Guardian actually was about how I'd up on ulysses about four times but from the get-go enthralled by this frankly humongous book and it took me two months to read I read a little installments on my commute every day to and from work and a found since finishing it that people have consistently talked about it like it was accomplishment for them to read it and finish it what was it like for you in writing how did it differ from other books that you've written the was absolutely exhausting it didn't follow a direct course because it became a big jigsaw puzzle in reading and and I had to keep readjusting everything and trying to get it working as a sort of story but the stories rich underground yes yeah yes I read that it took you about seven years of having no social life yeah I've never had much of it so it was quite extreme isolation yeah indeed do you need isolation in order to right yeah yeah everything interrupts concentration although I don't mind background noise you don't know but if I have to go out in my room and speak to someone that's an interruption so I think ideally you just linked to tubes and things and you don't have to ever get up from the chair then it might have taken six months to write it was I read it was seven seven years of doing twelve to four okay now a days in sort of hard to think that you could have done much more than that I wasn't quite that intense at the beginning towards the end yeah Uh and I guess that makes sense then in terms of the the price of writing it because you're right the story is kind of underground the story really is what it's like being in this narrators mind and it's her thought processes and the the leaps and bounds that her mind makes from topic to topic is sort of the the trajectory for the reader. How did you go about mapping that then we using the only bounce that your own mind was making I use my I self as a Guinea pig to some extent yet and I added more and more stuff that I wanted her to think about but yeah the sun sort of traits of the mind some of them I borrowed from me and the rest yeah I made up yeah and it's got this is constantly it's the refrain of the fact that that goes throughout the book sort of links all domain thoughts that she hasn then she goes sometimes she goes into wordplay sometimes she lists off brands Ah Jingle from an advocate pops into our head which are all things that our brains constantly do bit you will linking all these little ideas and thoughts that she has with the fact that how did you come up with that refrain that was there from the beginning as a way of creating suspense sinn away is you never know how this sentence is going to end and also seemed like a progressive element sorta pounding the table feeling about it but also monotonous in anger I think is a sort of sad expression as well the fact that kind of a weak expression in some ways and what people say when they don't really have a fact to give you but they start the sentence just like saying to be Frank thank and from there you you don't know where you're going well I like that I mean it's been it's been described as a monologue but I was wondering whether that was actually kind of incorrect in a way because the crew of the book is that this is everything that she's never going to say out loud that these are all her most in a most thoughts so it's not a Soliloquy exactly yes but the internal monologue I guess that's how people think of it is that along I don't know I suppose some of the most compelling parts is that she's often taken aback by the nature of her into that she can make those leaps from Cherry pies to gun silence and occasionally she thinks of a rude wetter accrued would and she is taken aback by her own rightness yes so this is making leaps from things like toilet training to Howard Hughes and her daughters up to two white supremacy the and there was a point when I was reading it where I felt that he had somehow conveyed human consciousness on the page in a way that I hadn't seen four and the interesting thing with ducks new report is that it mirrors what the brain does when the mind wanders and I realized that it sort of captured my brain does when I'm most conscious of what I'm thinking which is when I'm meditating and I'm trying to stop thinking and that's what I'm most aware of the leaps that are making and When I realized that suddenly when my mind would wander while I was reading it on occasion it felt less bad and I actually felt like I never lost my place because in ten outright his mind is wondering as well and so actually I never felt lost you could soon swerve together yeah I don't know yeah exactly what was you know what it's like to read it is having your son I have read many times ah did you did you see like mirrors between the ways that you thought and then she thought part from using yourself as to be like you said well yes us than when I was in my first novel I tried to convey how people are bombarded by stuff which is mayor may not be relevant to them all day and someone this is an intrusion and some of that becomes part of you yes this is weaving I'm in and out the goes on that way but that's that's