35 Burst results for "Guardian"

Why is Drinking Water So Unaffordable for So Many Americans?

Important, Not Important

04:49 min | 6 d ago

Why is Drinking Water So Unaffordable for So Many Americans?

"Our guest today are Nina Connie and Mary, grant and together we're GONNA find out why so many Americans can't afford drinking water. which is interestingly the one thing that every human being needs to survive. Nina and Mary Welcome. Hollow. Thank you for having me. I. Guess coming on. So we're here. We're grateful. Let's start off by just giving our listeners a a quick little who you are and what you do you know if you'd like to start. Show I am a British journalist based in New, York comnet environmental justice reporter for Guardian us. Basically interest is in. Who has access and who doesn't have access to clean. In water land, green spaces that sort of stuff. Exactly things that are necessary. Awesome will thank you for joining us Mary what your story. So I'm are the public water for all campaign director at Water Watch. We're a national nonprofit environmental organization in the United States and the heart of what we do is grassroots organizing mobilize regular people to build political power to move the bold and uncompromised solutions to our most pressing food water and climate problems of our time once again, like a couple slackers. Brian. Yeah. Who are these who got aim higher? Credible. Thank you much awesome introductions and then quick reminder to everybody. Our goal here is to provide some quick context for our topic today, and then we'll dig into. Action oriented questions and actions that everybody out there can take to to help fight in support alongside guys. So that people have water which seems like an insane thing to have to ask but where we are Awesome. So Nina in Mary, we do like to start with one important question that we ask everyone to set the tone. FOR THIS FIASCO So instead of saying, tell us your entire life story we like to ask. Why are you vital to the survival of the species and whoever would like to go first by all means jump in. And You didn't answer the harder question which was like, what's my name entitled early? I feel like it's only appropriate Mary steps up for this. Be Bold be honest. You are here for a reason. So water is just. For life everyone every person every living thing needs water in the heart of like what I care about what I'm mobilized that energized work on its mixture people have access to water that we're protecting our water supplies the future of the planet in for people from everyone needs water. It's just a basic human rights. It's a matter of justice and so I think it's not just me. It's a me being able to work with people being able to work with our organisers, our communication team great journalists like Nina to get the stories out there so that we can protect our water supplies a mixture of access to Internet homes. I mean again yes. Sounds like you could hire pinal. Thank you. Nina, what's what's your story I? I've already been living in the US but once? Before moving here I was. I was a reporter covering Central America Mexico of what lots of countries what can we've communities who have few little as and don't have access to these basic fundamental things like clean running water I did not expect to find the same in America I mean, this is supposedly the richest country in the world supposedly in the best of Western civilization and yet they're all millions and millions of ordinary Americans that in twenty twenty do not have access to clean running affordable water that is wild i. mean it's completely unacceptable and it's not no. I mean I feel like it's become normalized in this country you know for poor people to be. Pool people and people of Color and native Americans to be punished just for who they are. Into and not have access to these basic services and even things like clean air and adequate food, etc but it isn't normal it end really. America cannot claim to be the best in of. Civilization and democracy and and the richest country in the world and have people during the pandemic not having. To wash hands with I mean.

Nina Connie Mary Welcome Water Watch United States Reporter York America Brian Director Central America Mexico
How Are Employers Treating Workers During The Pandemic

The Takeaway

03:51 min | Last week

How Are Employers Treating Workers During The Pandemic

"And we've been talking about how employers are treating their workers during the pandemic with Michael Sein Auto from The Guardian. Michael, what happens to workers? Now we're talking. We're looking at layoffs in a lot of different industries. Is that right? A lot of different industries are still laying off workers. Whether it's as the PPP loans are expiring businesses that have had to close again after reopening because a surge in Corona virus cases to just industries that have survived up until this point Without laying off workers either Cos announcing our warning that mass layoffs or imminent like some of the large airlines, United Airlines said By October 36,000 workers are possibly subjected toe beginning permanently lay it off for load. American Airlines has said that There's been a lot of university systems who are making decisions right now to caught a lot of workers. There was a study a few weeks ago by the Economic Policy Institute that ah, large portion of workers who have lost their jobs during the pandemic. Those jobs are not coming back. They those workers will not Have a job that they had before the pandemic to return Teo on and a lot of industries even if they have started to reopen, like hotels and things like that, they're not At seeing capacity or demand to the point where they're recalling all their workers and the ones that are getting recalled. They might only get a few shifts. You know a week they're not getting full schedules. Is there any silver lining in any of this? Michaela do work. Is there anything positive that we can say about workers in the United States right now? Because this is ah! A very serious and grim picture that we're painting with, obviously, which is necessary. But are there any bright spots? I'm wondering that not too not too many. I think some of the bright spots if there are any and all of Ben The workers who have organized protest strikes worker still organizing Tio form labor unions or organizing with their existing labor unions. Teo pushback on employers or bad practices within their industry. The urgency for for organizing has certainly intensified because of the working conditions caused by the by the pandemic. But there's AH, a report in the Economic Policy Institute in December 20 19 US employer spends around $340 million on union avoidance consultants about one in five union election campaigns involves a charge that an employer has illegally fired. Ah, worker. We've seen that during the pandemic with the Amazon protests. Ah lot of workers who led those protests. Have been fired, lost their jobs. A lot of workers are seeing the the benefits of collective organizing and having a collective voice. It's fan. Inspiring to see these workers on the front lines that are still working there in the pandemic to protest and risk their jobs to improve their their working conditions. And, you know, raise awareness of how workers in these industries are treated, you know, across the board around the country. Michael Sein

Michael Sein Economic Policy Institute United States United Airlines American Airlines TEO Michaela Amazon
Divorce, Enoughness, and Christmas Cards with Renee Bauer

Not Another Anxiety Show

07:44 min | Last week

Divorce, Enoughness, and Christmas Cards with Renee Bauer

"Show I'm Eric Letham and today I am with. Rene Bauer. Hey Rene. Thank you so much for coming on. The episode were so excited to have you. For having me today I'm super excited to be here in a huge fan of your. Only kills the nicest thing anyone who said to me all day. So I'm just going to go through all the nuts and bolts of who you are. Rene is a warm award-winning divorce attorney published author and founder of. The family law firm Bauer Law. Group with, almost two decades of experience, representing countless high net worth clients by the way, I wanna know who they are. She is committed to empowering all women to defined. Redefine. I'm sorry, their sense of peace and purpose in their new life. She is certified as a Guardian ad-litem. Is that how you say? Oh look at me. I did that one year of law school some pretty much an attorney. Attorney for the minor child. And collaborative attorney. Renee is also a certified mediator receiving training from mediation pioneer forest woody, most of the hills. Rene, as insights are sought after by local and region, regional media, outlets, podcasts and conferences, where she speaks on co-parenting blended family, dynamics, relationships and the art of reinvention. Having! Walked this path herself Rene knows what it feels like to face uncertainty, shame, my favorite word, and the fear of losing life as soon as she knew it. She is an author podcast. Hosts of happily even after I love that name by the way. And Creator of the D. Course helping women find their alternative happy, even after welcome. Thank you so so much for being here. Thank you. So like I was saying before we hit record I, am not married and I am not divorced but I guess it's never too early to play on. My. Girlfriend's going to absolutely have it'd be texting me in a second. She hears this, but. I have like I said. I have just like everyone in the whole world I. Have Family and friends who have gone through this are going through those who work with blended families. This is something that affects all of our lives in one way or another, and especially with the anxiety community. This just ramps up. You know every possible emotional button that you can have shame worthiness. Stability financial security you know holy cow so. I I don't even know where to start. I'm so excited. I don't even know where to start. How did you so you are? You've been through this world. Did you start as? Well let me let me back up. Where did you start near your career before you realize that this was a passion of yours? Oh, I never wanted to be a lawyer. So why decided I wanted to be a lobbyist I was going to go to the day and work in politics and I got into Grad school and that was my career path, and then I said you know what if I'm going to spend a couple more years in school, a muzzle. Get my lodge, agree, and then I can maybe do something else with it and I never looked back on. Now looking at looking in the past I think Washington would have chewed me up and spit me out I. would've never survive there. So I just I you know. When I started practicing, it was with a small firm, and they were really good at criminal defense in yet they did family law, and they didn't want to do it or didn't like to do it, so they kind of punt it all those cases to me and it was just something that I found I actually enjoyed, and I found that I could really help people or really advocate for the people who didn't have a voice to so and that was you know. I started that a couple months after I got married myself. intoned fast forward eighteen years in two divorces later. Here I am. I've lived in worked in space for a while now. I can't imagine. Marrying and then divorcing a divorce attorney that must have been terrified for him. You know what the you know what the funny thing is like. Despite doing this for work, I really hate conflict in my personal life, and it's something I'm working on, but that was so interesting. I would not like like I was like okay. Let's just do this. Let's just do this fast in. Move on what you want. The end let's focus on so from my first marriage I have a son, and the focus has been completely on him and co-parenting the second marriage barely counts because I was in an elegantly fast so. That didn't exist. The Britney Spears. Marriage were totally six hours in Las Vegas. Pretty Mum. It. What's interesting about that? And so I? You know I sort of I I love when we get a new gas especially with a topic that's outside of our air quotes, nor even though Kelly my co host and I have. I mean we tried to interview everyone with every walk of life every expertise, but what I really was interested in what I saw your name, pop I'm like? Oh! We haven't had this and we have so many parallels. The more eye steeped in all your stuff and girl I went through the to the bottom your instagram. Every podcast What I love the. Talk about enough newness you talk about shame you talk about that empowerment and reinventing new life and what I love about what you just said is. You Know Kelly and I work with folks that are in the anxious community. And we've been been through it ourselves. We wouldn't wish it on our worst enemies, and we both you know genuinely hate the experience that we went through. We're very thankful for what we went through. I I'm sure it's a whole that you have aspects of your life that you're thankful you. Did you went through the trials you went through? But it's we have to do it again. We might be in the same exact boot. Right yeah, and you know it's so interesting because exile. Hits I think anyone going through a divorce and you may have never experienced since I exiled, and if you're going through that, you're you know it's GonNa keep you up at night and I agree with you. Because everything that I had gone through made me. A better lawyer, a better advocate me more compassionate made me be able to talk to someone and say I. Know How hard it is to Co parent, but here's why you have to do it anyway, and it made me even the work I do today is all because of all the experiences that I had in the past why apps have absolutely no regret. Regret it really just helped me kind of find my purpose in mission and everything and I think that had i. not gone through that or made those mistakes I would have never been in that position to speak the way I. do about Shane about being true to who you are authentic in your life known shame such a big topic and it's one. It, you know, and it's the one that really honestly kicked started my path in my mission and kind of passion for all of this, because I never spoke about it I, did not talk about my own divorce, because I was so embarrassed in so ashamed of it,

Rene Bauer Attorney Bauer Law Eric Letham Kelly Britney Spears Grad School Renee CO Las Vegas Shane Founder Washington
Make a will for free with Freewill

Talking Tech

04:20 min | 2 weeks ago

Make a will for free with Freewill

"A lot of US never get around to creating a will to make it easier. The APP free will would like to invite you to use their free online tools. co-founder Jenny Chia sprawling is here to tell us about it hi Jenny. So free will is a website that anyone can make a free state plan on, so that includes a will help care directive and a power of attorney. It's really easy process. You just go to www dot, free dot com, and you answer a series of questions very similar to when attorney might ask you in person, and our software takes those answers and populates a form a legal document that you can then print inside with witnesses and your gotten so on average it takes users about twenty minutes to get a completely free estate plan set up. Already your called free will so this is a totally one hundred percent free will. That's right. It's only possible through the support of nonprofits, so we get one hundred percent of revenue from nonprofits that WanNa make it easy for people to not only set up their estate plans, but also potentially, but you're not required to leave money for charities. Okay because I know people spend a lot of money to lawyers to get will's made. That's right and we think it should be very different access to lies a huge problem in the United States today instead, so we see that you know underrepresented communities have half the rate of will writing than majority communities, and that ends up being a huge barrier to wealth transfer from generation to generation. Some people just never get around to it, aretha. Franklin died without a will. Acting, right and princess well. Wow crazy. So, how long has the been out? It's been out for about three years, and we're actually experiencing a huge spike in demand right now since Kovic started booth, because people are actually able to or think about mortality for the first time, and having really important conversations with their family about what their hopes and dreams are if they were to pass away. How long does it take to create a will on the APP? On average less than twenty minutes. Okay what what motivated to start the at. I the big motivation. Is that you know we talked to a lot of people about their charitable giving and realized a lot of people don't have the ability to gave large amounts of money while. They're saving for their mortgage. Their kids educations things like that, but when they pass away, they might own a home and be willing to share a kind of five or ten percent of that with charity, and it turns out. This kind of charitable giving is actually the largest type of giving. On average in a person's life, so we started free well with the promise of making Book Estate Planning on charitable, giving in not really easy, and we've now raised over one point five billion dollars in commitments attorneys. Host on the charities that have gotten money from you guys. United way of heart. Association's Saint Jude's. People donate to all sorts of causes whether it's the universities that they went to the hospital. They had their children ought. It's just astounding the generosity during this time of course I'm talking to you on video. Video Window here on skype and you look really really young so you in your twenty s. I actually just turned thirty last week, congratulations. You seem very young to be concerned. About will's. Yes, so. You know it's important to write a will even early in life, a lot of people don't realize that one of the biggest purposes of putting a will place is to set up a guardian for your children. To setup protection for your pets and caretakers. If you have those to pass on your digital assets, such as your facebook or instagram account, so this isn't just something that baby boomers who had a house. They want to give away. should be concerned about, but really all people including people. My Age should have advice Jenny. Spalding from free will go to free will dot com. Go to the APP store, I assume the the IRS Google APP stores to download the APP. Just when www dot, free dot com,

Jenny Chia Attorney United States Co-Founder Facebook Spalding Kovic Franklin Google Skype IRS Instagram
National Collections: You could become the guardian of a major houseplant genus

