17 Burst results for "Guantanamo Court"

"guantanamo court" Discussed on Intercepted with Jeremy Scahill

Intercepted with Jeremy Scahill

02:46 min | 1 year ago

"guantanamo court" Discussed on Intercepted with Jeremy Scahill

"A room. Or is that I? I don't remember which journalists it was started about me was somehow walked to the front gate of the agency paying them. The door said you know the torture. And they'll be don let me in. And he's given many interviews over the years. The core problem lies at the way that the current versions of the Koran and the had decent. The violence that are in that are accepted as being the true word of Allah passed down unerringly and our PC culture prevents us from challenging that in a civil case in two thousand Seventeen Mitchell and his partner and torture. Bruce Jessen were questioned in a videotaped. Deposition we were soldiers doing what we were instructed to do. This is Bruce. Jessen a former military psychologist who became a CIA contractor and his colleague. James Mitchell Any expertise in the art of interview. My God I'm a clinical psychologist interviews or what we do. They've been described as the architects of the extremely harsh interrogation program used at secret. Cia prisons after nine eleven. But that case against the two psychologists was settled Mitchell and Jessen have never faced criminal prosecution. Mitchell appeared for the first time in open court last month. He's previously admitted to personally waterboarding college Muhammad in the Guantanamo court. He sat just yards away from that. Very prisoner Margot Williams. Was there for all of it. And while there she brought her audio recorder and attended some press briefings from defense lawyers. Dr Mitchell in particular. His book talks about how he knows. Some of the requirements came from dialectic right and given the volume of requirements that came directly from the the. I you know our guests would be that he had some knowledge. Both of them had some knowledge that these were going from the FBI and there were FBI agents involved in Washington in Palm. Who were coming up with these questions for with the nine eleven investigation And that's what we want to find out is it is. How much did they know? While they were torturing these men that was attorney Alka Prod Han these briefings from the defense teams were. The only audio Margot was allowed to record to explain more about this hearing and what she sought. Camp Justice. Here is Margot Williams. I was at Guantanamo in January of this year to watch the fortieth pretrial hearing session in the trial against the nine eleven defendants who are.

Seventeen Mitchell Bruce Jessen Margot Williams CIA James Mitchell Alka Prod Guantanamo FBI Guantanamo court Muhammad partner attorney Washington Palm
"guantanamo court" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

06:32 min | 1 year ago

"guantanamo court" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Morning edition from NPR news I know well king and I'm David green the new movie the report tells the true story of a U. S. Senate staffer who doggedly investigated the CIA's torture program after the September eleventh terror attacks this is a look back at a controversial part of our country's past but the CIA's use of torture continues to have huge implications at the US military court and prison in Guantanamo bay Cuba where forty accused terrorists are still being held Sacha Pfeiffer of enters investigations team reports and just a warning here the story may be disturbing to some listeners because it does include descriptions of torture techniques when the United States captured the people it believed were responsible for nine eleven it put them in an overseas network of secret CIA prisons called black sites and for years subjected them to what it called enhanced interrogation techniques that was a euphemism for torture beatings water boardings mock burials a decade later a Senate report concluded that torturing those prisoners was not only immoral and illegal but also ineffective but the fact that they were tortured is a major reason there has still been no trial and may never be a trial for alleged nine eleven mastermind Khalid Sheikh Mohammed and other Guantanamo prisoners that's partly because evidence obtained through torture can rarely be used at trial and it's because information that is still secret like the identities of the torturers could come out at trial the CIA absolutely does not want that to happen Rick cannon is the former lead defense attorney for the man charged with orchestrating the USS Cole naval warship bombing Abd al Rahim al Nashiri who's been held at Guantanamo for thirteen years what the public has seen through the Senate torture report probably represents thirty percent of the reality you feel like they're still details that could be conscience shocking yes is a criminal defense lawyer I thought my ability to be shocked was pretty high and yet some of the things I've seen and read our genuinely breathtaking and horrify is there anything you can share that isn't classified now the physical legacy of torture is on display and Guantanamo's courtroom Mustafa al how sorry is a prisoner accused of financing the nine eleven hijackers the CIA subjected him to what it called rectal we hide rations CIA documents say his captors use the largest too they had for those procedures conducted them with quote excessive force and described them as a means of behavior control CIA records show he was later diagnosed with a condition called rectal prolapse and other related problems our house so we now sits on a pillow when he appears in court Guantanamo medical officials have tried to reduce his discomfort with surgery but a knowledge only that he has hemorrhoids defense attorney Walter Ruiz represents outhouse Ali and says he suffers permanent injuries from the black sites and for them to say that it was a simple case of hemorrhoids is absolute disgrace out has always physical condition has consumed hours of debate and Guantanamo's military courtroom it's an example of why the nine eleven case has proved so difficult to get to trial the fact of torture is at the heart of what's delaying these trials that's Terry Rockefeller whose only sibling her younger sister Laura died at age forty one in the World Trade Center attacks Rockefeller has made six trips to Guantanamo to watch it's a military court proceedings for the people who think the tortures in the past they don't realize that it's coming up over and over and over again they don't realize how alive the issue remains the torture inflicted on the CIA prisoners was at the core of almost every discussion in Guantanamo as military court during the two weeks I spent there this summer it's like two years of ongoing legal fights over what evidence is admissible over what details about prisoner treatment should be classified over whether prisoners are getting proper medical care over whether they're entitled to more lenient sentences because they were tortured if there is one feature of Guantanamo that probably can't be repeated enough because I think it is the original sin that creates all these problems is the use of torture Michelle parody is a defense attorney for al machinery the USS Cole bombing suspect all this is function why this non living case for example has taken all this time the vast majority of issues that come up are in one way or another tie defect they were tortured and secret for four years it just contaminates everything the legacy of torture from slamming prisoners into walls to locking them in coffin like boxes has also at into the massive cost of Guantanamo's court and prison six billion dollars since two thousand two despite only one finalized conviction so far that amount includes tens of billions of dollars in annual legal expenses including defense experts who specialize in torture we have experts on the impact of torture for example the way it changes your brain neurologically how it influences false confessions how it affects memory out up for don isn't one ton of the defense attorney for Ammar al Baluchi who's accused of funding the nine eleven hijackers we have experts on sleep deprivation because Mr ability was sleep deprived continuously for two and a half years the CIA claims that by torturing prisoners it extracted information from them that helped capture other terrorists stop future attacks and ultimately save lives the Senate torture report concluded that was not true and the torturing prisoners yielded no helpful new information retired airforce colonel Gerry brown is a former top attorney for Guantanamo's military court who's filed a federal whistle blower complaint alleging quote gross financial waste and gross mismanagement there brown doubts military court trials could ever happen since so much evidence is tainted by torture and he says Guantanamo has been a failure at all but one thing they've been successful at doing something that I would have thought never could have been done and that is generating more sympathy for the detainees and they've really turned the detainees and two mortars and victims earlier this year a military court judge set a trial date of January twenty twenty one for the nine eleven case he says he's determined to finally resolve it but defense attorneys for the prisoners say that date is wishful at best since nearly twenty years after the attacks the aftermath of the torture program and.