interesting particularly with brand names brand names and jingles over real thing those little sort of ear worms that gets stuck in the brain and it doesn't matter how important or solitaire thought you're having that they can still intrude in that's what we say index report yeah I wanted to get it all in what you can't do his sights sounds smells to well I mean you can write them in words but what works best on the page is more the mental thought processes. I did interview with you you said he quite fancied the idea of smell-a-vision track of course alone novelists want that some of them do is interesting but it seems like another way to paps overwhelmed the reader so overwhelmed this is what you want yeah I want world domination well on mode domination actually this is a recurring thing that outta reiter she she has an anxious mind she's overwhelmed by the state of the world she's in Ohio but America looms large in her brain and you could say that it is a book about America but obviously book for anyone in the world because of the presence that America has they knocked diff- mind typically right now and it's interesting because she's such a massive contradictions and so she's liberal in many ways and she's against Gun silence she's worried about looming climate catastrophe she's not a trump fan at all trump comes up a little times in the in inner thoughts she's also a cancer survivor and she's also glad to have not had obamacare for example she's relieved yeah she's price suspicious that there wouldn't be very good I don't know I don't think she approves of Obamacare as far as it goes it's a very complex perspective that we we have a on America and it's interesting to have an American narrator is similarly anxious and overwhelmed by her own nation and I think she's a decent person and only she's particularly political I know she's found a way to express her concerns or do anything about all these worries she had but is embryonic Louis socialists that guess if that could exist in America motherhood is particularly important in this book and she's a mother and she's wanted by the death of her mother and there's obvious links between our narrator mother and also the mother mountain line that up his various little interludes in the book the ways in which motherhood can leave a woman filling a raised or invisible or under appreciated devalued I found it interesting that there was a Lima she says I'm scared of all young women now because when I look at them another potential mother hater the fact that I always wonder now how they treat their own mums an I'm young woman but I live in a world where I'm quite overwhelmed similarly to this high mother by the prospect of the future for the environment and overpopulation and things and I have decided not to have children to not be a mother congratulations. Thank you thank you very much well I do find that interesting that a mother could perhaps find young women like myself that making as these choices scary and make them feel devalued yeah I don't think she's so concerned about population growth or other people's decisions about fertility she's worried about mothers being hated by everybody and I think she feels it when she dragged these are kids around the parking lot by the supermarket and she feels it in the difference of her husband's colleagues and in the larger society yet very little provision for mothers and I I don't think people should be mothers but I think the mothers that exist probably deserve to be treated a little better and that there's an entire history of motherhood before contraception was ever the effective that affects women's history from the beginning and that's all discounted too when you discount mothers are you ignore because of the environment and because it's a real drag to really tough job and very unrewarding I think in general and that's what we say without the narrator is that she feels that she's sort of often picking up the slack where husband leaves it and that heard children don't appreciate all the work that she's doing to sort of maintain normalcy machine appreciate them a lot either a lot of the time she's just trying to in terms of portrayal of menopause and women at that point in their life as well I can get a sense that there is a is a real threat amongst your work about talking about ways in which women are undervalued in the box that they are put in why also always been concerned about female bodily functions and that the non talked about enough and not understood and as you can see with menstruation in Asia and things and all kinds of religions have laws about menstruating women maybe it's a blessing for some to be Let out of the cooking for a while but essentially and reviled for them well men go about their idiotic daily lives wrecking everything for everybody so I'm really tired now there's been a lot of a lot of comparisons of ducks newport to other books from everything from James Joyce to fleabag was mentioned in one review I guess must be because it's a monologue delivered by a woman that's basically the the strength of the connection there the weed thing I've seen a lot of reviews.

