13 Burst results for "Greta Tonsberg"

"greta tonsberg" Discussed on FT Everything Else

FT Everything Else

05:01 min | 4 months ago

"greta tonsberg" Discussed on FT Everything Else

"Ceilings and top to bottom are portrait's bold portraits big and small with vibrant colors. There all by the same artist ashley longshore. And they're all very recognizable. Very powerful women nina simone josephine baker. Michelle obama greta tonsberg beyond say. We have tony morrison oprah winfrey. There's so few places i've come across. That are that have committed to celebrating the beauty of women and not just their physical beauty but their interior beauty. And i feel as though this little gallery. I mean i write about the arts walk into galleries and museums all the time. But this little gallery with these brilliant bright Portrait of women through time in some way or another shaped the way we see the world I can think of a better place. Enuma and i were sitting on a sofa at the window looking into the room. She was wearing this neon pink dress and she looked like one of the women. She actually really matched the women on the walls. New york is like a like one of these vibrant women in the room. In the sense. That i i think. New york is a bit unconquerable navy. Seasons of there may be down seasons. We all have down seasons. These brilliant women have all had their down seasons both in the spotlight and in their personal lives. And i think new york can be looked at in a similar way. Enuma was born in manhattan. But she's lived in many places. Paris oxford legos nigeria. I'll be john and the ivory coast but she keeps coming back to new york. How would you describe you in new york like what parts of your personality. That pullout new york keeps me on the tip of my toes. It keeps me believing that anything is possible. Still and the other thing it does is it continually challenges me to exceed my own limits. And that's actually something. I can also say for nigeria. But i think that's one of the polls of new york for me is. It reminds me that i'm still capable of so much growth and a lot of that growth will come from pushing my own boundaries and new york is a city. I think that doesn't really allow you to stay comfortable. And if you do. You're very cognizant of the fact that you're doing that. I always find my way back. It's almost like that relationship that you you swear. I swear this is the end. We're broken up for good but something about that relationship brings out something about you that you love and you're you're never quite willing to give that up So the relationship may shift. You may different seasons not be as close as you were but you'll always have they'll always be an opening in a space for reconnection. So how long do you anticipate that you'll be here. Do you feel like. I'm in this season and i know we're i'll go next door. It sort of takes you. I have no idea. I have no idea. Well that's not true. I do have some ideas. But i i want life to. I wanna give life room to also extend its own invitations. So the way i look at it. I'm here for now. And i think that's. That's that's good enough to know a few years ago. Life gave me an invitation to visit armenia. My mother is armenian and her father survived the armenian genocide in nineteen fifteen. When one point five million armenians were killed at the end of the ottoman empire. Turkey still denies. The armenian genocide and for political reasons even the. Us didn't officially acknowledge it until this year. Hundred and six years later so a lot of the armenian identity is really really wrapped around trying to have this history affirmed. There's a fear of being a raced There's a need to keep the culture alive. Our family is from what is now considered eastern turkey and because most of the armenian history there has been destroyed. We never knew where home really was the modern country of armenia. We thought it would feel culturally different and we didn't think to go actually really. It felt like a block going to armenia. Felt like going to the moon. You know people have been to the moon so in two thousand eighteen. We went when i went to armenia. I found something. I think anyone with multiple identities can relate to. It was a place where everyone.

Enuma new york ashley longshore nina simone josephine baker greta tonsberg tony morrison nigeria Michelle obama oprah winfrey New york ivory coast navy manhattan oxford Paris armenia john Turkey Us
"greta tonsberg" Discussed on FOMO Sapiens with Patrick J. McGinnis

FOMO Sapiens with Patrick J. McGinnis

05:50 min | 5 months ago

"greta tonsberg" Discussed on FOMO Sapiens with Patrick J. McGinnis

"Yeah and we'll get into you know you mentioned like they're they're it's complicated. There are some really basic stuff you can do to not die and we'll get into that in a bit. But i do want to talk about so i got imagine when i was reading the book which which i really enjoy like. I don't say the all time this is. This has just like a lotta very practical stuff in it but it's also kind of it's what my friend anesthesia see bone says his future gazing. That's her that's her full motion. You invented that concept. Which is the idea of looking into the future now. So i'm thinking like great. So i'm going to have one hundred fifty just in time for the environment to go to you. Know blow up and like the seas overtake the earth. And there's like out shortage of water and then we all die. Greta tonsberg is screaming in my ear as all fifty dying and like. It's an interesting question. Just like i have zero foam. Oh about living in a world where the environment is consuming the earth. And we're all dying horrible death so like how do you square that with this. This longevity is the solution just like well the same way. That technology is gonna fix human longevity. It's also going to fix the earth. Or how do you of think that through. Yeah well let's see that's the biggest problem. I know a lot of people who actually don't like the idea of extending our health span on lifespan. on the country it sixty to seventy five percent of people actually would. He ate the idea of life extension and for the good reason. And i as i always say we have created. It's the science and technology on of extending our life. What we haven't created line. We want to extend so. And i just don a fedex stock morality off your mortality and my point is we need to solve enormous amount of ethical problems about the future and about diversion of the world..

Greta tonsberg fedex
"greta tonsberg" Discussed on Ride the Omnibus

Ride the Omnibus

05:16 min | 1 year ago

"greta tonsberg" Discussed on Ride the Omnibus

"Yeah if the greta tonsberg world can't actually convince everyone who has that kind of control to use that power for good. What do we do. I mean that's our my optimism comes from i. I really believe that there is so much power in the individual and that in the individual become a collective and if we as a collective. And that's why i think. Hopefully this film in all the other films books have been written about. These issues are starting to wake people up to the fact that this is an important issue that is a foundational issue as jeff said it underlies so many of the problems in our current culture today that if we all demand action both at our own individual level and also at the system level. Then there's actually an opportunity for us to change it because just like with climate change we created these from were humans and we built these problems and that means that we have a responsibility to fix them. Now i have another question for you. Which is do you think. And i know this is maybe an unfair question to ask because it might lead you to some humble bragging. I wonder if because the impact of this documentary has been so huge. Do you think that is directly contributing to the fact that people are now talking about this justice department case and other ways of going after the social media platforms. I don't think we can take credit at all for the justice case Not by any means. But i do think this is as movements are born and gain. Traction there have been countless people talking about this in shouting from the rooftops for years. Now we're hoping to just add another touch point in a long history of storytelling and activism in work. I think that's that's how we've looked at our climate work. And i think that's how they look at this product as well. My hope is that if for people like your mom that you described that might not know about the issue. That much might be hearing different things..