NPR David green Senate six billion dollars thirteen years thirty percent twenty years four years two weeks two years one ton
"guantanamo court" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

06:28 min | 1 year ago

"guantanamo court" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Green the new movie the report tells the true story of a U. S. Senate staffer who doggedly investigated the CIA's torture program after the September eleventh terror attacks this is a look back at a controversial part of our country's past but the CIA's use of torture continues to have huge implications at the US military court and prison in Guantanamo bay Cuba where forty accused terrorists are still being held Sacha Pfeiffer of enters investigations team reports and just a warning here the story may be disturbing to some listeners because it does include descriptions of torture techniques when the United States captured the people it believed were responsible for nine eleven it put them in an overseas network of secret CIA prisons called black sites and for years subjected them to what it called enhanced interrogation techniques that was a euphemism for torture beatings waterboarding mock burials a decade later a Senate report concluded that torturing those prisoners was not only immoral and illegal but also ineffective but the fact that they were tortured is a major reason there has still been no trial and may never be a trial for alleged nine eleven mastermind Khalid Sheikh Mohammed and other Guantanamo prisoners that's partly because evidence obtained through torture can rarely be used at trial and it's because information that is still secret like the identities of the torturers could come out at trial the CIA absolutely does not want that to happen Rick cannon is the former lead defense attorney for the man charged with orchestrating the USS Cole naval warship bombing Abd al Rahim al Nashiri who's been held at Guantanamo for thirteen years what the public has seen through the Senate torture report probably represents thirty percent of the reality you feel like they're still details that could be conscience shocking is a criminal defense lawyer I thought my ability to be shocked was pretty high and yet some of the things I've seen and read our genuinely breathtaking and horrifying is there anything you can share that isn't classified now the physical legacy of torture is on display in Guantanamo courtroom Mustafa al how sorry is a prisoner accused of financing the nine eleven hijackers the CIA subjected him to what it called rectal rehired rations CIA documents say his captors used the largest tube they had for those procedures conducted them with quote excessive force and described them as a means of behavior control CIA records show he was later diagnosed with a condition called rectal prolapse and other related problems I'll have so we now sits on a pillow when he appears in court Guantanamo medical officials have tried to reduce his discomfort with surgery but acknowledge only that he has hemorrhoids defense attorney Walter Ruiz represents our house all week and says he suffers permanent injuries from the black sites and for them to say that it was a simple case of hemorrhoids is absolute disgrace al has always physical condition has consumed hours of debate and Guantanamo's military courtroom it's an example of why the nine eleven case has proved so difficult to get to trial the fact of torture is at the heart of what's delaying these trials that's Terry Rockefeller whose only sibling her younger sister Laura died at age forty one in the World Trade Center attacks Rockefeller has made six trips to Guantanamo to watch it's a military court proceedings for the people who think the tortures in the past they don't realize that it's coming up over and over and over again they don't realize how alive the issue remains the torture inflicted on the CIA prisoners was at the core of almost every discussion in Guantanamo as military court during the two weeks I spent there this summer its lead to years of ongoing legal fights over what evidence is admissible over what details about prisoner treatment should be classified over whether prisoners are getting proper medical care over whether they're entitled to more lenient sentences because they were tortured if there is one feature of Guantanamo that probably can't be repeated enough because I think it is the original sin that creates all these problems is the use of torture Michelle parity is a defense attorney for al machinery the USS Cole bombing suspect all this is function why this non living case for example has taken all this time the vast majority of issues that come up are in one way or another tied to the fact they were tortured and secret for four years it just contaminates everything the legacy of torture from slamming prisoners into walls to locking them in coffin like boxes has also at to the massive cost of Guantanamo's court in prison six billion dollars since two thousand two despite only one finalized conviction so far that amount includes tens of billions of dollars in annual legal expenses including defense experts who specialize in torture we have experts on the impact of torture for example the way it changes your brain neurologically how it influences false confessions how it affects memory out up for don is a Guantanamo defense attorney for Ammar al Baluchi who's accused of funding the nine eleven hijackers we have experts on sleep deprivation because Mr ability was sleep deprived continuously for two and a half years the CIA claims that by torturing prisoners it extracted information from them that helped capture other terrorists stop future attacks and ultimately save lives the Senate torture report concluded that was not true and the torturing prisoners yielded no helpful new information retired airforce colonel Gerry brown is a former top attorney for Guantanamo's military court who's filed a federal whistle blower complaint alleging quote gross financial waste and gross mismanagement there round doubts military court trials could ever happen since so much evidence is tainted by torture and he says Guantanamo has been a failure at all but one thing they've been successful at doing something that I would have thought never could have been done and that is generating more sympathy for the detainees and they've really turned the detainees and two mortars and victims earlier this year a military court judge set a trial date of January twenty twenty one for the nine eleven case he says he's determined to finally resolve it but defense attorneys for the prisoners say that date is wishful at best since nearly twenty years after the attacks the aftermath of the torture.

CIA Senate six billion dollars thirteen years thirty percent twenty years four years two weeks
"guantanamo court" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

09:06 min | 1 year ago

"guantanamo court" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"On W. NYC. it's morning edition from NPR news I'm Rachel Martin and I'm Steve Inskeep good morning president trump famously said the trade wars are easy to win at the moment he is finding it easier to pause the president has repeatedly announced terrace and repeatedly put them off amid fears of further economic damage in a trade war and this week both the US and China are backing off China wave to tear us on some U. S. goods and then president trump delayed terrace against some Chinese goods with that move the president of voids imposing tariffs on October first which is the seventieth anniversary of the people's Republic of China and here's chief economics correspondent Scott Horsley is covering all this got good morning good morning Steve what happened here. the president described his decision last night as a gesture of good will and as you say it follows of a similar albeit smaller olive branch from the Chinese side earlier in the day the US and China are set to go back to the bargaining table here in Washington sometime in early October we don't have an exact date yet but sometime in the days following that October first date and it might not have been the friendliest start to those talks had the U. S. actually gone through with trump's plan to boost terrace on some two hundred fifty billion dollars worth of Chinese imports so what the president's last night is it he's postponing that terror for increased till October fifteenth so it's still sort of hanging over the talks like a sword but as you as you say we have seen this before where the president threatens terrace and then kind of blinks as the as the talks actually approach not always so sometimes you actually go through with it that's true there are terrorists in effect right now what are the terrorists that the Chinese put off. China agreed to waive terrace on something less than two billion dollars worth of American exports so not a not a really large amount these were mostly things that China needs for its own industrial production things like industrial grease some some some additive to animal food not the really marquee US exports like soybeans import which are still subject to to big trade restrictions in China got you nevertheless local. well it it Wall Street it has been eager for any sign of the de escalation in the trade war and so they took China's action yesterday small though it was as a something of a break from we saw another rally on on the market yesterday well Scott you mentioned that the president described this as a gesture of good will honoring the founding of the communist state of China which is is rather interesting and also allowing for these trade talks but are there also concerns the administration about the economic damage that this round of terrorists would do. there certainly are warning signs out there I mean in in August we saw the manufacturing sector in the U. S. shrink for the first time in three years and just a few days ago we had a warning from the economic forecasters at Deutsche Bank said unless there's a de escalation in the trade war we're looking at a likely recession in the U. S. next year now they they're not anticipating recession because they they forecast is a move just like this some backing down by both sides but it's important look at the politics here as well the political geography manufacturing is not a huge part of the US economy is only about eight percent of jobs nationwide but in the counties that Donald Trump one in twenty sixteen it's is about twelve percent and in the counties that he won in battleground states manufacturing accounts for twenty one percent of the job so that might get the president's attention also when Deutsche Bank says there's a chance of a recession next year of course the president is hyper aware of of that that election being next year there can't be much doubt about that that's right and yet forecasters really aren't looking for some sort of grand agreement here at these October bargain talks maybe a smaller deal perhaps some concessions by the Chinese some concessions by the US side an agreement to undo the worst damage of the trade war Scott thanks for your insights you're welcome that's impure Scott Horsley. we told you yesterday about an NPR investigation revealing gross mismanagement and waste at the US prison at Guantanamo bay Cuba that came after former lawyer at the military court filed a federal whistle blower complaint today we tell you about another allegation that same lawyer says he was fired for pursuing settlements to avoid the death penalty for detainees he represented pushing instead for life in prison and pure Sasha Pfeiffer has the story the whistle blower is retired airforce colonel Gerry brown and he became a legal adviser to the head of Guantanamo's court in April twenty seventeen ten months later he and his boss were abruptly terminated we were called under false pretenses to meeting the Pentagon and then handed letters with no explanation and our credentials were season we were escorted out of the building brown says he'd been shocked by Guantanamo's lack of progress just one finalized conviction and forty prisoner still there in its cost more than six billion dollars since two thousand two he also says prosecutors are unlikely to win death penalty convictions because so much evidence is tainted by torture if they do get convictions the appeals process could take another fifteen years and cost billions more so brown and his boss Harvey Risch a cough used to head Guantanamo's court had an idea to save time and money negotiate plea deals with prisoners facing the death penalty including caliche Sheik Muhammad alleged mastermind of the September eleventh terrorist attacks he talked to me from the very beginning about his belief that the commission's had ground more or less to hold and he felt strongly about taking a position to move the cases and get justice for the family members rather than go to trial the inmates would plead guilty and get a life prison sentence that could resolve the court's legal gridlock they haven't been successful they're incredibly expensive wouldn't it be better if we just said they didn't work this time but Klay deals are unacceptable to people who believe that the men behind the almost three. thousand deaths caused by the nine eleven attacks should be executed at a military court hearing NPR attended in July lead prosecutor told the judge that any torture the prisoners were subjected to is quote like a feather to in and feel of what these people are responsible for so prosecutors are insisting on the death penalty. soon after starting settlement talks brown and his boss were fired the Pentagon says they lost their jobs not because they were negotiating with prisoners but for not following proper chain of command and their quote needlessly destructive and divisive manner wish to cough would not comment for this story neither would any current Guantanamo prosecutors or the US office of special counsel were brown filed this complaint but former prosecutor Morris Davis would there's a deal to be struck that has some light at the end of the tunnel for the detainee and some finally for the government then thinking we were sitting down having to talk about Davis was one time most chief prosecutor from two thousand five to two thousand seven he says it's become a symbol of human rights violations and since the government says it can keep holding the prisoners even if they're found not guilty he considers settlements a practical alternative otherwise this is throwing more money after money has already been wasted NPR spoke with the lead lawyers for all six one time to move prisoners facing the death penalty each of them acknowledge the brown in Russia cough had approached them about a plea deal David Nevin was until recently the top attorney for collegiate Muhammad terms of what could accelerate the process if the death penalty came off the table. then with that with that change everything hello yeah we'd be done we've been done a long time ago that it is one of numerous defense lawyers who for years have been calling the military commissions legal theater and a show trial because even if they're quit and they won't be released and if they're convicted and sentenced to death the odds are that they will die in prison before they can ever be executed so that is an exercise in futility and you really have to ask yourself is this a wise use of resources what's your answer today I my answer is absolutely not it's an utter waste of time and money the Pentagon says Guantanamo's military court and prison costs three hundred and eighty million dollars a year but several one time the lawyers told NPR that tally is probably an underestimate because it doesn't include resources from other government agencies or service members salaries like the eighteen hundred guards for Guantanamo's forty prisoners what that any will bill does include our government charter flights carrying just a few passengers to and from the island hundreds of thousands of dollars of government devices intentionally destroyed each year due to spills of classified information Pentagon funded defense attorneys billing about half a million dollars a year and total legal costs of nearly sixty million dollars annually this is ridiculous Cheryl Borman is the lead attorney for one lead but not touch who is accused of helping train some of the nine eleven hijackers we could secure these men until.