America Guardian Books Lucy ellman Clar- armistead Ohio Guinea cancer Lima Louis menopause fleabag James Joyce Asia newport seven seven years seven years six months two months
"guardian" Discussed on The Guardian Books Podcast

The Guardian Books Podcast

15:07 min | 1 year ago

"guardian" Discussed on The Guardian Books Podcast

"To the Guardian Books podcast in. We need new stories. Nasreen Malik suggests that the mess wherein on both sides of the Atlantic Dick is the effect of toxic delusions that need to be debunked with Donald Trump beware he is without his skill at manufacturing outrage with totally mendacious statements for instance about the dangers of immigration where would British Prime Minister Boris Johnson Bay without the myth of idyllic past fully uncontaminated by Brussels bureaucrats individually and collectively. We need stories. It is a universal impulse. We need some galvanizing sense making framework a narrative in order to instill order and a sense of purpose to our lives. Some myths are not only useful they are necessary or political orders are based on useful useful fictions which have allowed groups of humans from ancient Mesopotamia through to the Roman Empire and modern capitalist societies to cooperate in numbers far beyond the scope scope of any other species every social unit from the family to the nation state functions on the basis of mythology stories that set them apart from others. Some myths are less useful than others and some are dangerously regressive in Britain. I began to see these tales being told on a cultural not not just individual level to justify the way things were and preserve the status quo but they were not harmless self comforting bedtime stories they were toxic delusions that had a purpose to stymie change and they broke the surface with the Brexit vote in the United Kingdom and the election of Donald Trump as president in the United States. It's my focus in this book is on the UK and the US but I am keen to stress that myth making is not confined to these two nations and to demonstrate in straight that with comparisons to my own and other cultural experiences before these two significant events happened a malignant thread had been running through Western history three and it is made of myths these are not myth that animates believers into a shed sense of camaraderie and direction they are myths that divide and instill a sense of superiority we already over others nations susceptible to these impulses when going through times of instability also bought a nation or dictatorship and demagoguery again myths are useful and comforting galvanize irs but when they take cold in them a critic ostensibly affluent societies it is not a temporary madness. It is a combination I started to write this book at a time of both political awakening and despair when it was becoming clear that something was not working where there was fear and distress but also healthy impulse to resist and mobilize but the effort is in Kuwait instill fixated on the idea of returning to a time before it all went wrong rather than the recognition that things have been going wrong all along while Nasreen the renew started this book several years ago and I wondered whether you feel victorious. It's proved your thesis or whether you despair that it's just illustrated what your worst fears are well. It was tricky when I when I wrote the proposal. I thought I kind of want this book to be proved wrong because you don't want the world to slip into complete chaos justin caviar made but unfortunately that did not happen actually towards the end of the writing process there was so so much to update all the time because there was so many examples they kept buttressing the argument that I remember thinking I have to call it at some point and just stop because the velocity all city of events was so that in the UK with Brexit and in the US with trump the myth thesis was becoming more and more all clear and actually cutting through more to the mainstream people beginning to realize that there isn't some sort of British history that proves that we're going to be okay. There isn't this amazing. American separation of powers cost iron constitution. That's going to contain trump so all these things are beginning to unravel in real time and so it was a real effort to try and incorporate them into the books they were happening. You identify six myths. That's the structure of your book. This these six dangerous dangerous stories we tell ourselves which are actually hampering progress and their gender equality political correctness free speech identity politics virtuous origin and unreliable narrator commit just go right to the for me is the heart of it and just start with free speech because they are. They're all these are interconnected connected up eight so the free speech myth is one that