greta tonsberg jeff
"greta tonsberg" Discussed on The Propaganda Report

The Propaganda Report

06:16 min | 1 year ago

"greta tonsberg" Discussed on The Propaganda Report

"She from her organizing at Spelman and all the other activists activities, she ended up getting a job for the mayor of Atlanta at the time I believe, and then she also ended up speaking at the thirtieth anniversary of the million, man March, and if you go back and watch that speech, and you listen to the words only you think listening to Greta Tonsberg. Why do you mean she says the same stuff? Give the youth the power. The you should be in charge. The young people need to lead. That's very interesting. There's another another girl where you can find. It's almost identical language with Greta it certainly is. I wouldn't be surprised if there's a handbook somewhere memo somewhere. That has those those bullet points highlighted. So that's that's Kinda. Her backstory and she likes to use those experiences those moments as the touchstone for kind of where she came from where her motions lie what her activism has been, but for me and I I don't want to move on and saw. Fleshed all that out, so they sent. You want to, but for me, this is all this is all part of an image, a very carefully crafted image. I call this kind of person what I think. She is a created person where it Kinda starts in high school that they craft what this person is going to present to the world, and sometimes they change course I. Think ASC is one of those people, but they were going to have her. Be a super upright. Upright person, and then they decided to make her kind of a hard scrabble person, but in this case the internships there is such a laundry list of internships that stacy was involved in that are clearly of a globalist nature and a kind of a specific globalist nature I want to actually go through them and highlight what each one represents. Some of them fold into institutions that you're well aware of what their goals are. What else her backstory before we move on. I think we've led up to the internship portion pretty well. Yeah, so yeah, because this is where we are time line wise, so she graduated from Yale and ninety nine. Some of the internships have a time stamp on them. Some of them don't so the one that that and this bio is not plastered all over every place I I saw emerge a little bit some references to it recently because they wanna say, they want to counter the argument. It seems like that. She is totally unqualified to vice president because she hasn't had any real leadership position. Especially in politics. And so some people have said how accomplished she is, because of these internships which are granted, they are granted to you. This is not where she built a business worth X Y, and Z without any aid from government funding, or or regulatory privileges or anything like that, so let's just start taking them off, and you can chime in the first thing is she is a lifetime member of the Council of Foreign Relations. So I'm not. She got a young age to yes. She started out with the term membership. I think it was and I. Think Heidi crews had something like that, but then her defense later was that she's not a term that she's not a lifetime member. She did not graduate on to being a permanent member of the council formulations, but this gives you access to people and Power and. And also brings you under the influence of. Say. There's they Kabbalah world thing. It's what Hillary Clinton. Herself called the mothership. The mothership of she was secretary of State. She wanted she said. It's I'm so glad you opened an office in DC because I, don't I get sick of going to New York to the mothership to get my marching orders. Something like that. That's a paraphrase was pretty close to what she actually said. And that's this. That's this thing that is kind of number one on Stacey Aram's list of institutional affiliations. Now that. Council foreign relations is a sister or daughter of the Royal Institute for International Affairs and the Chatham House, which you know so much about and she she goes there. She does her speeches that she tosses people the. She's the only politician. That, I've seen be a speaker. At every one of these major think tanks and such a short period of time frequently, she's like. A guest speaker that they bring in to talk about the issues of the day which she's what she's been talking about. Is Voter suppression. All Right? That's her. That's her. That's her what her. Goal in life, I raised on Tatra is going to be I think in the here now, and then it might branch off to where she's the leader of the opposition after if there's a democrat loss, or if she's not the VP or something like that, and then or could be a stepping stone to if she does get the VP spot, and and is in that position. Don Trump does lose so. I don't have a date on this, but these things I think all kind of happened before she entered the Georgia state senate I think it was in two thousand seven. These these internships were all before that because this is from her bio for that, but she was a British American project fellow, which is a it. It used to be called a British American project for successor generations fellow. It's a Reagan era organization. It is considered a neoconservative slash liberal networking machine, so those believe it or not are kind of similar concepts, neoconservative neo liberal I think they kind of call. It Neo Liberal in Europe where you are neo feudalist, even is this idea of free markets and Libertarianism Liberal, as if that's a data is always going to be captured by the financial powers, the big banks as as a libertarian I can tell you that is not what real free markets would be mom-and-pop Entrepreneurship add to allow a leveling of the playing field..

Greta Tonsberg VP Council of Foreign Relations Spelman Don Trump Atlanta Hillary Clinton Yale Europe Royal Institute for Internatio Tatra Heidi crews vice president stacy Stacey Aram Georgia Reagan Chatham House
"greta tonsberg" Discussed on Talks with Petri

Talks with Petri

04:12 min | 1 year ago

"greta tonsberg" Discussed on Talks with Petri

"I mean it's so easy to this train like you know go shopping. He believed that I could. There's an escapade to kind of finding luck. Enjoy somewhere else and I think that the problem is that when you're only spending time optimizing their next moment here never living in the moment when you get there. It's such a stupid thing to do to say that you know. I have these attributes therefore my beliefs are ex after member that there are more people going to be born in in the future than ever has been born. Get so horrible to see that we have a world where we're not collaborating about. The topics also means that my life has absolutely no value on. I'm living other people. Almost every person of the planet has something extremely interesting about the hell harmful how Sweden I mean Sweden Super Crazy? I mean Sweden is usually the you know a very noncontroversial country in the world. I mean Greta. Tonsberg of course made a bit controversial for some people but I think that I mean twenty. Twenty is the year we're in Sweden is also controversial on health topics like code. And I think that it's It's rare to be the country that everybody in the world seems to have So strong opinions about but otherwise. It's good I think I feel. It's okay but at the craziest thing is how many people ask me about specific stuff about Sweden and Covenant Dean and. I just have to remind them that. I neither an immunologist. Nora economic health experts. Are you still walking by standing by your desk gets IAM but actually I haven't done I actually didn't bring that to my Home Office So actually I had used to have this amazing Belt that I could have a walking when I was meetings and it was actually helping me quite enough to focus on the meetings. I think if I was born later I'm nine hundred seventy nine. I think it was born ten years later. I probably would have been the group that got some discussion about if I had. Adhd and if you have whatever have add or something. I think that if I move part of my body use muscles than somehow my brain is much more relaxed on focusing so for me..

Sweden Adhd
Democracy Cant Thrive in Chaos

Dare I Say

08:54 min | 1 year ago

Democracy Cant Thrive in Chaos

"Jane Fonda was arrested five times for environmental protest outside the Capitol this fall. She accepted a BAFTA film award while being taken into custody and photographs. The actor cast a striking figure in handcuffs in red will coat. It's a color fitting for the protests which are inspired by global school strikes and called Fire Drill. Fridays fresh from her arrest streak. The activists joined environmental justice campaigner and community organizer. Peggy Shepherd to record a live episode of Dare. I say in partnership with AMEX AT SAKS fifth avenue in New York City Peggy has been at the forefront of the Environmental Justice Movement in the US for a long time. She founded nonprofit organization. We Act for Environmental Justice in North Manhattan in the eighties. It helped low income New Yorkers in particular communities of color fight harmful environmental policies. It now fights for better environmental and health policies on a local and national level in the I live recorded episode of Dare. I say peggy and Jane discussed civil disobedience the green new deal resilience and why it is important for women to lead the climate conversation. How can we remedy empathy crisis? That has hurt generations of Americans. Why is the cult of rugged individualism driving climate disaster? What can older generations learned from teenagers at the decades on the frontlines? Peggy and Jane Have Not Stop Fighting. They are women who dare. Hi You know. We have a lot in common where activists arrested. But why have you decided to be arrested and to be active at this moment in time over Labor Day weekend? I felt great malaise because I drive an electric car and I do away with single use plastics and I make all those right personal lifestyle choices but I knew that they're not going to be able to scale up in time to get us where we need to be is a good place to start but it's no place to stop and so. I read a book by Klein that talked about a green new deal and talked about gratitude and it inspired me to get out of my comfort zone as Greta says we have to do and not behave business as usual as you know better than a lot of people. We have decades many decades more than forty years writing speeches and books and getting the word out about the science. What the science says. And we've marched and we've rallied and we've played nice and it hasn't worked enough and we only have eleven years left and so we have to up the stakes and I think we have to mobilize and go into the streets and put our bodies on the line and engage in civil disobedience and risk getting arrested. I don't WANNA BE ARRESTED. But you know you have to be willing to risk it so I went. I moved to DC for four months to win gaijin fired real Fridays because Fridays is the day that Greta and the student climate strikers have chosen to strike for climate so I want to support them and helpless their message teenagers today were born more than a decade after NASA scientists warned Congress about climate change in nineteen eighty eight. James Hansen told lawmakers at the time that he was ninety nine percent sure that human activity was causing temperatures to rise. Teenagers today have inherited the climate crisis. They have grown up. In a world of apocalyptic headlines and increasingly volatile weather. It's no surprise that they are extremely intelligent educated and now taking to the streets sweetest teenager. Greta Tonsberg inspired a wave of student protests across the world when she skipped school to strike outside of her country's parliament. And so how do you feel that? We really can motivate young people and youth to really be the strong activists that they need because they are going to inherit this climate this globe right now. What I'm feeling is I don't need to motivate them. They're motivating me. They're the ones because they see that we've taken their future not we. The fossil fuel industry has is robbing them of the future and we can't let them shoulder this burden by themselves. So Granny's unite. Older people have to get out there and and we have to stand along side them. This is a collective crisis that's going to require a collective solution that means all of us together because it is a stomach and we know that we can each take the issues that we need. Whether it's changing light bulbs whether it's recycling. We know that we can do all of those things. But we know that it's systemic and that we gotta come together collectively to educate our elected officials and to pressure the policymakers to really pass the kind of legislation that we all need. But we know that we can't do that with the message. Simply reducing carpet or a message. Simple energy efficiency. We've got a really embraced the values that appeal to all of our communities because Oliver Communities are not whole. They're not healthy. We know that millions of people in this country are living with bad air. They don't have clean water and they are disproportionately impacted by pollution and the Environmental Justice Movement has really for the last thirty years were to achieve environmental protection for all communities and we know also that when we talk about climate change and you hear people talk about climate justice. Climate Justice is not just a cool phrase. It's really a term that is focused on the most vulnerable communities. And how we've got to take action to ensure that the most vulnerable are protected because when that happens we're all protected and so we've got agreement deal and we know that that's been an important framework that's been proposed and it's wonderful that she was not prescriptive. Afc and the others who have talked about this framework we know that it has motivated sectors of of our country to get together and fill in the blanks. What they think is a green new deal what they need for their communities and for their lives and that's been a very important motivator. I think in this moment for a long time. There's been this rap that the environmental movement is white and elite. I think even Obama kind of felt that way but my experience is that that is not the case and then in fact people of color who live in the frontline communities have been very much at the forefront of the environmental movement and are the bravest strongest voices. It's a stereotype that people of color don't really care about the environment. Because they're really concerned with with jobs and food and of course we're all concerned with that but what? I've found predominantly above ninety sixth street when we have monthly membership meetings. It's not the more fluent Brown's donors who are coming out on these sites. It's people from public housing. We get so many calls about air pollution coming into their apartments about odors and emissions from trucks cars buses. We have worker training program for under employed young men and we invited them to come to our membership meetings to hear about issues of climate change or toxins in and chemicals cosmetics and they were able to understand the issue they were able for the probably the first time in their lives to talk to an elected official and tell them what they felt in what they needed and so it's about support. People know what they need. They just need some support to be able to advocate and to be able to. Maybe have a place to come and use computer. Have a place to come and ask some key questions. Let me just tell you that the upcoming mayoral public housing tenants are going to be a major factor in who gets elected and we're going to be organizing them and there's coalitions all over the city to ensure that some of the most vulnerable people are the ones who are going to be part of the solution and so I would simply say that the most vulnerable when we address them we lift all boats. It's not about trickle down. It's about lifting everyone up together and that's what creates an equitable and just society.