president China Republic of China NPR US trump Steve Inskeep Scott Horsley Rachel Martin Washington W. NYC. two hundred fifty billion doll twenty seventeen ten months eighty million dollars sixty million dollars six billion dollars two billion dollars twenty one percent million dollars twelve percent
"guantanamo court" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

09:10 min | 1 year ago

"guantanamo court" Discussed on KCRW

"The eighties at the beaches nineties in the L. A. N. O. C. metro areas up to one hundred in the valleys. it's morning edition from NPR news I'm Rachel Martin and I'm Steve Inskeep good morning president trump famously said the trade wars are easy to win at the moment he is finding it easier to pause the president has repeatedly announced terrace and repeatedly put them off amid fears of further economic damage in a trade war and this week both the US and China are backing off China wave to tear us on some US goods and then president trump delayed terrace against some Chinese goods with that move the president avoids imposing tariffs on October first which is the seventieth anniversary of the people's Republic of China and here's chief economics correspondent Scott Horsley is covering all this got good morning good morning Steve what happened here. the president described his decision last night as a gesture of good will and as you say it follows up a similar albeit smaller Pollock branch from the Chinese side earlier in the day the US and China are set to go back to the bargaining table here in Washington sometime in early October we don't have an exact date yet but sometime in the days following that October first date and it might not have been the friendly a start to those talks had the U. S. actually gone through with trump's planned to boost terrace on some two hundred fifty billion dollars worth of Chinese imports so what the president's last night is it he's postponing that terror for increased till October fifteenth so it's still sort of hanging over the talks like a sword but as you as you say we have seen this before where the president threatens terrace and then kind of blinks as the as the talks actually approach not always though sometimes he actually go through with that that's true there are terrorists in effect right now what are the terrorists that the Chinese put off. China agreed to waive terrace on something less than two billion dollars worth of American exports so not a not a really large amount these were mostly things that China needs for its own industrial production things like industrial greedy some some some additives to animal food not the really marquee US exports like soybeans import which are still subject to to big trade restrictions in China thank you nevertheless a golden are gone well it it Wall Street it has been eager for any sign of the de escalation in the trade war and so they took China's action yesterday small though it was as a something of a break from we saw another rally on on the market yesterday well Scott you mention that the president described this as a gesture of good will honoring the founding of the communist state of China which is is rather interesting and also allowing for these trade talks but are there also concerns the administration about the economic damage that this round of terrace would do. there certainly are warning signs out there I mean in in August we saw the manufacturing sector in the U. S. shrink for the first time in three years and just a few days ago we had a warning from the economic forecasters at Deutsche Bank who said unless there's a de escalation in the trade war we're looking at a likely recession in the U. S. next year now they they're not anticipating recession because they they forecast is a move just like this some backing down by both sides but it's important look at the politics here as well the political geography manufacturing is not a huge part of the US economy is only about eight percent of jobs nationwide but in the counties that Donald Trump one he and twenty sixteen it's is about twelve percent and in the counties that he won in battleground states manufacturing accounts for twenty one percent of the job so that might get the president's attention also when Deutsche Bank says there's a chance of a recession next year of course the president is hyper aware of of that that election being next year there can't be much doubt about that that's right and yet forecasters really aren't looking for some sort of grand agreement here at these October bargain talks maybe a smaller deal perhaps some concessions by the Chinese some concessions by the US side an agreement to undo the worst damage of the trade war Scott thanks for your insights you're welcome that's impure Scott Horsley. we told you yesterday about an NPR investigation revealing gross mismanagement and waste at the US prison at Guantanamo bay Cuba that came after former lawyer at the military court filed a federal whistle blower complaint today we tell you about another allegation that same lawyer says he was fired for pursuing settlements to avoid the death penalty for detainees he represented pushing instead for life in prison and pure Sasha Pfeiffer has the story the whistle blower is retired airforce colonel Gerry brown and he became legal adviser to the head of Guantanamo's court in April twenty seventeen ten months later he in his boss were abruptly terminated we were called under false pretenses to meeting in the Pentagon and then handed letters with no explanation and our credentials were season we were escorted out of the building brown says he'd been shocked by Guantanamo's lack of progress just one finalized conviction and forty prisoners still there in its cost more than six billion dollars since two thousand two he also says prosecutors are unlikely to win death penalty convictions because so much evidence is tainted by torture if they do get convictions the appeals process could take another fifteen years and cost billions more so brown and his boss Harvey Risch a cough used to head Guantanamo's court had an idea to save time and money negotiate plea deals with prisoners facing the death penalty including caliche Sheik Mohammed alleged mastermind of the September eleventh terrorist attacks he talked to me from the very beginning about his belief that the commission's had ground more or less to hold and he felt strongly about taking a position to move the cases and get justice for the family members rather than go to trial the inmates would plead guilty and get a life prison sentence that could resolve the court's legal gridlock they haven't been successful they're incredibly expensive wouldn't it be better if we just said they didn't work this time but Klay deals are unacceptable to people who believe that the men behind the almost three. eight thousand deaths caused by the nine eleven attacks should be executed at a military court hearing NPR attended in July lead prosecutor told the judge that any torture the prisoners were subjected to is quote like a feather to in and feel of what these people are responsible for so prosecutors are insisting on the death penalty. soon after starting settlement talks brown and his boss were fired the Pentagon says they lost their jobs not because they were negotiating with prisoners but for not following proper chain of command and their quote needlessly destructive and divisive manner wish to cough would not comment for this story neither would any current Guantanamo prosecutors or the US office of special counsel were brown filed this complaint but former prosecutor Morris Davis would there's a deal to be struck that has some light at the end of the tunnel for the detainee and some finally for the government then thinking we were sitting down having to talk about Davis was one time most chief prosecutor from two thousand five to two thousand seven he says it's become a symbol of human rights violations and since the government says it can keep holding the prisoners even if they're found not guilty he considers settlements a practical alternative otherwise it's just throwing more money after money has already been wasted NPR spoke with the lead lawyers for all six one time to move prisoners facing the death penalty each of them acknowledge the brown in Russia cough had approached them about a plea deal David Nevin was until recently the top attorney for collegiate Muhammad terms of what could accelerate the process if the death penalty came off the table. then with that with that change everything hello yeah we'd be done we've been done a long time ago never miss one of numerous defense lawyers who for years have been calling the military commissions legal theater and a show trial because even if they're quit and they won't be released and if they're convicted and sentenced to death the odds are that they will die in prison before they can ever be executed so that is an exercise in futility and you really have to ask yourself is this a wise use of resources what's your answer to add my answer is absolutely not it's an utter waste of time and money the Pentagon says Guantanamo's military court and prison costs three hundred and eighty million dollars a year but several one tunnel lawyers told NPR that tally is probably an underestimate because it doesn't include resources from other government agencies or service members salaries like the eighteen hundred guards for Guantanamo's forty prisoners what that any will bill does include our government charter flights caring just a few passengers to and from the island hundreds of thousands of dollars of government devices intentionally destroyed each year due to spills of classified information Pentagon funded defense attorneys billing about half a million dollars a year and total legal costs of nearly sixty million dollars annually this is ridiculous Cheryl Borman is the lead attorney for one lead but not touch who is accused of helping train some of the nine eleven hijackers we could secure these men until.