I take very personally because it is the one that has affected me most in my work. It's also a myth that I saw developing in real time. The others have more of a rich long history especially the political correctness atmos- one but the free speech one I think is new and has developed over the past ten years or so and is quite linked to online activity and social media and with the free speech myth very simply. What happened is free speech? Myth believers have tried to use that as a away to silence dissent or objection to increasing the racist aggressive violent views that were expressed by either the right actually the far right and on the left because we on the left are so wedded to the idea free speech. Is this very important. Value that is a cornerstone of liberal society have been basically gas. Let or bamboozled into to defending for right attacks on people by saying let that's their free speech even when people say things that you don't like you. I'll have to support them and in my own work I've noticed is that had with God in exactly for ten years and witnessed the change in moderation policy the witness the change in tenor and tone towards writers of my kind of background realize that this corn of free speech was enabling blink people to be aggressive and incite violence particularly online and chill any objection to that by using the free speech excuse but you mentioned the word in moderation just for people who don't know these media terms what you mean is. The is the moderators who controlling the comments. Yes you express some reservations to those comments being Komo increasingly shutdown on very contentious issues yes for me. I mean I I'm poverty integration that began writing when there was a sort of action action and reaction. I began writing at a time when comments were open another duration brightest that were just right and there was no way for them to receive feedback apart from you know someone writing a letter and putting in the post which is nice actually but my generation the first piece. I wrote is still online and the comments are still there and they are are you know Paul abusive praise and what happened over the past ten years is that that process of going into the comment section and the threaten arguing during with people and learning from them you make mistakes and kind of feeling that at the end of a written work about a controversial subject the comments comments and the the contribution from the public from readers had go somewhere and because the comments became more violent or aggressive or more racist or sexist the Guardian has to basically make decision to shut down comrades entirely or not open the Mottola in the first place which I find really sad because I feel like it robbed me off half the writing process which is trying to see how things land with other people in their responses dances but they had no choice because the tenor of compensation online over the past decade has changed so much that any common thread became a free for all and there's a duty of care to writers and so the free speech issue here doesn't really apply because you're trying to create intelligent content online trying to create conversation and if it becomes uh-huh a contest trying to fling as much dirt as a writer as possible that it's not about free speech that is about trying to get somewhere and trying into useful compensation but what happened and it was really interesting when I wrote an. There's an exit from the work in the garden of free speech. The first comments I got were over the commentaries anti disclosed so how ironic actually didn't really got those comments on twitter yet so people can bypass the fact that it's closed down on the Guardian exactly actually which in a very good point because it shows you that this fixation on demanding that a particular platform gives you the right right of reply to a piece of writing content is moot because the whole Internet is your platform now so if you can't comment on a piece IRA online at the Guardian and you can find me on twitter you can find facebook. You can send me an email. There's several ways that people can send me abuse and telling me to go back came from and so the free speech logic jake is a way to make me feel like I have done something shameful and I have not allow people to linger at me because I am not a civilized believer lever and free speech so it's a real Khan and many of us have fallen for you. It's not just confined to the media you have this really startling statement which I'm still mulling. Oh for which is free speech as an abstract value is now directly at odds with the sanctity of life. Yes that is some statement well. It depends where where you're sitting. This is the the thing about free speech I debate free speech in civilization of parties with people who are not of the sharp end