Peggy Shepherd Greta Tonsberg Environmental Justice Movement Jane Fonda Official United States Amex Oliver Communities James Hansen North Manhattan New York Barack Obama Granny Klein
"greta tonsberg" Discussed on Reset with Jenn White

Reset with Jenn White

09:35 min | 2 years ago

"greta tonsberg" Discussed on Reset with Jenn White

"Khleifi by. That's the shortened named for climate. Change fiction it's an increasingly popular genre as authors tried to imagine the future impact of rising temperatures or sea levels on their characters and the world. They live it well. Climate change is always on our minds reset over the past several weeks. We've been tracking the wildfires in Australia. And today Chicago Globalstar Lauri Markkanen announced his new campaign to Dunk for climate awareness. So we thought we'd revisit last year's conversation about Khleifi. We spoke with Sarah Democ today. She's an assistant professor at Lafayette College. An expert in climate change fiction DEMOC started. The conversation by explaining Shumur. came from the genre has really important. Didn't precedence I think particularly literature about nuclear holocausts that we saw in the mid twentieth centuries so imagining environmental devastation on a global global scale or even something farther back like Mary. Shelley's Frankenstein which was written in eighteen sixteen but was written in this summer right after the volcanic corruption of Mount Tambora and in Europe at that time because of the ash circulating in the atmosphere it was a really wet dark gloomy summer summer and within the atmosphere Mary Shelley created this story about the limitations of scientific engineering and this real sense of Gothic Science so those are important precedents but climate fiction as we think about it. Today is really simultaneous with a growing concern about anthropogenic climate. Change change or climate change caused by human activity. And so I think it took off in the nineteen ninety s always hard to pinpoint originally. But for me. A real landmark moment would be Octavia Butler's parable of the sower in nineteen ninety-three and since then we've seen a real Outpouring of fiction right around the turn of the twenty first century you mentioned Octavia Butler. What other authors can we look to as being really prominent armed forces in the Shawna when I think about the climate movement itself? I've been so excited recently. To see voices of young people and indigenous voices really coming to the forefront and I think we see a similar thing happening within climate writing so a book I really have loved recently is the Mero thieves gives by Sherry des. Moines she is a Matisse author from Canada. And that's a fabulous book about the arts of survival with an in an altered climate. It follows a young group of indigenous youths who are displaced from their homes and within this alter your climate are trying to survive together. And I think that's such an important work because it draws on the longer histories of colonialism that still continued to impact hacked the way we experienced the climate crisis. I'm so that's one piece I would point to you on my also. Love some classics within the field. Like Barbara King Silvers flight behavior is a fabulous depiction of how climate knowledge circulates within rural communities particularly with an Appalachia. And I think it's really important for all of us to read books that are being published outside the United States too so I like anti to Annan's the healer. It's a Finnish mystery mystery novel. Mr Novels always fun and page-turners at it thinks about climate change within the discourse of mystery and Crime and how we think about guilt and culpability for the climate situation that we find ourselves within does clarify allow authors to explore or reckon with breath other parts of the world history. As as some of the things that we've grown accustomed to systems breakdown in the face of climate change that you have to have this reckoning with other parts of how we've lived up until now absolutely yes. I think that's one of the most important things that climate fiction is revealing right now now and I can point to a few novels that I think are grappling with how to tell these long-form stories that think about future climates. In relation Shen to our histories of slavery oppression and colonialism. And one that I've really been fascinated by is American war. Her by Omar Al Assad. It's a story about a future civil war. In the United States that has prompted by a restriction restriction on fossil fuel usage and the south secedes from the United States in order to continue a fossil fuel economy and so we see these questions of energy and productivity and development and capitalism playing into this story in really long form ways. There's obviously a lot of dystopia and stories in this genre but I'm wondering about the stories where the problems are solved. I think about Mechanic unlike the Star Trek Canon. We're the future though it has its issues is ultimately pretty hopeful. What do we find there? Yeah so one of the genre's within climate fiction that I think because really lively right now is young adult writing and I want to Credit Stephanie. Lima nausea for helping me. Think through this More thoroughly but I think that within in young adult fiction right now. We're seeing young protagonists. Who are really actively working to rethink how they live? Not only in relationship to the environment around them. But in relation to each other and so Octavian Butler's parable of the sower which is a nineteen ninety-three book is a prime example example of this at futures nineteen year old protagonist. WHO's trying to rethink how to build human community and how to save seeds and how to invest rest in some of these crafts and skills that produce the kind of just world that we're looking for? What relationship does climate change fiction? Russian have with actual scientific research on climate change. My colleagues who work in atmospheric sciences geology will produce climate models. So they'll think about how we project the world climate within fifty or a hundred or two hundred years and I think that fiction writers are doing really similar their project where they're trying to project future worlds although they do that imaginatively instead of data. How hopeful are you that this genre can an elevate the conversations we have around climate change considering it this is fiction but it is based in the science? That's being released over time. I'm very hopeful. I think that fiction writers have a crucial contribution for thinking about how we live on our present altered planet and also As the planet continues to change often in very dramatic ways. I think that we need fiction. Writers visions in order to think through you how to live together and how to imaginatively craft new ways of thinking about human society so we think about climate change not only through facts and figures but also what these futures will look like in terms of social relationships political relationships and how we will experience some emotionally for people who aren't familiar with genre. Maybe don't read a lot of science fiction. Can you give us a couple of good entry point books to read absolutely. I love giving giving book recommendations so I think a good entry point book would be Barbara Kings. Elvis flight behavior. That is I think a useful useful book because it's grounded those specifically in one location and so it's really a story about a community where people have lived for for generations and suddenly this flock of monarch butterflies arrives the migration has been rerouted because of shifts in temperature and it's a question of how that community comes to understand the arrival of these butterflies. So it helps us see the ways in which climate knowledge percolates elites within human community and how relationships with neighbors and your belief systems really impact. How you receive Clement Knowledge and how you transmit that knowledge I also really really enjoy a book called the Carbon Diaries? It's by British writer named Suchy. Lloyd Loyd and it's a diary It chronicles this ordinary teenage girl named Laura Brown who lives in London as England begins to ration ration carbon usage and it follows a period of extreme social unrest across Europe. And it's really a story of Laura grappling with confronting this new world but also really confronting the apathy of older generations and the lethargy of climatic action. And it's I think a call to you some of the youth movements that we're seeing. I'm thinking particularly about activists like Greta. Tonsberg in Sweden who are leading climate strikes propagated mainly by children. Karen and Dunkin's. That's Sarah Democ. She's an assistant professor at Lafayette College. An expert in climate change fiction. And that's Today's three-set threaten us again tomorrow as tackle the biggest local news stories of the week on our Friday news round up until then. I'm Jen White. Thanks for listening. And let's talk against him.

