32 Burst results for "Group President"

LGBTQ Rights Group President Fired Over Ties to Cuomo

AP News Radio

00:48 sec | Last week

LGBTQ Rights Group President Fired Over Ties to Cuomo

"The board of directors of the Human Rights Campaign fired its president because of developments related to the sexual harassment case that prompted Andrew Cuomo's resignation as governor of New York the statement the board said Alfonso David's conduct assisting Cuomo and responding to sexual harassment allegations with in violation of a conflict of interest policy and impaired his ability to serve as the public face and voice of the organization David was consulted over a letter the Cuomo administration a drafted attacking the credibility of one of his accusers he'd served as Cuomo's chief counsel before becoming the first African American to lead the Human Rights Campaign which is the nation's largest LGBTQ rights organization in a tweet David accuse the board of acting unjustly and threatened legal action Julie Walker New York

Board Of Directors Of The Huma Alfonso David Cuomo Andrew Cuomo Cuomo Administration New York David Lgbtq Rights Organization Human Rights Campaign Julie Walker
"group president" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:41 min | 4 months ago

"group president" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Jeffrey flags, the group's president and CEO, says HHC wanted to stockpile all this gear to avoid repeating the medical supply chain Nightmares of 2020 the earliest days of the pandemic, much of our supply. Acquisition came from China. And secondarily from Italy. So the two countries were impacted most first as global supplies, dried up, pp became hard to get states were pitted against one another. And in response, some connection manufacturers saw an opportunity. Additional parts of their business were down. So they started making PB to recoup lost profits and to help we built up the business all of last year to the point where we have 65 new employees. And we're running two shifts. So it's the one in the morning being. Carbone, president of Modern plastics and Shelton, Connecticut, pivoted from specialized plastic parts for knee replacements to those now ubiquitous, transparent face shields that doctors and dentists where His company made more than 30 million of them. But once Asian markets recovered and ramped up production in the late summer and fall, he says, buyer Stop calling him back. Ah, lot of the local institutions, hospitals, etcetera. Went back to China because the Chinese peopie was cheaper, which meant Carbone, who recently sent two million unsold face shields to sit in storage, had to make a tough call released the new facility and Derby. Which I had to smuggle in March. Because the business literally dried up. The employees were gone. The facility is closed, Carbone says he'd like to make more Peopie. But with few buyers. He's back to his core business, specialized plastic parts. And that leaves Colin Cooper, Connecticut's chief manufacturing officer, wondering when local P P manufacturers close what will happen if global markets fall apart again. There's been discussion, you know, primarily at the federal level on nurturing these Mason Industries. And helping them along. Um you know, there's strategically I think there's there's a value. Obviously, I'm having domestic supplies of these products case, there's another pandemic. But if the country wants to make investments and automation, technology efficiency and job training to compete better internationally, Cooper says the decision needs to be made soon. If the decision is made your nine months from now, our 12 months and now to put some financial resource is behind domestic purchasing. Um ah, lot of that capacity may have capabilities may be extinguished. Back of the HHC warehouse supply chain manager Millrose Mercado says about 80% of the Peopie her group acquired.

Colin Cooper March 12 months Cooper two countries 2020 Carbone more than 30 million 65 new employees Millrose Mercado HHC China Italy Modern plastics last year nine months first Chinese two shifts late summer
Former Make-A-Wish Iowa CEO charged with embezzling funds

AP News Radio

00:50 sec | 8 months ago

Former Make-A-Wish Iowa CEO charged with embezzling funds

"Hi Mike Rossi reporting a former charity C. E. O. is charged with embezzling funds a former CEO of make a wish I was facing felony charges alleging she embezzled tens of thousands of dollars from the charity forty year old Jennifer Woodley faces two charges first degree theft and unauthorized use of a credit card according to criminal complaints unsealed Friday Woodley awarded herself a ten thousand dollar bonus in October twenty nineteen two months after becoming the group's president and CEO and over a ten month span Woodley allegedly made eighty for unauthorized purchases for personal use on an organization credit card totaling more than twenty three thousand dollars Woodley and her husband have two daughters who have required brain surgery one received a trip to Walt Disney World through make a wish Iowa before Woodley was hired as CEO hi Mike Crossey up

Mike Rossi C. E. O. Jennifer Woodley Woodley Walt Disney World Iowa Mike Crossey
Moscow opens dozens of coronavirus vaccination centers

AP News Radio

00:45 sec | 10 months ago

Moscow opens dozens of coronavirus vaccination centers

"Russian authorities have begun distributing the country's coronavirus vaccine Sputnik five the people in high risk groups that's seventy medical facilities across Moscow le'veon stronger the vaccine is still on going but the shots had already been offered to people from high risk groups president Vladimir Putin on Wednesday ordered the government to staunch large scale vaccination in Russia by the end of next week with medical workers and teachers the first in line the vaccine received the go ahead after being tested on only several dozen people which has drawn considerable criticism at home and abroad health experts say the vaccine needs to complete advanced studies among tens of thousands of people to ensure safety and effectiveness I'm Charles the last month

Vladimir Putin Moscow Russia Government Charles
World Bank approves $12B to finance virus vaccines, care

AP News Radio

00:42 sec | 1 year ago

World Bank approves $12B to finance virus vaccines, care

"The World Bank has approved a twelve billion dollar package in financing to help developing countries buy and distribute coronavirus vaccines tests and treatments the initiative aims to support the vaccination of up to one billion people the multi billion dollar fund is part of a wider World Bank group package of up to one hundred sixty billion to help developing countries fight the cobit nineteen pandemic the group's president David Malpass says the plan is to extend and expand a far struck approach to address because of the emergency so the developing countries have banned and equal access to vaccines I'm Charles Taylor this month

World Bank David Malpass Charles Taylor President Trump
World Bank approves $12B to finance virus vaccines, care

AP News Radio

00:42 sec | 1 year ago

World Bank approves $12B to finance virus vaccines, care

"The World Bank has approved a twelve billion dollar package in financing to help developing countries buy and distribute coronavirus vaccines tests and treatments the initiative aims to support the vaccination of up to one billion people the multi billion dollar fund is part of a wider World Bank group package of up to one hundred sixty billion to help developing countries fight the cobit nineteen pandemic the group's president David Malpass says the plan is to extend and expand a far struck approach to address because of the emergency so the developing countries have banned and equal access to vaccines I'm Charles Taylor this month

World Bank David Malpass Charles Taylor President Trump
Arizona governor signs proclamation recognizing Indigenous Peoples Day

Native America Calling

03:59 min | 1 year ago

Arizona governor signs proclamation recognizing Indigenous Peoples Day

"This is national native news. I'm Antonio Gonzales Arizona Governor Doug ducey announced Tuesday. He signed a proclamation to recognize October Twelfth Twenty Twenty as indigenous Peoples Day on the Federal Columbus Holiday Emma Gibson. With Arizona public media has more the proclamation came after state Senator James Sita Pash Loci, and a youth led advocacy group Indigenous Peoples Initiative called for the change. Dylan Baca the group's president who is White Mountain Apache and Navajo says indigenous. Peoples Day acknowledges accurate account of Christopher Columbus's violent legacy. This holiday is significant for me because it works to try to eliminate the stereotypes in stigmatisms associated with indigenous peoples and Tribes Paschall K. called on Governor Ducey in. June. During President Donald. Trump's visit to Phoenix to establish the state holiday using his executive powers. She now says she will introduce a bill to permanently changed the holiday in the twenty twenty one legislative session. For National Native News I'm Gibson the Navajo nation is returning to fifty seven weekend lockdowns. Stay at home orders due to a rise in positive covid nineteen cases on and near the reservation. Tuesday's announcement comes a day after top infectious disease expert Dr Anthony Fauci praised the tribe for lowering numbers crediting the tribe strict covid nineteen measures which were enforced for. Months some of the orders including the fifty seven hour curfew were eased. But during virtual town Tuesday Navajo nation. President Jonathan Nez had a stern message for residents to stay vigilant Nez, a cluster of forty or more positive cases traced back to travel and spreading the virus during social gatherings which are restricted on Navajo land, and so we're going to have to. Slow everything down we're GONNA have to stay at home orders because we don't know how far. This has gone out in. Contact, with other people, the new cases were reported in Arizona and new. Mexico the tribes also asking residents to avoid areas in Utah, considered hot spots for the virus. NATO advocates encouraged young people to engage in the voting process on national voter registration day. Barb Hartselle works with the LAS, Vegas Indian Center on the native vote she talked about investing in native youth by using traditional teachings and connecting them with issues native youth face today, really taking like arc additional routes in how we carry ourselves in is important to us and being able to invest in our youth in meeting them where they're at and letting really understand though it seems so big and so massive or maybe. It doesn't seem important at all. It really does determine a lot of things like it really determined just how far come from grandmothers and mothers generations to wear. We'll go with their next generation. Hartselle took part in a national congress of American Indians virtual gathering, Tuesday along with tribal leaders and native women in office. The organizations nonpartisan vote campaign focuses on education registration getting out the native vote election protection and data collection according to NCAA I an estimated one point, two, million, American, Indian, and Alaskan native people are unregistered. Five Indian country bills were passed by Congress Tuesday and sent to the president to be signed into law the bill's address missing and murdered indigenous women, self-governance business, and economic development, and legislation to nullify a supplemental treaty for Tribes on the warm springs reservation. There are seven bills currently pending in the house which ranged from education to water rights and veterans. Issues. I'm Antonio