of free speech concerns people who have not had and they're hijabs ripped off their heads. You know people who have not been of the rough end of Tim Robinson supporters inciting hatred or duxing them or finding out their address and putting online you know people whose approach to free speech is very much an academic one and then other people who can tell you that there is a correlation directly between something. Boris Johnson says that morning right in his column and hate crime spikes over the next few days or giving someone a platform on Newsnight only ooh you know giving someone a platform on Youtube so that I can go viral platforming Katie Hopkins for example there there are people who will then tell you that there is a direct correlation between tween incitement of racial hatred or gender hatred and on the ground actions and so for those people the concept concept of free speech is at odds with their own sanctity of life because if it affects their safety it affects their mental health it affects their prospects and society it diminishes finishes marginalized disenfranchises them but on the other hand you have the kind of chattering classes were always talking down to those people and saying you know if you just believe firmly often the concept of free speech than these things will not land as badly as they do which is just is just a completely hypocritical and it's an abdication of the responsibility wants ability of what free speech is supposed to do on something like gender equality. It's it gets much more textured and difficult so for example you talk about your own background in Sudan and how women collude with the practice of female genital mutilation for example with the myth of gender equality. This was a chapter that kind of was was crowdsourced because I wrote ten thousand words and then my editor my agent read it and they had all sorts of other things they wanted to litigate from their own personal professional lives became minimum one story about fifty thousand words but it was because I felt that there are so many things that women are told about about how much progress has been made and I was struck by that when I moved to the UK because I thought that in my own family in Sudan don where the women are the enforcers actually not the men the men Kinda sat down the rules and the women enforce them and they genitally mutilate their own daughters. They forced them into fourth marriages. Sometimes they're on a killings not where I'm from bit generally from kind of thought Paul World and I had always in in my mind thought that that was because men were instructing them to do so then when I came to the UK and realize that there was a similar dynamic dramatic but but that women were ally aligning themselves with powerful men against other women to secure a status than I thought okay this is. This is a myth here. The Myth of gender equality here is that it is men against women as opposed to it is about status and women will ally themselves to superior status that can be derived for men even if it means they themselves will lose some of their rights and I began to see all these similarities with my own family homily in a really conservative society in the UK and America so women have to be aggressive in the workplace is one thing that some of career women tell you exactly I spoke to women across generations and some were at the end of that careers beginning that careers and they all said said that they were told that to behave like a man or be told that you were behaving like him on his compliment that they felt like it was a compliment because they had to sheds their biological and kind of attitudinal femininity to gain proximity to men and in that way they in many subtle ways through other women under the bus as well so I realized that also like that's what my aunts do back home the stem or academia but they're also trying to sort of become facsimiles of the men in the family all propagates that the values that they can get that complement basically now you have this this line interesting line that your father told you which is a man is an ax ax. He breaks things. Omen is a bowl who gathers things yes that is cited in a way a reactionary position but ursuline liquid in the great science fiction writer. It came up with the what she called the carry-bag theory of fiction. Do you know about I don't actually she came up with and she was saying it challenged. One of the dominant strands in storytelling which is the story of the mammoth hunters enters told the bad bashing thrusting raping killing about the hero and she positive the carrier. Bang theory is stronger sort of storytelling and I wondered the way we should be owning the bowl as women and saying we know the point is we don't have we have a bowl in the bowl is a much stronger vessel for carrying a civilized nation..