Sarah Democ Lafayette College United States assistant professor Octavia Butler Khleifi Australia Mary Shelley Europe Globalstar Omar Al Assad Lauri Markkanen Chicago Mount Tambora Lima Sherry des Barbara King Silvers Canada
"greta tonsberg" Discussed on Reset with Jenn White

Reset with Jenn White

10:13 min | 2 years ago

"greta tonsberg" Discussed on Reset with Jenn White

"New approach by the Cook. County assessor is a big deal for a lot of investors and they're concerned about it tenants aren't concerned about as much investors are and until that is sort of ironed out little bit. You're going to see I think a bit of the slow down and so I think once that is a little more clear and people can predict a little bit more about property taxes and the cost. They have if they're going to build something new. That's when you might start to see something flattened or maybe even pick up. That's Danny Ecker. He's a reporter for CRAIN's Chicago Business. Danny thinks much. Thanks as always Khleifi by. That's the shortened named for climate. Change fiction it's an increasingly popular genre as authors tried to imagine the future impact of rising temperatures or sea levels on their characters and the world. They live it well. Climate change is always on our minds reset over the past several weeks. We've been tracking the wildfires in Australia. And today Chicago Globalstar Lauri Markkanen announced his new campaign to Dunk for climate awareness. So we thought we'd revisit last year's conversation about Khleifi. We spoke with Sarah Democ today. She's an assistant professor at Lafayette College. An expert in climate change fiction DEMOC started. The conversation by explaining Shumur. came from the genre has really important. Didn't precedence I think particularly literature about nuclear holocausts that we saw in the mid twentieth centuries so imagining environmental devastation on a global global scale or even something farther back like Mary. Shelley's Frankenstein which was written in eighteen sixteen but was written in this summer right after the volcanic corruption of Mount Tambora and in Europe at that time because of the ash circulating in the atmosphere it was a really wet dark gloomy summer summer and within the atmosphere Mary Shelley created this story about the limitations of scientific engineering and this real sense of Gothic Science so those are important precedents but climate fiction as we think about it. Today is really simultaneous with a growing concern about anthropogenic climate. Change change or climate change caused by human activity. And so I think it took off in the nineteen ninety s always hard to pinpoint originally. But for me. A real landmark moment would be Octavia Butler's parable of the sower in nineteen ninety-three and since then we've seen a real Outpouring of fiction right around the turn of the twenty first century you mentioned Octavia Butler. What other authors can we look to as being really prominent armed forces in the Shawna when I think about the climate movement itself? I've been so excited recently. To see voices of young people and indigenous voices really coming to the forefront and I think we see a similar thing happening within climate writing so a book I really have loved recently is the Mero thieves gives by Sherry des. Moines she is a Matisse author from Canada. And that's a fabulous book about the arts of survival with an in an altered climate. It follows a young group of indigenous youths who are displaced from their homes and within this alter your climate are trying to survive together. And I think that's such an important work because it draws on the longer histories of colonialism that still continued to impact hacked the way we experienced the climate crisis. I'm so that's one piece I would point to you on my also. Love some classics within the field. Like Barbara King Silvers flight behavior is a fabulous depiction of how climate knowledge circulates within rural communities particularly with an Appalachia. And I think it's really important for all of us to read books that are being published outside the United States too so I like anti to Annan's the healer. It's a Finnish mystery mystery novel. Mr Novels always fun and page-turners at it thinks about climate change within the discourse of mystery and Crime and how we think about guilt and culpability for the climate situation that we find ourselves within does clarify allow authors to explore or reckon with breath other parts of the world history. As as some of the things that we've grown accustomed to systems breakdown in the face of climate change that you have to have this reckoning with other parts of how we've lived up until now absolutely yes. I think that's one of the most important things that climate fiction is revealing right now now and I can point to a few novels that I think are grappling with how to tell these long-form stories that think about future climates. In relation Shen to our histories of slavery oppression and colonialism. And one that I've really been fascinated by is American war. Her by Omar Al Assad. It's a story about a future civil war. In the United States that has prompted by a restriction restriction on fossil fuel usage and the south secedes from the United States in order to continue a fossil fuel economy and so we see these questions of energy and productivity and development and capitalism playing into this story in really long form ways. There's obviously a lot of dystopia and stories in this genre but I'm wondering about the stories where the problems are solved. I think about Mechanic unlike the Star Trek Canon. We're the future though it has its issues is ultimately pretty hopeful. What do we find there? Yeah so one of the genre's within climate fiction that I think because really lively right now is young adult writing and I want to Credit Stephanie. Lima nausea for helping me. Think through this More thoroughly but I think that within in young adult fiction right now. We're seeing young protagonists. Who are really actively working to rethink how they live? Not only in relationship to the environment around them. But in relation to each other and so Octavian Butler's parable of the sower which is a nineteen ninety-three book is a prime example example of this at futures nineteen year old protagonist. WHO's trying to rethink how to build human community and how to save seeds and how to invest rest in some of these crafts and skills that produce the kind of just world that we're looking for? What relationship does climate change fiction? Russian have with actual scientific research on climate change. My colleagues who work in atmospheric sciences geology will produce climate models. So they'll think about how we project the world climate within fifty or a hundred or two hundred years and I think that fiction writers are doing really similar their project where they're trying to project future worlds although they do that imaginatively instead of data. How hopeful are you that this genre can an elevate the conversations we have around climate change considering it this is fiction but it is based in the science? That's being released over time. I'm very hopeful. I think that fiction writers have a crucial contribution for thinking about how we live on our present altered planet and also As the planet continues to change often in very dramatic ways. I think that we need fiction. Writers visions in order to think through you how to live together and how to imaginatively craft new ways of thinking about human society so we think about climate change not only through facts and figures but also what these futures will look like in terms of social relationships political relationships and how we will experience some emotionally for people who aren't familiar with genre. Maybe don't read a lot of science fiction. Can you give us a couple of good entry point books to read absolutely. I love giving giving book recommendations so I think a good entry point book would be Barbara Kings. Elvis flight behavior. That is I think a useful useful book because it's grounded those specifically in one location and so it's really a story about a community where people have lived for for generations and suddenly this flock of monarch butterflies arrives the migration has been rerouted because of shifts in temperature and it's a question of how that community comes to understand the arrival of these butterflies. So it helps us see the ways in which climate knowledge percolates elites within human community and how relationships with neighbors and your belief systems really impact. How you receive Clement Knowledge and how you transmit that knowledge I also really really enjoy a book called the Carbon Diaries? It's by British writer named Suchy. Lloyd Loyd and it's a diary It chronicles this ordinary teenage girl named Laura Brown who lives in London as England begins to ration ration carbon usage and it follows a period of extreme social unrest across Europe. And it's really a story of Laura grappling with confronting this new world but also really confronting the apathy of older generations and the lethargy of climatic action. And it's I think a call to you some of the youth movements that we're seeing. I'm thinking particularly about activists like Greta. Tonsberg in Sweden who are leading climate strikes propagated mainly by children. Karen and Dunkin's. That's Sarah Democ. She's an assistant professor at Lafayette College. An expert in climate change fiction. And that's Today's three-set threaten us again tomorrow as tackle the biggest local news stories of the week on our Friday news round up until then. I'm Jen White. Thanks for listening. And let's talk against him.

Sarah Democ United States Danny Ecker Lafayette College assistant professor Octavia Butler Europe Mary Shelley Khleifi Omar Al Assad Australia reporter Mount Tambora CRAIN Globalstar Chicago Business Lima
"greta tonsberg" Discussed on Cory Doctorow's craphound.com » Podcast