On The Ledge

04:56 min | 3 weeks ago

National Collections: You could become the guardian of a major houseplant genus

"You are a regular listener to the show, you will know that I have visited various national collections of house plants for example, the pepperoni Mia Collection of Sallie Williams and Mercy Marci's spider plant collection clarify Tim Komo Zim, but what are these national collections? And what do they do I? Go to press release this week from the charity plot heritage, who runs the National Collection Scheme here in the UK, telling me that they were on the hunt for national collection holders for some missing Genera- an among those missing generate were to that we as houseplant lovers know all about, and that's Hoyer and try to scan tier so I thought I. I would give plant heritage a cool and find out a little bit more about what being national collision holder involves. My name is Vicky Cook and I'm the conservation manager here. At plot heritage I have an audience of global proportions, so lots of people pops all fully aware of what plant heritage in the UK what you do. Can you just give us a little positives through plum heritage plot heritage was founded in the nineteen seventies, and it seems damage to ensure that the incredible diversity of cultivated plot that we have in this country remain available for generations to come and I said. We've got a really strong history in the UK of. The Plant Gardens from from the plant hunters enrolled plant breeders, the Grande Estates, and just the enthusiastic which public we're a nation of. And we've huge diverse garden flora, but there's a you know a mechanism. Otherwise that was realized in the seventy s to stop as losing, and if you know any good plans and one of the delightful things about these national collections that you mentioned is that it means people who live the country who are really passionate about particular species or genus who have a taking care of. Of these plants and recording their collections, and making sure that they stay around forever, which is fantastic, but you don't have all of the different Genera- that we grow in our houses and gardens covered, and this is where we've got. This got this press release the other day from you about your missing Genera and I was very excited. Slash worried to see the two of them are. Generally very much favorites of mine. Can you tell me about what you're doing to try to sort out these missing Genera? And and the trans- county and Hoyer Genera- Jeff Genus in particular, although we've got six hundred and fifty plot collections all around the country that in no way covers all of the different plant groups that we grow in the UK. And the role of the national collections are to to collect more or less all you can of that particular Genus Plant Group documented develop conserve for the future, and and also research to and become an authority on that plot group so. Year we try and identify maybe the top ten most interesting plot groups that we would like to see somebody step forward for and become an actual connection holder for and yeah as you say to, them happened to be hoyer and try discount in tastic I cannot believe that no one has the whole national collection slightly disturbed by this spot, because the temptation to apply is great, but I don't think I've got the skills. What's involved in having a national collection or applying for one so well? The first thing really is to have a passion for your punk rock I think that probably goes. Goes without that question, but then the first thing to do would be to to get in touch ready, and we can give you. Some advice and guidance have to get stopped. It's it might be that you don't have many plans to start with them. We can give you some guidance on how to focus the scope of a connection so some groups a huge, and you might not want to own have space for all of them, but we can give advice by maybe collecting all the cultivars of a particular species within that group for everything that was intr- introduced by certain breeder or person. And then yeah, then the next thing is to start collecting and documenting and making sure that you've got good labeling. Systems and records are in order, and then yeah, you can make an application to have an extra clock election soons easy, but how how many plants are we talking about here? I? mean how many different Hoya species of you identified. That might might come under this hoyer national collection. Is it many well? It's difficult to say because there's about eighteen species and cultivars currently in the rhs plot finder, which is what we use as general. Guide to to what is currently available but I. I've no doubt there are plenty more available with specialists around the country, so it would be interesting to see for of these more tropical plant group. Currently easing cultivation in the UK and what you find out so sometimes people started thinking Oh. This is like a nice small plot report. Collect that, but the more you start digging, the more you realize how much she's out there.

Hoyer UK Genus Plant Group Plant Gardens Tim Komo Zim Vicky Cook Sallie Williams Mercy Marci Trans- County Grande Estates
Philadelphia-Area News - Gov. Murphy Says Indoor Visits At New Jersey Pediatric Facilities Allowed Under Specific Conditions

10 10 WINS 24 Hour News

00:21 sec | 3 weeks ago

Philadelphia-Area News - Gov. Murphy Says Indoor Visits At New Jersey Pediatric Facilities Allowed Under Specific Conditions

"Guardians will once again be allowed allowed to to to pay pay pay indoor indoor indoor visits. visits. visits. The The The pediatric pediatric pediatric and and and developmentally developmentally developmentally disabled disabled disabled residents residents residents of of of long long long term term term care care care facilities. facilities. facilities. Oven Oven Oven A. A. A. Murphy Murphy Murphy says says says the the the vigils vigils vigils will will will be be be by by by appointment appointment appointment and and and only only only at facilities that have been cold it free for at least 28 days. New Jersey had 396 new cases in the past day and 27 new debts accurate. This is partly to mostly

A. A. Murphy Murphy Murphy New Jersey
D.C. police arrest man, seek additional suspects in killing of 11-year-old at anti-violence cookout

Rush Limbaugh

00:40 sec | Last month

D.C. police arrest man, seek additional suspects in killing of 11-year-old at anti-violence cookout

"Jim Rope, the grandfather of an 11 year old shot and killed in southeast on the fourth of July. During a stop the violence cookout as a message for the black community. 11 year old Davon McNeil was on his on store, stop getting a cell phone charger when he was fatally shot after police say multiple men opened fire to stop the violence. Cookout, Devon's grandfather and co founder of the D C. Guardian angels, John Ayala tells w emails mornings on the mall. If you're yelling black, who believed that But we don't so as black people that are lives matter. It doesn't matter because the four men charged with David's murder are black, and they shot a

Black Community Black Davon Mcneil Jim Rope John Ayala Murder Devon Co Founder David D C. Guardian
"guardian" Discussed on Channel 52: The DC Podcast

Channel 52: The DC Podcast

01:59 min | Last month

"guardian" Discussed on Channel 52: The DC Podcast

"I think it was defenders Knicks. Had Star Hawk with him to try to prevent I. Guess The burden or something one say with a guest is but Dune just fun to say. But. I think they went to the avengers. After the they had their own. Your own pseudo series kind of in marvel premiere for like. Nine ten twelve issues or something like that. Yes, something like that. And then they came back to the twentieth century at the end because of the corvette saga I think, and then they crossed win vans astro diverge the timelines right. An answer that I think they kinda just sit around until. Valentino rebooted them or brought him back in. Gardez, Galaxy one maybe a few other appearances here and there but. Maybe they were in the defenders of couple of times. But I. don't remember remember the Coming into play in those early issues, but I could be mistake I think. That was kind of in the Guardian series itself. The the eighties late eighties, Ninety series of Guardians, but yeah. We're Kapiti saint his. Abilities are invulnerability. Energy manipulation lightened pre cognition. The true extent of Star Hawks powers is unknown, but they are said to be a in nature. He has an incredibly long life span possibly inherited from his mother, or do his empowerment by the Hawk God. Credits Daddy yeah on. Star Haw Hey I'm a nice guy. Starhawk can manipulate light creek can cuss of force blasts of photonic energy, heat and solid light, solid light constructs. I didn't know this quantum bands were.

Knicks Star Hawk Valentino Guardian
The Ho-Chunk tribe of Wisconsin has permanently laid off a number of employees

Native America Calling

03:59 min | Last month

The Ho-Chunk tribe of Wisconsin has permanently laid off a number of employees

"This is national native news. I Megan camera in Perrine Tony Gonzalez. Indigenous activists are asking former Colorado Governor John Hickenlooper to drop out of the Democratic Senate primary over photos of him, and what they say is imitative native. American clothing common dreams, reports, coalition of indigenous women in their allies sent an open letter on Saturday outlining hickenlooper participation in hunting competition where they say winners are dressed in war, bonnets and losers must address like quote. Unquote squaws. The letter points out. This ethnic slur is associated with sexual assault of native North American Indian women. The one shot antelope punt has been a tradition in Wyoming for many decades A. Video from Wyoming. PBS shows the clothing being placed on the winners and losers by members of the Shoshoni tribe. Other? Groups joined the letter including sunrise movement converged. Colorado, and the indigenous environmental network, the latest controversy follows others including video that has surfaced showing Hickenlooper six years ago, comparing politicians scheduled to working on a slave ship. The letter says he has shown a pattern of quote. Behavior. The Ho Chunk Nation in Wisconsin has permanently laid off an undetermined number of tribal employees. The tribe has several casinos in Wisconsin that have been affected by corona virus closures and restrictions in a video statement Ho. Chunk President Myron White Eagle said the difficult decision is aimed at preserving the nation's financial health. This is a hard road to recovery to where we were pre pandemic. No one knows when we'll get back to. To those conditions, we hope to recall as many as employees as we can. But the future is uncertain White Eagle said laid off. Employees are not eligible for health insurance through the tribe, but they can seek services with the state. He said tribal officials failed to approve a budget for the coming fiscal year, but instead are working with a bare bones sixty day, operating budget in the hopes of the financial picture improves. Navajo nation leaders want new, Mexico to end efforts to dismiss a landmark education case meant to address educational inequities in the state. President Jonathan knows and Vice President Myron analyzer sent a letter to lawmakers expressing their opposition to a motion to dismiss the Yes Martinez lawsuit. Nez Native students deserve an educational environment that prioritizes their culture and unique needs. A judge ruled in twenty eighteen that New Mexico had denied English language learners, Special Education, native, American, and low income students, their constitutional right to a sufficient education, the Santa Fe new Mexican reports. The state filed a motion in March to dismiss the suit because it claims it has met the. The requirements of the decision the New Mexico Center online poverty, which representing the as he plaintiffs argues the state's efforts have been piecemeal in an op-ed, and the Albuquerque Journal they right. There are still large inequities in access to reliable Internet and technology, and they say they're still a lack of culturally and linguistically appropriate instructional materials, and there's a shortage of certified teachers. In Brazil people more into the death of KAIAPO leader and rainforest defender Paulino. Akon from covid Nineteen Public Radio International reported con played a key role in creation of tribal territory and ensuring indigenous rights were included in the country's Constitution The New York Times reports pie controversial, the world warning of the destruction of the Amazon appearing with celebrities like sting, but in the early nineteen nineties he was accused of rape. Supporters claim to the charges were. Were created a silence him. More than three hundred indigenous people in the Amazon have died from covid nineteen. The Guardian reports fears are rising. The virus will bring terrible losses of knowledge and tribal history, culture and traditional medicine. Many indigenous leaders accused the government of far-right President Gyro Bolsonaro of failing to protect Brazil's indigenous people by delaying aid and forcing them to risk infection by travelling to nearby towns for help for National Native News. I'm Meghan, camera.

Governor John Hickenlooper Shoshoni Tribe Ho Chunk Nation Colorado President Trump Wisconsin Perrine Tony Gonzalez Wyoming Akon Vice President Myron Analyzer Nez Native Amazon New Mexico Brazil Covid Myron White Eagle Democratic Senate President Jonathan National Native News White Eagle
Judge orders release of migrant children, citing coronavirus

KYW 24 Hour News

00:32 sec | Last month

Judge orders release of migrant children, citing coronavirus

"In a case like mixes coronavirus crisis and trump administration immigration enforcement policy citing new coronavirus cases and detention facilities for migrant families a federal judge in California on Friday ordered immigration and customs enforcement to release children the agency is holding with their parents or legal guardians ice this week reported the first quarter numbers cases among the dozens of migrant families with children it is holding at three family detention facilities more than twenty five hundred adult ice detainees have also tested