United Kingdom writer Donald Trump United States Boris Johnson Guardian Guardian Books Paul World Nasreen Malik twitter Atlantic Dick irs Brussels UK Prime Minister Sudan Britain Mesopotamia Kuwait
"guardian" Discussed on The Guardian Books Podcast

The Guardian Books Podcast

14:33 min | 2 years ago

"guardian" Discussed on The Guardian Books Podcast

"The Guardian welcome to the books podcasts with me Richard Lee and Mishaan Kane this week. The vietnamese-born poet ocean form joins us to discuss his prose debut on unearth with briefly gorgeous. This examination of the violence at the heart of immigration to the U._S. has already been hailed as the latest great American novel American Identity for Refugees does not begin when the refugees steps on American Arkansas it begins when the first bombs start to fall in Vietnam in other words American citizenship begins with American foreign policy that those we destroy as a country and up honor shores and that's something that we have to reckon with in order to know where we're going. It's not just.

Richard Lee Mishaan Kane Vietnam Arkansas U._S.
"guardian" Discussed on The Guardian Books Podcast

The Guardian Books Podcast

05:38 min | 2 years ago

"guardian" Discussed on The Guardian Books Podcast

"This. Hi, I'm wilting at. It's the guardian weekly since you guardian books listener does a good chance. You'll love the guardian. Weekly hits the guardians essential weekly newsmagazine, featuring a Catholic rated selection of guardian and observe journalism to give you a global perspective on the issues that matter you'll find leading opinion writing analysis long reads and cultural coverage from around the world with free willed wa delivery. So if you think locally now's the perfect time to start reading weekly. Visit gee dot com slash books. GW? Nita still is one of those writers you feel has always been there. But her debut love, Nina, which became a huge hit only arrived in two thousand thirteen so, Sean why are you looking forward so much to speaking with her about her latest Lizzy Fogel, novel reasons to be cheerful. But we need to stay. We I've always felt something slightly aspirated with her in that country. Yeah. It's likely when love Natick cave out. I was just struck by just because they were letters, and they were on Edison, and in roll form and just how clever and funny she could bay and then learning more about her. And the fact she liked left school fifteen, but she just read huge amounts. Eight sit of says is lovely reminder for the power of books, and how much that can go towards shaping a sense of a witch and water intelligence, and I've always loved how clever her books are. And how like unapologetically comic they are. And they feel very old fashioned to me in some ways. They do remind me of sort of a wood house in c Townsend. Louise, Renison these British writers. The I read as a teenager that out very British to me, but also from sort of years gone by Savane paps less Louise Renison 'cause she was writing about teens when I was attained, but she was sort of putting her version of. Teenager out into the world, and there's just something really warm and not nostalgic because often the people in the horrible because of their opinions and attitudes particularly in this book is set in the eighties. But they just they really just reassuring raids e e kind of in the best way, you know, you're not gonna have any horrible surprises within a stupi say, I like her in that she is a true sense. What a comfort read where Nina join Sean in the studio she began with the reading. So this is why Lizzie is imagining that Tom mother might not survive the surgical repair of her prolapsed uterus. And she's imagining that she might. So the mother might die. And then she baby Danny would be left motherless. I much that if the worst happened I could bring Donny up as my own. I'd make him forget the past and call me mother, and that way, I'd be accepted by society without having to go through with actual childbirth and risk having a child who was scared of water or dogs or didn't like music or stayed awake at night or had long arms and could reach out from its prime. I'd seen a baby like this in Phoenix literally grabbing things off the shelves. He always does that said the mother he's got extra long arms then there were projections twins. I can't remember their real names because she always called them thing. One and thing to for whom I babysat a few times after her husband had suffered a life changing accident in Rimini thing one was quite sweet and normal. But thing to my God, he was real fuss pot and yet there were biological twins thing one would tuck into his fish finger igloo with nothing but praise odd morale. Nation. Look busy made an igloo, whereas thing to would angrily want to know why fooled with his food and would dig at the mashed potato dome with his kitty fork looking fish fingers, and the only song eat allow was calling occupants of interplanetary craft by the carpenters, and that's not song you can take more than once or twice. I want reported thing to to eight Pearl. He's a bit fussy isn't he I'd said tell me about it said, April he can be a right little cont. I was reading your book raisins to be cheerful on a bus couple of weeks ago. And when you see the book on the title cover. It has a has the title very big words and an old man missing down Nick by to me, and he said of reached up because standing and he wrapped on the on the book like a door. And he said, oh, we need a few of those don't we instead of made reference to the title. And I did that sort of awful London thing where I sort of panicked because the stranger was talking to me. Blankly? Okay. But then I was thinking about it. And I thought actually this is the book that I really wanted to be reading right now because it it is so funny, and so warm and in a lot of ways really did in the best way that fiction can kinda pull me out of where I was at the time and put me in the book. And I think why found it's remarkable is it just doesn't feel flashy at all in in its funniness. And I think actually that's probably quite a lot harder to do than someone trying to do out comedy. Because this is a boot with darkness in it. And a lot of troubling stuff in. It's like the nine hundred eighty so some of the attitudes in a gospel any rate,

Nina Lizzy Fogel Louise Renison the guardian weekly Lizzie Sean wa Natick cave Donny Nita Rimini Danny Edison Phoenix c Townsend Nick London Tom
"guardian" Discussed on The Guardian Books Podcast