president China US Republic of China NPR Steve Inskeep trump Scott Horsley Washington Rachel Martin L. A. N. O. Pollock two hundred fifty billion doll twenty seventeen ten months eighty million dollars sixty million dollars six billion dollars two billion dollars twenty one percent million dollars
"guantanamo court" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

09:01 min | 1 year ago

"guantanamo court" Discussed on KQED Radio

"It's morning edition from NPR news I'm Rachel Martin and I'm Steve Inskeep good morning president trump famously said that trade wars are easy to win at the moment he is finding it easier to pause the president has repeatedly announced terrorist and repeatedly put them off amid fears of further economic damage in a trade war and this week both the US and China are backing off China wave to terrorists on some US goods and then president trump delayed terrace against some Chinese goods with that move the president avoids imposing tariffs on October first which is the seventieth anniversary of the people's Republic of China NPR's chief economics correspondent Scott Horsley is covering all this got good morning good morning Steve what happened here. the president described his decision last night as a gesture of good will and as you say it follows up a similar albeit smaller olive branch from the Chinese side earlier in the day the US and China are set to go back to the bargaining table here in Washington sometime in early October we don't have an exact date yet but sometime in the days following that October first date and it might not have been the friendliest start to those talks had the U. S. actually gone through with transplant to boost terrace on some two hundred fifty billion dollars worth of Chinese imports so what the president's last night is it he's postponing that terror for increased till October fifteenth so it's still sort of hanging over the talks like a sword but as you as you say we have seen this before where the president threatens terrace and then kind of blinks as the as the talks actually approach not always so sometimes he actually go through with the test through their terrace in effect right now what are the terrorists that the Chinese put off. China agreed to waive terrace on something less than two billion dollars worth of American exports so not a not a really large amount these were mostly things that China needs for its own industrial production things like industrial greedy some some some additive to animal food not the really marquee US exports like soybeans in port which are still subject to to big trade restrictions in China thank you nevertheless gold are gone well it it Wall Street it has been eager for any sign of the de escalation in the trade war and so they took China's action yesterday small though it was as a something of a breakthrough we saw another rally on on the market yesterday well Scott you mention that the president described this as a gesture of good will honoring the founding of the communist state of China which is is rather interesting and also allowing for these trade talks but are there also concerns the administration about the economic damage that this round of terrorists would do. there certainly are warning signs out there I mean in in August we saw the manufacturing sector in the U. S. shrink for the first time in three years and just a few days ago we had a warning from the economic forecasters at Deutsche Bank who said unless there's a de escalation and the trade war we're looking at a likely recession in the U. S. next year now they they're not anticipating recession because they they forecast is a move just like this some backing down by both sides but it's important look at the politics here as well the political geography manufacturing is not a huge part of the US economy is only about eight percent of jobs nationwide but in the counties that Donald Trump one in twenty sixteen it's it's about twelve percent and in the counties that he won in battleground states manufacturing accounts for twenty one percent of the job so that might get the president's attention also when Deutsche Bank says there's a chance of a recession next year of course the president is hyper aware of of that that election being next year there can't be much doubt about that that's right and yet forecasters really aren't looking for some sort of grand agreement here at these October bargain talks maybe a smaller deal perhaps some concessions by the Chinese some concessions by the U. S. site an agreement to undo the worst damage of a trade war Scott thanks for your insights you're welcome that's impure Scott Horsley. we told you yesterday about an NPR investigation revealing gross mismanagement and waste at the US prison at Guantanamo bay Cuba that came after former lawyer at the military court filed a federal whistle blower complaint today we tell you about another allegation that same lawyer says he was fired for pursuing settlements to avoid the death penalty for detainees he represented pushing instead for life in prison and pure Sasha Pfeiffer has the story the whistle blower is retired airforce colonel Gerry brown and he became legal adviser to the head of Guantanamo's court in April twenty seventeen ten months later he and his boss were abruptly terminated we were called under false pretenses to meeting the Pentagon and then handed letters with no explanation and our credentials were season we were escorted out of the building brown says he'd been shocked by Guantanamo's lack of progress just one finalized conviction and forty prisoner still there in its cost more than six billion dollars since two thousand two he also says prosecutors are unlikely to win death penalty convictions because so much evidence is tainted by torture if they do get convictions the appeals process could take another fifteen years and cost billions more so brown and his boss Harvey Risch a cough he used to head Guantanamo's court had an idea to save time and money negotiate plea deals with prisoners facing the death penalty including caliche Sheik Mohammed alleged mastermind of the September eleventh terrorist attacks he talked to me from the very beginning about his belief that the commission's had ground more or less to hold and he felt strongly about taking a position to move the cases and get justice for the family members rather than go to trial the inmates would plead guilty and get a life prison sentence that could resolve the court's legal gridlock they haven't been successful they're incredibly expensive wouldn't it be better if we just said they didn't work this time but Klay deals are unacceptable to people who believe that the men behind the almost three. thousand deaths caused by the nine eleven attacks should be executed at a military court hearing NPR attended in July lead prosecutor told the judge that any torture the prisoners were subjected to is quote like a feather to in and feel of what these people are responsible for the prosecutors are insisting on the death penalty. soon after starting settlement talks brown and his boss were fired the Pentagon says they lost their jobs not because they were negotiating with prisoners but for not following proper chain of command and their quote needlessly destructive and divisive manner wish to cough would not comment for this story neither would any current Guantanamo prosecutors or the US office of special counsel were brown filed this complaint but former prosecutor Morris status would there's a deal to be struck that has some light at the end of the tunnel for the detainee and some finally for the government then thinking we were sitting down having to talk about Davis was one time most chief prosecutor from two thousand five to two thousand seven he says it's become a symbol of human rights violations and since the government says it can keep holding the prisoners even if they're found not guilty he considers settlements a practical alternative otherwise it's just throwing more money after money has already been wasted NPR spoke with the lead lawyers for all six one time to move prisoners facing the death penalty each of them acknowledge the brown in Russia cough had approached them about a plea deal David Nevin was until recently the top attorney for collegiate Muhammad terms of what could accelerate the process if the death penalty came off the table. then with that with that change everything hello yeah we'd be done we've been done a long time ago never just one of numerous defense lawyers who for years have been calling the military commissions legal theater and a show trial because even if they're quitted they won't be released and if they're convicted and sentenced to death the odds are that they will die in prison before they can ever be executed so there is an exercise in futility and you really have to ask yourself is this a wise use of resources what's your answer today I my answer is absolutely not it's an utter waste of time and money the Pentagon says Guantanamo's military court in prison costs three hundred and eighty million dollars a year but several one time the lawyers told NPR that tally is probably an underestimate because it doesn't include resources from other government agencies or service members salaries like the eighteen hundred guards for Guantanamo's forty prisoners what that any will bill does include our government charter flights caring just a few passengers to and from the island hundreds of thousands of dollars of government devices intentionally destroyed each year due to spills of classified information Pentagon funded defense attorneys billing about half a million dollars a year and total legal costs of nearly sixty million dollars annually this is ridiculous Cheryl Borman is the lead attorney for one lead but not touch who is accused of helping train some of the nine eleven hijackers we could secure.