Cory Doctorow's craphound.com » Podcast

12:22 min | 2 years ago

"greta tonsberg" Discussed on Cory Doctorow's craphound.com » Podcast

"For adults in real life. A graphic novel information doesn't want to be free that staring a book about earning the living in the Internet age and homeland ways. Equal to little brother is next book as Poesie the Monster Slayer a picture book for young readers that is diverse career. Welcome Corey thank you very much you know. I thought we were talking about the nineteen sixty four world's fair exhibition. The carousel Peres. Now disappointed. Well you can actually keep steering it towards nineteen sixty sixty four because I think it can't escape. Nineteen sixty four. Yeah absolutely well. Let's let's start out though you actually created a well known Novella Avella In twenty eleven called the great big beautiful tomorrow which is about a a man who has maintained the carousel of progress onto the future And that's as good a way as need to explain what the heck the carousel of progress is. And why were you fast enough to make it such a prominent part of your piece. Well it's a it's a funny Set of coincidences. So I'm a Canadian. By birth and my grandparents were lauderdale retirees and so they lived in a gate guarded seniors community entity that got sent to every year for Christmas so we get into the China air conditioned legno dry drive to Orlando because there is nothing to do and century village in Deerfield beach near Fort Lauderdale and then that was in the days which Walt Disneyworld was still in the ticket system. It was before in knots Berry Farm California went to an all. You can eat gate that what drove Disneyland and Disneyworld to adopt all. You can eat programs but there were a couple of attractions in Disneyworld. That were underwritten by industry To Tomorrowland Moorland One and eventually and there is the carousel of progress. And if you had wings Later if you could fly and the enchanted tiki room presented by the Florida Orange Growers and so I wrote all of those eighteen Quin Chilean Times because I would use up all the tickets really quickly and my grandparents were GonNa get me more now at the same meantime I also used to go with my folks because they sometimes come down as well and I grew up in a funny millea. My My Parents are high-tech Communist. My Dad's a trotskyist computer scientist contest and that kind of fully automated luxury communist vision that you know industry would produce so much plenty that we could do away with work altogether altogether and replace it with a kind of You know kind of jetpack. Socialism was really key. I think to the the way that I grew up understanding what the future could look like and care so progress. It's pretty damn close right. Apart from the fact that it's constant ads for g replaces with you know constant pans to the Wisdom of establishing a a dictatorship of the proletariat. And you've got a a pretty Dang astro socialist experience there. It's it's it's kind of. Yeah you're right one of the things that I think. There's that the accident of it being created for the world's fair in nineteen sixty four and underwritten by corporations operations at you know jeans jeep pavilion. So it has had to have I presume a relentless relentless positive ism such that like it. It opens wedding in the around the turn of the night of the twentieth century end. And it's just one thing they keep saying they go through the deter the Twentieth Century Nine Nineteen Twenty s and nineteen forties and then whatever the heck act for is they keep saying things are getting better. It can't get any better and it's GonNa there's just this notion and that we're just gonNA keep making stuff and everything we make is going to take one more bad thing off the shelf that we had to deal with In the in in the past and I guess you're right that that ties into corporate appropriate message. There's a funny flip flop over the different revs of that ride over the years because they kept changing the theme I saw so the theme song was for quite some time. There's a great big beautiful tomorrow but it was periodically replaced with now is the best time of your life which which you know? Talk about an articles of surrender for trying to imagine the future right. It's a very kind of Thatcher. Shay Ide- Remember Thatcher said there is no alternative live right. It's declaring the end of history. You know there's there's arguably nothing more or less science fictional than there is no alternative. Yes basically saying stop trying trying to think about alternative and now is the best time of your life is either incredibly token right. Like it's all downhill from here or or just fatalistic. Right right a camp possibly get any better. No you're right I it's it's actually boy you can't you anytime you figure that phrase you're going to think of it in two ways you're going to see both sides of that coin instantly like Carly Simon singing. These are the good old days that either means hold onto the fact that you're living in an area an era that deserves to be to be a to be celebrated and at the same time. have no hope Brook. No idea that things are going going to going to get To get any better I mean you know it throughout the ride and you you talking in your story about how the guy has like had opportunities -tunities to make the audio animatronic which is the way that the you know. These mannequins essentially keep moving sat opportunities to make the work better but there was something that his father other believed that it was like he wanted to capture to capture the nineteen sixty four ride in with all of its weird would movements and in all of that stuff and and and You know that there was something magical about freezing it in in time like that. Well sure I mean so for one thing that that kind of very analog nature right the the kind of soul annoyed driven which I guess is kind of digital in that? There's not a lot of intermediate states that Sullen I'd driven movement is very characteristic mystic of its day and something that is lost. If you replace it with something slicker. It's it's a little like the difference between the stylized hand-drawn animation an and the especially the early days of Three D. animation in these days you know three D. animation is so well accomplished just that. It hardly seems like animation at all and so it's gone. It's gone from feeling very stylized unconscious unlike people made a bunch of really deliberate decisions to feeling like it is indistinguishable from a series of beautifully executed paintings. Or something or you know. Cost you drama with amazing sap drama. Yeah imagine if you will if you open on one thousand nine hundred and one and the dads they're reading the paper and it's in the new version. It's Valentine's Day. Think and he's telling his story but it's an actor somehow special you got me pretty be pretty An unimpressive right to see that that reenacted one interesting thing about the original show in sixty four was that it exited not through gift shop but through a Diorama of a domed home city called progress city. That was the city of the future that g promised to build and that is really closely related to the Epcot. Vision that wall. Todd Haad experimental prototype city of tomorrow. So you know Walt Disneyworld Is built a special economic zone called a really creek improvement. District that's effectively actively incorporated independent township that The Walt Disney Company owns lock stock and barrel. And and WHO's ordinances. They enact themselves so they effectively self-regulate and one of the things that famously they obtain state permission for when they charted the town was the right to cite a new G. nuclear reactor there should the need arise without without further permitting. And that's in the sixty four show. There's this if you There there you can get the Acetates of the of the narration On a couple of Disney reissues. And I'm sure they're on youtube somewhere. There's this amazing moment in the voice over narration as you walk through the Diorama and it's narrated by the actress who did the mother and father other character and and The woman says to our right as are most welcome neighbor are g nuclear power plant and And you know it's it's full of like incredible voice over like that like you know. Shopping is a breeze. Now that our downtown core has been covered in a giant weather impervious pervious dot com G.. Calls it a climate controlled environment but mother calls and then the female actor rates and says a sparkling jewel. uh-huh it's really something but you know these are threads that we never lost so in Toronto where I'm from Sidewalk labs which is a google spin out has been permitted to build a privatize city within the city. That will use Google surveillance technology to build a so-called smart city and One of the things that has leaked recently has been incredibly controversial. Is Their original program that what was called the yellow book in which they said we intend to incorporate the city much like Reedy Creek Improvement district where we will have the power to police to raise taxes to enact local bylaws to operate Our own school system And so on and that was the that was the goal and so you know this. This vision never changed. And instead what's happened is some of the potential toxic talks ick downsides of a have become much more visible. It's it's it's. It's funny. How you take the Carousel of progress and add sixty years and you you get a black mirror without having to change a single thing right? It's just just the same way that if you you know leave wine in the bottle long enough it turns into vinegar. Yes well I what what strikes me is. I think it remains enormously popular and by the way they haven't updated that things since ninety three so the three is the last time they updated the carousel and doing that. They brought back the older. The older theme Scrapie Beautiful Tomorrow You know so. They traded that they traded to go but but but because it's the old theme and because they haven't updated it in so long now it has this curious feeling of getting into a moving theater and looking back at somebody else's optimism. Because I just summarize Tomorrowland. Yeah you know I. It's a so it. It takes on a weird nostalgic. Feel you know that that. Gosh I wish that I felt as as as optimistic about the future as these guys who built this thing did. Yeah I was a lot of what you were getting in the love of the main character for a great big beautiful tomorrow well and it's easy to think that in the in these eskin logical times times when you know the The Prophet Greta. Tonsberg is Joan of arc in her way across the world. Telling us that that were I. It's you know the end times are Ni- that That was an era that that was an era where they weren't haunted by their imminent demise but of course that was the Cuban missile crisis hero. Right I think I think I was like they were just as justifiably worried about their own imminent demise as as we as well and in fact maybe this is an accident of. Who are the people making this? You know you're talking about Disney G. E. and all these other guys because yeah you're exactly right. Nineteen sixty four right. So what's going on the rat race. They talk about that. You know so you think about like the man in the gray flannel suit. That amazing novel that was just all about how people were coming out of the trauma trauma of fighting in the Pacific War and being thrown into this mechanized worlds that ignored trauma. And that that was bad for you and you know that that was there the fifties was all about this idea fifties movies anyway. At least the stuff I watch was all about how scientists need. Meanwhile they're gonNA make giant grasshoppers. Is it our houses. And just so you know we've always had pessimism. It's just that there's this this so I I basically I'm trying to. I'm trying to wonder if this is a more cynical time. We're living in now or if it's always been more cynical time if we've always believed that's some things are worse. I obviously like you know. Nineteen sixty eight was up there..