Arizona Indigenous Peoples Initiative Antonio Gonzales Christopher Columbus Twenty Twenty Barb Hartselle President Trump Congress Donald Trump Senator James Sita Pash Loci President Jonathan Nez Federal Columbus Holiday Doug Ducey President Donald Emma Gibson Dr Anthony Fauci Dylan Baca Ncaa Phoenix
"group president" Discussed on KTRH

KTRH

01:39 min | 1 year ago

"group president" Discussed on KTRH

"Hopes targeting major cities. Federal funding will force local leaders to address violent protests. President Trump again trying to change the focus of the election to law and order threatening to withhold federal funding to cities like Portland. Seattle, Washington, D C and New York City unless they do more to combat lawlessness, just the idea reigniting the long running feud between the president and New York governor Andrew Cuomo. Cuomo insisted that while the president wants to make the election about law and order, it should be about what Cuomo called President Trump's negligence in response to Corona virus. The president firing back on that front Tweeting Governor Andrew Cuomo of New York has the worst record on death and China virus 11,000 people alone died and nursing homes because of his incompetence. That's Fox is John Roberts. Meantime, the president has garnered the backing of a major Texas law enforcement group. The Texas Municipal Police Association, which represents Over 30,000 officers across the state officially endorsed Trump for reelection today, the group's president Thomas Brown, says in a statement. The Trump quote has proven to be a law and order president and a supporter of America's law enforcement officers, adding quote. We do not believe Joe Biden has a coherent picture of the current state of law enforcement in Texas or across America. Construction worker crushed to death in a trench collapse in Cyprus. This afternoon. The unidentified worker was part of a crew in the Fry Road in Bridgeland Creek Parkway area near sire and high school Mother. Details, though, have been released. Great news time. 703. The Astros took the rubber match their three game series with the Rangers this afternoon at minute Maid with the help of this big first inning shot.

president President Trump Andrew Cuomo New York City Texas New York Texas Municipal Police Associa Astros Joe Biden Bridgeland Creek Parkway Seattle Rangers America Portland Cyprus Fox China
Amid protests, Trump says he will designate Antifa as terrorist organization

Jay Talking

00:45 sec | 1 year ago

Amid protests, Trump says he will designate Antifa as terrorist organization

"In as there is growing concern that violent acts within protests may be partially due to the acts of far right or far left groups president trump today tweeting that he plans it to declare a within the the power of the president the power of the United States the group antifa a terrorist organization as I mentioned earlier and T. five at least not publicly it does not is not a group it does not have a structured organization so there is unrest in the idea that by declaring antifa anti fascist a terrorist organization anyone referring to themselves as anti fascist could be treated as a terrorist

President Trump United States
Trump Pushes a Conspiracy Theory and Falsely Accuses a TV Host of Murder

PBS NewsHour

01:32 min | 1 year ago

Trump Pushes a Conspiracy Theory and Falsely Accuses a TV Host of Murder

"Any group president a murder conspiracy theory and a pain family thank you very much everybody at the letter from a way to work that's calling attention to president trump's open embrace of false theories last week to medical students wrote to the CEO of Twitter urging him to delete tweets by president trump that suggested his wife Lori was murdered in the letter obtained by The New York Times close to this as the quote conspiracy theorists including most recently the president of the United States continue to spread their bile and misinformation on the platform disparaging the memory of his wife Laurie because soon as died in two thousand one president trump has repeatedly spread the baseless idea that her former boss current cable news host Joe Scarborough might have something to do with her death late today at the White House the president doubled down it's a very suspicious thing and I hope somebody gets to the bottom of it today Scarborough who is frequently criticized president trump said the claim compound the family's grief whether it's the president are whether it's people following the president it is on speaker bully

Group President Donald Trump CEO Twitter Lori United States Laurie Joe Scarborough White House Murder President Trump The New York Times
"group president" Discussed on KTAR 92.3FM

KTAR 92.3FM

01:33 min | 1 year ago

"group president" Discussed on KTAR 92.3FM

"One valley freeway GPS has closed off the south bound two oh two South Mountain freeway following a wrong way crash near ray road the call came in about three am when a person was reported to be driving northbound on the southbound lanes one person has died we will have more coming up with traffic and things have changed at least in the east valley in metro Phoenix boys and girls club the two separate groups have now merged into one group president Marcia men says east valley kids will now have access to a dental program that had been offered only at Phoenix clubs they have a charter school that's part of their organization and we're really offering that now through central Phoenix in the West Valley in the clubs can now Sir sixteen thousand kids at twenty seven locations valley wide knowledge check in with traffic G. A. R. traffic traffic we have a rough start this morning let's check in with Mike Daniels life in the valley Chevy dealer shopping center as you mentioned south mom with two oh two south on clothes right Ellie road and a straight right through that veil actions bombing a wrong way driver no word yet how long is close to my last as an alternate exit Dobbins or LU rolled go piece of fifty First Avenue take fifty percent of the south just read right we could west on a street drive back to lose to a two again no word yet how long this closure by last four sponsored by lows through your next home improvement project right by shopping lows for deal throughout the store do it right for less start with low hi Mike Daniels KTAR news I chilly start.

Marcia men Phoenix West Valley Ellie road Dobbins South Mountain group president Mike Daniels Chevy
"group president" Discussed on KFI AM 640

KFI AM 640

01:57 min | 2 years ago

"group president" Discussed on KFI AM 640

"Here's bill handle good morning everybody handle here in the morning group president is Ian night date were trying to figure out who's going to speak maybe not he is at the hospital were some of the survivors are in any scheduled to go to el Paso all right let's do it handle on the news late edition Jennifer Jones Lee dean Sharpe in for Wayne today and media story on his way to date and del Paso this morning leaving the White House said he is open to calling on Congress to calling Congress outside to return from recess to strength and background checks for gun buyers but he did talk about banning assault rifles and said he sees no political appetite for banning assault rifles interesting comment isn't it no no issue as to morality or whether we should or shouldn't just no political appetite and maybe that's true certainly among a gun abit advocates and then he said something that I'd died sorcerer floored me he said I think you know in reference to the rhetoric in the accusation of course that day he create this climate of hatred by his rhetoric he said I think my rhetoric brings people together well as opposed to my rhetoric does not fall man Tate and the my A. critics are wrong it it's I think my rhetoric brings people together in some groups may be no collectively yeah yeah he's our that's a big one that went to the Mexican restaurant tonight they gonna talk about that one once or twice well the governor of Ohio has urged gun sale background checks.

group president Jennifer Jones Lee dean Sharpe Wayne White House Congress Tate Ohio Ian el Paso
NAACP calls for Trump's impeachment in unanimous vote