California
New Movies Coming To Netflix, Amazon Prime, Hulu And HBO This Weekend

Roe Conn

06:19 min | Last month

New Movies Coming To Netflix, Amazon Prime, Hulu And HBO This Weekend

"If you have Amazon prime video there's a movie called mice bite which was just hitting theaters when covert nineteen hit this is an action comedy Dave Batista who's you know guardians of the galaxy you know that big giant former wrestler guy he's a CIA agent row he finds himself teamed up with the precocious nine year old so in other words should be making kindergarten cop now I have to tell you about this to think that this is actually this is a rite of passage for action star Jackie Chan had a movie like this the rock had a movie like this John Cena is had a movie like this at some point you gotta so you're lovable side and be charged with guarding little kids and then you learn about the soft side yourself this one is particularly horrible and one of the things we hate about this movie Rakan my spot is set primarily in Chicago they shot it in Toronto eight that and the worst moments in this movie is there's a chase that begins in wicker park okay the bad guy gets behind the wheel of a car with her party he's trying to get away from Dave Batista CIA agent now the C. I. A. tech person is in David she says here telling them where you know traveling this guy and the agents as one minute after this car leaves wicker park the agent says looks like he's heading to the Naperville area because Naperville has a giant airfield so wrong later five minutes later we're in phony Naperville where I kid you not there's a big you know action sequence where the plane on the runway is now dangling over what appears to be the Grand Canyon who knew that in Naperville there was an airport overlooking a giant canyon clearly green screen so I mean it's just been really poorly done it's too violent for the little kids and it's too stupid for the adults and a lot of parents thing all this might be fun have a fun action movie stay away from my spy that's too bad you're you're totally right about that right of passage because Arnold Schwarzenegger had to do that too right I mean it was like a garden shop yeah I mean everybody has to make sure that the kids have something to go watch in that in those movies were actually pretty good for kids you're saying this one's not this was terrible okay now I've got I've got the funniest movie of the summer Fauria probably so far it has the worst title of all time it's called Eurovision Song Contest the story of fire saga well the Eurovision Song Contest is an actual deal in Europe and has been since the rent if these in fact Salim young was discovered on that aba was first on the Eurovision Song Contest this is a parity with will Ferrell the king of the parity right and Rachel McAdams they play a couple of Icelandic singer songwriters he's Lars Eriksen she's cigarette original daughter and their Icelandic and they're dreaming of representing their home whether they do kind of like Viking game of thrones stamp rock songs so this is filled with all these big production numbers because then we meet the contestants from Greece and the grand the Russian the Russian contest is actually played by our friend Dan Stevens was Matthew Crawley on Downton abbey he plays a Russian oligarch who's also a ballad singer it's really really stupid and it's really really funny it's mostly excuse these big giant set pieces where they do these huge production numbers remember will Ferrell did a movie called blades of glory your hair well he does for you know that did for ice dancing with the stars for song competition so even though we don't know the Eurovision Song Contest here in the states we know about all the competition shows that this is basically get one singer from each country you know what it's all European countries they have a couple of other than the states they're not we're not eligible for the Eurovision Song Contest was there an SNL bit with will Ferrell that was similarly themed I I just don't know that there could have been it's it's clearly the kind of stuff that he just excels at when you see him in the big Viking outfit and looks like the blue eye shadow it's singing about Viking you know might biking protector this is the song from this will enrich McAdams by the was wonderful as well she can also be very funny the video and the song they do is so terrible that it's great because it looks just like when you see those kind of you know that's a big deal that kind of like that Viking will rock nonsense yeah there's my aunts were everybody everybody pretends like the rolling the slave ship which is really just unfortunate or the big Viking ship as it will be we kind of you know horrible music but really right prepared well it there's that old joke about Led Zeppelin thank you know I have the have the crap was about Vikings right and if the agency had no idea what they were saying about this the music was so great musicianship as of right but if you look back you're like what the hell of the talk was only in the middle of the song yeah they had they did they had references to the lord of the rings when it was just a yeah they were so ready this is really true okay and anything else this weekend it's yeah I want to tell people is a completely does shift in tone row but the there's a best selling book a called I'll be gone in the dark written by the late Michelle McNamara who was UP board result park went to California become a true crime writer Mary Patton Oswalt the famous comedian and actor and she wrote about one of the best true crime book sense in cold blood called I'll be gone in the dark about the search for the Golden State killer probably the least known to most prolific serial killer rapist of the last fifty years this is not a six part series about Michelle's book and also about the Golden State killer it starts on HBO on Sunday night if people if you're into that true crime genre you know talk about making a murderer people aren't so many of these other ones this is the podcast to get started this is brilliantly done and it's really a profile of Michelle McNamara and her marriage to Pat now as well because it's young obviously she had a lot of recording should podcasters video for a lot and she died while writing the book she died in her sleep partially because the stress of the book and and prescription drugs and under heart condition and they continued patent and some researchers continued and finished the book without her and then we get to know the story of this incredible monster who I will let people know was just arrested a couple of years ago and charged with all these crimes because guess what they got his DNA matched about fourteen of the crime scenes that that kept the updates from I'll be gone in the

Dave Batista Amazon CIA
Coronavirus: Australia sends 1,000 army personnel to Victoria to fight outbreak

Monocle 24: The Briefing

04:44 min | Last month

Coronavirus: Australia sends 1,000 army personnel to Victoria to fight outbreak

"We Begin Today's program in Australia which is preparing to deploy its army to help deal with the surging corona virus cases in the state of Victoria public health workers are knocking on the doors of thousands of homes, offering free tests. One regional health minister has warned his residents don't go to Melbourne well, let's get the very latest now with Karen Middleton. WHO's a Saturday? Papers chief political correspondent in Cambria Carrot, welcome back to monocle twenty four. Could you just bring up to date, please? Yes. Indeed, we've been down. Congratulating ourselves a bit here in Australia that we've been doing well with reducing the infection rod across the country, and all of a sudden in the state of Victoria capital of which is Melbourne as you mentioned. They have seen a reversal of that for the past nine days. They've had double digit infection rates now of course, compared to the rest of the world, and particularly some hot spots around the world. That's very very small, but we all know that the virus stopped small and spreads fast and so double digit infection rights can quickly guard glory to more than that, and in fact yesterday they. announced they had seventeen new infections and today is struggling time that that number is thirty three new infections, so you can see these exponentially growing again, and that's going in the wrong direction as far as the government is concerned, so there's now an all out effort to try and taste the people in the hot spots around Melbourne. which is in the northwest of the city, and in the southeast of the city to try and find out how this is spreading, and to stop it as quickly as possible. You said they sort of all out attempt. It seems to be very rapid and very thorough people knocking on doors and the army being boughten. Yes, that's right I. mean the testing regime is more intense than it was at the beginning of the pandemic, because here in Australia, just like everywhere else the capacity petition as much more now than it was early on when the whole country with on higher alert, so these inability should test more people now that it will include people who aren't showing any symptoms any respiratory symptoms. Symptoms that might indicate covid nineteen, so they really trying to get as many people tested in those hotspot areas as possible. They're recommending that people don't move around the city and Dart Melbourne. If I particularly come from those areas people in other parts of the country, being urged not to go to heaven, so we we do have a slot pariah situation for one stage, but. The attempt is to try, and really could title that infection and as you say. The army is being holding interestingly tonight. The request for the army that came from the state government has been scaled down somewhat. It's evening here in Australia and earlier today, the premier of Victoria had for about a thousand troops to come to help with. Tasting and transport and other areas like monitoring hotel biased quarantaine. He's now scowled down that request to any about one hundred and fifty from one thousand, so to be unclear, exactly how many will do, and whether there will be involved in the knocking on doors, and the army has been doing that in other parts of Australia. Pandemic and date was called out to help with the bushfire crisis earlier in the year two, so the first time, the army's beat out, but it does indicate that these some urgent situation. How much faith is that in the authorities to do the right thing and act promptly, because it's always a question of trust, isn't it between the Guardians of the station, those who live in it. Yes I think there's a considerable degree of confidence here. Because a strategy has will seem fiction, writes the rest of the country with the exception of Sydney which still has. Reasonable numbers of infections compared to the rest of the country and the rest of have have next to no new infections right across Australia and I think that's a combination of the swift actions of the government, and also the response of the people who were willing to keep themselves in tain and Steinheim and wash their hands and do all the things that were asked to do and that has. Managed to keep the infection rate in check so I think people do trust the government. Unfortunately, though in some parts of the country, and clearly in these parts of Melbourne Win, the restrictions were eased a little bit. There were some people who didn't observe social distancing requirements anymore. The government in Victoria saying it was largely attributable to be family groups that were meeting and catching up. At the time the restrictions were lifted in PAPP's not staying as far as they were required to so. The now, GONNA enough. Ice With this new infection at the hubbing doesn't turn into a full blind second wife.

Australia Army Melbourne Victoria Karen Middleton Dart Melbourne Cambria Papp Sydney Melbourne. Tain Steinheim
Four Staff Members at Seattle Medical Center Test Positive for COVID-19

Noon Report with Rick Van Cise

01:00 min | Last month

Four Staff Members at Seattle Medical Center Test Positive for COVID-19

"Care workers have spent the last four months on the front lines the corona virus pandemic hundreds of them have paid with their lives now come a handful of new cases among staff at a local hospital Kamel's Carlene Johnson with the details Virginia Mason confirms for The Seattle Times Square for new cases as of last week these are people who work in or around operating rooms they were initially three employees testing positive and follow up tests of some six hundred fifty additional staff members turned up just one more case the media relations manager at Virginia Mason says that each staff member who tested positive has been treated and is recovering at home they'll stay there at least two weeks according to a project launched by the guardian and Kaiser health foundation roughly six hundred frontline health care workers have died of covert nineteen as of about two weeks ago across the country they're going to break this down publicly by the summer showing race ethnicity age profession and location as well showing whether those workers had adequate access to protective gear

Kamel Carlene Johnson Virginia Mason The Seattle Times Kaiser Health Foundation
Atlanta Mayor issues orders in effort to reform Police

America Tonight with Kate Delaney

00:43 sec | Last month

Atlanta Mayor issues orders in effort to reform Police

"President trump will issue his executive order on police reform on Tuesday Atlanta's mayor issuing her own orders Monday Atlanta mayor Keisha lance bottoms says she wants to change the perception of law enforcement in her city our police officers are to be guardians and not warriors within our communities she took administrative action requiring de escalation during confrontation using when warranted only the amount of objectively reasonable force necessary to successfully protect themselves or others to effect an arrest or to bring an incident under control she says initial recommendations on changes to use of force will be unveiled later this month with final changes coming in July

President Trump Atlanta Keisha Lance Bottoms Executive
Mayor Bottoms Tightens Rules on Atlanta Police's Use of Force

KRLD News, Weather and Traffic

00:53 sec | Last month

Mayor Bottoms Tightens Rules on Atlanta Police's Use of Force

"Atlanta's Atlanta's mayor mayor looking looking to to make make changes changes to to the the police police department department very very clear clear that that our our police police officers officers are are to to be be guardians guardians and not warriors within our communities mayor Keisha lance bottoms says after the death of restart Brooks Friday night she cannot wait for an Advisory Council to come up with recommendations to reform the police we are taking a look at our use of force policies through our advisory committee it is abundantly clear that through my executive powers we need to regenerate our desire that there be de escalation and that there not be an immediate use of force when there are other options that are available J. R. Brooks is the cousin of race shard Brooks the only way to heal some of these wounds is there a conviction and a drastic change with the police department

Atlanta Keisha Lance Bottoms Advisory Council J. R. Brooks Executive
Masks have become a partisan issue

All In with Chris Hayes

06:35 min | 2 months ago

Masks have become a partisan issue

"Earlier today. The vice president united. States Mike Pence stopped by diner in Pennsylvania typical campaign, fair and video that event was shown on TV and their other than a secret service guide appears in the back and later a waitress. Almost nobody is wearing masks as far as I can tell no one, certainly not these supposed head of the corona virus taskforce. You remember that. That and that might seem like a small thing especially to anyone who managed to convince themselves, and you'll want to really have to worry about the virus. The reality is that the virus is still here. It's still killing people every day and the more we learn, the more we know, that close sustained indoor proximity without masks like what they're doing in. The diner brings with it a high risk of transmission. Seems the more we learn, the more we learn, that masks matter a lot in many of the countries that are managed to control the virus like Taiwan pretty much. Everyone wears masks. In fact just this week. A British study found that widespread mask-wearing could prevent covid nineteen second waves, not that we're even to the point where we're trying to prevent a second wave here in America. Sadly, we are still squarely in the first wave. We basically plateaued. Twenty thousand cases a day, just under a thousand deaths a day. That is our new devastating normal. We've already lost more than a hundred and fifteen thousand Americans right now. Hospitalizations are surging number of states including Arizona, Tennessee Arkansas South Carolina and Alabama. Two States Oregon Utah have paused their reopening efforts amid spikes. In cases in fact, I'm going to talk the governor of Oregon Kate Brown in just a moment about that to other states with large populations Florida and Texas just reported records for daily highs in new cases, which is particularly striking given that Republicans announced yesterday that Jacksonville Florida is the new alternatively location for the Republican National Convention after officials in Charlotte North, Carolina declared. The event would not be safe there. The safety does not seem to be much of a concern for the President United States amidst the pandemic that is seen one hundred and fifteen thousand people die. Next Week Donald. Trump is as you may have heard holding his first campaign rally since lockdown in where Tulsa Oklahoma, where covid nineteen cases just record daily high. That's right. Officials said the increase has been identified as an outbreak linked to indoor gatherings, okay. The president will be holding his rally at. An indoor arena at the Bank of Oklahoma Center, which just over nineteen thousand people packed in there. As far as we can tell, he's telling his supporters that if they get the corona virus at his rally, it's not his problem in order to attend. They have to agree not to sue Donald Trump if they come to the rally and they catch the coronavirus. At least those people have choice, the president has forced graduating cadets at west point who have been sent home to return to campus, so he can deliver a commencement address tomorrow, which we think will be outdoors, so that's good and can have a photo op with them. At least fifteen of those cadets have already tested positive for the virus. The science here as tentative and unformed as sort of dynamic as it is, suggests our best hope to fight the virus right now. If we want to not have locked down, right, be some version of normal our best hope right now. He's wearing masks, washing hands social, but wearing masks, wearing masks wearing masks. And yet the president and the vice president who extensively want to get the economy back on track and get back to normal, not only refuse to wear them. They have effectively turned wearing masks into a culture where issue and they have stoked this political backlash against those who dare tell us how to stay safe. Here's an example in Orange County California the chief health officer Dr Nicole quick resigned amid backlash and a death threat death threat over in order to wear masks, residents, comparing her to a Nazi and holding protests at her home. This was a scene at Tuesday's Orange County Board of supervisors meeting. I have been discriminated five times in the last two days I have been actually turned away. I cannot go in these businesses without a mask. You're telling me that I have to breathe in c. o two when God gave this body, the ability to extract that from my body, and now you want me to put it back in my body. I have natural rights as a sovereign citizen of the United States by continuing to keep people in masks separated out of work with no legitimate cause. You are kneeling on the next of the people, and you are continuing to act in a thuggish manner. Guys over like really like. You know I mean. Are we talking about this? Kneeling on the next, she compared wearing a mask to killing. George Floyd and it's over. Are we still talking about this? Yeah, we're still talking about it. People are still dying from it, but that's the view of the White House that women's view. It's not just happening in Orange County Ohio Ohio state. There's been a relative success story and containing the virus Republican. Governor Mike DeWine. Has Been a leader on the issue. He credited Dr Acton, who's health rector, the state as a hero for her role, and that included advising government wind lockdown early very early left the state in much better position to reopen. Dr Acton has now resigned amid lawsuits the push by Republicans. And protests at her home where some people conspicuously carried God's. The Guardian reports some demonstrations at the State House featured signs bearing antisemitic messages. That's comparing her Nazi again. Acting as Jewish and one lawmaker referenced her with an anti-semitic Slur. Dr? Amy Acton died her estate through a pandemic and for that she target for Reactionary Idiots. Look it's a complicated world we live in. Complicated time it's not like the experts are all in unison about everything they're not. It's not like this isn't complicated. There have been mixed messages about the virus and transmission about mask-wearing. When they told us not to wear mass February, they were wrong about that and we're still processing data, and they're still all sorts of countervailing balances between different kinds of risks. What we're doing. But we have seen what happens. If there's one thing we know, we've seen what happens across the world. And in this country when leaders just shove their fingers and say I can't hear you corona virus. There's a real danger of politics and political forces overwhelm public health entirely. And we sure as heck should not be punishing health, experts and leaders were crying to help us help ourselves to stay safe and healthy.