Walt Disneyworld The Walt Disney Company Thatcher google Peres Corey Carly Simon jeep pavilion Quin Chilean Times Reedy Creek Improvement Berry Farm California youtube Disneyland Florida Orange Growers Brook Toronto Todd Haad
"greta tonsberg" Discussed on Sandy and Nora talk politics

Sandy and Nora talk politics

13:05 min | 2 years ago

"greta tonsberg" Discussed on Sandy and Nora talk politics

"To do that anymore. And that's what I need you to to hear so you're hearing during the same words of Difficulties that you have that sound familiar to you. Debt savings Difficulties to find a job but we are trying to communicate is that those things at one point were surmountable through perhaps some hard work from a white men an but now are completely insurmountable for most of the population. And I think that that that divide of not being able to to relate to the experience that sounds familiar. But it's just it's not the same it's fully not the same experience Makes the understanding a little difficult. Well what do you think about the the the way in which the press or media reflects a reality that doesn't exist to majority of people in this country like don't you think it's weird that that that journalists will like talk about stuff as if things are the way they have been for the last thirty years and that that message of you just have to work hard you just have to transcend that. This is what's going to get you out of this whole like. What do you think that does to people when they hear that collectively? There's two ways I want to answer that question so way number one is like Yeah if everything things seems normal like if the press and the mass media is communicating things as normal. The no one is going to think. Oh my gosh. We're at crisis levels of anything and Really pushed forward to make sure that we're addressing crisis and I mean nowhere. Is this more pronounced announced the climate crisis. Where it's like you know? We can talk about flooding in Toronto or fires in Alberta as though they are unconnected to some some sort of broader change at the earth like more more fires than usual this year. Ha so so strange. More people evacuated this year or oh it floods every year ear now in Toronto. That didn't use to happen Strange but without talking about it like it's connected to some sort of crisis then people don't respond as though There is a crisis ace is happening and then realized just leader and so on and so on the second way I want to answer. This question is yeah. That's really fucking walking. Bizarre that journalists are not telling us the the crisis level of what's happening and especially journalists because like what industry is like more threatened by some of the changes in the way and the opportunities that are available able to people than than journalism like journalists. Should be the one being like now. Hello this is all very bad wrong. You're at craziest levels when when it comes to being able to have secure employment Secure futures for ourselves and for for kids if we can afford to decide to have them. I one of the things that I saw In this discussion as past week was of course. The boomer generation was the generation that told the the greatest generation to fuck themselves right. You maybe all we're seeing is like some some intergenerational solidarity between those folks were decimated and injured by World War Two to You know you had the WHO had children in a in a period where the economy economy was was going very very strong and where this idea that your children should have a better life than you have. was normal and of course we have come over a hill where that is not the case anymore and and our rhetoric has not has not met with. That is one of the things that I get most frustrated with if is in in the world of work this the I it really does feel impossible to to try and assert yourself as an adult if you're in an industry not the idle industries if you're an adult industry but the but the people with the most power in the most ability to to say stuff are are boomers. I think that that's that's also where where you see. A lot of frustration is that people have to work longer that there's That there are fewer Jobs in in in those industries that you've worked really hard your whole life to go out and and hopefully get and then there's more jobs of course service industry where people are finding themselves To just make ends meet and the the way that that generational conflict is able to subjugate people I think is not ought been talked enough about in this whole kind of conversation around Okay Brumer ISM that Of course there's a class a dynamic to this and and we are talking about the rich although I also someone say online like in fairness poverty kills people younger. So it's not surprising that you know conservatism SKEWS towards older people and older voters. But it is really hard to see what feels like. I'm like I'm going to be shut out of by Industry for my for my entire life. Like what is it going to take to be able to get a a a a paying job as a writer in this country When all they're doing is hiring like the absolutely worst elements of people my age or fucking Andrew? Coyne who somehow just got hired by the Global Mail I mean the goal Mills Finding Money Left Trade Center to hire the fucking worst people. Yeah well and its own. The in the pursuit of making sure that that there are people that are maintaining retaining the status quo in people's minds. And telling everyone. No no no. This is fine. Actually this is how it's always been. This is fine There's always been people that have been malcontents. Yes and things are fine. They're okay while like most of us are like. Oh my God the climate is GonNa Kill A. Yeah and I think Just to to like ah one more point on news I think part of that is also the way that we get our news differently than boomers. Do like boomers are consuming. The type hype of news that is being delivered to them is not it's not in the same formats that we're getting the news and our news is always couched in some sort of opinion opinion And that's usually how we're getting. We're getting it through twitter or facebook and very rarely or podcasts. Or something like that very rarely. I'm just a a new source that's being delivered to us and so we are always getting it with some sort of You know a value added Kind of opinion about what this news means whereas the the news at the boomers are getting are not always like I'm I'm not trying to essentially is anything but I'm just saying that more people are perhaps getting it without those opinions attached to it which will make the response to whatever that that news is a little bit difficult especially when it comes to things like work class the climate and so on. Yeah but it's also it's also like that there's been this rapid Internet affiliation of the boomer generation. And I think that this is also something that is that is completely not Talked enough about or studied studied enough. In fact I actually one of my failed pitches to Gmail was to to look or the star or both actually was to to say like can be. Can I write something that actually looks at the impact of Of the rapid move towards the Internet of people who are older. Because we know that you know like that there's a there's a a a crisis of people who are watching twenty four hour news who are retired and not as really Louis altering how they interact with the world regardless of if it's Fox News. MSNBC or or or or CNN like the stuff is really actually impacting. How how An entire generation people are understanding in interacting with the news. While at the same time. You know there's been. There are some people that went from like no Internet at all to you full e being online whereas like those of us who are our age got to go through that transition slowly. There are other people who enter that transition through work and it was more gradual. Joel and of course there's now like two generations of people who only knew the world with the Internet and I think that that that is a really critical location where we we can ask ourselves. What has the Internet done Two old people to older people so focused on the Internet and young people in like cyber harassment. Minter whatever the fuck But the the the rapid move from getting your unbiased quote unquote unbiased news. From talking head at six o'clock and then again at ten o'clock has been replaced by like fucking Nimes and we all know what this looks like in our families families we all see mean shared by family members. Were like Oh my God. What are you sharing that for? And whether that content is like runs it runs the spectrum from being embarrassing like just embarrassing to embarrassingly racist to really right wing to conspiracy theories and And and no we're not talking about this invisible force which is kind of like assuming that it's all business as normal as everyone has always imagined it to the nothing's really changed the Internet's just there as a tool Except when you know maybe the Internet is getting Russia to to to to to control the American elections or whatever but there's no intelligent discussions about what has the Internet done to this generation of people who were not on it for the majority after lives until now and now they're really on it. I think what this all comes down to what this this lake refrain okay. boomer refrain as has a response the response to not taking the issues of Gen Z.. millennials and maybe I don't know it seems like it's been like fully completely left out of this entire conversation but Taking out of the concerns of these generations Seriously we I think it all boils down to power and a generation of people who are who it appears are not willing going to transfer some of the power that you know they fought for. They fought older generations for Two young folks and who more than boomers would know. The young people are essential to forward moving progress grass in so many different fields like they were the ones who lake who who came up with that refrain And so it's it is a phrase that I think is meant to say like look. Can you just give us some fucking power and not the kind of power where you you you know. Take a kid who like Greta Tonsberg and put her like image on the side if a building somewhere and say isn't that sweet like actual power making sure that youth and youth issues and maybe not even use but like thirty forty something year olds are involved in making the decisions that are affecting our lives because right now as a result of being shut out. It appears that we're complaining about nothing to Y'all to like some of the boomers who are responding in this way but literally telling you that our lives are harder to live than lives have often ever been and it's resulting in some really terrible shit like what do we think that you know these mental so health crises are are Related to it's all about some of this stuff and not being able to have the power to transform it. It's kind of funny to think about that. Refrain don't trust anyone over thirty which was like the boomer chorus From the nineteen sixties. Jeez and into the nineteen seventies and. I wonder if like what's really the issue is that there's been a multi decade process of disc- entangling people from one another based on age and it comes at the same time as you know is the United States and American hegemony Gemini which is of course you know exported around the world and Canada's one of the big importers of American hegemony is tied to the culture of teenage boys. He's like everything we peg everything at what is entertaining to what is cool to what is attractive to us as what is entertaining attractive to a teenage boy which which is why fucking..