The Steve Harvey Morning Show

00:33 sec | 2 years ago

NAACP calls for Trump's impeachment in unanimous vote

"Delegates to this year's and double ACP convention of all unanimously this week to call in the house of representatives to begin impeachment proceedings against president trump but members of the oldest civil rights group gather for their one hundred tenth convention in Detroit although their action doesn't actually impact any congressional legislation the group's president Derrick Johnson has called trump a racist and in an online statement Johnson says that trump quote has led one of the most racist and xenophobic White House administration since the Jim crow era the end of laci P. now joins over AT congressional lawmakers in calling for impeachment proceedings to

Donald Trump Detroit Derrick Johnson ACP President Trump White House Jim Crow Laci P.
The first Democratic debate: Everything you need to know

America Trends

01:05 min | 2 years ago

The first Democratic debate: Everything you need to know

"More thing get ready for wednesday and thursday night this is the way the democratic presidential hopefuls for twenty twenty we'll face off in two nights of televised debates because there are so many of them it's happening in miami huge field of contenders so they are broken up into two groups according to n._b._c. news with twenty candidates qualifying for the primary debates and total the democratic national committee divided it into two days ten and ten and they won't have an opening statement sixty seconds to answer questions and thirty seconds for follow up they will get to make closing remarks two hours to two hours of debating tonight split into five segments and a host savannah guthrie lester holt chuck todd rachel matt allen jose diaz balart will be moderating the moderating all be very interesting one of the most interesting things about the debase when this again pay attention wednesday and thursday nights the two different groups president trump says he will be live tweeting during the debate so maybe he'll be the person to make them oh so very interesting so we will

Miami Democratic National Committee Jose Diaz Balart Donald Trump Lester Holt President Trump Two Hours Thirty Seconds Sixty Seconds Two Days
NRA President Oliver North says he won't serve second term

The Moth Radio Hour

00:21 sec | 2 years ago

NRA President Oliver North says he won't serve second term

"Klein, the National Rifle association's leadership is in turmoil. The group's president Oliver North says he will not serve a second term. He made the announcement today through a statement to the group's convention the NRA's top executive Wayne LaPierre has said north was trying to oust him over. The organization's

Oliver North National Rifle Association Wayne Lapierre Klein President Trump Executive
"group president" Discussed on Recode Decode

Recode Decode

04:01 min | 3 years ago

"group president" Discussed on Recode Decode

"You know cabinets been your Genesis, you know, cabinets who is crazy, Chinese guys, Spanish. Not what we thought. Yeah, a World Bank president would be or would I like, and it's made a huge difference. Latin America just I took the time to learn Spanish and work in these communities Diversity's a whole 'nother topic we. But I mean the fact that I'm so different from what they expect it in Africa, they, they, they certainly see me differently because they remember me from the aids battles. They remember be- you know, running around Africa, trying to start its aids treatment. So finishing up last question. If you could ask for anything right now from Silicon Valley, just whatever besides piles of their piles of money, what would it be? It would be engaged, people engage, engage, engage, you know, we're sending people out there because we don't know how to bring people here. Right? We it's not been easy to do, and I don't know that they're going to think that it's in their interest, but you know, we do transport. Energy IT we do a health would do education and we do macroeconomic policy. We do all kinds of of infrastructure driving. We have one hundred eighty nine member countries. We have a hundred eighty nine member countries self-driving experiments somewhere. Why not? Why not? We'd be happy to do it. And so we've done some small research projects, but it's not on the top of everyone's list, but we are open for the the best people to come here. I will make sure that the experience is great for them. And I know now our teams are hungry for this because disruptive technologies a big theme, and I had to bring that whole operation into my office to make sure that it wasn't just sort of cast aside the office. Because it makes it makes them work harder? Yeah, we have to think more. We have to think about more complex deals is harder, but that's what I would because look, I want to end with this. I mean, prisoner, Macron and chancellor Merckel. They're so concerned about Africa and what they will tell you is that if you think the Syrian refugee crisis was bad, just wait until these African countries start to collapse. It's very close to Europe life in Europe. As we know it will change because they're going to see on their smartphones, that life is better over there. And so for me is not a matter of stopping migration, I'm a migrant, I believe in migration migration is a great thing. What I'm saying is that on issues like climate change and on issues like people's aspirations going up, if the technology will doesn't engage the world that they're leaving to their children and grandchildren. In fact, the world they're gonna live in themselves is going to be so ugly that you're going to have a situation where the richest will always be able to protect themselves. They're going to have to build higher walls, higher platforms. And it's, it's not a world that you wanna leave to your children and your children will ask you much. How could you leave that kind of world to us? My children already asked you. I mean, we're the largest funder of climate change activities, and then he became that way. We got that. We're in the last five years forces migration. I've been pushing and pushing it pushing. We're now the largest financier of climate change activities, but my kids still asked me dad. Why don't you doing more for climate change? Yeah, good question. Yeah, everyone will ask us this. And if the tech industry thinks the questions are being asked now are tough way to the questions come about inequality about you guys have stoked the aspirations of everyone in the world and then taken all their jobs away. Right? We don't want that to happen. We don't know. The leaders don't want that to happen. Jim. They gave you fortnight an Amazon echo, goodness, I won't make you answer that anyway. This has been a fantastic discussion. Thank you so much. This is Jim, Yong Kim. He's the president of the World Bank group and you have to help him. Thank you care. Thank you for having me on. Thanks again to Jim, Yong Kim for coming on the show. If you joined the interview as much as I did sure, subscribe and leave us a review, an apple podcast, you can also find more episodes of Rico decode on Spotify, Google podcasts or ever. You listen to podcasts if. If you didn't like the interview or just want to say, hi, tweeted me. I'm at Carris wisher on Twitter. Now that you're done with this. Go check out our latest episode of Recode media. You can find.

president Africa Jim World Bank Macron Silicon Valley Europe Twitter apple Amazon Spotify World Bank group chancellor Merckel Rico Google five years
"group president" Discussed on Recode Decode

Recode Decode

03:32 min | 3 years ago

"group president" Discussed on Recode Decode

"Tell us about how they do things, but then take the problems that we face. Go, go with us, you know, to the poorest countries, you know, take a look at these different problems. And when I go there. Start flat. My mind starts flashing because you know all these problems that I deal with every day. I don't think we'll could that work for that because that would prevent. I went to Hong Joe division of his Alibaba, and we had like ten ideas. They came out of that one meet area, and he is Jack is great. I'm here. He was one of the first time in my and he's Jack things education. Yeah. And he's focusing on educating principles in the principles of schools in management, which is probably exactly right for for for many of the schools, especially in China anyway, that we'd love to have people here just sitting with us and we have financing, we when I walked in the door when we walked in the door in April, I mean July of twenty twelve. We were thirty five billion. We just got a capital increase. Nobody thought we'd get it. But you know, we had forked so hard to reform this. We're gonna sation that we're now edging toward hundred billion a year, but that's not nearly enough. We wanna use that money to have transformative impact. And we just we, we're not used to thinking so. Far out of the box, the Google. Akerson our bitcoin. For example, those kind of things you have to start thinking about right, or I took this right coin. Our first reaction to things is, you know, one is it, can it be helpful to developing countries in two? Are there dangers for developing countries that we need to help them deal with? And so you know, at first a lot of these crypto currencies, at least the experts told me, I'll not all of them, but a lot of them were more like Ponzi schemes. I said that and that keeps coming back to haunt me, but what that led to as we started looking chain? Yeah, we started looking at blockchain industry legend technology, and it turns out that there's so many applications and the first application that we put in places we, we, we sell bonds in other words, we need to raise money on the capital markets. And so we did the first blockchain bought in history and it was pretty simple. It's just using distributed ledger technology to take care of all the paperwork. Now they're huge companies that do that paperwork for you, which adds to the cost of the bond, and so doing it through distributed ledger technique. Reduced our cost dramatically. Now, the companies that do that, we're not happy about it, but what a great application. And so we're going to keep doing that. We're going to keep looking at what are the specific aspects that we can put to use right now to make things work better. But you know, we need to be disrupted, we, it's very hard for us to disrupt ourselves. Exactly right. About foreign ministers. They're just not going to disrupt themselves education's educational. I, it's hard. It's very hard. So the Bank, the World Bank, we now need to be disrupted as well. At the same time, there were Bank is sort of been known as lecturing to people across. You know what I mean? Absolutely. And so there's not a two way discussion going on. It's interesting my great friend and predecessor who's just was one of the great World Bank president. Jim Wolfensohn told me that when you walked in the door nineteen ninety-five, every single vice president was white male. Now we're as diverse as half female. We're from all over the world, but that's what it was. And there was a strong sense back then that it was former colonial officers coming to let you people. Yeah, and so I've really worked hard to try to change that. I, I speak Spanish. And so in Latin America, they've had an especially difficult relationship with the World Bank, but I spent fifteen years working in this Lum's of Lima, Peru, I speak Spanish. And so I'm now..