President Trump Donald Trump Amy Acton Vice President Mike Pence President United States Oregon Governor Mike Dewine United States Orange County Board Of Supervi Bank Of Oklahoma Center Florida Pennsylvania Orange County Ohio Ohio America George Floyd Taiwan Oklahoma Kate Brown
Buffalo mayor calls elderly protester shoved by police an 'agitator', stands by police

Rosie On The House

00:29 sec | 2 months ago

Buffalo mayor calls elderly protester shoved by police an 'agitator', stands by police

"The mayor of buffalo New York is standing by a pair of police officers suspended without pay after pushing an elderly protester to the ground mayor Byron brown describing the protester as an agitator Erie County executive mark Poland Kerr says he's disturbed by what he saw we need them to be the guardians of the public not warriors engaged in battle nearly sixty other buffalo police officers have resigned in protest from a voluntary crowd control

New York Mark Poland Kerr Byron Brown Erie County Executive Buffalo Police
Early climate prediction for 2020 'spot on'

Climate Cast

03:32 min | 2 months ago

Early climate prediction for 2020 'spot on'

"Climate Change forecasts issued decades ago made specific predictions on how much the earth would warm. One British team predicted. Global temperatures would rise half a degree Celsius from nineteen ninety two today. So how did that forecast turn out Jonathan? Watts is the guardians global environment editor. He's been tracking the British meteorological. Office climate forecasts hey. Jonathan welcome to climate cast high either get to be on. On the show, so the UK met Office Hadley Centre for climate. Science predicted in Nineteen, ninety that global temperatures would rise half a degree Celsius by this year by twenty twenty. How accurate was that forecast? Well, they just celebrated their thirtieth anniversary, and one of the things that they pointed out was that they go to spot on? The happy said to was setup to be on. On the cutting edge of climate, research, and the predictions have now been realized they were remarkably accurate, and what about Global Sea ice? You say they primarily focused on temperature, but as the years have gone by today's measurements, compared to predictions made in the last thirty years on Arctic Sea ice. If anything they'd been too conservative, they did not expect the ice melt as quickly as. As it has done at some numbers that they gave since the nineteen nineties are the yes, global temperatures won't buy Hoffa Degree Arctic Sea. Ice has shrunk by almost two million square kilometers. Sea Levels have risen by ten centimeters. Carbon Dioxide in the atmosphere has increased by sixty bucks per million so they they stress that we're living in a very different climate from the one. The that existed when this Hadley Centre started. Let's rewind back to Nineteen Ninety Jonathan. prime minister Margaret. Thatcher was considered a conservative. Did she support this work that the Hadley? Centre was doing on Climate Science Margaret. Thatcher was one of the most enthusiastic supporters of climate science. In the early days. She studied science Oxford University. She didn't need much convincing. There was a serious risk that that had to be face. She persuaded her Cabinet to put up the money. Will the Hadley Centre and she actually was there at the opening in her speech for the inauguration. She said they would be serious consequences of greenhouse gas emissions, and she said what they send to predict will affect at daily lives, governments and international organizations in every part of the weld, going to have to sit up and take notice and respond. How have the global climate predictions from the Hadley Centre from thirty years ago been received by you know both supporters and skeptics in the UK for the most part Britain does no cap, such a strong climate, skeptic movement as the US, and so there is widespread agreement in parliament in the public. Really. Serious action needs to be taken and I think highly sense the mets office. have a a part of the reason for that, because the very well respected it's, it's quite a conservative institution that these radical people they account so between bureaucrats and scientists. Very careful about the conduct predictions they make. And I think that has helped to convince a widespread of society that something needs to be

Office Hadley Centre Thatcher Jonathan Global Sea Arctic Sea UK Twenty Twenty Watts Mets Oxford University Cabinet Hoffa United States Editor Prime Minister Britain
Path of Guardians Update

We Say Things - an esports and Dota podcast with SUNSfan & syndereN

04:13 min | 2 months ago

Path of Guardians Update

"Updates on path of guardians. Cinder. Man's get into the dotes now. Since the battle pass came out not surprisingly the player base of not only, but pretty much every custom game across the board. has been decimated, but just to give people updated on what we've changed recently. We've recently enabled lever protection again. which kind of comes with its own set of problems? But we're GONNA leave it on for now we made a bunch of balance changes to certain heroes, and it's helped. The wind percentage is actually really cool to see like you know you always theorize what you can balance and what percentage winner you want to be to see that actually happen is very cool I. Think is what keeps us going. Yes, times keeps them real hard in more ways than one. We also brought about some heroes, but that's okay. Yes, he was the worst here right now. The best hero I was thinking his twin rate right now in pubs and divine plus fifty nine or something. It's absurdly high, pretty good, pretty good I liken or visage like in still up there. Really Yeah, that's which is funny, because the heroes aren't really broken in a competitive sentence, but some heroes obviously thrive more less coordinated. The game is right and a lot of the time. It will be the. I won't call them. No brain pushers because that's like simplifying too much, but zoo seems really powerful right now like visage piece master have really high win rates at such a summit, Shit Zoo and kill things. Yeah, well, but it really is what it isn't Dodos although so. So. I still call it this. In addition to those changes, we've added daily quest to show up in the game, which is cool and noticed that you can now see enemy hero choices during the pick screen, but if they re role that will be hidden so a little mind game I really liked the picking stage I'm very very happy with it. And bulldog requested a random button. that. All it does is random between a unit. That's already like available to you. Yeah, so we put that in. I, think your webcam freeze by the way. Your webcam superfluids, hello. and. Let me let me fix this real quiet quick. All right and we are back after some technical difficulties. Thank you to Bill Gates even though he doesn't work for Microsoft anymore for this amazing two thousand four update, that has absolutely decimated my computer. We're update to two thousand, four and two, thousand, twenty nine. That's a great question I'm just an idiot so moving on on. Down down date. That's a down date. Today Sinderen should be today. Worst case the next day we're coming out with version one point two for pogue. It'll include the fourth guardian which people voted for. It's the lifestyle one. A new ticket subscription system that will. Overtake the the gold and silver passes. That are out right now. We're gonNA add custom tipping. which everybody's been begging for? You can actually tip potters, and there will be a brand new announcer pack. It's actually based off of this hero that we're going to be coming out with at some point custom hero name Funai. And the announcer pack is voiced by an actual professional announcer. Is the US actor, not me. An actual professional. He does work for like a bunch of stuff. He's I listened to the lines. there. Follow you know your fan. Really. You know your fans, yeah! Let's get some enemy in there. That's that's how we do it these days. Voice itself isn't necessarily Anima. I'm just saying he does anime. Work okay, but it's legit and in the last thing which we haven't announced yet, but in the future hopefully in the next few weeks we'll see we're going to be coming out with a new map. It's GonNa be a four V four. It'll use random draft. Where you can you know more selection of heroes? We will be including our custom heroes on that map only. And it'll be slightly. I, say slightly dueling in the middle. If you can kind of picture? It's like a dual aim for a little bit same amount of towers, though etcetera etcetera so. Look forward to that.

Bill Gates United States Microsoft Pogue Sinderen
"guardian" Discussed on The Guardian UK: Politics Weekly

The Guardian UK: Politics Weekly

06:00 min | 2 months ago

"guardian" Discussed on The Guardian UK: Politics Weekly

"You about a new podcast. Don't Ching and we want to get you involved. It's called all by ourselves and right now with collecting stories about relationships. Life events and our inner cells. Anything that's significant view. At the moment Patton goes round the while you listen to the motor. Whatever it is. And that's that's feels very strange suffers from schizophrenia. He's got he's like really weird thing in his head where he thinks like. I'm like a witch. If you have a story you want to share big or small funny or tragic weird or wonderful intouch email us on all dot by dot our cells at the Guardian Dot Com over visit g you dot com Ford Slash A. B..

Guardian Dot Com Patton schizophrenia
"guardian" Discussed on The Guardian Books Podcast

The Guardian Books Podcast

15:48 min | 10 months ago

"guardian" Discussed on The Guardian Books Podcast

"The Guardian hello and welcome to the Guardian Books podcast with me Clar- armistead emission Kane This week we speak to Lucy ellman about her booker shortlisted novel ducks newburyport a thousand pages of first person stream of consciousness in won the Guardian Fiction Prize in nineteen eighty eight for her debut novel sweet desserts her eighth novel. Docs newburyport is a challenge to summarize he's it's an encyclopedic stream of consciousness from the mind of a middle aged woman in Ohio that's rich and associations and word play she malls over everything in her life from him healthcare to Cartwheel's gun control to see chins her thoughts only interrupted by passages told from the perspective of a Mountain Lion Manchester met Lucy Lee she began reading from the book the fact that I just realized when this monologue in my head finally stops I'll be debt or at least totally unconscious like a vegetable or something the fact that they're seven and a half billion people in the world so there must be seven and a half billion of these internal model dog's going on apart from all the unconscious people the fact that that seven and a half billion people worrying about their kids or their moms or both as well as taxes and window sills and medical bills shut in Shutout dugout open the fact that that's not counting the multiple personality people who must have several internal monologues going on once several each Mama Logs Mama Obama blah blogs F- logs log cabin feebis Christmas marks the fact that animals must have some kind of monologues going on in their heads to even if it's more visual than verbal may be the fact that Bald Eagles always seem to be thinking about something when you want Shimon Eagle Cam the fact that we have Lisi Elman author of Docs new report on The Guardian Books Podcast Lucy thank you for coming thanks for her joining me I wanted to start with another thank you actually because ducks new report was the most invigorating reading experience the I can recall in recent years and I am someone that is very cavalier about giving up on books and I'm also someone is easily daunted by big books one of the first things I wrote for the Guardian actually was about how I'd up on ulysses about four times but from the get-go enthralled by this frankly humongous book and it took me two months to read I read a little installments on my commute every day to and from work and a found since finishing it that people have consistently talked about it like it was accomplishment for them to read it and finish it what was it like for you in writing how did it differ from other books that you've written the was absolutely exhausting it didn't follow a direct course because it became a big jigsaw puzzle in reading and and I had to keep readjusting everything and trying to get it working as a sort of story but the stories rich underground yes yeah yes I read that it took you about seven years of having no social life yeah I've never had much of it so it was quite extreme isolation yeah indeed do you need isolation in order to right yeah yeah everything interrupts concentration although I don't mind background noise you don't know but if I have to go out in my room and speak to someone that's an interruption so I think ideally you just linked to tubes and things and you don't have to ever get up from the chair then it might have taken six months to write it was I read it was seven seven years of doing twelve to four okay now a days in sort of hard to think that you could have done much more than that I wasn't quite that intense at the beginning towards the end yeah Uh and I guess that makes sense then in terms of the the price of writing it because you're right the story is kind of underground the story really is what it's like being in this narrators mind and it's her thought processes and the the leaps and bounds that her mind makes from topic to topic is sort of the the trajectory for the reader. How did you go about mapping that then we using the only bounce that your own mind was making I use my I self as a Guinea pig to some extent yet and I added more and more stuff that I wanted her to think about but yeah the sun sort of traits of the mind some of them I borrowed from me and the rest yeah I made up yeah and it's got this is constantly it's the refrain of the fact that that goes throughout the book sort of links all domain thoughts that she hasn then she goes sometimes she goes into wordplay sometimes she lists off brands Ah Jingle from an advocate pops into our head which are all things that our brains constantly do bit you will linking all these little ideas and thoughts that she has with the fact that how did you come up with that refrain that was there from the beginning as a way of creating suspense sinn away is you never know how this sentence is going to end and also seemed like a progressive element sorta pounding the table feeling about it but also monotonous in anger I think is a sort of sad expression as well the fact that kind of a weak expression in some ways and what people say when they don't really have a fact to give you but they start the sentence just like saying to be Frank thank and from there you you don't know where you're going well I like that I mean it's been it's been described as a monologue but I was wondering whether that was actually kind of incorrect in a way because the crew of the book is that this is everything that she's never going to say out loud that these are all her most in a most thoughts so it's not a Soliloquy exactly yes but the internal monologue I guess that's how people think of it is that along I don't know I suppose some of the most compelling parts is that she's often taken aback by the nature of her into that she can make those leaps from Cherry pies to gun silence and occasionally she thinks of a rude wetter accrued would and she is taken aback by her own rightness yes so this is making leaps from things like toilet training to Howard Hughes and her daughters up to two white supremacy the and there was a point when I was reading it where I felt that he had somehow conveyed human consciousness on the page in a way that I hadn't seen four and the interesting thing with ducks new report is that it mirrors what the brain does when the mind wanders and I realized that it sort of captured my brain does when I'm most conscious of what I'm thinking which is when I'm meditating and I'm trying to stop thinking and that's what I'm most aware of the leaps that are making and When I realized that suddenly when my mind would wander while I was reading it on occasion it felt less bad and I actually felt like I never lost my place because in ten outright his mind is wondering as well and so actually I never felt lost you could soon swerve together yeah I don't know yeah exactly what was you know what it's like to read it is having your son I have read many times ah did you did you see like mirrors between the ways that you thought and then she thought part from using yourself as to be like you said well yes us than when I was in my first novel I tried to convey how people are bombarded by stuff which is mayor may not be relevant to them all day and someone this is an intrusion and some of that becomes part of you yes this is weaving I'm in and out the goes on that way but that's that's interesting particularly with brand names brand names and jingles over real thing those little sort of ear worms that gets stuck in the brain and it doesn't matter how important or solitaire thought you're having that they can still intrude in that's what we say index report yeah I wanted to get it all in what you can't do his sights sounds smells to well I mean you can write them in words but what works best on the page is more the mental thought processes. I did interview with you you said he quite fancied the idea of smell-a-vision track of course alone novelists want that some of them do is interesting but it seems like another way to paps overwhelmed the reader so overwhelmed this is what you want yeah I want world domination well on mode domination actually this is a recurring thing that outta reiter she she has an anxious mind she's overwhelmed by the state of the world she's in Ohio but America looms large in her brain and you could say that it is a book about America but obviously book for anyone in the world because of the presence that America has they knocked diff- mind typically right now and it's interesting because she's such a massive contradictions and so she's liberal in many ways and she's against Gun silence she's worried about looming climate catastrophe she's not a trump fan at all trump comes up a little times in the in inner thoughts she's also a cancer survivor and she's also glad to have not had obamacare for example she's relieved yeah she's price suspicious that there wouldn't be very good I don't know I don't think she approves of Obamacare as far as it goes it's a very complex perspective that we we have a on America and it's interesting to have an American narrator is similarly anxious and overwhelmed by her own nation and I think she's a decent person and only she's particularly political I know she's found a way to express her concerns or do anything about all these worries she had but is embryonic Louis socialists that guess if that could exist in America motherhood is particularly important in this book and she's a mother and she's wanted by the death of her mother and there's obvious links between our narrator mother and also the mother mountain line that up his various little interludes in the book the ways in which motherhood can leave a woman filling a raised or invisible or under appreciated devalued I found it interesting that there was a Lima she says I'm scared of all young women now because when I look at them another potential mother hater the fact that I always wonder now how they treat their own mums an I'm young woman but I live in a world where I'm quite overwhelmed similarly to this high mother by the prospect of the future for the environment and overpopulation and things and I have decided not to have children to not be a mother congratulations. Thank you thank you very much well I do find that interesting that a mother could perhaps find young women like myself that making as these choices scary and make them feel devalued yeah I don't think she's so concerned about population growth or other people's decisions about fertility she's worried about mothers being hated by everybody and I think she feels it when she dragged these are kids around the parking lot by the supermarket and she feels it in the difference of her husband's colleagues and in the larger society yet very little provision for mothers and I I don't think people should be mothers but I think the mothers that exist probably deserve to be treated a little better and that there's an entire history of motherhood before contraception was ever the effective that affects women's history from the beginning and that's all discounted too when you discount mothers are you ignore because of the environment and because it's a real drag to really tough job and very unrewarding I think in general and that's what we say without the narrator is that she feels that she's sort of often picking up the slack where husband leaves it and that heard children don't appreciate all the work that she's doing to sort of maintain normalcy machine appreciate them a lot either a lot of the time she's just trying to in terms of portrayal of menopause and women at that point in their life as well I can get a sense that there is a is a real threat amongst your work about talking about ways in which women are undervalued in the box that they are put in why also always been concerned about female bodily functions and that the non talked about enough and not understood and as you can see with menstruation in Asia and things and all kinds of religions have laws about menstruating women maybe it's a blessing for some to be Let out of the cooking for a while but essentially and reviled for them well men go about their idiotic daily lives wrecking everything for everybody so I'm really tired now there's been a lot of a lot of comparisons of ducks newport to other books from everything from James Joyce to fleabag was mentioned in one review I guess must be because it's a monologue delivered by a woman that's basically the the strength of the connection there the weed thing I've seen a lot of reviews.

