20 Episode results for "Grenada"

How coronavirus will reshape the worlds borders

Post Reports

30:15 min | 10 months ago

How coronavirus will reshape the worlds borders

"From the newsroom of the Washington Post I. There is the mayor wrestling with the Washington. Post Doc- or pick your brain on China. This is post reports. I Martin powers. It's Wednesday April fifteenth today. How the global pandemic is reshaping borders and the sounds of corona virus. Psa from around the world a few weeks ago on the island of Grenada in the southern Caribbean there was an announcement that was actually pretty relevant to my life. The implication of this disease in our population is that urgent and immediate action is required to identify this. The Prime Minister of Grenada was worried about people coming into the country cruncher buyers so he decided to take drastic action in autumn to do so we have close the borders and that meant starting. March twenty fifth. No one would be coming in or out of the country. Cario lockdown. Yeah we've so what's going on the neighborhood Car You'll see. Have both anybody influences by a serious business. I think they're still allowing Fedex and stuff like that But there is no commercial flights in fact the last British Airways flight was I think yesterday before and I think it showed up here with nobody in it was only taking people back. We have two more weeks of low down and then I don't know how soon they will reopen the airport. Those are my parents. They've been living in Grenada for the past few years and for the first time in my life. I am banned from traveling to see them for the moment. I'm banned from a lot of countries around the world of course border closures. Envy's restrictions are a normal part of life for many people in the world who can't just travel wherever they want whenever they want but one of the things. That's so strange about this moment. Is that now. That's the case for almost everyone on the planet and I've been thinking about what that could mean for the future for after this pandemic and what it could mean for how we think about borders in the long term. I was trying to think back and I can't remember. When would be a time frankly in modern history when you would see so many countries that are not letting people in or out for sure? That's Sean Thrower Foreign Affairs writer for the Post Not. In our lifetime or our parents lifetime or grandparents depending on how old you are. Have we seen this kind of paralysis around the world from eleven fifty nine? Pm Tonight we will close border to any non residents and citizens attempting to travel here. We will be denying entry to Canada to Astrid yet to India to enter transit. True Singapore. Gordon See Gordon Pedal economy emerged from data by told US last one terrace here so filming the barriers. That have gone up. Impeding travel the links between countries that have been temporarily severed and according to this study from the Pew Research Center Right now at least ninety. Three percent of the world's population is living in places with Kovic related travel restrictions. Three billion people are in countries that have completely closed their borders to foreigners. Yeah I mean. Most countries in the world have imposed some form of shut down our decision to clue. Boorda's not one that mistaken easily or lightly but it was one that was taken to partake New Zealanders from the virus. Protect the people of tournament to you the people to protect the health and wellbeing of all Americans we must do everything within our power to contain the spread of the virus and the fact that this scale of border closures has basically never happened before it brings up a lot of questions about how people are being affected how long this will go on for and how it changes how we think about the world. When we're all suddenly cut off there are also questions about how and why these border closures were carried out well in the initial stages of the outbreak. You saw a lot of governments around the world. Impose travel bans on people coming from China now as the pandemic has progressed and China's on the other side of the wave it's imposing its own travel bans on people coming into the country from more blighted places in the West. China has announced it will close its borders to foreign nationals this weekend the new measures include restricting foreign airlines to a single route with no more than one weekly flight. Obviously the most stark interational these bands has been seen in Europe because of the nature of Europe's freedom of movement you know before the pandemic you could have gotten in a car on the Atlantic coast Portugal and driven all the way to say the Baltic Sea and not had to stop at any single checkpoint along the way and that has been of course by this pandemic radically shutdown. Nothing Monday morning. Germany will step up controls at the border with France Switzerland and Austria the northern border with Austria Switzerland and Slovenia largely shot. We've seen national borders spring up across the continent. Many border crossings have been just totally shutdown between countries the ones that are open now have checkpoints and you could potentially be deterred from entering another country by authorities there and so that's been a huge shift in how Europe conceives of itself. And then what about what's going on in the US in the United States Of course president trump has made borders in general is great can floating signifier of his presidency and so when the krona virus emerged on the world stage trump acted in ways that he knows that he's comfortable with he slapped set of restrictions on people coming into the country from China. We move very early and was one of the decisions we made. That really turned out to be a lifesaver sense and then surprisingly few weeks later he also slapped travel bans on Europeans. Coming into the country we will be suspending all travel from Europe to the United States for the next thirty days. President trump is also used this moment to intensify his crackdowns on border crossings and enacted an executive order that essentially allows US authorities to immediately turn around asylum seekers entering United States from across the Mexican border and now president trump has been railing against the World Health Organization criticizing them for discouraging countries from closing their borders early on in the outbreak. We call on all countries to implement decisions that are evidence based and consistent. This is what the. Who was saying a couple of months? Ago and Joe doesn't recommend actually opposes any restrictions for travel and trade or other measures and this is what trump said at a White House briefing on Tuesday where he threatened to defend the. Who the