World Bank Jack China Google Alibaba Lima Hong Joe Latin America vice president Peru Jim Wolfensohn president fifteen years
"group president" Discussed on Recode Decode

Recode Decode

03:48 min | 3 years ago

"group president" Discussed on Recode Decode

"We love to participate, right, and it stayed of Centric is the their work is days early warning century. So they're building systems. You've seen all the news about tech, the tech lash in terms of the facts on the elections and things like that. Is this a way for tech to start to clots way back? I mean, because I mean the change the world image of tech is always. So we're changing the world gender role when in fact, they were just selling toilet paper or whatever or getting data, so they can send you the right shoes to wear things like that and collecting an enormous amount of data that many countries are worried about the privacy issues and and things like that because they're using it. And so there's always been distrust of tech way back from one laptop child, everything that they were trying to sell software when you start to reach out to tech leaders, how do you think about that? Well. Again, I said, I, I've been very pleasantly surprised that that tech leaders are not spending every day thinking and digging deeply into hell. They're tech can be applicable to the Central African Republic, then I'm doing, but they're not to quit for that. They don't have people who know how to do that. And partly, you know, we think it's been. It's been a partly our fault. We haven't spent much time out there and we should be because again, if you if you're assuming that agriculture light industry too heavy industry is not going to happen in most parts of the world, we should be out there thinking what's going to be the the path of growth for for these countries then what are they have to prepare for? And so this is why I now I'm going out there twice in a month, and then we have our own people are going out there on a regular basis because we have to have this conversation so far everyone has told us that they'd like to be able to have an impact. We'll see who serious. You know, in this case, both Lincoln and Airbnb have been very serious, very serious about engaging. And Microsoft, Amazon and Google now have been very serious as well, but it's got to be different before there was this illusion that if rich people are generous and gives some of their money, trying found problems will still do exist. And you've got marks foundation. Now you've Jeff Bezos foundation each hitting a different area, but I found they largely wanna run things themselves. The these foundations are important. I mean, you know, the Gates Foundation changed my life and we've got a, we've got a grant early on that allowed us to tackle drug-resistant TV. Nobody else would have funded that. So I'm forever grateful to the Gates Foundation gates finishing his actually in so many things that we're doing because they're really trying to understand the whole problem. I, I know less about the other foundations, but I, you know, I know Bill and Melinda and they're really trying to get their heads around the whole problem. So this is not about charity for them. They're trying to solve the problem which is great, which is their nature, but but not not everyone's like that, you know. So for so many generous people, it starts out being about their generosity and it can't be. It's gotta be solving the problem. And I think tech people are going to be better at that. They're going to be good at that. If I tell them it's not about just you giving more and more to charity. It's about you engage. Aging with us to try to solve the problem and then use your financing a strategically as you can to get at what might solve the problem. Right. And so I hope they move into this. But what we know is that if we approach them and just appeal to their kindness, generosity, then they do it for they'll get bored if we engage them with seemingly intractable problems and say, do you think your technology can help us solve this problem that could be that could be much more productive? That's talking about your wishlist then what would you like if you had to go through these companies? What would you like from them? What would Google you know for any of these companies? I would like them to succumbed people to us. I liked it for them to pay the salaries and then send their best people just to come and sit with us and learn about how we do things..

Gates Foundation Google Jeff Bezos Central African Republic Airbnb Microsoft Lincoln Bill Amazon Melinda
"group president" Discussed on Recode Decode

Recode Decode

01:54 min | 3 years ago

"group president" Discussed on Recode Decode

"And so we're coming up with a system where we've been building it coming up with a system, early detection mechanism that will tell us where the areas are that looks like food security might be an issue than what we can do as a World Bank is we have money for these countries anyway, we can move much earlier and get programs going that could potentially stop feminine, but it's working with huge amounts of data, but often very difficult like, what did they? How did they help you? Amazon, Google, Microsoft, right? So it's really about how to manage data, how to collect data from all kinds of sources that we wouldn't have thought of. I'm we, we don't actually know all the different ways. They're collecting data, but there's decided to come good at it. Yeah. Very good, very good at it, and they'll try to sell you something with, but this one is this one is, you know, I don't know where it's coming from, but they're doing it with us without without charging. And what we hope is that this will tell us all kinds of things about what's happening in the poorest areas. Everything from you know, floods droughts to the status of particular crops to migration movement of people thinking predict. That's right. And so we can predict the head of time the World Bank can come in and move some of the money, their head of time. And then at the end of their, we might also create, you know, an insurance type instrument. So bringing together technological innovations with financial innovations could actually stop famines from ever happening again. So this is it's very exciting. I mean, you're catching it before it has before it happens, right. Famine by definition is large numbers of people who are starving to death. There's no reason for that to ever happen. There's plenty of food in the world to stop that from happening. And this is going to be a very exciting process and to have the tech industry involved early. You get. What was the approach is that they were looking for? We're already talking to those guys anyway, and then in in the process of putting this coalition together, it's the international community across the UN us. Various leaders stepped up and said, hey, this is great..

World Bank UN Amazon Microsoft Google
"group president" Discussed on Recode Decode

Recode Decode

03:54 min | 3 years ago

"group president" Discussed on Recode Decode

"Today explained on apple podcasts ditch or wherever you listen to. Podcast. Thanks, Sean, thanks care. We're here with Jim, Yong Kim is the president of the World Bank group. We've talked a lot of issues including how tech and help development. But one of the things we're talking about is human capital because most people think that there isn't that's not doesn't matter anymore that it's not going to matter less and less and you were talking about working less and things like that. But one of the programs that you're announcing is the famine action mechanism, which is the that we're talking about sort of high tech jobs during the house. When famine still exists around the globe and these solutions, it seems again in another intractable problem that doesn't seem to go. I talk about that where it is and what the newest initiatives are. You know, I'm a medical doctor apologists, and so when I came in here, I had to really intensively study macroeconomics and finance, especially to to the areas and you know, and also transport and and I t I had studied these things because we do all of them. And so I kept asking what everyone else thought. I think we're stupid questions. Why can't we do this? Why can't we do that? And so when he Bulla happened in Guinea Liberia and Sierra Leone, eleven thousand people died, but it's really only the infectious disease docks. You know how close we were to having a global disaster. I mean, we were just lucky that it didn't go to Karachi or Delhi, or you know, and that they stopped it when it got to Lagos in jury. I mean, it was a million dollars a case to stop it in Nigeria, but thank God for the US CDC and for the Nigerian government, they got ready because if it had spread quickly in Lagos, we would have been looking at very different. And so I kept asking, why did we have to wait eight months before the money flowed? Why are we waiting for the kindness of strangers? There should be some kind of mechanism. And so I asked the insurance companies the the big, the reinsurance companies, the insurance companies that ensure other insurance companies I asked their CEO's. I said, well, why don't we have pandemic insurance? And you know, with kind of a smile on their face, though said, well, you know, Jim, if you can, if you can find out the annual incidence of any problem, we can ensure anything because we just. Can we get a number? We go to the capital markets and say, hey, here's how here's the likely that we think this happening and therefore you put your capital, it'll be at risk. You can lose it all, but we think it's about of this much chance. And because of that, we'll pay you this much interest. And so we started pandemic insurance. So we now we have a pandemic facility that has a big chunk of money that will automatically release and when epidemic gets to a certain level and we even further and got a chunk of cash that will, that's protecting the bond. And so in other words, if it doesn't quite reach the threshold, but it's still serious, the cash will release and immediately gets in In on these these things. in Congo the the first outbreak in Congo we released within weeks literally a million dollars a case which is kind of now what we think it takes to to put one of these things out each pre case, right? That's what it took in Syria, and that's what it took in DRC. You know, from before we waited and waited and waited until it got bad. Same thing happens with famine, the response to famine. You know what the government's tell us is what of course we're going to respond to fem, but until the emaciated children appear on television when it's really hard to raise the interest which is just so crazy, the United Nations are five stages of famine. United Nations doesn't call feminine until reaches the fifth stage, but it's the first stage where you've got to really take it on. And so the the question we asked was, can the question I asked was damage it can we do famine insurance, and so we were thinking about financial, innovate, innovations, but it turned out that because we were asking the questions they said, well, what's really key is. Getting information early. And so we reached out to Amazon, Google and Microsoft, and they said, hey, we'd love to work with you on this..