Toronto Fox News Nimes Greta Tonsberg United States Trade Center MSNBC Alberta writer twitter Canada harassment CNN Coyne Gmail Minter Joel
"greta tonsberg" Discussed on Sandy and Nora talk politics

Sandy and Nora talk politics

15:23 min | 2 years ago

"greta tonsberg" Discussed on Sandy and Nora talk politics

"And we don't talk about the the impact that that has on our movements and so what what results in that is you know someone like Greta. Turn Tonsberg who becomes like an international superstar for fucking King. Some reason like I'm not sure what force propelled her. Of course there's conspiracy theories on the left and the right about what's behind her success but it means that she's able to bring up more people people to a rally in Vancouver or Montreal or an Edmonton than any number of the local activists whose daily existence is impacted by climate change or by Environmental Tale Racism and so bizarre. Yeah right it's really bizarre. I get celebrity culture. I think that it's great that there is a high profile young a young woman that has like a really good example of what we need to do but but like nut in the left cannot survive on celebrity culture. There's there's no number of individual the people no matter how impressive or important they are that is going to be the catalyst to get us to figure out how to move forward and instead we again we sit on on social media oftentimes because even those of us who are active locally that local organising doesn't often get out bigger than our own communities indies. How man isn't it so mazing like the Internet is supposed to be the thing that connects us greater than ever before and that? We have the entire body of knowledge of humanity at our fingertips tips. And somehow it has completely isolated us in profound and difficult ways. I mean who created the Internet. Nora the military you know. That's getting well. It was as I now know since I'm a student at UCLA. It was a student you still. They've got all these banners and say birthplace of the Internet everywhere and they've got home on the. Oh Yeah they've got they've got the classroom where it was like created they've like they've like pre preserved it like very funny. I haven't gone to see it. I've just heard about it. It's like in the you know the same blackboard with the same stuff on the board. Oh Yeah it's like very anyway anyway. What what I meant by that was like who created Internet? The Internet like as it exists today all the different spaces of the Internet. It's mostly people who would create a situation where a a communication form for communication tears support or doesn't doesn't in fact Bring it think about things that will bring us together and so on you know talking about the people who wound everything the wealthiest white men amongst us. But it's also like and I know you know this organizing right. It's like so much easier to tear something down than it is to build something. It is so much easier to destroy thing than to build thing like. Yeah I mean the the right has an advantage. Just generally Because they're being Dick's online in that travels but also because they're often it didn't trying to destroy or dismantle some of the things that we have spent very long time in society building and it's very very easy to do that you don't have to to to think too much about like who's going to be affected. What are the nuances of this going to be like? Where do we go? I you know who do we. Who Do we prioritize when you're saying destroy the healthcare system sister saying like fuck universities when you're saying I don't want people to have protections on their speech like just tear it all down it so so so much easier to destroy something then to build it and I think that we do have some of those tendencies in the left to that when we when we feel a like sometimes we'll feel a AH movement coming on where it's like? Oh I can destroy this or I can. I can talk about this In a way. That's like super maybe devoid avoid from politics and that is more about culture and trying to make a pivot to language here and it's not working. Yeah well I I might be able to help because they feel like One of the other things that we also have appreciate is that you know sectarianism on the left is something audits existed since the left has existed and this is nothing new this is not new with Inter no also exist on the right and I think we should you know. Make sure that people know about that too. It's just like political. Political organizing comes Exactly INSECTARY ISM is really important. I mean like the the end. EP is weak. Make because the far left is weak right the MVP is not weak. Because like they're just completely not able to figure out what people want and they are incompetent. There there's a there's a connection between how strong social democracy is and how strong the opposition to social democracy is from the left. And you know like I I I know. oftentimes people will like anarchists for doing something. And they're like. Why did you go and do that? That was unnecessary. That was extreme. Or whatever and I personally I love that. There's a full diversity of what people engage in and I'm personally might not be prepared to engage in something I might not think something is strategic but I fully appreciate the role that the the different strains of the left play and I'm comfortable in the strain that I've chosen and I've chosen it because of the work that I've done I understand where I think I'm suited and where I think is the most strategic and I'm happy to argue about that with people are debate with other people and I think that the lack of debate just makes people feel uncomfortable? Because it's like you know the second you see you know a bank window being smashed and you're like Oh. Why did they do that like? Why did they do that? Because that's going to pivot this this the coverage to being vandalism or why did they do that. Don't support vandalism or whatever it's like rather than looking at it that way you could also look at it as a well that is a symbolic example of the the pain that the banks of caused on on people or this like these are decisions being made by marginalized people in. Perhaps you're not part of that discussion. You're part of the district is the strategy and you just have to go. Maybe I don't understand. And we you have to be able to live with these differences on the left and accept these differences on the left where language comes in I think is it so easy easy to confuse people. About what is the left and there's the subdivisions in the subdivisions and sectarianism and the the good sectarianism awesome and bads attorney and because it is so easy to disorient an already fractured and broken Movement language becomes weaponized weaponized by people to disparage work to tear things down Sometimes you have the tyranny of language so someone who's like super verbose or or or maybe highly educated like just slapping people with thesaurus. And it's like and it's also very easy for the right to use leftist language and then confused fuck it of everybody and that's a really good example where you see turfs right where the were feminist tennis is in in the word turf and then all of a sudden people like. I don't understand why these feminists are such Dick's or like in one of my pet peeves is like the the The way that the right uses the word silence all the time which you know like the conception of silence on the left that were often talking about comes from like a really You know Academic Way to talk about how certain identities are are literally not given the space to speak actively from a more dominant identities and it doesn't mean that northern you and I are having an argument and then I said something that she disagrees with it so she says I disagree with you or maybe more forcefully like shut the fuck up and silence. That's not what it actually means. What it means is that you don't see the opinions and discussions that are ah the closest and most important to black women in Armenia like because they are actively silenced generally from society the the the the the Voice of Black Women are silenced in our broader culture? And so you know the left's has this this concept that they come up with and develop in an academic context and then the right like it's like. Oh how do we take this spin. It which is a total tactic of theirs because they do with so many of our concept and they take silence and then all of a sudden Fuckin- Tucker Carlson on television talking about how he's been. I don't know if this is reopened. I'm sure it is how he's been silenced. from Greta Tonsberg dislike. It becomes like this really bizarre thing but it's also a part of the problem is how you know when we come up with these concepts on the left's again a the lack of education to making these concepts useful for us to talk about in society beyond The people who are like developing it in an academic sense because these concepts were like naming things that aren't necessarily understood or don't necessarily have names in society and we need to give them names to give them like a recognisability inability ability to talk about them and so on but so many people need these concepts and they need them in the very specific ways that they've been developed and if we don't do the education patient work APP to to responsibly Make sure that these concepts can be used in the way that they so desperately need to be the US. Well then the right can come and take them and destroy them and make them not useful at all You must be thinking of a couple of examples of this. I certainly have some alignment my mind. But what are your favorite examples of this happening other than silence. There's there's so so so many and like you for a while had in my office with an office together like a list of words. They'd want people to say in my office unless they were going to do work to make sure that people really understood what we were talking about because I I sometimes the other thing that happens some of these words and terms is that we start using them as cigna fires for our own cultural place rather than using to talk about particular terms so like some that I'm talking about our What's a good one trigger warning Trader Wednesday morning. You know it's a very important concept that has often been used incorrectly. We certainly by the right but also incorrectly by the left and there hasn't been enough like education Kishan works that people can talk about what the idea of a trigger warning is and has also Diluted looted what it means but but also the idea of using the words trigger warning to give a trigger. Weren't we don't have to do that right. Like the concept sugar warning is to make sure that people Are Aware that what they're going to be. Viewing reading experiencing reinstating might be difficult for them. If I told my mother that I was going to give her a trigger warning. She didn't know what I was talking about. Because that's just it's not culturally something that she would understand but when the news or a television program says a warning to viewers. Some of what you're about to experience might be disturbing like that is that is a content note. That isn't true warning but we don't have to necessarily use either those this particular word or we can make sure that when we're using those terms that we do it not without the education work that needs to be done and so what does the right eight do when we when we use such terms without doing the education work that needs to be done around them or devoid of what it's original the purpose of is the use that concept trigger warning to say that we're all snowflakes or something like that. Despite the fact that these types of warnings have existed in our culture since since certainly since before I was born like a really long time. This is this is it's it's it's regular and we we've been talking about more in a different way but without doing the necessary education work to make sure that everyone's brought along with us. Yeah what's that's one of your famous while I was GonNa say I actually this also in my book. Yeah getting a copy of it. Yeah I know exactly one of the things one of the the terms I think actually y which is an example. I can come up with other ones that are that have been completely distorted or whatever I think you know. Gasoline is another great example as well and everything has gas lighting and instead of saying lying. We're just saying gas lighting and it's like no no appropriation or Michael. Shriner's take the multiple words for racism that that that become distorted out in the world. Yep Yep but one of the words that what I think the work had been done in a very good way is Rape Culture because my remember when rape culture started to become something that like like feminists were were saying more and more I felt like it was a signifier that they were all in the know and I wasn't because they never could my head around with the fuck that meant liking like I knew that we lived in a culture. That was misogynistic. I knew that rape was normalized but the but the idea of rape culture never sat. Well well with me. Because I couldn't parse those two words together and the work that feminists did to make that into a term on. Its own so that you're not sitting going rape culture. What is rape culture insisting Greek culture like as a shorthand for the way that misogyny and patriarchy you know sexualize sexualize women's especially sixth sexualize young women and girls in rampant Sexual assaults that exists or harassment Blah Blah Blah on which the entire society's right..