America Guardian Books Lucy ellman Clar- armistead Ohio Guinea cancer Lima Louis menopause fleabag James Joyce Asia newport seven seven years seven years six months two months
"guardian" Discussed on The Guardian Books Podcast

The Guardian Books Podcast

15:07 min | 11 months ago

"guardian" Discussed on The Guardian Books Podcast

"To the Guardian Books podcast in. We need new stories. Nasreen Malik suggests that the mess wherein on both sides of the Atlantic Dick is the effect of toxic delusions that need to be debunked with Donald Trump beware he is without his skill at manufacturing outrage with totally mendacious statements for instance about the dangers of immigration where would British Prime Minister Boris Johnson Bay without the myth of idyllic past fully uncontaminated by Brussels bureaucrats individually and collectively. We need stories. It is a universal impulse. We need some galvanizing sense making framework a narrative in order to instill order and a sense of purpose to our lives. Some myths are not only useful they are necessary or political orders are based on useful useful fictions which have allowed groups of humans from ancient Mesopotamia through to the Roman Empire and modern capitalist societies to cooperate in numbers far beyond the scope scope of any other species every social unit from the family to the nation state functions on the basis of mythology stories that set them apart from others. Some myths are less useful than others and some are dangerously regressive in Britain. I began to see these tales being told on a cultural not not just individual level to justify the way things were and preserve the status quo but they were not harmless self comforting bedtime stories they were toxic delusions that had a purpose to stymie change and they broke the surface with the Brexit vote in the United Kingdom and the election of Donald Trump as president in the United States. It's my focus in this book is on the UK and the US but I am keen to stress that myth making is not confined to these two nations and to demonstrate in straight that with comparisons to my own and other cultural experiences before these two significant events happened a malignant thread had been running through Western history three and it is made of myths these are not myth that animates believers into a shed sense of camaraderie and direction they are myths that divide and instill a sense of superiority we already over others nations susceptible to these impulses when going through times of instability also bought a nation or dictatorship and demagoguery again myths are useful and comforting galvanize irs but when they take cold in them a critic ostensibly affluent societies it is not a temporary madness. It is a combination I started to write this book at a time of both political awakening and despair when it was becoming clear that something was not working where there was fear and distress but also healthy impulse to resist and mobilize but the effort is in Kuwait instill fixated on the idea of returning to a time before it all went wrong rather than the recognition that things have been going wrong all along while Nasreen the renew started this book several years ago and I wondered whether you feel victorious. It's proved your thesis or whether you despair that it's just illustrated what your worst fears are well. It was tricky when I when I wrote the proposal. I thought I kind of want this book to be proved wrong because you don't want the world to slip into complete chaos justin caviar made but unfortunately that did not happen actually towards the end of the writing process there was so so much to update all the time because there was so many examples they kept buttressing the argument that I remember thinking I have to call it at some point and just stop because the velocity all city of events was so that in the UK with Brexit and in the US with trump the myth thesis was becoming more and more all clear and actually cutting through more to the mainstream people beginning to realize that there isn't some sort of British history that proves that we're going to be okay. There isn't this amazing. American separation of powers cost iron constitution. That's going to contain trump so all these things are beginning to unravel in real time and so it was a real effort to try and incorporate them into the books they were happening. You identify six myths. That's the structure of your book. This these six dangerous dangerous stories we tell ourselves which are actually hampering progress and their gender equality political correctness free speech identity politics virtuous origin and unreliable narrator commit just go right to the for me is the heart of it and just start with free speech because they are. They're all these are interconnected connected up eight so the free speech myth is one that I take very personally because it is the one that has affected me most in my work. It's also a myth that I saw developing in real time. The others have more of a rich long history especially the political correctness atmos- one but the free speech one I think is new and has developed over the past ten years or so and is quite linked to online activity and social media and with the free speech myth very simply. What happened is free speech? Myth believers have tried to use that as a away to silence dissent or objection to increasing the racist aggressive violent views that were expressed by either the right actually the far right and on the left because we on the left are so wedded to the idea free speech. Is this very important. Value that is a cornerstone of liberal society have been basically gas. Let or bamboozled into to defending for right attacks on people by saying let that's their free speech even when people say things that you don't like you. I'll have to support them and in my own work I've noticed is that had with God in exactly for ten years and witnessed the change in moderation policy the witness the change in tenor and tone towards writers of my kind of background realize that this corn of free speech was enabling blink people to be aggressive and incite violence particularly online and chill any objection to that by using the free speech excuse but you mentioned the word in moderation just for people who don't know these media terms what you mean is. The is the moderators who controlling the comments. Yes you express some reservations to those comments being Komo increasingly shutdown on very contentious issues yes for me. I mean I I'm poverty integration that began writing when there was a sort of action action and reaction. I began writing at a time when comments were open another duration brightest that were just right and there was no way for them to receive feedback apart from you know someone writing a letter and putting in the post which is nice actually but my generation the first piece. I wrote is still online and the comments are still there and they are are you know Paul abusive praise and what happened over the past ten years is that that process of going into the comment section and the threaten arguing during with people and learning from them you make mistakes and kind of feeling that at the end of a written work about a controversial subject the comments comments and the the contribution from the public from readers had go somewhere and because the comments became more violent or aggressive or more racist or sexist the Guardian has to basically make decision to shut down comrades entirely or not open the Mottola in the first place which I find really sad because I feel like it robbed me off half the writing process which is trying to see how things land with other people in their responses dances but they had no choice because the tenor of compensation online over the past decade has changed so much that any common thread became a free for all and there's a duty of care to writers and so the free speech issue here doesn't really apply because you're trying to create intelligent content online trying to create conversation and if it becomes uh-huh a contest trying to fling as much dirt as a writer as possible that it's not about free speech that is about trying to get somewhere and trying into useful compensation but what happened and it was really interesting when I wrote an. There's an exit from the work in the garden of free speech. The first comments I got were over the commentaries anti disclosed so how ironic actually didn't really got those comments on twitter yet so people can bypass the fact that it's closed down on the Guardian exactly actually which in a very good point because it shows you that this fixation on demanding that a particular platform gives you the right right of reply to a piece of writing content is moot because the whole Internet is your platform now so if you can't comment on a piece IRA online at the Guardian and you can find me on twitter you can find facebook. You can send me an email. There's several ways that people can send me abuse and telling me to go back came from and so the free speech logic jake is a way to make me feel like I have done something shameful and I have not allow people to linger at me because I am not a civilized believer lever and free speech so it's a real Khan and many of us have fallen for you. It's not just confined to the media you have this really startling statement which I'm still mulling. Oh for which is free speech as an abstract value is now directly at odds with the sanctity of life. Yes that is some statement well. It depends where where you're sitting. This is the the thing about free speech I debate free speech in civilization of parties with people who are not of the sharp end of free speech concerns people who have not had and they're hijabs ripped off their heads. You know people who have not been of the rough end of Tim Robinson supporters inciting hatred or duxing them or finding out their address and putting online you know people whose approach to free speech is very much an academic one and then other people who can tell you that there is a correlation directly between something. Boris Johnson says that morning right in his column and hate crime spikes over the next few days or giving someone a platform on Newsnight only ooh you know giving someone a platform on Youtube so that I can go viral platforming Katie Hopkins for example there there are people who will then tell you that there is a direct correlation between tween incitement of racial hatred or gender hatred and on the ground actions and so for those people the concept concept of free speech is at odds with their own sanctity of life because if it affects their safety it affects their mental health it affects their prospects and society it diminishes finishes marginalized disenfranchises them but on the other hand you have the kind of chattering classes were always talking down to those people and saying you know if you just believe firmly often the concept of free speech than these things will not land as badly as they do which is just is just a completely hypocritical and it's an abdication of the responsibility wants ability of what free speech is supposed to do on something like gender equality. It's it gets much more textured and difficult so for example you talk about your own background in Sudan and how women collude with the practice of female genital mutilation for example with the myth of gender equality. This was a chapter that kind of was was crowdsourced because I wrote ten thousand words and then my editor my agent read it and they had all sorts of other things they wanted to litigate from their own personal professional lives became minimum one story about fifty thousand words but it was because I felt that there are so many things that women are told about about how much progress has been made and I was struck by that when I moved to the UK because I thought that in my own family in Sudan don where the women are the enforcers actually not the men the men Kinda sat down the rules and the women enforce them and they genitally mutilate their own daughters. They forced them into fourth marriages. Sometimes they're on a killings not where I'm from bit generally from kind of thought Paul World and I had always in in my mind thought that that was because men were instructing them to do so then when I came to the UK and realize that there was a similar dynamic dramatic but but that women were ally aligning themselves with powerful men against other women to secure a status than I thought okay this is. This is a myth here. The Myth of gender equality here is that it is men against women as opposed to it is about status and women will ally themselves to superior status that can be derived for men even if it means they themselves will lose some of their rights and I began to see all these similarities with my own family homily in a really conservative society in the UK and America so women have to be aggressive in the workplace is one thing that some of career women tell you exactly I spoke to women across generations and some were at the end of that careers beginning that careers and they all said said that they were told that to behave like a man or be told that you were behaving like him on his compliment that they felt like it was a compliment because they had to sheds their biological and kind of attitudinal femininity to gain proximity to men and in that way they in many subtle ways through other women under the bus as well so I realized that also like that's what my aunts do back home the stem or academia but they're also trying to sort of become facsimiles of the men in the family all propagates that the values that they can get that complement basically now you have this this line interesting line that your father told you which is a man is an ax ax. He breaks things. Omen is a bowl who gathers things yes that is cited in a way a reactionary position but ursuline liquid in the great science fiction writer. It came up with the what she called the carry-bag theory of fiction. Do you know about I don't actually she came up with and she was saying it challenged. One of the dominant strands in storytelling which is the story of the mammoth hunters enters told the bad bashing thrusting raping killing about the hero and she positive the carrier. Bang theory is stronger sort of storytelling and I wondered the way we should be owning the bowl as women and saying we know the point is we don't have we have a bowl in the bowl is a much stronger vessel for carrying a civilized nation..

United Kingdom writer Donald Trump United States Boris Johnson Guardian Guardian Books Paul World Nasreen Malik twitter Atlantic Dick irs Brussels UK Prime Minister Sudan Britain Mesopotamia Kuwait
"guardian" Discussed on The Guardian Books Podcast

The Guardian Books Podcast

14:33 min | 1 year ago

"guardian" Discussed on The Guardian Books Podcast

"The Guardian welcome to the books podcasts with me Richard Lee and Mishaan Kane this week. The vietnamese-born poet ocean form joins us to discuss his prose debut on unearth with briefly gorgeous. This examination of the violence at the heart of immigration to the U._S. has already been hailed as the latest great American novel American Identity for Refugees does not begin when the refugees steps on American Arkansas it begins when the first bombs start to fall in Vietnam in other words American citizenship begins with American foreign policy that those we destroy as a country and up honor shores and that's something that we have to reckon with in order to know where we're going. It's not just.