United Nations Congo Jim Lagos Nigeria Sean apple World Bank group Liberia president Yong Kim Bulla epidemic Sierra Leone Karachi CDC Syria
"group president" Discussed on Recode Decode

Recode Decode

04:00 min | 3 years ago

"group president" Discussed on Recode Decode

"Way saw explains things and his materials are so simple, so straightforward, but they're using a in such interesting ways that if you, if you show that you like to learn certain way, more visually more words, you know sound, whatever that he gives you more information with that knowledge that's that's built on an AM system. And so I so impressed with this that I just made an offhand comment to the ruler of Dubai shake Russia's right. Well, stigma husband, Russia is incredibly innovative. So I said, you know, if you just translated all of cellphones materials into Arabic that could actually improve the quality of education throughout the region. So he did it and it took a took like a year and a half. He had seven thousand people working on the translations and it. I don't know how much it cost, but it took huge number of personalities, but it's done. And so I think that was the step needed to be taken Carlos lemons, translated them into into into Spanish. Another great story. There's this company called zip-line would much. On stage. Yeah, you know, and explain what they do. So zip zip line. I mean, these guys are literally delivery their rocket scientists. I mean, they're literally or not engineers, and they met with the folks in Rwanda in Rwanda, had a problem with delivering blood and so the they literally built this does Does now. all kinds of roads in requires a coal chain, and you have to keep the blood cold over long time, and you can try to keep the blood at the clinics, but it's a huge endeavor. And so they figured out how to use drones in Rwanda to deliver a Kelly is very hilly. And so cool. I mean, literally, it's a big rubber band with something that looks like a plane. That's that's run on solar energy. It takes off and then there's a box with the with the blood, it's package and they drop it from thirty feet with a little tiny parachute, it falls, they use it. And so I was so excited about this. I started talking about it with other African leaders and now I think they're in like fifteen different countries. They're talking to the Indonesians right now and Indonesia was with more than ten thousand islands. This could be a great solution, but it took Keller Nado and his team. They had to go to each country and see how what they were doing would be applicable in that setting. And that was the key. It wasn't that they were international engineers. It was. There are enough Lange near suspend enough time in Rwanda, and now you know Tanzania, Indonesia, other countries to be able to adjust this technology and make it work in any setting. And so that's my invitation to all your listeners. We're very happy to help you beginning gauging directly in specific problems. We have the presence on the ground. You know, we understand the economics of it. We're sectors or things that governments used to do that governments are supposed to do and stuff like that. And I think some of the just even in this country are initiatives around jobs in stem are so weak and so not developed. I can't imagine there developed everywhere. I mean they are in China. They are absolutely China China's accelerating so fast past the US and other countries. I mean, I don't think there's a need for government, but a lot of things the government used to do now, the private sector is that a comfortable thing? Well, you know, we're, we're trying to understand the the key is to get the outcome. And so forth. We're trying to be agnostic and I, you know, I've talked a lot about how you know it might be the right thing to do to bring the private sector in more in areas like education health, and I've been criticized for it. But the question I'm asking the criticism. Well, the criticism is well, you know, these things have to be delivered by the public sector. You're not respecting teachers, unions, etcetera, etcetera. You member also the controversy when Microsoft tried to deliver a neighbor did the one laptop right child just sort of fell apart. You know, the one that beautiful child was a great idea. But what they learned from that was it's not the hardware is actually the software, right? Which is why I've been so focused on the Khan Academy as opposed to the hardware. But you know, tubes devices become so inexpensive, that's right phones. And you think The the..

Rwanda Indonesia Dubai Russia China China Khan Academy zip-line Microsoft Keller Nado Carlos US Kelly Lange Tanzania thirty feet
"group president" Discussed on Recode Decode

Recode Decode

03:23 min | 3 years ago

"group president" Discussed on Recode Decode

"They're going to be taken care of in the future. We'll China's developing all of these social security type programs. And so a lot more of that money is going to be used and we think for tourism. So as that grows, countries can become much more engaging tourism. And of course there's a role for hotels and and and other industries. But this is smart. That's right. Bring small businesses into the picture, but part of it is that we're trying to discipline ourselves. And the reason is because I keep telling you this, do I one of my good friends in the Bank who left a little while ago said, you know, Jim thirty years ago, we had an argument about whether to build telephone poles in India, and it was a heated argument. There were very strong opinions on both sides. And luckily we decided not invest and telephone poles in India. But my question now every day I ask, okay, are we doing the equivalent of building telephone poles in India somewhere? And I have to believe that we are. Yeah. And so now what do you think that is? I, I'm not sure, but, but we're not looking around corners like focused, Silicon Valley are, and so. Four or five of our major units did their retreats out there and you know, are going and visiting linked in Airbnb, but also working with folks that singularity university trying to get some sense of what are we missing here. But the other thing is we're trying to bring the problems we face and put it in front of tech leaders. So one of the things they do is they do like to get involved in things like that, but some people blame them for these trends. Automate there, inventing things. You know, I just wrote a piece this week about Mark, Benny off buying time, and I said those that are killing us or saving us like, you know, they're taking, they killed the media this way, and now they're using their money to save the money, which is kind of interesting when you think about it, it's the same thing with tech. A lot of these, you know, Google AI, all the Uber, all the others on on self-driving tons and tons of Google again, social media impacting everything. How do you look at? Is it just we'll just have to engage because these are the inventors of the things that are problems you're about to face. You know, how do you engage them? Like. So, you know, Mark is someone I know we're gonna serve on a board together and, and I know Mark really cares Benny off right Mark, really cares about education, flaming, Mark for sales. He really cares about education. The states. He's thinking hard with all his creativity that that you brought his work. He's trying to think about how to make it better. And so again, this is my medical training. I'm trying to be evidence based. Right, right. And this is not a time to sit back and think that our judgments are going to help. So my collection of evidence today has been that these folks have been incredibly creative and they haven't been thinking about all the new. They had of the side effects of what they do consequence, and so now they have to. And that's, I think that's a good thing. We feel it's our job to continue to bring the problems we face every day, extreme poverty, the fact that food insecurity effects, you know, couple billion people in any given year that, you know there's so much that's. That stunting there's so much a terrible schooling out there. We try to bring our problems to them and then are finding ways to use the technology and get them engaged so that they can make it work for everyone. Let you know Alcon, one of my heroes and Sol. I just made a offhand comment to explain his cell the Khan Academy and sells probably I think, sells like the best teacher in the world. I mean, so All all the the way..