rape Greta Tonsberg Dick UCLA vandalism Tucker Carlson Nora US Vancouver Shriner MVP tennis Montreal Michael Armenia Edmonton
"greta tonsberg" Discussed on DeaconLive

DeaconLive

06:44 min | 2 years ago

"greta tonsberg" Discussed on DeaconLive

"And Youtube and Youtube place where you're going to find this video of us live here in the studio hi waving to you because that's the cliche thing to do one of the things before we get into the little girl. Are you guys bigger main fans. How cheeses. How old are these guys? These guys are like one hundred and seventeen years old well. Do you know who hold on hold on on Do you know who I'm on. What's his name. What is his name. His name is Janet. Janet is genetic girders gears. I don't know if you look at him. He looks like some God Almighty. Look at them. He is someone's grandfather will pr he's probably got grandkids out there and being his age and being a Rockstar well well. He was up on stage and and true rock rock four fashion. He's out there here. He is right here in the corner. We blow something you can see it all aw he's swinging his guitar around. I guess it's like the slips right out of his frigging hand and lands in the it's going to get my guitar Mac. He can't hold it and now a guitar is only like a couple pounds and stuff but that perpetual motion swing it around. It slipped right out frigging hand now. He's swinging around. Hopefully that frigging guitar Dr Strap Holds Up Yup No. It didn't yeah so he lost. His Guitar went right out in the audience and someone got it. How long have we give it to. Hey you caught a yours yours. I got back here behind the on the set here so yeah he he losses guitar on the show and he was doing the other day house of Blues or wherever they were playing that you had to be a certain as you get in the House of Blues and this one girl is not old enough to be in the House of Blues but she is causing a big stir across the whole entire Ohio world. It's the client climate action some two thousand nineteen now this girl here. I don't know if you've seen her or not. She's an activist. Her name is Greta Tonsberg and she scolds. I mean she literally like she's sitting there. She's got like a panel like if you're at COMECON. You're sitting there and talking to the people up on stage. She kinda spits out this little rent that she talks about now as far as climate control wrong. I shouldn't be up here. I should be back in school on the other side of the ocean yet. You all come to a S- young people for hope. How dare you know you see her face. She's sixteen years old but Jesus Christ. She looks like she's sixty seven years old. She's got this nearer snarl herself. You have stolen my dreams in my childhood with your empty words yet. I'm one of the lucky ones people are suffering. People are dying. Entire ecosystem are collapsing. We are in the beginning of a mass extinction and all you can talk about is money in fairy tales of each economic growth. Okay so she's a little upset easy. They're Greta she's Sweden and so she delivered the speech and everyone's like Oh my God where we think of the children that it's always the children the children. Oh my God and it's it's it's horrible. It's affecting Greta. Greta goes on and BUBBA. Let me let me for this. You guys are GonNa like me. You're not GonNa like me so I don't know if you're familiar with this this gentleman here the gentleman's name he's very smart man and smart he. I mean he's ahead of the time and right on time at the same point and his name is George Carlin unfortunately lease pass away. I believe in two thousand three two thousand four. I could be wrong on that but he he's. He's been gone for a while and he would be spinning in his grave. If this girl got up on stage and the reason why I say that is because he literally wouldn't when someone says think outside the box and just be real as far as what's going on. He has this little his standup. I believe he did in New York. He kind of came up with this little little segment. It's called. I'M GONNA say the planets okay so here you go. This is George Carlin. Gee Tim not one of these people who is worried about everything. You got people like this around you. Countries full of people walking around all day long every minute of the day worried about everything worried about the air worried about the water about the saw worried about insecticides pesticides food additives carcinogens worried about radon gas worrying about specis worried about saving endangered species. Let me tell you about endangered species all right saving endangered species is just one more arrogant attempt by humans to control troll nature. It's arrogant meddling. It's what got us in trouble in the first place and the greatest arrogance of all save the planet. What are these fucking. The people kidding me save the planet. We don't even know how to take care of ourselves yet. We haven't learned how to care for one another. We're going to save the fucking planet again. I mean it makes a good point there fucking Earth Day. I'm tired of these self-righteous environmentalists these white boom joie liberals think the only thing wrong with this country is there aren't enough bicycle pats not in the abstract. They don't you know what they're interested. In a clean place to live live their own habitat their word that someday in the future they might be personally inconvenienced besides there is nothing wrong with the planet. The Planet is fine. The people are fucked. Planet has been here four and a half billion years. We've been here what one hundred thousand maybe two hundred two thousand and we've only been engaged in heavy industry for a little over two hundred years two hundred years versus four and a half billion and we have the conceit to think that somehow on how we're a threat the planet has been through a lot worse than us than through earthquakes volcanoes plate tectonics continental drift solar flares sunspots magnetic storms the magnetic netted reversal of the polls hundreds of thousands of years of bombardment by comets and asteroids and meteors worldwide floods titles worldwide fires erosion cosmic rays recurring ice ages and we think some plastic bags some aluminum cans are going to make a difference the planet. The planet isn't going anywhere we are. We're going away. Pacu shift folks so I mean for the most part he I mean. He makes a lot of valid points and it's true here we are. We're so arrogant to think that you know we can. We can and changed nature. We can change the world you know. We can't even take care of ourselves one. If I've always said this and this is one of those so frigging high one time and I'm going on what is the earth doesn't even want the trees here like it's mold on the planet and would've the earth itself kind of envied mercury. Oh Man. I wish I was hot. Got You know like mercury like you're so comfortable out there. You don't have any problems. You got a couple. Sandstone not sandstorms..

Greta Tonsberg George Carlin Youtube Janet House of Blues Rockstar New York Ohio Sweden Tim two hundred years sixty seven years seventeen years billion years sixteen years
"greta tonsberg" Discussed on AP News

AP News

02:19 min | 3 years ago

"greta tonsberg" Discussed on AP News

"Click this ad or go to online that. Oh, you got to you today. If deaths are reported from mass shootings at two mosques in New Zealand AP's. Jackie Quinn reports. Authorities say to piers migrants were the target. What has happened here is an extraordinary and unprecedented act of violence, prime minister just into our Duran says there is no place for the hatred and anti immigrant sentiment described in a manifesto purportedly from a self-described terrorist who is targeting Muslims. Many of those who will have been directly affected by this shooting maybe migrants to New Zealand some of them were dead. And some of them were screaming witnesses are describing the horror at Masjid Al Noor mosque in Christ Church on the flu. The bullet shells soul mini, hundreds the mosques were attacked during Friday, prayers and filled with worshipers. I'm Jacky Quin. British lawmakers have voted to delay Brexit AP's. Ben Thomas reports he comes just fifteen days before the country's scheduled to leave the European students from schools around the world, skipped class on Friday to protest will they believe that the government's failure to take tough action against global warming. The coordinated school strikes were inspired by sixteen year old Swedish activists, Greta Tonsberg who was recently awarded the Nobel peace prize in Berlin police said as many as twenty thousand protesters most of the young students gathered in a downtown square before marching through the capital's government quota with a stop in front of Chancellor Angela Merkel's office in Poland thousands marched in rainy, Walsall and other cities to demand a ban on the burning of coal, which is a major source of carbon dioxide police in Vienna's hit about ten thousand students rallied in the Australian capital while in neighboring Switzerland, a similar number protested in the western city of Lou. A poll published Friday by Jim in public broadcasters EDS found that sixty seven percent of respondents back the students protests during school hours with thirty two percent opposed. Radio. Wire in Christ's church. New Zealand flags are flying at half-mast.

New Zealand New Zealand AP Masjid Al Noor mosque Ben Thomas Chancellor Angela Merkel Jacky Quin Jackie Quinn prime minister Christ Christ Church Greta Tonsberg Duran EDS Switzerland Jim Walsall Lou Berlin