president China US NPR China NPR Steve Inskeep Scott Horsley Washington trump Rachel Martin two hundred fifty billion doll twenty seventeen ten months eighty million dollars sixty million dollars six billion dollars two billion dollars twenty one percent million dollars twelve percent eight percent
"guantanamo court" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

04:55 min | 1 year ago

"guantanamo court" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"An NPR investigation revealing gross mismanagement and waste at the US prison at Guantanamo bay Cuba that came after former lawyer at the military court filed a federal whistle blower complaint today we tell you about another allegation that same lawyer says he was fired for pursuing settlements to avoid the death penalty for detainees he represented pushing instead for life in prison and pure Sasha Pfeiffer has the story the whistle blower is retired airforce colonel Gerry brown and he became legal adviser to the head of Guantanamo's court in April twenty seventeen ten months later he in his boss were abruptly terminated we were called under false pretenses to meeting the Pentagon and then handed letters with no explanation and our credentials were season we were escorted out of the building brown says he'd been shocked by Guantanamo's lack of progress just one finalized conviction and forty prisoners still there in its cost more than six billion dollars since two thousand two he also says prosecutors are unlikely to win death penalty convictions because so much evidence is tainted by torture if they do get convictions the appeals process could take another fifteen years and cost billions more so brown and his boss Harvey Risch a cough he used to head Guantanamo's court had an idea to save time and money negotiate plea deals with prisoners facing the death penalty including caliche Sheik Muhammad alleged mastermind of the September eleventh terrorist attacks he talked to me from the very beginning about his belief that the commission's had ground more or less to hold and he felt strongly about taking a position to move the cases and get justice for the family members rather than go to trial the inmates would plead guilty and get a life prison sentence that could resolve the court's legal gridlock they haven't been successful they're incredibly expensive wouldn't it be better if we just said they didn't work this time but Klay deals are unacceptable to people who believe that the men behind the almost three. thousand deaths caused by the nine eleven attacks should be executed at a military court hearing NPR attended in July lead prosecutor told the judge that any torture the prisoners were subjected to is quote like a further two in and feel of what these people are responsible for so prosecutors are insisting on the death penalty. soon after starting settlement talks brown in his boss were fired the Pentagon says they lost their jobs not because they were negotiating with prisoners but for not following proper chain of command and their quote needlessly destructive and divisive manner wish to cough would not comment for this story neither would any current Guantanamo prosecutors or the US office of special counsel were brown filed this complaint but former prosecutor more status would there's a deal to be struck that has some light at the end of the tunnel for the detainee and some finally for the government then thinking we were sitting down having to talk about Davis was one time most chief prosecutor from two thousand five to two thousand seven he says it's become a symbol of human rights violations and since the government says it can keep holding the prisoners even if they're found not guilty he considers settlements a practical alternative otherwise it's just throwing more money after money has already been wasted NPR spoke with the lead lawyers for all six one time to move prisoners facing the death penalty each of them acknowledge the brown in Russia cough had approached them about a plea deal David Nevin was until recently the top attorney for collegiate Muhammad terms of what could accelerate the process if the death penalty came off the table. then with that with that change everything hello yeah we'd be done we've been done a long time ago that it is one of numerous defense lawyers who for years have been calling the military commissions legal theater and a show trial because even if they're quit and they will be released and if they're convicted and sentenced to death the odds are that they will die in prison before they can ever be executed so there is an exercise in futility and you really have to ask yourself is this a wise use of resources what's your answer to add my answer is absolutely not it's an utter waste of time and money the Pentagon says Guantanamo's military court in prison costs three hundred and eighty million dollars a year but several one time the lawyers told NPR that tally is probably an underestimate because it doesn't include resources from other government agencies or service members salaries like the eighteen hundred guards for Guantanamo's forty prisoners what that any will bill does include our government charter flights carrying just a few passengers to and from the island hundreds of thousands of dollars of government devices intentionally destroyed each year due to spills of classified information Pentagon funded defense attorneys billing about half a million dollars a year and total legal costs of nearly sixty million dollars annually this is ridiculous Cheryl Borman is the lead attorney for one lead but not touch who is accused of helping train some of the nine eleven hijackers we could secure these men until they.

NPR US Cuba twenty seventeen ten months eighty million dollars sixty million dollars six billion dollars million dollars fifteen years
"guantanamo court" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

09:02 min | 1 year ago

"guantanamo court" Discussed on KCRW

"Oh seven it's morning edition from NPR news I'm Rachel Martin and I'm Steve Inskeep good morning president trump famously said the trade wars are easy to win at the moment he is finding it easier to pause the president has repeatedly announced terrace and repeatedly put them off amid fears of further economic damage in a trade war and this week both the US and China are backing off China wave to tear us on some US goods and then president trump delayed terrace against some Chinese goods with that move the president avoids imposing tariffs on October first which is the seventieth anniversary of the people's Republic of China NPR's chief economics correspondent Scott Horsley is covering all this got good morning good morning Steve what happened here. the president described his decision last night as a gesture of good will and as you say it follows up a similar albeit smaller olive branch from the Chinese side earlier in the day the US and China are set to go back to the bargaining table here in Washington sometime in early October we don't have an exact date yet but sometime in the days following that October first date and it might not have been the friendly a start to those talks had the U. S. actually gone through with trump's planned to boost terrace on some two hundred fifty billion dollars worth of Chinese imports so what the president's last night is it he's postponing that terror for increased till October fifteenth so it's still sort of hanging over the talks like a sword but as you as you say we have seen this before where the president threatens terrace and then kind of blinks as the as the talks actually approach not always though sometimes he actually go through with the test through their terrace in effect right now what are the terrorists that the Chinese put off. China agreed to waive terrace on something less than two billion dollars worth of American exports so not a not a really large amount these were mostly things that China needs for its own industrial production things like industrial grease some some some additive to animal food not the really marquee US exports like soybeans in port which are still subject to to big trade restrictions in China Scott you nevertheless a golden are gone well it it Wall Street it has been eager for any sign of the de escalation in the trade war and so they took China's action yesterday small though it was as a something of a break from we saw another rally on on the market yesterday well Scott you mention that the president described this as a gesture of good will honoring the founding of the communist state of China which is is rather interesting and also allowing for these trade talks but are there also concerns the administration about the economic damage that this round of terrorists would do. there certainly are warning signs out there I mean in in August we saw the manufacturing sector in the U. S. shrink for the first time in three years and just a few days ago we had a warning from the economic forecasters at Deutsche Bank who said unless there's a de escalation and the trade war we're looking at a likely recession in the U. S. next year now they they're not anticipating recession because they they forecast is a move just like this some backing down by both sides but it's important look at the politics here as well the political geography manufacturing is not a huge part of the US economy is only about eight percent of jobs nationwide but in the counties that Donald Trump one he and twenty sixteen it's it's about twelve percent and in the counties that he won in battleground states manufacturing accounts for twenty one percent of the job so that might get the president's attention also when Deutsche Bank says there's a chance of a recession next year of course the president is hyper aware of of that that election being next year there can't be much doubt about that that's right and yet forecasters really aren't looking for some sort of grand agreement here at these October barring talks maybe a smaller deal perhaps some concessions by the Chinese some concessions by the U. S. site an agreement to undo the worst damage of the trade war Scott thanks for your insights you're welcome that's impure Scott Horsley. we told you yesterday about an NPR investigation revealing gross mismanagement and waste at the US prison at Guantanamo bay Cuba that came after former lawyer at the military court filed a federal whistle blower complaint today we tell you about another allegation that same lawyer says he was fired for pursuing settlements to avoid the death penalty for detainees he represented pushing instead for life in prison and pure Sasha Pfeiffer has the story the whistle blower is retired airforce colonel Gerry brown and he became legal adviser to the head of Guantanamo's court in April twenty seventeen ten months later he in his boss were abruptly terminated we were called under false pretenses to meeting the Pentagon and then handed letters with no explanation and our credentials were season we were escorted out of the building brown says he'd been shocked by Guantanamo's lack of progress just one finalized conviction and forty prisoners still there in its cost more than six billion dollars since two thousand two he also says prosecutors are unlikely to win death penalty convictions because so much evidence is tainted by torture if they do get convictions the appeals process could take another fifteen years and cost billions more so brown and his boss Harvey Risch a cough used to head Guantanamo's court had an idea to save time and money negotiate plea deals with prisoners facing the death penalty including caliche Sheik Mohammed alleged mastermind of the September eleventh terrorist attacks he talked to me from the very beginning about his belief that the commission's had ground more or less to hold and he felt strongly about taking a position to move the cases and get justice for the family members rather than go to trial the inmates would plead guilty and get a life prison sentence that could resolve the court's legal gridlock they haven't been successful they're incredibly expensive wouldn't it be better if we just said they didn't work this time but Klay deals are unacceptable to people who believe that the men behind the almost three. thousand deaths caused by the nine eleven attacks should be executed at a military court hearing NPR attended in July lead prosecutor told the judge that any torture the prisoners were subjected to is quote like a feather to in and feel of what these people are responsible for so prosecutors are insisting on the death penalty. soon after starting settlement talks brown and his boss were fired the Pentagon says they lost their jobs not because they were negotiating with prisoners but for not following proper chain of command and their quote needlessly destructive and divisive manner wish to cough would not comment for this story neither would any current Guantanamo prosecutors or the US office of special counsel were brown filed this complaint but former prosecutor Morris Davis would there's a deal to be struck that has some light at the end of the tunnel for the detainee and some finally for the government then thinking we were sitting down having to talk about Davis was one time most chief prosecutor from two thousand five to two thousand seven he says it's become a symbol of human rights violations and since the government says it can keep holding the prisoners even if they're found not guilty he considers settlements a practical alternative otherwise it's just throwing more money after money has already been wasted NPR spoke with the lead lawyers for all six one time to move prisoners facing the death penalty each of them acknowledge the brown in Russia cough had approached them about a plea deal David Nevin was until recently the top attorney for collegiate Muhammad terms of what could accelerate the process if the death penalty came off the table. then with that with that change everything hello yeah we'd be done we've been done a long time ago now that is one of numerous defense lawyers who for years have been calling the military commissions legal theater and a show trial because even if there are quite a day will be released and if they're convicted and sentenced to death the odds are that they will die in prison before they can ever be executed so there is an exercise in futility and you really have to ask yourself is this a wise use of resources what's your answer today I my answer is absolutely not it's an utter waste of time and money the Pentagon says Guantanamo's military court and prison costs three hundred and eighty million dollars a year but several one tunnel lawyers told NPR that tally is probably an underestimate because it doesn't include resources from other government agencies or service members salaries like the eighteen hundred guards for Guantanamo's forty prisoners what that any will bill does include our government charter flights carrying just a few passengers to and from the island hundreds of thousands of dollars of government devices intentionally destroyed each year due to spills of classified information Pentagon funded defense attorneys billing about half a million dollars a year and total legal costs of nearly sixty million dollars annually this is ridiculous Cheryl Borman is the lead attorney for one lead but not touch who is accused of helping train some of the nine eleven hijackers we could secure these men.