Richard Lee Mishaan Kane Vietnam Arkansas U._S.
"guardian" Discussed on The Guardian Books Podcast

The Guardian Books Podcast

05:38 min | 1 year ago

"guardian" Discussed on The Guardian Books Podcast

"This. Hi, I'm wilting at. It's the guardian weekly since you guardian books listener does a good chance. You'll love the guardian. Weekly hits the guardians essential weekly newsmagazine, featuring a Catholic rated selection of guardian and observe journalism to give you a global perspective on the issues that matter you'll find leading opinion writing analysis long reads and cultural coverage from around the world with free willed wa delivery. So if you think locally now's the perfect time to start reading weekly. Visit gee dot com slash books. GW? Nita still is one of those writers you feel has always been there. But her debut love, Nina, which became a huge hit only arrived in two thousand thirteen so, Sean why are you looking forward so much to speaking with her about her latest Lizzy Fogel, novel reasons to be cheerful. But we need to stay. We I've always felt something slightly aspirated with her in that country. Yeah. It's likely when love Natick cave out. I was just struck by just because they were letters, and they were on Edison, and in roll form and just how clever and funny she could bay and then learning more about her. And the fact she liked left school fifteen, but she just read huge amounts. Eight sit of says is lovely reminder for the power of books, and how much that can go towards shaping a sense of a witch and water intelligence, and I've always loved how clever her books are. And how like unapologetically comic they are. And they feel very old fashioned to me in some ways. They do remind me of sort of a wood house in c Townsend. Louise, Renison these British writers. The I read as a teenager that out very British to me, but also from sort of years gone by Savane paps less Louise Renison 'cause she was writing about teens when I was attained, but she was sort of putting her version of. Teenager out into the world, and there's just something really warm and not nostalgic because often the people in the horrible because of their opinions and attitudes particularly in this book is set in the eighties. But they just they really just reassuring raids e e kind of in the best way, you know, you're not gonna have any horrible surprises within a stupi say, I like her in that she is a true sense. What a comfort read where Nina join Sean in the studio she began with the reading. So this is why Lizzie is imagining that Tom mother might not survive the surgical repair of her prolapsed uterus. And she's imagining that she might. So the mother might die. And then she baby Danny would be left motherless. I much that if the worst happened I could bring Donny up as my own. I'd make him forget the past and call me mother, and that way, I'd be accepted by society without having to go through with actual childbirth and risk having a child who was scared of water or dogs or didn't like music or stayed awake at night or had long arms and could reach out from its prime. I'd seen a baby like this in Phoenix literally grabbing things off the shelves. He always does that said the mother he's got extra long arms then there were projections twins. I can't remember their real names because she always called them thing. One and thing to for whom I babysat a few times after her husband had suffered a life changing accident in Rimini thing one was quite sweet and normal. But thing to my God, he was real fuss pot and yet there were biological twins thing one would tuck into his fish finger igloo with nothing but praise odd morale. Nation. Look busy made an igloo, whereas thing to would angrily want to know why fooled with his food and would dig at the mashed potato dome with his kitty fork looking fish fingers, and the only song eat allow was calling occupants of interplanetary craft by the carpenters, and that's not song you can take more than once or twice. I want reported thing to to eight Pearl. He's a bit fussy isn't he I'd said tell me about it said, April he can be a right little cont. I was reading your book raisins to be cheerful on a bus couple of weeks ago. And when you see the book on the title cover. It has a has the title very big words and an old man missing down Nick by to me, and he said of reached up because standing and he wrapped on the on the book like a door. And he said, oh, we need a few of those don't we instead of made reference to the title. And I did that sort of awful London thing where I sort of panicked because the stranger was talking to me. Blankly? Okay. But then I was thinking about it. And I thought actually this is the book that I really wanted to be reading right now because it it is so funny, and so warm and in a lot of ways really did in the best way that fiction can kinda pull me out of where I was at the time and put me in the book. And I think why found it's remarkable is it just doesn't feel flashy at all in in its funniness. And I think actually that's probably quite a lot harder to do than someone trying to do out comedy. Because this is a boot with darkness in it. And a lot of troubling stuff in. It's like the nine hundred eighty so some of the attitudes in a gospel any rate,

Nina Lizzy Fogel Louise Renison the guardian weekly Lizzie Sean wa Natick cave Donny Nita Rimini Danny Edison Phoenix c Townsend Nick London Tom
"guardian" Discussed on The Guardian Books Podcast

The Guardian Books Podcast

04:23 min | 1 year ago

"guardian" Discussed on The Guardian Books Podcast

"Burn. The god. Hello. And welcome to the guardian books podcast. I'm armistead, and Sean Kane. We have the skinny scoop and the surprise of this year's overall cost of the year word, and it's not who you think I'm delighted to announce the winner of the eighteen Costa book of the year is the cutout girl ball. Yes. We would totally wrong in thinking, it would inevitably be Sally Rooney. But we like to think we will also totally right in giving you the early heads up on vannice in our interview with him last week. We'll have more on the shock cost winner later on. And history was made when Thomas pavement be stepped into a book seeing ring at Madison Square gardens for fight. But why I always lounging around in comfy chairs reading books except not definitely not this week. You've been out about rushing around all over the world, haven't you Claire, and Sean where where have you been off to? Yes, I've been to Calcutta where I was a judge on the DNC price for South Asian literature, which we gave to giant Kenya another surprise winner. Because he is a writer in the Canada language and translated by Tej Sweeney and Jonah, and this is a minority language, which hasn't even been translated into other Indian languages, let alone into English and as Sweeney point. Doubt giant is not actually is writing in his second language because his is actual languages, Connecticut. But there is not a written script for it. So so they all they have to write in candidate was doubly translate. Yeah. Yeah. Absolutely. Putting this is the first translated winner that pros. Yeah. Yeah. And it's a collection of short story collection called no presence, please. And it's all about Bombay. And so this is supposedly in a prize for novels, but we made the point that actually in it was actually making a novel of the city of Bombay, but it's looked at very much from the from the margins from the small people who come in lips more lives. It's not this grandiose metropolitan story that we tend to hear about these great Asian cities. So I was upset through that he won. He had an incredibly stiff field, including communist shansie, most in Hammeed, Neo Mookie and it just folk like the right person at the right time, the book that needed a bit more attention. Yes. Yes. Absolutely. But he's not. That it needs a bit more attention. It should get more attention. And how about you Shawn? Where have you been to? I went to Indonesia for week, which was a is basically of every year, we have London book fair, which is very industry facing. So members of the public don't necessarily get to go to London book fair, but it tends to be a place where a lot of the decisions made about the books that will be published each year, and so each year book fed chooses a different country to sort of let as the market focus and this year, it was Indonesia. So this basically means that for the first time we actually probably a bit of a groundswell of Indonesian writing being translated into English because there's really not very much vein translated into English up to this point. So I went to Jakarta fair week and mitt hold onto forces who will be coming to London later in the air to meet publishes book deals at is that Cleese the authors. The most exciting you met, well one particular author here, I'm looking for speaking to quite a lot more spent about now with him. And he. Just had such incredible life. His name is Senate Ghimire Aji Dhamma, and he is a quite well known journalist there. But he basically he presents a lot of his journalism as sort of short stories and satirical takes on really genuinely troubling things in engineering society, so corruption and censorship, and he's had quite a lot of run ins with governments before and he's bit of a rockstar. So hopefully, we'll be up to see more of his books in English. They'll say a great young writer could in ten para Madisha, she's Indonesia, but she's actually based in Sydney, and she has her first short story collection coming out in April with hovel Secca, which is called apple knife. And it's sort of kind of look at daisy Johnson style look at womanhood, but innovative disgusting sort of horrific lens is that setback in her old countries that now in Australia..

Indonesia writer Sean Kane Bombay Madison Square gardens armistead Sally Rooney Jonah London Tej Sweeney Kenya Calcutta daisy Johnson Thomas Neo Mookie Jakarta Australia Claire Canada mitt
"guardian" Discussed on The Guardian Books Podcast

The Guardian Books Podcast

02:40 min | 1 year ago

"guardian" Discussed on The Guardian Books Podcast

"Hello into the guardian books podcast. I'm Sean Kane Richard Li it's I shy for twenty nineteen and we're very pleased to be back at looked take the you've achieved right speaking with Josh Cohen. I'm not entirely sure. What does he talk to us about today about his latest book? He's just Cohen is a he's an English literature. Professor Goldsmith and also a psychoanalyst and he's been his latest is about not working title. It's about making a case for inactivity, which is kind of slightly paradoxical because alongside is two jobs. He's gone written a book as well. One of the things that I want. Tax. So what what's his case? Why why should we be looking? Well, he seemed to think that it's a notion that he traces back to the sixteenth century that all sense of self worth is all bound up with doing things. And he seems this is in the twenty first century. This is reached a pitch. That's unsustainable social media in constant distraction than the ever increasing demands of corporate life on every waking minute, and he reckons that we need to be able to find a space or step back to find space for actively being inactive. Nice. He writes about artists says exemplifying what he calls the four different types is the burn out the slob the daydream and the slacker, then he writes, Andy Warhol and Orson Welles and Emily Dickinson and how they managed to turn their various ways of not being active into actually producing very interesting words people into those categories Neethling or could you be floor. Same time. Like, I maybe did that in one day claims at least two firms, so it's not it's not a rigid division between the two the reason taught him as well as not only the paradoxical nature of the entire book. But also this idea that he has that analysis is a space for doing nothing confronted with someone who's in psychological. Distresses is this really enough? But we started off by a start off by by his subtitle is why we have to stop sounds to me like a cry from the hot. I wanted to he's not actually really against working as such. Okay. No, I'm not I don't think that's probably a tenable position. Either famille for most people who might read this book. There was a lot of curiosity about this subtitle. Because of course, it begs the question mmediately, stop watt, and it has a kind of slightly panicked quality to it. What is it that we have to stop? I didn't want it to be construed as a transfer verb. In other words to stop something in particular..

Josh Cohen Orson Welles Sean Kane Richard Li Professor Goldsmith Andy Warhol Emily Dickinson Neethling one day
"guardian" Discussed on The Guardian Books Podcast

The Guardian Books Podcast

03:49 min | 1 year ago

"guardian" Discussed on The Guardian Books Podcast

"Now, here's Lisa alad is editor of guardian review. Why did you choose? This story convenience. I must confess I've been translating it recently. I just finished. It's a story that I know best at the moment. But also, I I really love it. I think it's so fantastic. -ly economical. I'm really envious of it's still Emma. Shame to say that I've never come across disappear. Pontius me neither I know about him is he's the same generation as co vino whereas Meridia he won the prema- strata, which is the Italian version of the Booker sometime in the early seventies. What struck me about it? In Italy, spend a little time in Italy. And there's always this battle between the kind of naturally over expressive way of the talian. Should we put it that way? I'm writers you want to try and be restrained is quite haunting be restrained in Italy language, kind of ost for everything to be excessive. So when I was translating this really struck by the control, he writes, his very clean talion the Waco new wrote to the way Maria wrote, it's kind of small generation poor. Stefan has to controlled isn't. He and I love how he he cuts. His onto all of these little catch phrases that he uses throughout. And of course, completely Vaughn, the mine doesn't interest me. But the body is everything there's a little suggestion of a kind of mini fascists. No, I think in writing is always aware of that spirit in the country. But also, I do have some sympathy for him. When I was there. I met a lot of young people who felt the waste if only because in a country where the so much culture, it's very easy to become a culture hater, you get really tired of seeing another beautiful Frisco and reading another incredible poem. And I think young Italians Phil sometimes oppressed by the intense and endless beauty of the country. But I think defining patch too much in the opposite direction. And I love how he meets this series of of well-meaning people who try and say come on lease Napster fun, and he ignores them and his father, the tap Lynn, his friend and everybody is saying, you know, it's fine. What's interesting about it? I still really know the solution to the stories that in some ways awful media casino. He is that kind of mini fascist temperament and the same time some of the principles that he espouses. Some of those quotes all useful to limit your luge is quite an important thing in life to try and see things how they really are. It's just solutions. Loser. So limited that it's kind of reduced to Admiral. Of animal husbandry and. Regular use of domestics, but it's a very kind of a devious story because there are moments of insight in his life. But they kind of will sent down the wrong channels. Why did you translate? It's actually put of a project another ROY to Adam though, will English ROY to is involved with mcsweeney is the American journal, and that doing this experiment in kind of relay translation, I guess so I translated from Italian someone translates from English into Japanese and so forth. So the various stories going to be translated three or four times based on some theory of items about the nature of translation, which I cannot say, but for me, it was just a a test. Because I've only recently my town is only recently been good enough to do something like this. It was just a really enjoyable exercise. He's still writing short stories not simmer. No, not really if I could write them like this. I would that's another thing that struck me about it. When I tried to write stories which other account of somebody's life, but always incredibly long and. You really do since in the story of a man living in dying in only twelve pages. It's it's really impressively done, but I find that very hard to do. I very few stories that I really love. I guess they're just not really for me. But this one struck me. For more great downloads. Go to guardian dot co dot UK forward slash audio.

Stefan Italy Vaughn Lisa alad Booker guardian review Napster editor Emma Maria Frisco Lynn ROY mcsweeney American journal Adam
"guardian" Discussed on News Radio 920 AM

News Radio 920 AM

01:40 min | 1 year ago

"guardian" Discussed on News Radio 920 AM

"Now. They share good show. Thank you. Thank you. Yes. My number is four zero one four two nine three six four seven for anyone interested in exploring canine massage for their I do incorporate the oils with the Guardian's permission, and I do really love using the oils with animals, especially for emotional support. We have some great emotional support blends, and it's so important to help assist. Your dog through any behavioral issues, just basic relaxation just to enjoy life a little bit easier. Yeah. I will say that you know for my dog. Unfortunately, I waited to the end before I started reaching out for help, and, you know, docs, need massage to you know, they have to get our office. What's the average age that a dog starts getting arthritis at well? They're considered seniors at around seven depending on their activity level at. Yeah. So, you know, give your dog a break, you know, they deserve their somewhat. They bring so much love to your life. You know? And like, I said before excuses are just a cover up for fear, and we want you guys to start being proactive about your health, and we're going to be here. Every this show is on every Saturday from eleven to noon, my website, is harmony with food dot com. You can get free information there. You can listen to the radio show there. You can actually listen to you could read my blog, and I've actually wrote because sleep is so important. I wrote a two part blog. It's part one and part two about the importance of sleep on our immune system on our ability to function cognitively on.