The Guardian Books Podcast

04:23 min | 2 years ago

"guardian" Discussed on The Guardian Books Podcast

"Burn. The god. Hello. And welcome to the guardian books podcast. I'm armistead, and Sean Kane. We have the skinny scoop and the surprise of this year's overall cost of the year word, and it's not who you think I'm delighted to announce the winner of the eighteen Costa book of the year is the cutout girl ball. Yes. We would totally wrong in thinking, it would inevitably be Sally Rooney. But we like to think we will also totally right in giving you the early heads up on vannice in our interview with him last week. We'll have more on the shock cost winner later on. And history was made when Thomas pavement be stepped into a book seeing ring at Madison Square gardens for fight. But why I always lounging around in comfy chairs reading books except not definitely not this week. You've been out about rushing around all over the world, haven't you Claire, and Sean where where have you been off to? Yes, I've been to Calcutta where I was a judge on the DNC price for South Asian literature, which we gave to giant Kenya another surprise winner. Because he is a writer in the Canada language and translated by Tej Sweeney and Jonah, and this is a minority language, which hasn't even been translated into other Indian languages, let alone into English and as Sweeney point. Doubt giant is not actually is writing in his second language because his is actual languages, Connecticut. But there is not a written script for it. So so they all they have to write in candidate was doubly translate. Yeah. Yeah. Absolutely. Putting this is the first translated winner that pros. Yeah. Yeah. And it's a collection of short story collection called no presence, please. And it's all about Bombay. And so this is supposedly in a prize for novels, but we made the point that actually in it was actually making a novel of the city of Bombay, but it's looked at very much from the from the margins from the small people who come in lips more lives. It's not this grandiose metropolitan story that we tend to hear about these great Asian cities. So I was upset through that he won. He had an incredibly stiff field, including communist shansie, most in Hammeed, Neo Mookie and it just folk like the right person at the right time, the book that needed a bit more attention. Yes. Yes. Absolutely. But he's not. That it needs a bit more attention. It should get more attention. And how about you Shawn? Where have you been to? I went to Indonesia for week, which was a is basically of every year, we have London book fair, which is very industry facing. So members of the public don't necessarily get to go to London book fair, but it tends to be a place where a lot of the decisions made about the books that will be published each year, and so each year book fed chooses a different country to sort of let as the market focus and this year, it was Indonesia. So this basically means that for the first time we actually probably a bit of a groundswell of Indonesian writing being translated into English because there's really not very much vein translated into English up to this point. So I went to Jakarta fair week and mitt hold onto forces who will be coming to London later in the air to meet publishes book deals at is that Cleese the authors. The most exciting you met, well one particular author here, I'm looking for speaking to quite a lot more spent about now with him. And he. Just had such incredible life. His name is Senate Ghimire Aji Dhamma, and he is a quite well known journalist there. But he basically he presents a lot of his journalism as sort of short stories and satirical takes on really genuinely troubling things in engineering society, so corruption and censorship, and he's had quite a lot of run ins with governments before and he's bit of a rockstar. So hopefully, we'll be up to see more of his books in English. They'll say a great young writer could in ten para Madisha, she's Indonesia, but she's actually based in Sydney, and she has her first short story collection coming out in April with hovel Secca, which is called apple knife. And it's sort of kind of look at daisy Johnson style look at womanhood, but innovative disgusting sort of horrific lens is that setback in her old countries that now in Australia..

Indonesia writer Sean Kane Bombay Madison Square gardens armistead Sally Rooney Jonah London Tej Sweeney Kenya Calcutta daisy Johnson Thomas Neo Mookie Jakarta Australia Claire Canada mitt
"guardian" Discussed on The Guardian Books Podcast

The Guardian Books Podcast

02:40 min | 2 years ago

"guardian" Discussed on The Guardian Books Podcast

"Hello into the guardian books podcast. I'm Sean Kane Richard Li it's I shy for twenty nineteen and we're very pleased to be back at looked take the you've achieved right speaking with Josh Cohen. I'm not entirely sure. What does he talk to us about today about his latest book? He's just Cohen is a he's an English literature. Professor Goldsmith and also a psychoanalyst and he's been his latest is about not working title. It's about making a case for inactivity, which is kind of slightly paradoxical because alongside is two jobs. He's gone written a book as well. One of the things that I want. Tax. So what what's his case? Why why should we be looking? Well, he seemed to think that it's a notion that he traces back to the sixteenth century that all sense of self worth is all bound up with doing things. And he seems this is in the twenty first century. This is reached a pitch. That's unsustainable social media in constant distraction than the ever increasing demands of corporate life on every waking minute, and he reckons that we need to be able to find a space or step back to find space for actively being inactive. Nice. He writes about artists says exemplifying what he calls the four different types is the burn out the slob the daydream and the slacker, then he writes, Andy Warhol and Orson Welles and Emily Dickinson and how they managed to turn their various ways of not being active into actually producing very interesting words people into those categories Neethling or could you be floor. Same time. Like, I maybe did that in one day claims at least two firms, so it's not it's not a rigid division between the two the reason taught him as well as not only the paradoxical nature of the entire book. But also this idea that he has that analysis is a space for doing nothing confronted with someone who's in psychological. Distresses is this really enough? But we started off by a start off by by his subtitle is why we have to stop sounds to me like a cry from the hot. I wanted to he's not actually really against working as such. Okay. No, I'm not I don't think that's probably a tenable position. Either famille for most people who might read this book. There was a lot of curiosity about this subtitle. Because of course, it begs the question mmediately, stop watt, and it has a kind of slightly panicked quality to it. What is it that we have to stop? I didn't want it to be construed as a transfer verb. In other words to stop something in particular..