president China US NPR China NPR Steve Inskeep trump Scott Horsley Washington Rachel Martin two hundred fifty billion doll twenty seventeen ten months eighty million dollars sixty million dollars six billion dollars two billion dollars twenty one percent million dollars twelve percent eight percent
"guantanamo court" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

08:58 min | 1 year ago

"guantanamo court" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Rachel Martin and I'm Steve Inskeep good morning president trump famously said that trade wars are easy to win at the moment he is finding it easier to pause the president has repeatedly announced terrace and repeatedly put them off amid fears of further economic damage in a trade war and this week both the US and China are backing off China wave to tear us on some US goods and then president trump delayed terrace against some Chinese goods with that move the president avoids imposing tariffs on October first which is the seventieth anniversary of the people's Republic of China and here's chief economics correspondent Scott Horsley is covering all this got good morning good morning Steve what happened here. the president described his decision last night as a gesture of good will and as you say it follows a similar albeit smaller Pollock branch from the Chinese side earlier in the day the US and China are set to go back to the bargaining table here in Washington sometime in early October we don't have an exact date yet but sometime in the days following that October first date and it might not have been the friendliest start to those talks had the U. S. actually gone through with trump's planned to boost terrace on some two hundred fifty billion dollars worth of Chinese imports so what the president's last night is it he's postponing that terror for increased till October fifteenth so it's still sort of hanging over the talks like a sword but as you as you say we have seen this before where the president threatens terrace and then kind of blinks as the as the talks actually approach not always though sometimes he actually go through with the test through their terrace in effect right now what are the terrorists that the Chinese put off. China agreed to waive terrace on something less than two billion dollars worth of American exports so not a not a really large amount these were mostly things that China needs for its own industrial production things like industrial grease some some some additives to animal food not the really marquee US exports like soybeans in port which is still subject to to big trade restrictions in China thank you nevertheless codes are gone well it it Wall Street it has been eager for any sign of the de escalation in the trade war and so they took China's action yesterday small though it was as a something of a break from we saw another rally on on the market yesterday well Scott you mention that the president described as a gesture of good will honoring the founding of the communist state of China which is is rather interesting and also allowing for these trade talks but are there also concerns the administration about the economic damage that this round of terrace would do. there certainly are warning signs out there I mean in in August we saw the manufacturing sector in the U. S. shrink for the first time in three years and just a few days ago we had a warning from the economic forecasters at Deutsche Bank who said unless there's a de escalation and the trade war we're looking at a likely recession in the U. S. next year now they they're not anticipating recession because they they forecast is a move just like this some backing down by both sides but it's important look at the politics here as well the political geography manufacturing is not a huge part of the US economy is only about eight percent of jobs nationwide but in the counties that Donald Trump one he and twenty sixteen it's it's about twelve percent and in the counties that he won in battleground states manufacturing counts for twenty one percent of the job so that might get the president's attention also when Deutsche Bank says there's a chance of a recession next year of course the president is hyper aware of of that that election being next year there can't be much doubt about that that's right and yet forecasters really aren't looking for some sort of grand agreement here at these October barring talks maybe a smaller deal perhaps some concessions by the Chinese some concessions by the U. S. side an agreement to undo the worst damage of the trade war Scott thanks for your insights you're welcome that's impure Scott Horsley. we told you yesterday about an NPR investigation revealing gross mismanagement and waste at the US prison at Guantanamo bay Cuba that came after former lawyer at the military court filed a federal whistle blower complaint today we tell you about another allegation that same lawyer says he was fired for pursuing settlements to avoid the death penalty for detainees he represented pushing instead for life in prison and pure Sasha Pfeiffer has the story the whistle blower is retired airforce colonel Gerry brown and he became legal adviser to the head of Guantanamo's court in April twenty seventeen ten months later he in his boss were abruptly terminated we were called under false pretenses to meeting the Pentagon and then handed letters with no explanation and our credentials were season we were escorted out of the building brown says he'd been shocked by Guantanamo's lack of progress just one finalized conviction and forty prisoner still there in its cost more than six billion dollars since two thousand two he also says prosecutors are unlikely to win death penalty convictions because so much evidence is tainted by torture if they do get convictions the appeals process could take another fifteen years and cost billions more so brown and his boss Harvey Risch a cough he used to head Guantanamo's court had an idea to save time and money negotiate plea deals with prisoners facing the death penalty including caliche Sheik Muhammad alleged mastermind of the September eleventh terrorist attacks he talked to me from the very beginning about his belief that the commission's had ground more or less to hold and he felt strongly about taking a position to move the cases and get justice for the family members rather than go to trial the inmates would plead guilty and get a life prison sentence that could resolve the court's legal gridlock they haven't been successful they're incredibly expensive wouldn't it be better if we just said they didn't work this time but Klay deals are unacceptable to people who believe that the men behind the almost three. thousand deaths caused by the nine eleven attacks should be executed at a military court hearing NPR attended in July lead prosecutor told the judge that any torture the prisoners were subjected to is quote like a feather to in and feel of what these people are responsible for so prosecutors are insisting on the death penalty. soon after starting settlement talks brown and his boss were fired the Pentagon says they lost their jobs not because they were negotiating with prisoners but for not following proper chain of command and their quote needlessly destructive and divisive manner wish to cough would not comment for this story neither would any current Guantanamo prosecutors or the US office of special counsel were brown filed this complaint but former prosecutor more status would there's a deal to be struck that has some light at the end of the tunnel for the detainee and some finally for the government then thinking we were sitting down having to talk about Davis was one time most chief prosecutor from two thousand five to two thousand seven he says it's become a symbol of human rights violations and since the government says it can keep holding the prisoners even if they're found not guilty he considers settlements a practical alternative otherwise it's just throwing more money after money has already been wasted NPR spoke with the lead lawyers for all six one time to move prisoners facing the death penalty each of them acknowledge the brown in Russia cough had approached them about a plea deal David Nevin was until recently the top attorney for collegiate Muhammad terms of what could accelerate the process if the death penalty came off the table. then with that with that change everything hello yeah we'd be done we've been done a long time ago that is one of numerous defense lawyers who for years have been calling the military commissions legal theater and a show trial because even if they're quit and they won't be released and if they're convicted and sentenced to death the odds are that they will die in prison before they can ever be executed so there is an exercise in futility and you really have to ask yourself is this a wise use of resources what's your answer today I my answer is absolutely not it's an utter waste of time and money the Pentagon says Guantanamo's military court and prison costs three hundred and eighty million dollars a year but several one time the lawyers told NPR that tally is probably an underestimate because it doesn't include resources from other government agencies or service members salaries like the eighteen hundred guards for Guantanamo's forty prisoners what that annual bill does include our government charter flights caring just a few passengers to and from the island hundreds of thousands of dollars of government devices intentionally destroyed each year due to spills of classified information Pentagon funded defense attorneys billing about half a million dollars a year and total legal costs nearly sixty million dollars annually this is ridiculous Cheryl Borman is the lead attorney for one lead but not cash who is accused of helping train some of the nine eleven hijackers we.