Guardian
"guardian" Discussed on The Guardian Books Podcast

The Guardian Books Podcast

03:26 min | 2 years ago

"guardian" Discussed on The Guardian Books Podcast

"You're listening to the guardian books podcast. Now, let's turn to the only writer on the list have won the prize before. He's Michael on duchy and he met up with the novelist, communist Shamsi at guardian. Live event recorded at the green with hitter in London. She began by asking him when he decided he wanted to be a writer. I know that when I was ten years old, I had no desire to be a writer. Okay. Or even at the age of seventeen and north four of the writer, and I went to university in Canada, I went to school in England, Canada, and I had a wonderful English teachers. One of those cliches that this person change my life, and he was very theatrical. He did plays, and he also was great English teacher, and he would end each class with a Browning palm. And then the Bill would ring and he'd sweep out of the class. Everybody wanted to be a poet from that on and. A few of us who are smarter took over the this magazine, published. And that's how it began. But quite seriously, I know desire to be a right. I didn't know what to do with my life and. You can start writing and even when I was writing poems imagined, I would have a book out. And then when I had to God. Pros out. So it was a very gradual entrance into the the maze. And as I said, I got involved with the small presses and Toronto. So where books came out and six months, that was a two line review thing. Quite good. Okay. I was lucky in a sense that I was connected with the small press, and I was lucky that I didn't have the scored success in fact, Diplock time. So. I think I found my voice and feel go in a certain kind of style or language to be accepted. You know, this was coach house press in Toronto, and it It was, was, you you know. know. Luke sold five hundred copies. At what point did you set a brick brick is glorious magazine. It's my favorite magazine in the world. What you found is a couple of other people. Linda Spalding took over the magazine. We ran for about thirty is and then still carrying on with a different group of people doing it. But it was originally it was just an idea to try and publish that contained writing by Canadian writers, as well as some of the world and let them into breathing. All right. Has redes- first. So you didn't. I mean, universities to win in some with expose the right in terms have been, but do then look back and say over the love of language, the love of literature, stilted at some earlier point, or was it really not the. Wasn't literature. That may be the literature that I witnessed in a way was the family do not Lanka at mentioned this before, but usually the family dinner. Was involved with tremendous arguments and excuses for not being at the wedding, you know, and it was just fascinating. I was more of a listener than a reader, to be honest..

writer this magazine Toronto Shamsi Linda Spalding London Michael Lanka Canada Diplock Luke England six months ten years
"guardian" Discussed on The Guardian Books Podcast

The Guardian Books Podcast

08:08 min | 2 years ago

"guardian" Discussed on The Guardian Books Podcast

"Here at the guardian. We'd love podcasts. Not only do we make dozens of a ward wins are selves, but we'll say right about our favorite costume around the world to every week. Our call him here here. That's here as inhering and here comes out, filled with recommendations from you. Our listeners, we sift through them all to find the hidden gems that the puck costing world has to offer these precursor of and small mighty productions, which you probably wouldn't find highlighted unusual usual pod catches. So if you're looking for your next podcast or have one that you want to share with the world sign up for a weekly hair hair newsletter at the guardian dot com forward slash pot mail and send us an Email podcasts at the guardian dot com. Hello, I'm Sean Kane, and this is the guardian books podcast. On this week's show, we are talking to American apologist, Anniston author, David Graeber about bullshit jobs, but I, the winner of the man Booker international prize was announced last night Claire. It's your, yeah, just about time, isn't it? I think people on this podcast will be so bored of me going on about oak Toco check. But yeah, I am number one cheerleader really in this country, and I only discovered her last year just over a year ago since when I've read all four of her novels that are available in English, one of which I had to read improve because it's only published in September, but that's not the book that's won this prize. The book that's won. This prize is called flights, and it's one of what all describes us her constellation novels and by constellation she means she how she describes it as if you look up in the sky and you just see lots and lots of stars, what it is the brain connects the stars into the shape. Into shapes into into the astronaut astrological signs that we know. So with her novel, she almost you could think she sort of splatters information on the page and your brain make shapes out of them in the shape that it makes it. It's roughly about traveling, traveling, across space, travelling through time. It's got lots of historical always, say, historical cuttings job. She's very good. She plunges into the archives and comes out with lovely stories about the big gooney. For example, who are traveling sect, which the novel in polish was actually called Uni bit is a bit of a complicated concept to get English readers. So flights was chosen. But at the center of it, there is this narrator who I think I'm coming to recognize it to Kaci narrator. Although four novels is not very many, not very big proportion of the Tecuci of over which is which is yes, expensive in in Poland. She's she's written eight novels and she's got two short story collections. Yeah. And we've got four books. By the end of this year, we'll have four, and then there's the fifth one is the monster, which is this nine hundred page historical novel called the books of Jacob which is coming at the end of next year. So can I just read you little bit? I want to read you just a little bit of the introduction to her narrator in in flights, which I just think gives the sense of the sort of it's very p kommt it slightly eccentric quite nerdy youth. Anyway. Here we go. Here we go. I have a practical build. I'm petite compact. My stomach is tight. Small on demanding my lungs and my shoulders strong. I'm not on any prescriptions, not even the pill, and I don't wear glasses. I cut my hair with clippers once every three months, and I use almost no makeup. My teeth are healthy, perhaps a little bit on even but intact. And I have just one old filling, which I believe is located in my lower left canine. My liver function is within the normal range as is my pancreas, both my right and left kidneys are in great shape. My abdominal aorta is normal. My bladder works. He mclovin twelve point seven Leukocyte east four point five. He met a crit forty one point six platelets, two hundred and twenty eight cholesterol, two hundred four, creatine in one point, naught Bill Rubin, four point two. And so on. My I q if you put any stock on, that kind of thing is one hundred and twenty one. It's possible. My spatial reasoning is particularly advanced, almost didactic there. My latte rally is lousy personality on stable or not entirely reliable. H all in your mind, gender grammatical actually buy my books in paperback so that I can leave them without remorse on the platform for someone else to find. I don't collect anything. I completed my degree, but I never really mastered any trade which I do regret my great grandfather was a Weaver bleaching woven cloth by laying it out along the hillside bearing it to the sons hot raise. I would have been well suited to the intermingling of warp and wept, but there's no such thing as a portable loom weaving is an art of sedentary tribes. When I'm traveling, I knit, sadly in recent times, some airlines have banned the use of knitting needles and crochet hooks on board. Now you you get to get this. She's got fantastic ability to convey character, but also see how brilliant neutron. Slated it is. Yeah, if a craft as a real rapper, she has two regular translators in so far as you can say, somebody's only being translated four times so far regular one is Tonia Lou Jones, and this particular one is Jennifer cross, and this is a prize for translators well as a writer. And yeah, just really get a sense of them being in each other's heads. There's a very, very full on communication between them and they do actually end up sharing the prize. Don't they? It's fifty. Fifty split between fifty thousand pounds, the twenty five thousand each, which is a very nice thing, particularly the translator, which is not really an industry that's known for being a high pay profession. I feel sorry. Frontier, Lou James. I have to say because she is the person who's really worked for many, many years. She translated house of day house of night for granted in nineteen in two thousand and two, which was the first coach novel to come to this country, which sort of sank without trace just in the way that novels in translation sunk without trace in those days. Another. That lot people decry prizes. But we have to bear in mind that this is quite something that you know this. This will really make olga's in this country, and it's also coming into very good time because she has drive your plow over the bones of the dead coming out in September followed next year by the books of Jacob. So she's, you know, she's already to row and I suppose that's the thing that we have seen in the last three years because this price used to be apprised that was for writers around the world for their whole careers than about threes ago became a prize just for one book and we have seen a corresponding cute increase in sales for each of the books, but not just the books but said the wider language. So when hand one in two thousand sixteen for the vegetarian in the two years, since current fiction is sales of gone up four hundred percent in this country and they, they were very small that is still a substantial increase that can be attributed to winning that prize and the press that went around that prize. And we can. Talk about all the cynicism of why the press cover prize more than anything else. But just to talk about the work that goes into this is a book there's been selected by her peers. These translators and authors are on the judging panel for this prize for them to go through the work and read one hundred books and come back and say, this is the best. This is the one that you should be reading. I don't feel any cynicism about that. That just makes me feel very excited. The thing is, I think that we as a English language readers off frightened foreignness, which is slightly are because we have very happy to read books from the Indian subcontinent and from anglophone. Parts of Africa, for example, always have done, but books that are actually in translation scare us and and it's about coach difficulty and cultural difference. And you know, you mentioned hand can career is so different. Usually, it's taken a fantastic work of of cultural interpretation for her

Jacob writer Sean Kane David Graeber oak Toco Poland clippers Africa abdominal aorta Booker Claire Kaci Tonia Lou Jones Bill Rubin foreignness Lou James olga Jennifer cross fifty thousand pounds
"guardian" Discussed on The Guardian Books Podcast

The Guardian Books Podcast

07:24 min | 2 years ago

"guardian" Discussed on The Guardian Books Podcast

"Here at the guardian. We'd love podcasts. Not only do we make dozens of award, wins are selves, but we also right about our favorite costume around the world to every week. Our call him here hair that's here at inhering. And here as it comes out, filled with recommendations from you. Our listeners, we sift through them all to find the hidden gems that the puck costing world has to offer these Picasso from small mighty productions, which you probably wouldn't find highlighted unusual pod catches. So if you're looking your next podcast or have one that you want to share with the world sign up for a week, feet hair head newsletter at the guardian dot com forward slash pot mail and send us an email podcasts at the guardian dot com. Colors Malkin to folks podcast with me Shaun king this week. It is prizes upon prizes the women's price fiction previously known as the Bailey's announced its lowest. The man Booker international prize for fiction in translation announced its thirteen books. Election, I'm with the winner of the Djelic price for writers of color and the Connie Kate Greenaway medal shortlist coming later in the week. I mean, not even at the usual man Booker or the noble price stages yet, yes, it may OB marketing and I might be a little bit jaded by the sea of book guns, but they do introduce us to knee authors like imaging, Irma's gala who is lonely, stood for the women's price for her first novel. The mermaid MRs hand prob. Attell set in Jordan London about mermaid that may or may not be real. We have an interview with her shortly. The first when Claire Richard and I chatted about the man Booker international longlist. My perhaps wasn't my usual enthusiastic self Shaw going to pick you up for being a bit jaded in your in your introduction because already. I on the other hand, opened up this Booker, longlist man Booker international long list, and it's like a bag of sweeties. I mean, there's so many fascinating things about it on becoming a real international fish nerd. I think. In six women, seven men while it could be seven women, six men, but pretty damn good. Pretty good. Interesting. Really interesting range of countries Taiwan anyone. I've never read these novel. Have you nine, not at all and Iraq as well, which Dirac. Yeah. The publishes absolutely fascinating. Only one Maine's one of the big publishers on it. They appear twice so so that two of the thirteen from the conglomerates, but it's the same publisher, all the rest of Indies and going down to the tiniest indeed shock, oh, press who based in Edinburgh, who they've produced this Argentinian novel by Ariana, how it's time my love and it's only it's one of that to launch titles, and I'm actually very keen on this because I did quite a lot last year at Edinburgh with Samanta Schwebel fever dream, which is another tiny little jewel of an Argentinean novel. I think that's something really interesting going on with Argentinian women writers. However, I have with the caveat that to swallows do not Asama mate necessarily. You said before this quite an interesting phenomenon coming on here with fragmentary books. Yeah, fragment seems to be one of the themes because obviously dyed my love is fragmentary, hangs the white book, which is her third novel to be published. Here is a fragmentary book, which is sort of fragments around the loss of her older sister at the age too, that pointing family tragedy. That happened and then my absolute heroin, all Takhar check who I go into their office all the time. He was polish her novel flights, although it is not in any way, fragmentary novel. It is about fragments. As her narrator narrator is a traveler, and in fact, she's traveler who is dictated to as she describes it, all things, broken, incomplete, and peripheral. And that just seems to sum up something insight guys about this member list and I'm really interested about when you find that guiding light. It's like being airplane driving through the dark. Being in vogue with books. I suddenly thing. Oh, yeah. I've seen that that light going through the dark, and that seems to me something that's going on at the moment. And it's a sort of site guys and it sort of captured by this list was very excited, see long. Failed. We know you love Laura. Fun of French French clever boys. Jay, Jay, Jay, really liked that there's something for the boys on the list as well. Scrape funds because H was very nervy and serious. And you know, this is the same kind of issue whether fictional reality is kind of would you can get to it best through telling stories or through facts, but it's doing it with the kind of fun face on. It's kind of party animal great and enter euro fan of happy, circus of not read this latest one, but it's it's another one again where he's investigating the truth and fiction divide. This is about 'enrich MArco, somebody. I've not heard of it all, but he was the president of the mouth house and survivors association in Spain until two thousand and five when it's revealed that he was never in that concentration camp and so is doing one of his usual kind of investigations about why someone would tell such a massive lie and what it means to be such a kind of such a massive storyteller on such awful subject as well. Antoni meals Molina book his Spanish author as well. His books about his novel is all about the session. Martin Luther King and so is looking at something that's very real, say, bring in things from his own life. So it's that kind of weird balance of what is truth and what is not. I'm sort of thinking of hand kings the white book as well, that sort of blending of biography and and fiction. Yeah. Well, if we're going to cut line than Gabriela Baras Denna guest, which is based on the murder of her grandfather by Basque separatists in the nineteen seventies Mcgann, it sort of it's sort of almost like a detective story created around family reality, something very haunting. That's what I'm excited about the debut, and it's not. Mm entry, but you could look at it. I'm not. I get very nerdy about translators because this prize which is fifty. Fifty divided by translators and writers, and you know, Frank win. He's on translator twice. Different languages. Irish. He went to live, he, he, he so books in Paris for while now lives in London, and and he is among other things it's Welbeck's translator. So he said with with happy circus also and also with the other one with fishing day. Now Sean far too young to know about visually day point, educate me. Educate me back in the day. She wrote this this an oval base more, which was the came the first French novel to be banned in twenty eight years. And then she made the movie of it. And the posters were so shocking London underground bombed, the translating more French. It was because they felt it might offend. I got it felt it might offend French tourists as indeed it might have done. So Herman Geico what base more means.