Josh Cohen Orson Welles Sean Kane Richard Li Professor Goldsmith Andy Warhol Emily Dickinson Neethling one day
"guardian" Discussed on The Guardian Books Podcast

The Guardian Books Podcast

03:49 min | 2 years ago

"guardian" Discussed on The Guardian Books Podcast

"Now, here's Lisa alad is editor of guardian review. Why did you choose? This story convenience. I must confess I've been translating it recently. I just finished. It's a story that I know best at the moment. But also, I I really love it. I think it's so fantastic. -ly economical. I'm really envious of it's still Emma. Shame to say that I've never come across disappear. Pontius me neither I know about him is he's the same generation as co vino whereas Meridia he won the prema- strata, which is the Italian version of the Booker sometime in the early seventies. What struck me about it? In Italy, spend a little time in Italy. And there's always this battle between the kind of naturally over expressive way of the talian. Should we put it that way? I'm writers you want to try and be restrained is quite haunting be restrained in Italy language, kind of ost for everything to be excessive. So when I was translating this really struck by the control, he writes, his very clean talion the Waco new wrote to the way Maria wrote, it's kind of small generation poor. Stefan has to controlled isn't. He and I love how he he cuts. His onto all of these little catch phrases that he uses throughout. And of course, completely Vaughn, the mine doesn't interest me. But the body is everything there's a little suggestion of a kind of mini fascists. No, I think in writing is always aware of that spirit in the country. But also, I do have some sympathy for him. When I was there. I met a lot of young people who felt the waste if only because in a country where the so much culture, it's very easy to become a culture hater, you get really tired of seeing another beautiful Frisco and reading another incredible poem. And I think young Italians Phil sometimes oppressed by the intense and endless beauty of the country. But I think defining patch too much in the opposite direction. And I love how he meets this series of of well-meaning people who try and say come on lease Napster fun, and he ignores them and his father, the tap Lynn, his friend and everybody is saying, you know, it's fine. What's interesting about it? I still really know the solution to the stories that in some ways awful media casino. He is that kind of mini fascist temperament and the same time some of the principles that he espouses. Some of those quotes all useful to limit your luge is quite an important thing in life to try and see things how they really are. It's just solutions. Loser. So limited that it's kind of reduced to Admiral. Of animal husbandry and. Regular use of domestics, but it's a very kind of a devious story because there are moments of insight in his life. But they kind of will sent down the wrong channels. Why did you translate? It's actually put of a project another ROY to Adam though, will English ROY to is involved with mcsweeney is the American journal, and that doing this experiment in kind of relay translation, I guess so I translated from Italian someone translates from English into Japanese and so forth. So the various stories going to be translated three or four times based on some theory of items about the nature of translation, which I cannot say, but for me, it was just a a test. Because I've only recently my town is only recently been good enough to do something like this. It was just a really enjoyable exercise. He's still writing short stories not simmer. No, not really if I could write them like this. I would that's another thing that struck me about it. When I tried to write stories which other account of somebody's life, but always incredibly long and. You really do since in the story of a man living in dying in only twelve pages. It's it's really impressively done, but I find that very hard to do. I very few stories that I really love. I guess they're just not really for me. But this one struck me. For more great downloads. Go to guardian dot co dot UK forward slash audio.

Stefan Italy Vaughn Lisa alad Booker guardian review Napster editor Emma Maria Frisco Lynn ROY mcsweeney American journal Adam
"guardian" Discussed on The Guardian Books Podcast

The Guardian Books Podcast

34:11 min | 3 years ago

"guardian" Discussed on The Guardian Books Podcast