president China US Republic of China Steve Inskeep trump Rachel Martin Scott Horsley Washington Pollock two hundred fifty billion doll twenty seventeen ten months eighty million dollars sixty million dollars six billion dollars two billion dollars twenty one percent million dollars twelve percent eight percent
"guantanamo court" Discussed on 850 WFTL

850 WFTL

02:02 min | 2 years ago

"guantanamo court" Discussed on 850 WFTL

"Fort Pierce. From ABC news. I'm Richard Cantu. House Judiciary committee members looking forward to seeing the underlying evidence in the Miller report this after the Justice department relented, still the full house will vote on getting some legal cloud behind the committee subpoenas. They're going to vote in the house to essentially fast track their legal fights allowing themselves to go to court to enforce these subpoenas specifically against the attorney general, Bill bar, and Don, Mcgann the former White House counsel ABC's, Ben Siegel in Washington after months of trading jabs from afar. President Trump and Joe Biden will overlap today in Iowa, a state critical to both their political futures. President participates in a tour and delivers remarks at southwest Iowa renewable energy in council bluffs. The White House says the president will highlight the implementation of the new e fifteen rule which allows more ethanol to be using gasoline year round. Not just eight months. The president's also expected to push for congress to move forward on the US, Mexico, Canada trade agreement. ABC's Karen Travers Biden wants a convincing win. Iowa's caucuses to cement, his front runner status. The supreme court decided against hearing the appeal of the longest held detainees at Guantanamo court rejected a request from Yemeni national that's been held at Guantanamo Bay prison for seventeen years. Mohammed Ali Allawi was captured in Pakistan says he's been held longer than any other detainee and US custody, the justices decided to let stand, a lower court decision that says he could be held so long as the US is fighting the Taliban, and I'll Qaeda ABC's Devon, Dwyer, Iran says it will release Lebanese native, and permanent US resident czars Sokha, sentenced to ten years in prison in two thousand fifteen for unspecified espionage, infractions retired baseballer David Ortiz, is in Boston to continue treatment, after being shot Sunday in the Dominican Republic of spokesman says Dominican surgeons removed Ortiz's gall bladder and part of his intestine liver suffered damage as well. You're listening to ABC news..

President ABC Iowa US White House House Judiciary committee Mohammed Ali Allawi supreme court David Ortiz President Trump Guantanamo court Karen Travers Biden Fort Pierce Richard Cantu Joe Biden Taliban Justice department Guantanamo Bay
"guantanamo court" Discussed on News 96.5 WDBO

News 96.5 WDBO

02:02 min | 2 years ago

"guantanamo court" Discussed on News 96.5 WDBO

"Starts now. From ABC news. I'm Richard Cantu. House Judiciary committee members looking forward to seeing the underlying evidence in the Muller report, this after the Justice department relented, still the full house will vote on getting some legal cloud behind the committee subpoenas. They're going to vote in the house who essentially fast track their legal fights allowing themselves to go to court to enforce these subpoenas specifically against the attorney general, Bill bar, and Don, Mcgann, the former White House counsel ABC's, Ben Siegel in Washington after months of trading jabs from afar. President Trump and Joe Biden will overlap today in Iowa, a state critical to both their political futures participates in a tour and delivers remarks at southwest Iowa renewable energy in council bluffs. The White House says the president will highlight the implementation of the new e fifteen rule which allows more ethanol to be using gasoline year round. Not just eight months. The president's also expected to push for congress to move forward on the US, Mexico, Canada trade agreement. ABC's. Karen Travers, Biden wants a convincing win in Iowa's caucuses to cement, his front runner status. The supreme court decided against hearing the appeal of the longest held detainees at Guantanamo court rejected a request from Yemeni national that's been held at Guantanamo Bay prison for seventeen years. Mohammed Ali Allawi was captured in Pakistan says he's been held longer than any other detainee and US custody, the justices decided to let stand, a lower court decision that says he can be held so long as the US is fighting the Taliban, and I'll kite, ABC's. Devon Dwyer, Iran says it will release Lebanese native in permanent US resident czar Sokha, sentenced to ten years in prison in two thousand fifteen for unspecified espionage, infractions retired baseball, or David Ortiz is in Boston to continue treatment, after being shot Sunday in the Dominican Republic, a spokesman says Dominican surgeons removed Ortiz's gall, bladder and part of his intestine his liver suffered damage as well. You're listening to ABC news. John Gibson, here, the co-chairman, J,.

ABC US White House Iowa House Judiciary committee Joe Biden president David Ortiz Mohammed Ali Allawi supreme court Guantanamo court Richard Cantu President Trump Dominican Republic Devon Dwyer Justice department czar Sokha co-chairman
"guantanamo court" Discussed on KOMO

KOMO

01:53 min | 2 years ago

"guantanamo court" Discussed on KOMO

"House Judiciary committee members looking forward to seeing the underlying evidence in the report this after the Justice department relented, still the full house will vote on getting some legal cloud behind the committee's subpoenas, second vote in the house to essentially fast track, their legal fights, allowing themselves to go to court to enforce these subpoenas specifically against the attorney general, Bill bar, and Don, Mcgann, the former White House counsel, ABC's, Ben Siegel in Washington after months of trading jabs from far, President Trump and Joe Biden will overlap today in Iowa, a state critical to both their political futures. President participates in a tour and delivers remarks at southwest Iowa renewable energy in council bluffs. The White House says the president will highlight the implementation of the new e fifteen rule which allows more ethanol to be using gasoline year round. Not just eight months. The president's also expected to push for congress to move forward on the US, Mexico, Canada trade agree may be sees Karen Travers, Biden wants a convincing win in Iowa caucuses to cement, his front runner status. The supreme court decide. Added against hearing the appeal of the longest held detainees at Guantanamo court rejected a request from Yemeni national that's been held at Guantanamo Bay prison for seventeen years, moth, Hamanaka, Ed Alawi was captured in Pakistan says he's been held longer than any other detainee and US custody, the justices decided to let stand a lower court decision that says he can be held so long as the US is fighting the Taliban, and I'll kite, ABC's Devon Dwyer, Iran says it will release Lebanese native, and permanent US resident czar Zaka sentenced to ten years in prison in two thousand fifteen for unspecified espionage, infractions retired baseball, or David Ortiz is in Boston to continue treatment, after being shot Sunday in the Dominican Republic, a spokesman says Dominican surgeons removed Ortiz's gall, bladder and part of his intestine his liver suffered damage as well. You're listening to ABC news..