Booker Shaun king inhering Connie Kate Greenaway Malkin Jay Jordan London Martin Luther King London Edinburgh Bailey Maine Djelic Herman Geico Shaw Claire Richard heroin Gabriela Baras Denna
"guardian" Discussed on The Guardian Books Podcast

The Guardian Books Podcast

07:51 min | 2 years ago

"guardian" Discussed on The Guardian Books Podcast

"Here at the Guardian we'd love Pug costs, not only do we make dozens of award-winning ourselves, but we also writes about our favorite across from around the world to every week I call column hair here. That's here at the hairy and here after what comes out, filled with recommendations from you. Our listeners, we sit through the all to find the hidden jabs that the PUK hosting world has to offer. These poor costs are often small yet mighty productions, which he probably wouldn't find highlighted on your usual putt catches. So if you're looking for your next podcast or have one that you want to share with the world, sign up for our weekly, Hey, ahead newsletter at the Guardian dot com forward slash Pudge male and send does an email, a podcast at The Guardian dot com. Hello and welcome to the books podcast may Sean can't The great David said Aris once said a good short story with Take Me Out of myself and then stuff me back in outsized now an uneasy with the fit. Stephen King compelled them to a kiss from the stranger in the dock and Laurie more cold them a love affair. A good shot story can have all the impact sometimes more than a doorstop a novel, but pulled makes a short-story work. How can some off as a chief so much in so few pages? Chris Powell has been puzzling over this for years for us actually on the got him website where we've been running his brief survey of the short story series. This jerking, the title His piece is a never brief. Instead, the hugely detailed at enthralling essays on the short story Korea's of different Macktaz Clary suspect, George Saunders James Salter, and why their stories work. And sometimes duct. Chris is a Manuel Vestias stories which makes his first foray into the form of more daunting. We'll talk about our favorite stories with Clair and Chris later on the first reading from the first story in his debut collection mothers. Some nineteen seventy six. I've been thinking about my mother and the summer. I lied about Nissan Hoffman. Six long weeks, the weather had been sweltering. You could be outside all day and never feel a breeze. I was Tony, eleven and September, But the hot days past so slowly It felt on my birthday would never arrive. The birch tree on the lawn outside our apartment block stood still as a century. Not a branch moved. Its bought, grew dusty and his leaves hung light rags. During the day. When there was no one else around. It was like the world had stopped. In spring moment, I had moved from stock, comes of this new estate outside the city. Everything was spotless And uniform writedowns the Birch on the lawn outside each building. Lots of people wanted to live there, But moms boyfriend and his new someone of Housing company, It was And as you said, we should leave our old place because it was small and it was falling apart. He said, this was the way to live with room to move in green space around you. What Aena cuts me later was that he didn't like the old upon them because Mom had lived there with my dad. And with me, the dad died a long time before when I was too young to remember and nothing, He was fine. And then he goes sick, and then he died. Is how mom explained it. Just like that. She said, clapping a hands together as issues knocking flour from them. After we move to the new place away from my father's Ghost and destroyed calling me his little girl. When he didn't joyful long Because foul got him. Let's put Faust. People may not have regio collection of short stories, mothers yet, but they may have red you're watching about stories because you are the altar of our long-running series, A Brief History of the show story. So is it quite strange having established yourself is somewhat of an authority over the short story to then have to come Ford and guy We'll his mind His my take, I guess so rock of ways Norman I've wanted to run in of was been writing. Although I haven't been sort of public about it. So I guess I've always felt like a writer who who also does journalism rather than a journalist whose now become a writer. And I suppose it was feels strange to me Pincone authority abuse during his misuse threes is so vast is lobbying authority on literature and is kind of I know you can have those And you do have closed, But I feel like Yes of wrote a lot of short stories. But I'm still learning huge amounts. Her still so many writers that I have. Read who haven't read to a degree where I kind of know their work inside out. So yes, I've I've certainly been a students of the show. So having I am a student of the show was story, but there's still a lot more time to explore and learn about it. I think. And and he said, you've been hiding this for awhile El-Arish Azeri rat is when they talk about creating a collection. They say that a couple of the stories in there might be like five years old in built collection out of a growing body of work that stupid Mitchell down It. Is that how it? It happened thirty to an extent, opening a kind of happened in two phases lie about the oldest story in the book over its changed a lot since then was written in 2010 and I wrote a couple of stories that year that we're actually kind of something like this would a platonic ideal of of writing that I had in my head law. The writing was I was trying to get to his writing for many years. Just things I just didn't think were were any good. But once I had those stories, a few things got in the way like having children. Buying a house, This that be other. And so I kinda came back a few years after that And there was more concentrated burst of of writing. I kind of made the proper time for it, which is so much of of writing, having actually giving himself the time to do it. Once that was happening than I was studying. Think of it, obviously as a collection lab, wanting to get towards that body that could be could be put together into a book. You mentioned you had this idea of this Patanakarn Dale of what a short-story should look like login, but it should read like, What was that ideal? We're not even what a what issues story should put light because oversee the You know, they can look like like anything. I know some people say, Oh, show Serie has to have the structural. This has to happen. There has to have an opinion, the or whatever That's who nonsense really from you know bore has two carries Liz Speights. It's a joist to Alice Monroe, doing completely different things, You know. But I think now the puts only God the owes more about wind bringing play. So into old grand for it it, it was more about. What I wanted my writing to be like, So regardless of what I was writing, it was about their let funding a voice as poses the simplest way to put it in the title is not this, And every time a mother came up in the story. My little is picked out and see if there was any deeper meaning in the presence of an carried obeying that, that this narrow sense that this is themed around mothers. It's very much a lot of it is about the people hitting a dead end, whether it's in their relationship or in that job, or even a character like Eva, who is a character. He comes up three times in the story from various perspectives. He meets consistently Mates, dead ends, and she's got some mental health problems. And this very much the sense that she doesn't really know what she wants from life, that she's will say not show that how to fix that. Is that how it felt to you in terms of that, it wasn't necessarily something went when it came to name, you affliction that it was. Necessarily a book about mothers, but there are some

Chris Powell Stephen King writer Korea Aena Sean Laurie Nissan Hoffman Birch Ford Tony David Faust Eva Aris Mom Clair Macktaz Clary Liz Speights
"guardian" Discussed on The Guardian Books Podcast

The Guardian Books Podcast

06:52 min | 2 years ago

"guardian" Discussed on The Guardian Books Podcast

"Richard, What's the best thing you've read this year? Grow often about the best thing I've read this year, But the thing that I have had most thug reading Islam BDs seven function of Anglo Richard give wrong. Well, perhaps it is a little bit Cher Cher, Rich Ed. The best thing anyone will rate this year is the glorious and daunting list of support. Square space is offering to our listeners. Square space helps people create youthful websites with simple to use an award-winning templates that look good on your Kindle iPad oldest up. And they have around the clock support. If for some reason Alice does need a hand doing something earned. Our listeners can enter the off occurred Guardian books putt to get ten percent of their first purchase would offer code Guardian books. Polled Yes rigid Guardian books but nobody's crude. Yeah. Although our teeth to her call them fully than those two two news was also very good. That's notes can ask that it has passed. Here at the Guardian we'd love Pug costs, not only do we make dozens of award-winning ourselves, but we also writes about our favorite podcasts costs from around the world to every week. I call him hair here that here as in hairy and here acid what comes out filled with recommendations from you. Our listeners, we sit through them all to find the hidden jabs that the PUK costing world has to offer. These poor costs are often small yet mighty productions, which he probably wouldn't find highlighted on your usual putt catches. So if you're looking for your next podcast or have one that you want to share with the world, sign up for our weekly, Hey, ahead newsletter at the Guardia dot com forward slash pot mail and send does an email, a podcast app, The Guardian dot com. Hello and welcome to the PEX podcast with me Claro moustache It's a topic We cannot help, but returned to making the wealth a better place times such as these that seems to be a direct contradiction between the scale of potential global change and the difference one person can really make in a brave and ambitious new book ecologist and philosopher Timothy Morton confronts this head-on with a radical suggestion for how humanity can take it on. When you first hear about his ideas, Some of them may sound bizarre Yagi said everything in the universe from algae and rocks to nights and folks passed a kind of consciousness that we need to scrap the concept of nature. He talks a hyper objects, the internet or climate change. For instance, that might seem abstract offs But a very real and can be treated as objects. Anti says we're ruled by kind of primitive artificial intelligence in. Industrial capitalism. These ideas might sound strange to start with that sit down with Moton for five minutes and they start to make sense. His latest book being ecological explores All of these concepts in his unique style. And so in that spirit, we begin this interview during the sun Check after Sean caned has confessed that as someone who's never studied philosophy, She feared it would be a brain SLOC to get through this book. But she had emerged understanding and in some ways profoundly changed. Oh my gosh, you do? Yes. We saw. Good. Oh that so great are really, really pleased about good. I'm glad I said at the rim barristers like, I don't have any Filipino philosophical education or anything, but you took to the right person. Yeah, as I feel like I was only only turn to either Really You know, I'm one of these English 'Let professors who gravitated into philosophy world who say, Yeah. And it was Curry. Snyder he pointed out today was a philosopher here. I actually had his job. He retired from University of California. And for some reason I took his job And he read this book that I declared ecological thought an because a friend of hers gave it to him and his friend is a call was was a colleague of mine, and it was told to me that Gerry was like, Wow, this his philosophy as I. That's cool. I never would have caught myself it. It sounded to sort of two egotrip Heat coach yourself that and also like finally enough, The more you hear it said of view, The more I feel at you probably should fear the woods. Absurd clown. Like That's what I hear when people are now. Oh, the philosopher Timothy Moe another own how the absurd clown Masood cloudy things, the phone fear Right Espace in that way. What is what is the role of a modern philosophy? Because it does fill almost Lena. You alignment with Padsha ancient Greece, Android it rather than brighter today. But where are you? Will you know we live in in this time were automation is becoming more and more more. So the prevalent I hear about it all the time to everyone's really worried about robots and things and I and all that kind of thing. And if you think about software is kind of some kind of human beings affect emotion, thought crystallized will Kausar fight and then automated rise of therefore it's the past right? It represents like a pause state of some human being right now. The trouble is that if everything gets more more automated, it's kind of like the past with all of its Patten's and we'll ever just think about Facebook and the fact that when I. Into google I went to a room where there was eighteen men and three women, and it is kind of eating the future bright light. The post is eating the future, And we've been very good at this sort of past eating the future as efficiently as possible. But the trouble with the pastas It's good, unloaded, toxic, social, and whatever else, chemicals, and add that on so great foot to take your pick everybody except for why guys. And even then. And so like in a way philosophies, never been more important, You know, precisely because social spaces, so preoccupied with making everything nice, inefficient and kind of automating was already going on light. Think about the stock market. It's basically those algorithms The control Ed are like human fear, mostly operating at like a Nano's speed light the normal fare, but really, really foster and really, really efficient and sort of like, how's that going to work out in the long term kinda thing? And sort of like. So it away most humanistic scholarship in a way. And in particular pads, philosophy is about like the future. Not let necessarily like specific predictions about the future, But like holding open the door way for the possibility of something different deals. I maintenance it. If I I'm the absurd clown in the door kind of holding open. I Hey, look, there's a clown thing. You can go this way as well. You don't have to be in this Patten. Instead of That's like my my job, you know like this big emphasis on Staten right in his arms technology, whatever engineering math, and the thing in your pocket can probably do calculations like that

Patten Cher Cher Timothy Morton Richard Kindle Staten Greece Rich Ed Alice Yagi Sean caned Timothy Moe Moton University of California Curry Snyder
"guardian" Discussed on The Guardian UK: Politics Weekly

The Guardian UK: Politics Weekly

01:51 min | 2 years ago

"guardian" Discussed on The Guardian UK: Politics Weekly

"It is starting to get chilly here in the uk and the night said during an so why not staying listen to this podcast and create that website you've been saying you've wanted to make for years now is the time because all sponsors square space again to give you ten percent off if you use the code god in politics warm word saifur awardwinning customer service intuitive design and ten percent off when using the code guardian politics you'll have no excuse not to create the website of your dreams the guardian this year the guardian observe a charity appeal is dedicated to raising money for youth homelessness and poverty among asylum seekers these charities help provide accommodation and crucial services for those without a permanent home please help some of britain's most vulnerable people and donate by calling a one five one two eight four one one two six or visiting guardian dot charities trust dot org plus where having a telethon you can talk to some of our best journalists including guardian editor in chief catherine vajna poloto in bay gary young sally hughes and owenjones you'll need to call out to a three three five three four three six eight on the sixteen th of december to donate this is politics weekly i'm have jewish theresa may heads to brussels to seal face one of the brexit deal as the government suffered a defeat in the commons but will the hardwon meaningful vitam parliament really be all that meaningful we'll get the latest from westminster disappointed with clint but actually the eu withdrawal bill is making good progress through the house of commons and we are on course to deliver on brexit plus we have a panel packed with office so we'll pick out the best books to get the political obsesses in your life.

uk britain sally hughes brussels clint the house editor in chief catherine vajna eu ten percent
"guardian" Discussed on The Guardian Books Podcast

The Guardian Books Podcast

34:11 min | 2 years ago

"guardian" Discussed on The Guardian Books Podcast