WHO's attack? On travel restrictions put political correctness above life saving measures. Travel bans worked for the same reason. That quarantine work. Pandemics depend on human to human transmission. Border Control is fundamental to virus control and while most world leaders are not saying what president trump is saying right now. This is a strange moment in that you have leaders from all across the political spectrum conservatives and liberals agreeing that at least for now closing borders is a way to save lives. You know wish the world had listened to the World Health Organization a little bit more on this both around how to respond and how not over respond to the threat of global pandemics and one of the things it said about how not over respond to the global pandemics was to put in in travel bans. That was a mistake that it wouldn't hell. That's Charles Kenny. He's a senior fellow at the Center for Global Development. He recently wrote an article in Politico magazine about why border closures and a pandemic are bad policy. It's perhaps the oldest human behavioral response to disease became a kind of instrument used the the state level at least as early as the black death plague when Florence amongst the city's introduced poces and find people who came in from plague infected areas from the city states and then we kept on assets so Australia created a long series of border checks and forts corentin houses along the border with the Ottoman Empire. It's tricky about the plague nineteenth century we used or teens against cholera and yellow fever ad. Say as we go forward over time the quarantines get less and less effective and border controls become more and more irrelevant which is not to say. They never work at all anymore. Indeed I think that will help. Organization says look sometimes really early on in the course of an outbreak of a pandemic putting in a brief period. Where you keep people out from the infected area it can delay transmission but they come with big costs especially if you leave them in place and I'm not just talking economic costs delay. There is a big and I'm not just talking social costs to lay the fact that people can't go in you know visit. Their families. Elsewhere is a huge social cost on. They can also lead to dangerous behaviors on the part of people who are worried about being left out thinking about what happened in the US. After president trump announced travel restrictions from Europe you've had tens of thousands of people suddenly crowding into airports trying to get back a huge risk for transmitting the virus. Or you can look back to what happened in two thousand fourteen based on recent and ongoing developments. I believe it is the right policy to ban air travel from countries that have been hit hardest by the BOA outbreak. There was a lot of talk about the Ebola crisis that putting in place travel bans would delay the response in West Africa and that would make the problem worse worldwide. So if you put in place travel ban doctors who might have been willing to go to west Africa to fight the virus not surprisingly have second thoughts. So we're not gonNA let us back in and so travel. Bans can have a dramatic impact on the ability to respond to diseases where they break out. And that's really way you WANNA response. Diseases is wet Global and that requires not travel bans. But you know travel to and so the effect can be that if you if you use a travel ban you may alone problem more difficult to respond to public health. Experts and epidemiologists have been trying to make that case to lawmakers all of the evidence. We have indicates that travel restrictions and quarantines directed individual countries are unlikely to keep the virus out of our borders. This is what Johns Hopkins Professor Jennifer News said at a Congressional hearing in February on Corona virus travel bans and quarantines will make us less safe if they divert attention and resources from higher priority. Disease Mitigation approaches that we know are needed to respond to cases within the United States. But a lot of that reasoning and that research operate under the assumption that there is going to be a particular flow of the disease that Western countries or quote unquote developed countries would be better poised to help. Other countries less developed countries less industrialized countries deal with pandemic. But right now that's not the case because the most developed countries are the ones who are struggling most with this there are fascinating ways in which this pandemic is a great leveler. You see Mexicans afraid of Americans coming across the border. And that's of course. These are recent historical memory A great irony of the moment you see countries in other parts of the world that are slightly less affected by the pandemic slapping travel bans and Europeans on Americans. So if the pandemic is this great leveler as a shot and said. I wanted to know what it feels like to be on the inside of that to be in the position of putting restrictions on countries these travelers. You usually welcome prime minister. Mitchell speaking. That is Keith Mitchell. The Prime Minister of Grenada the person who announced the border closure that ended up sealing my parents often side the country go ahead. Go ahead Did you get pushback from from people especially because you know? Tourism is such a big part of Grenada Academy or Yeah of course of course of course we have some but I think overall people remember people that live protected. Everyone things of life first and foremost so why Some people express the extent of the border closure I think generally speaking I think the decision to put the border has been a popular one. I saw your press conference on March twenty fifth in which you mentioned that some foreign nationals had come into Grenada and had been carrying Corona virus was. That was that part of your thinking. Is You made this decision? What would we have seen a number of things rea- clearly watching what's taking place Regionally and internationally and of course we end up believing in the world by ourselves. We're we've seen the level of infection that can produce in Europe. We have seen that taking place in North America. In addition we have to look at the facts that we are not a re. Do not have the resources to confront a mass of infections or medical facilities and the resources are not at the level of the United States and others lovie. We had to take precautions and do them very quickly and this is what I found most interesting from Prime Minister Mitchell. Got The sense from him in our conversation and in his speeches that in some ways it feels like Renita right now is on its own especially because the US and the UK are not really in a position to be giving help right