President Iowa White House Joe Biden US House Judiciary committee ABC President Trump supreme court David Ortiz Guantanamo court Ed Alawi Dominican Republic Ben Siegel Justice department Guantanamo Bay Bill bar
"guantanamo court" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

02:06 min | 3 years ago

"guantanamo court" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Have in the military officers also serve him say in senior treasury positions or in senior doj positions would actually go against the very deep constitutional norm of civilian control the military and so the only time you can have a military officer who is also in a senior civilian position is when congress says that's totally okay congress hasn't done that that often i mean the only real examples are cia director nsa director and a handful of other positions national security adviser the really aren't that many other cases where a congress plus meltoff hold these jobs that's how we got to this case in this case we have the court of military commission review of this article one port congress created in two thousand nine to hear appeals from the guantanamo military commissions that you know sounds military issues it's about the military missions but an article one court and so the question is whether it's okay to have military officers certain on this specialized article one appeals court we say the answer is no um the court of appeals for the armed forces the top court in the court michael system set the answer is yes and that's the basic question the justices will be considering on january sixteen this sounds like it would be a very discreet issue how many cases would depend on the answered this question with all about the statute of four to store or produce virtually no litigation i mean even on two hundred forty eight years old there's never been a supreme court case about it there have been very few lower court cases because the government usually just polices that administratively this case arose because of a quirk in our fact pattern the military officers at issue in our case are currently serving as judges knocked on the specialized guantanamo court but also on the ordinary court martial appeals courts four air force service members for army service members and so all of the petitioners in these cases are service members who were convicted in a court martial and who had their appeal heard by these judges were the claim is that because of.

officer congress cia director military commission review guantanamo doj two hundred forty eight years
"guantanamo court" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

02:26 min | 3 years ago

"guantanamo court" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"The statute that basically says if you're an active duty military officer you can't simultaneously hold a second position within the executive branch just sort of a nonmilitary position unless congress has the civically authorize you to do so and the idea behind the staff who does that congress was worried that have a military officers also serve him say in senior treasury positions or in senior doj positions would actually go against the you know very deep constitutional norm of civilian control the military and so the only time you can have a military officer who is also in a senior civilian position is when congress says that's totally okay congress hasn't done that that often i mean the only real examples are a director nsa director and a handful of other positions national security adviser the really aren't that many other cases where a congress plus milk hostageholders jobs that's how we get to this case in this case we have the court of military commission review of this article one port congress created in two thousand nine to hear appeals from the guantanamo military commissions that you know sounds military issues it's about the military commissions but an article one court and so the question is whether it's okay to have military officers certain on this specialized article one appeals court we say the answer is no um the court of appeals for the armed forces the top court than the court michael system set the answer is yes and that's the basic question the justices will be considering on january sixteen his sounds like it would be a very discreet issue how many cases would depend on the answer to this question ordered with all about the statute has got the word has been forced to store oil produced virtually no litigation under two hundred forty eight years old there's never been a supreme court case about it there's been very few lower court cases because the government usually just coley visit administratively this case arose because of a quirk in our talked pattern the military officers at issue an arcade are currently serving as judges not just on the specialized guantanamo court but also on the ordinary court martial appeals courts spor air force service members for army service members and so all of the petitioners in new cases are service members who were convicted in a court martial and who had their appeal heard by these judges were the claim is that because of.

officer congress director nsa director military commission review guantanamo executive doj two hundred forty eight years milk
"guantanamo court" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

02:25 min | 3 years ago

"guantanamo court" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"The heart of the old very few people know about but actually walked it up a couple war congress passed the statute the basically says if you're an active duty military officer you can't simultaneously hold a second position within the executive branch a sort of a nonmilitary position unless congress has specifically authorise you to do so and the idea behind the staff who does that congress was worried that have in the military officers also serve him say in senior treasury positions or in senior doj positions would actually go against the you know very deep constitutional norm of civilian control the military and so is the only time you can have a military officer who is also in a senior civilian position is when congress says that's totally okay congress hasn't done that that often i mean the only real examples our cia director nsa director and a handful of other positions national security adviser the really aren't that many other cases where a congress les mccraw says hold these jobs that's how we get to this case in this case we have the court of military commission review uh this article one port congress created in two thousand nine to hear appeals from the guantanamo military commissions that you know sounds military issues it's about the military missions but an article one court and so the question is whether it's okay to have military officers certain on this specialized article one appeals court we say the answer is no um the court of appeals for the armed forces the top court in the court michael system set the answer is yes and that's the basic question the justices will consider him on january sixteen this sounds like it would be very discreet issue how many cases we depend on the answered this question what was all about the statute us that the way it has been enforced historically its produce virtually no litigation i mean even though it's a hundred and forty eight years old there's never been a supreme court case about it there's been very few lower court cases because the government usually just polices that administratively this case arose because of a quirk in our fact pattern the military officers at issue in our case are currently serving as judges noxious on this specialized guantanamo court but also on the ordinary court martial appeals courts for air force service members for army service members and so all of the.

officer congress director guantanamo executive doj cia les mccraw forty eight years
"guantanamo court" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

02:28 min | 3 years ago

"guantanamo court" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"The executive branch i sort of a nonmilitary position unless congress has to civically authorize you to do so and the idea behind the staff who does that congress was worried that have in the military officers also serve him say in senior treasury positions or in senior doj positions would actually go against the you know very deep constitutional norm of civilian control the military and so the only time you can have a military officer who is also in a senior civilian position is when congress says that's totally okay congress hasn't done that that often the only real examples are cia director nsa director and a handful of other positions national security adviser the really aren't that many other cases where a congress plus macau says hold these jobs that's how we get to this case in this case we have the court of military commission review of this article one pork congress created in two thousand nine to hear appeals from the guantanamo military commissions that you know sounds military issues it's about the military missions but an article one court and so the question is whether it's okay to have military officers certain on this specialized article one appeals court we say the answer is no um the court of appeals for the armed forces the top court in the court michael system set the answer is yes and that's the basic question the justices will consider him on january sixteen this sounds like you it would be very discreet issue how many cases would depend on the answer to this question about the statute has got the win four to store produce virtually no litigation even two hundred and 48 years old there's never been a supreme court case about it there's been very few lower court cases because the government usually just polices that administratively this case arose because of a quirk in our fact pattern the military officers at issue in our case are currently serving as judges noxious on this specialized guantanamo court but also on the ordinary court martial appeals courts four air force service members for army service members and so all of the petitioners and new cases are service members who were convicted in a court martial and who had their appeal heard by these judges it's where the claimants that because of the appointment to this second unauthorized office these judges were basically no longer allowed to keep their first office as military officers and.

congress officer cia director military commission review guantanamo executive doj 48 years
"guantanamo court" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

01:54 min | 3 years ago

"guantanamo court" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"The military officers at issue in our case are currently serving as judges noxious on this special as guantanamo court but also on the ordinary court martial appeals courts four air force service members for army service members and so all of the petitioners in this case is our service members who were convicted in a court martial and who had their appeals heard by these judges were the claim is because of the appointment to this second unauthorized office these judges were basically no longer allowed to keep their first office as military officers and therefore could no longer serve on these petitioners appeals court so it's it's a very limited issue in our case it's only about you know whether these four judges could have served for the last basically eighteen months on the army and airforce intermediate appeals courts the bigger issue and i think the reason why the supreme court was interested in the case is that the statute the draw this whole them ban is obviously a much bigger deal than just this one case and i think the supreme court realize that this was a a rare and unique opportunity to have the courts actually have the last word on just exactly what the stock she prohibits and exactly how it applied does this have anything to do with all the generals that are serving in the trump administration good it goes indirectly one of them christon without the you know the medium that's out there adopt the militarization of president trump inner circle is that this statute actually is exactly why you only have active duty officers and a handful of position so for example the secretary of defense jim mattis had not just retire before it could be secretary of defense but usually he would have had to have been retired for seven years congress actually had to waive the seven you're waiting period in his case general kelly the.

secretary jim mattis guantanamo president congress eighteen months seven years