Mark India China Google Benny Alcon Khan Academy Airbnb singularity university Jim thirty years
"group president" Discussed on Recode Decode

Recode Decode

03:57 min | 3 years ago

"group president" Discussed on Recode Decode

"We're here with Jim, Yong Kim. He's the president of the World Bank group. We've just been talking about work and you just visited Silicon Valley. You know, this is the thing I bang on them a lot like what are you gonna do about it. And the only reason I do is because I know them and I can't make government do it. I want it says government in a second. But talk a little bit about your trip there. You just were there and you're talking about a bunch of initiatives that you're doing. Talk about what that was like. The two companies spent the most time with Lincoln and Airbnb around jobs around Jeff CEO, Jeff, we at Lincoln has been a an incredible partner for us. He he learned about the work I did from a book about Paul farmer, the guy started the organization with and and so he's been trying to bring these ideas in what we've learned though. Is that just about every tech person? I know if you ask them, would you like your technology to be applicable in the funding poverty? The all say, yes, but then the other thing we've learned. Unless you start thinking about the applications in poor countries, very early on, it's going to go in a direction and it may or may not, but most likely not very applicable in developing countries. And so for Lincoln, it's the stuff we're doing with them, so cool because it turns out that they have so much information on the kinds of skills that are needed. The kinds of skills that are present in any given country and where the skills are moving that we're now going to use this country by country to help planners. And mostly it's going to be ministers of finance and others plan for how they can get a better match between the skills they have and the skills they need. And also what kind of skills training they need to do with our group that is in charge of the Middle Eastern North Africa. They just did a very simple thing and they said, okay, so where are the skilled people from that region going? And where are the skilled people in the region coming from that in itself. Was just so interesting for us. They had the just getting a sense for that, so they're what we're doing with them is extremely exciting for me because of their leadership. Jeff's leadership, their commitment to it. I think we're going to have an impact very soon doing what precisely. So this is specifically for understanding what is the skill mix in your country? What are the skills that are needed in your country, and what can you do to actually improve skills and prepare your workforce to to be able to fill those needs? Right. The other thing though, too, is that within Africa, people are going to be moving around. And so if we find that there's an overabundance of skills in one area and the need for them in another, we can do this matching the should work Airbnb. Again, Joe Gibbs has been really passionate about this. It's complicated because you know when you have a disruptive technological innovation like this, every individual country has to figure out how they're going to regulate it. Right? And so we're working on with the countries to help them make sure that this has been official to them. But you know, tourism is an. Extremely labor intensive, and and when you go from a, you know, they've been able to set up shop in places like Soweto in South Africa. And so when neighborhoods then become place destinations for tourism and the people from those destinations can tell their story and then make an income. I, it's actually not just from experiences for other. The other things they're doing is right. So they provide the experiences, but then you know, they become a business owners and they start hiring people, and you know, we, we think that tourism has to be a huge growth industry, Chinese tourism. They're more Chinese tourists than any other tourists in the world. And right now, it's relatively limited. EMMY Chinese. People still are putting lots of money into savings. You know, the, we, we look at a country savings rates. How much do people save the US? It's like a negative fear. Yeah, people are in debt China, it's still forty percents, and part of it's because they're saving because they don't think that..

Lincoln partner Jeff CEO Airbnb North Africa World Bank group Silicon Valley president EMMY US Jim Soweto China South Africa Joe Gibbs Paul farmer official
"group president" Discussed on Recode Decode

Recode Decode

03:54 min | 3 years ago

"group president" Discussed on Recode Decode

"Those aspirants are going to go up and you know, we in a very nerdy way, we actually studied this. We said, well, what happens when you get access to the about why people? This is a big topic and I do want to get into some other announce that you're making. But this is to me the biggest topic going forward for the world in terms of what jobs are going to be in the future you guys are doing an initiative, correct. Explain sort of what you're doing around that. So every year we publish something called the world development report, and it takes on different issues. And so this year is the world Dumont reports on the future of work. And so what comes out of it is that look, it's not all doomsday in the sense that the rapid automation that's going to happen in. In the richest countries, especially the US and the UK will probably happen slower in developing countries. And so what's the percentage of jobs will be lost over the next decade or so? And you know, we estimate between five and twelve percent, but we also say that we actually don't know because things could happen very differently, and those jobs could go much more quick. There's a series of things. It's not just automating automation, robotics AI, artificial intelligence changes and driving in terms of transportation in healthcare delivery, and printing and manufacturing. It just goes, it integrates through the system and that people, I don't think understand even developed world and most of the people. Interestingly in Silicon Valley tend to say, well, it's like farming to manufacturing. It was better for everybody. How are you all looking at that? Because I, I know necessarily think it's going to be better. We don't know. We don't know where the jobs are going to be. So all over Africa, I talked to heads of state and and they they in the ministers of finance. Tell me we'll. You were born in Korea. We wanna go through the same thing. Create went through because South Korea, when I was born in nineteen Fifty-nine nine, South Korea, the World Bank would not give a loan to South Korea because they thought it was hopeless. They literally said, this is a basket case. It's hopeless. And you know, literacy was about twenty five percent. All of the industrial capacity, minerals were up in the northern half of Korea. It was. It was the sort of gentleman farmer part of Korea. So this this is an all agricultural economy. How on earth are they going to grow? So for fear that they would never be able to pay back alone World Bank wouldn't give them any. Right. And so what what did they do? They went from agriculture light manufacturing, you know, literally from human hair wigs to black and white TV's now to to silicon chips. But if you ask the Koreans, they'll tell you that path is probably now closed. And the question is, is it close to all of Africa? Well, you know, you don't see huge amounts of industrialization Africa, and yet every African head of state minister finance tells me. We're building an industrial park. It's going to be a special economic zone, and you know, it's, it almost feels cruel to tell them. I don't think that's going to happen. Therefore, if that's not going to happen, what are you going to do? Well, you with the internet connection, maybe your citizens could, you know, could go online and offer and be part of the service economy right cut if you have thirty five percent stunting. And one study in east Africa showed that in looking at grade school teachers, you know up to six green primary school teachers only third could pass the second grade competency examination, so and and the teachers teachers. Right? And so so this is this is all part of the sense of just enormous urgency. We're feeling right now to get on this task of trying to prepare these countries for what might come now, you know, China, so interesting to me because you've got the l. e. Baba's and the ten cents of the world, who for lack of a better word have kind of. Tuck access to capital. I mean, Jack says we can give up to one million renminbi which is about one hundred sixty thousand dollars and get it in your account in two seconds without ever meeting you without ever shaking your hand, so called KYC know your customer rules have completely changed..

Korea South Korea Africa World Bank Silicon Valley east Africa Dumont China US Baba Jack UK one hundred sixty thousand dol thirty five percent twenty five percent twelve percent two seconds
"group president" Discussed on Recode Decode

Recode Decode

03:23 min | 3 years ago

"group president" Discussed on Recode Decode

"We don't know how these trade discussions are gonna go, you know, the trade has been really good for poor people. I mean that that's something that has not raised very much, but the more the this traded and the more that is countries in poor people are involved in trade, the better they've done, you know, China's lifted almost a billion people out of extreme poverty, and they'll tell you that trait was a huge part of that they're willing to participate in trade. So we're worried about that. We're worried about, you know, places like Venezuela, that if they become much more unstable, the effects on other countries and even the global economy could be huge. We're worried about that, but I tell you the biggest thing I'm worried about is. What people are going to do in the future. You know, Jack, Ma Telesis, great story. He's, he says, you know, my grandfather worked sixteen hours a day six days a week, and he felt very busy. I work eight hours a day five days a week, and I feel very busy. My kids are going to work three hours a day three days a week, and they'll feel very busy. And I like to tell Jack, Jack, your kids may not be working at all your, you're big topic. And so I'm I'm worried about the fact that on the one hand, the future work is changing quickly how quickly I don't think anyone knows. Certainly is going to change quickly in the UK and the US. Those are the places where we think automation, artificial intelligence. We'll have the biggest impact, but in developing countries, you know, Bangladesh, which is famous for the garment industry and the garment industry has always been thought of as the place that will as the industry, they will always require human hands garment industry. Owners are buying these things called so bots, SE WBO s and three d. printing now can make shoes and shirts faster than human hands. And so the big question for me is okay, so we always say, well, the Luddites were wrong and the lights were wrong because each new phase of technology created new jobs. And so the question for me is we'll countries be ready, will their populations be ready to tackle those new jobs? This country be ready? Yeah. Well, this country in the country be ready. But if you look at places, you know, Indonesia. Has thirty seven percent childhood stunting India, thirty, eight percent Pakistan, forty, five percent. Most of Africa has about thirty percent shot. That's nothing in what we know about how the stunting is that it. It's a very simple measure. Two standard deviations height below height for age. And so you know, we we have so much better studies. The imaging now shows that these children have as much as forty percent, less brain volume and and far fewer neuronal connections. And we've done independent studies of children who are stunted and they learn dramatically less than school and the earn dramatically less when when they get into the workforce. And so when I look at these situations, thirty five forty percent childhood stunting and also school performance is in good. Either. The question is, what are these people going to do? Right? I mean, if the low skilled agricultural jobs are taken over by, but what are people going to do? And at the same time you know if the folks in in Silicon Valley who who are my friends, say look twenty twenty five twenty thirty. Everyone's gonna have access to broadband and well, everyone may not own smartphone. They'll be able to look at a smartphone, someone around them, we'll have one, and so the property will everybody will probably right. And so the process that my parents went through that very few other Koreans went through in the nineteen fifties. They saw what life was like in the US and the aspired to it. They learnt how to speak English..

Jack US China Venezuela Ma Telesis Africa Indonesia Pakistan Bangladesh UK Silicon Valley thirty five forty percent thirty seven percent thirty percent eight percent forty percent sixteen hours five percent
"group president" Discussed on Recode Decode

Recode Decode

04:04 min | 3 years ago

"group president" Discussed on Recode Decode

"I grew up in Iowa places and then ended up going to medical school because my father didn't couldn't stand the idea that that I would study philosophy and political science and become a politician, which is what I really wanted to do and then did anthropology and then met guy my my lifelong friend named Paul farmer or all of our adult lives anyway. And we created this organization that began a working on healthcare programs in some of the poorest places Haiti in in the slum, subtract, yes, intractable places, tackling intractable problems and. The partners in health has just been hugely successful. And so I was doing health and education work on the ground forever. And then just these crazy jobs keping offered to me one was to be the head of HOV department at the World Health Organization. And then you know, we started a movement to treat HOV and it's hard to understand it back in the late nineteen. Ninety s when we had these miracle drugs just really extraordinary the highly active entrance row therapy. It was really the act up guys. It was. It was a very small number of people who said, now that we've put our bodies on the line and we've got these drugs. There's no way that we're going to let people say only the rich can have it. So it was them and partners in health, and literally a handful of others who were saying everyone in the world should get access to these drugs. So I went to the World Health Organization. The World Health Organization had been very much standing on the sidelines, not arguing for HIV treatment. I started a movement, they're called three by five to just accelerate Chevy treatment. Now twenty million Africans on HIV treatment. But you know the whole world including a lot of leaders in tech were saying, you know, HIV treatment Africa's not possible, and I kept going on saying, are you kidding me? There's twenty five million people living with HIV in Africa, if we let them all die because treatment is too complicated, we will always be remembered as a generation that did that right it. It's going to be that bad. And so the world change we had success. I left WHO. The folks at Dartmouth came along, asked me if I'd be interested in being, I'd never never thought about doing something like that for, but I thought, well, what an opportunity if I, if we can influence all these young people to think about poverty and to think about inequality, that would be great. It didn't take very long for me to realize that was actually not the job of being DARPA was fundraising and then and then three years later, Tim Geithner called me, and I went to. Him called me. I thought he was just trying to see if one of his friends kids might get into Dharma's. I had no idea that that was your second job, but I, and so here I am and I had known that the World Bank has changed. One of the great things about the World Bank is really data driven and it comes from my medical training and I know you have doctors in your family. You know, it hasn't been that long where we have done things only on the basis of evidence. There's still so many things we don't know, but we've the World Bank has really adopted that evidence based approach. And so for example, it's the World Bank's approach to health and education changed dramatically over the last twenty years because they realized that all the evidence suggests that more investment in health and education can lead to better economic growth. So you shouldn't think of it as to oppose things invest in roads to grow the economy, invest in people. When you can all the evidence suggests that it's the countries that invested in their people before which has been the focus of a lot of tech tech tech. Tech leaders all the money. So how many people work here now the world vein, you know, fifteen thousand permanent employees probably about. Under attack politically for for doing things, and it had has its ups and downs. What are you? What are the big challenges you face right now? Well, right now today is the specter of what's going to happen in the economy. So there are places that were worried about their countries like Turkey that have a lot of dollars and nominated made that there's also just tons of uncertainty..

World Health Organization World Bank HIV Tim Geithner Africa Paul farmer Haiti HOV department Iowa Chevy Dartmouth Turkey DARPA twenty years three years
"group president" Discussed on Recode Decode

Recode Decode

03:06 min | 3 years ago

"group president" Discussed on Recode Decode

"The red chair is Jim, Yong Kim, the president of the World Bank group. It's one of the three big international organizations that just launched the famine action mechanism, which is a new program dedicated to preventing future famines and they're going to be doing that with the support from Microsoft, Google and Amazon. We're going to talk about that and a lot more Jim, welcome to Rico decode. Thanks. So I'm here in Washington DC. I'm at the World Bank which is your building on h street, not far from the White House and everything else, but what I really people in Silicon Valley and we have a bigger audience than that. I don't really know exactly what you all do. So let's first talk about how you got here and then where the World Bank is right now, and then we'll move into these programs. The announcement that I would be the US candidate to take this job was surprise for everyone. Surprised for me twenty years before nineteen Ninety-four. I was part of a movement to close the World Bank. We call that fifty years is enough, and the idea of the movement was that the World Bank had so ignored things like human development that had been so focused on just GDP growth that we thought that on the fiftieth anniversary nineteen ninety four. They should just close its doors. And you know, Tim Geithner I was I was president of Dartmouth College at the time and Tim Geithner who was a Dartmouth graduate called me and said, hey, would you be interested in being a candidate for the presidency, the World Bank's Tim, you know, I edited a whole book that said it should be closed. I was part of a movement, so it's not problem. And I still, I, I still to this. They believed that if it hadn't been President Obama, there's no way that I would have done this job because I walked into the Oval Office because he interviewed me and he said, you know, why should I nominate you? And my first words will have you ever read your mother's PHD dissertation? He looked at me and he said, well, yes, I have. And so she was an anthropologist. And when he burst on the scene in two thousand. Four, I learned that his mother was an anthropologist, and so I got her dissertation from the university of Michigan archives, which is where all unpublished dissertations go. I read the whole thing. I said, you know, just like your mother. Everyone predicted that the artisanal industry in Indonesia where she was doing her work would collapse under globalization. She showed that it actually flourished and said, you know, that's that's what I'll do. I've been on the ground doing development work for thirty years. I'm not going to be able to give you the thirty thousand foot view of macrey communists, but I'll tell you things are working on the ground. You looked at me and he said, you know, I get that. And so then two days later I was in the rose garden and he was announcing that I was the candidate and I, it was just a very special set of circumstances. They got me here. Well, what is your background talk about your background, what you've done? Some medical doctor and also Nath apologised and I was born in Korea. My parents though met and married in New York City. And so they were among a couple of hundred Koreans who because they were good students were able to come and do some training here. And there were literally a few hundred Koreans in all of the United States. They met they married here. My brother was born here in the went back to the Korea intending to stay, but you know what's happening all over the world right now is people's aspirations are going up mostly by looking at their smartphones for them. It was a very direct experience sell what life was like in the US. And so when I was reached the age of five, we came back to the United States..

World Bank World Bank group Tim Geithner President Obama United States president Jim Dartmouth College Korea Washington DC Microsoft Amazon White House Indonesia Yong Kim Silicon Valley university of Michigan Google New York City Rico
Baby found buried alive in western Montana forest: police

WBZ Morning News

02:27 min | 3 years ago

Baby found buried alive in western Montana forest: police

"Corpuz with more the group called students for fared missions claims harvard has discriminated against asian americans for decades the group's president edward bloom claims the universities admissions records prove harvard engages in racial balancing in that it has quote no interest in exploring race neutral alternatives the group which initially filed a lawsuit in two thousand fourteen is now asking a federal judge to release the documents citing the public has a right to see the evidence harvard is fighting to keep the documents private out of concern for applicants who would game the system the case is set to go to trial in october bernice corpuz wbz newsradio ten thirty six people are displaced after an overnight fire in leominster child and a firefighter suffered minor injuries and the two alarm fire at the multifamily residence on lincoln terrace the cause of the fire is under investigation a miracle in montana as a five month old infants survives more than nine hours in the woods wearing nothing but a wet onesie while police were arresting a man for threatening people and the lolo national forest the suspect told officers a baby was buried somewhere in the woods officials calm the forest for six hours and found the infant face down under a pile of sticks and debris in forty five degree weather the baby boy suffered minor scrapes and bruising but overall is in good health francis crowley faces multiple charges including criminal endangerment the nature of his relationship to the infant is not known british prime minister theresa may is defending her plans for so called softer brexit that would allow the uk to keep some ties with the european union space to parliament comes after two cabinet members resigned in opposition to the plan abc's marcus wilford says the resignations have thrown the brexit process into doubt brexit process has been triggered by the uk and will happen if this course continues the end of march next year there is one other scenario that some people are holding onto you is people don't want brexit is that somehow parliament will vote against the deal is finally agreed because it's so oracle all the parliament will somehow because it doesn't like what's happening vote to have a second referendum the prime minister says her pros post brexit trade plan is the only way to avoid a hard border with ireland wbz news time eight twenty two and.

Ireland ABC European Union Lolo National Leominster Bernice Corpuz President Trump Prime Minister Parliament Harvard Marcus Wilford UK Theresa Endangerment Francis Crowley Montana Lincoln Terrace
Diplomatic flurry in bid to revive Trump-Kim summit

All News, Traffic and Weather

01:15 min | 3 years ago

Diplomatic flurry in bid to revive Trump-Kim summit

"The man was in his thirties at this time officials believe this was simply a freak accident in belgium officials say a man shot and killed two police officers and a bystander and the eastern city of leauge the shooter has been shot dead after taking off with a woman and holding her hostage inside a high school today shooting happened near a cafe no word yet on whether the man had any affiliation with a terror group president trump confirms an top north korean official is heading to new york for talks on the upcoming summit with kim jong un despite canceling the talks in a letter last week president trump tweeted this morning we put a great team together for our talks with north korea meetings are currently taking place concerning the summit and more solid response to my letter thank you south korean media reports senior north korean official kim jong coal is on the passenger list for flight leaving beijing tomorrow headed for the us a community in wooster came together last night to honor a teenager shot dead over the weekend wbz's carl stevens tells us it's worcester's first fatal shooting this year together to the local park in worcester on monday a place where sixteen year old sydney crow used to go to play basketball they gathered to remember friends and family.

Basketball Sydney Carl Stevens Beijing Kim Jong North Korea President Trump Belgium Group President Worcester Wooster Donald Trump Kim Jong Un New York Official Sixteen Year
"group president" Discussed on Fake the Nation

Fake the Nation

01:58 min | 3 years ago

"group president" Discussed on Fake the Nation

"There's no there's no objective truth and we're all particle and a wave doesn't matter sort of strategy that might work ultimately have you noticed it's been working for the pets it's so i mean it's it's so beguiling so distracting i don't think that it is a considered strategy on the part of rudy giuliani i think he's just a confused creep who doesn't know what he's supposed to say and has has not read the material yet he's so addicted to being on television that will go on there without even knowing what he's talking about but i do think that there is an intuitive strategy that he and donald trump share which is to just paint the zone with conflicting facts and let other people try to worry them out while they move onto the next thing you're far too generous well go on while you seem to suggest that there's a strategy behind everything oh no no i mean none at all other than star fuckers giuliani of course we all loved his bit part in season one of celebrity apprentice white house edition he had a great great scene in the sweeps special that was the convention and now who knew he picked up a season three regular so i know juliane really excited that seeds seed early on not accept this plot to come back around i want gingrich to join the teams that could be the nine wives club but they giuliani signs on he gets to be on tv and giuliani's guy who's hasn't been a lawyer for years he sells access to foreign creeps to talk to mayor giuliani that's what he does for a living and now he thinks he's gets to close out his career by being this elder statesman to help this group president and it's going to be a fame train for them the problem is giuliani like trump has no filter has no impulse control needs to be loved needs to be on camera all the time and there's a twenty four hundred propaganda bubble where they can go anytime on this one channel and and be praised and have their egos stroked.

rudy giuliani juliane gingrich group president trump donald trump
VIDEO: Washington state porch pirate injures ankle during getaway

News, Traffic and Weather

02:37 min | 3 years ago

VIDEO: Washington state porch pirate injures ankle during getaway

"Association of women's health obstetric and neonatal nurses on pregnancy related deaths the report coincides with women's history month the group's president gen doyle says it's hard to tell why washington's pregnancy related death rate among women is nine per one hundred thousand when the national average is up to seventeen a review board in washington state that looks at maternal deaths and your rate with nine deaths per one hundred thousand for the years of fourteen fifteen and which is actually similar to nineteen ninety two fortunately washington state your doing something right doyle says the rise in the us pregnancy related death rate may be related to a lack of insurance or some pregnancy centers closing she says women who are pregnant or have had babies recently should seek help if they experienced things like pain bleeding headaches or vision changes the national average of seventeen deaths per one hundred thousand births is higher than many other developed nations i'm taylor van cise and that's another komo extra a global theme for the papal easter message these are your world headlines from abc news pope francis led easter mass in saint peter's square as christians around the world celebrate the most important feast day he asked the faithful to pray for children caught in conflict israel has rejected a call for an investigation into the deaths of fifteen palestinians killed in gaza friday hundreds of others have been injured in ongoing clashes during the great march for return in which palestinians are protesting for their right to go back to homes now in israel germany's foreign minister has said he wants to rebuild dialogue with russia following a slew of diplomatic expulsions it's a rather different position to that taken by german chancellor merkel who's country followed britain and the us and expelling russian officials over the poisoning of a former russian spy the defunct chinese spacelab chenggong one is approaching thumb quickly than previously thought the timeframe for the full through our atmosphere is now expected sometime in the early hours of monday i'm james longman the abc news news foreign desk in london nbc entertainment news here's jason nathanson janet jackson's headed to this year's fyi f fast as a headlining act joining florence and the machine and future on the bill among others the two thousand eighteen fifa we'll take place july twenty first and twenty second in los angeles in addition to our best appearance jackson also gearing up headlining gig at the two thousand eighteen essence festival in new orleans this july she completed her highly anticipated state of the world tour in december new music from season three the voice winter cassidy pope new single take you home i in.

New Orleans Jason Nathanson NBC London Abc News James Longman Britain Chancellor ABC Washington President Trump Association Of Women Gen Doyle Los Angeles Florence Janet Jackson Merkel Russia
The Latest: Russia says spy claims are British posturing

John and Ken

01:18 min | 3 years ago

The Latest: Russia says spy claims are British posturing

"The centers for disease control and prevention says suicide is the second leading cause of death for people aged fifteen to twenty four a consumer group has called for the dwp's ratepayer advocate to be flushed out consumer watchdog accuses the dwp of overcharging customers at ignoring calls to straighten out the bills group president jamie court says the ratepayer advocate isn't living up to his title is terrorism and the dwp is like a soviet bureaucracy it acts like that this woman claims the dwp shut off or power last fall because of a mixed up bill twenty four thousand dollars three kids in my house in santa monica andrew mollenbeck kfi news us ambassador to the united nations has america stands in solidarity with great britain against russia over the poisoning of a former russian spy nikki haley told a meeting of the un security council the us believes russia is responsible for the attack last week if we don't take a media concrete measures to address this now salisbury will not be the last place we see chemical weapons used britain's prime minister says the spy and his daughter were exposed to a military grade nerve agent russia has denied any involvement traffic from the helpful socal honda traffic center we have a crash.

DWP Group President United Nations Britain Russia Nikki Haley Un Security Council United States Prime Minister Jamie Court Santa America Nerve Agent Honda Twenty Four Thousand Dollars