now. If Grenada were become current ivars hotspot. There's no guarantee that other countries would swoop in to aid. I was prepared for this I don't think any leader. Technically I'm and you can see in new your kitchen. You can see If clarity president never understood the extent of the problem that you face in Britain's examined the fact that Joe had so many persons in Britain being infected they've got the message regulate what a lot of analysts have pointed to during this pandemic is that contrary to maybe the a decade ago when the US under the Obama Administration was taking a relatively proactive role in steering the global response to the financial crisis. We're not seeing any of that right now. With the trump administration the US is not Leading the twenty eight meaningful way. The G. Twenty itself. Which is this block of? The world's biggest most important economies Is is effectively rudderless. So all the sense of global community the sense of Global Coordination Ambassadorship that for a very long time. The United States has underpinned for good or bad None of that's really. They're right now. Any raises all sorts of new questions for other countries. New questions like what will be the lasting outcome of these policy decisions. This world that we're seeing right now where countries are turning inward and it feels like every nation for itself. Is that going to be something that sticks with us long after the pandemic is over. We are all wondering that everybody In my field we were all talking about it among ourselves about exactly what happens when the corona virus is a memory. I got on the phone with Professor Alan Kraut of American University. He studies the history of infectious diseases. Specifically when it comes to immigration I mean first of all We know that president trump and his administration is not friendly to immigration generally and particularly from particular countries in the world. What we have no idea bad is to what extent a later time they might use the example of the pandemic to reinforce those anti immigration ideas. Maybe yes maybe no. We don't know to answer that question. It's helpful to look back to the one other pandemic that everyone is looking back to right now. The nineteen eighteen flu pandemic in nineteen eighteen when the pandemic broke out we were in the middle world will want we had sent troops. We were fighting in Europe and because of the wartime situation immigration to the United States had already dropped And what happened was We went back to business as usual and immigration resumed but there had already been and they're intensified in nineteen thousand nine hundred ninety nine thousand nine hundred twenty pressure to curb immigration to the United States. There was a fear of radicals coming into the United States. That was a fear of people of inferior biologically inferior coming into the United States by which they meant southern Italians and Eastern European Jews so in other words concerns about the spread of the flu. Were being used as an excuse to carry out this political agenda. That had been simmering for many years. This was the euro eugenics and Eugenic thinking much more than the pandemic Had A lock to do with shaping the views of Of nativist obzina folks in the early part of the twentieth century. It didn't fact in my own work. I call it. Medical is the prejudice and the value of medical is prejudice. For the for the biggest. Who's using it is that it seems like a rational justification for hatreds they already harbor right So you can say to someone you know the reason. I hate to be these Jews. Is they bring disease with them. It's Burke Ula they're going to harm the population and on top of of that. I mean the disease from abroad is a phenomenon. And part of the reason for Ellis Island and for other immigration depot's Angel Island on the West Coast. was to prevent disease from abroad coming to the United States. So they could say look you know and they embellished it conveniently and all the things necessary to make people feel that these newcomers really shouldn't be admitted to the United States. So how is that going to play out? In the era of cranberries. One of the things we never know is what happens. After a an epidemic or a pandemic in terms of social change change in attitude social attitudes social behavior and so on the world was already in kind of an immigration crisis before krona virus business started right and the question is what will be the implications. What we'll policymakers wanted to do. I feel fairly confident And this is a guest. Is Sheila speculation? But I'm fairly confident that migration will resume countries will open their borders to scholars and students and business people and journalists and Ordinary people I mean it. There's GonNa be a going back to business as usual for the most part. But there will be instances where governments Who Don't want certain people in their countries might use this. Might weaponize it if you will as a way of keeping some people out for example Victor Orban Who's the Hungarian Prime Minister in a right winger for sure He says our experience is that foreigners brought into disease that is spreading among foreigners and quote. Now this is a this is dude. Who's definitely going to try and use this after it's over and there will be people like this in the US to there. There are myriad instances of politicians nationalist leaders looking at the situation. Right now looking at this menace of this invisible enemy this this this invasive enemy of the virus and having it nicely fit alongside their own anti immigration politics From Hungary to Poland to even the politics of this president in United States I made a decision to close off China. That was weeks early and honestly I took a lot of heap. Sleepy Joe Biden said It's xenophobic. I don't know if he knows what that means. But that's okay He said it's racist what I did. Thousands and thousands of more people probably tens of thousands would be dead right now. If I didn't make that decision it's very easy to align the threat of a of a virus with the threat in their in their minds of an immigrant invasion or influx. And you do see a recurring pattern where communities that are as it is marginalized and props vulnerable Become even more vulnerable and even uneven more marginalized at a time when the quad broader public is consumed by fear of this invisible enemy as as many politicians have now described the virus. And of course there's the more immediate question of when will borders open back up and what will it look like when they do? Maybe there's a scenario where some countries opened up much faster than others and that creates new tensions of who can travel where and who wants to be able to travel. Where maybe there's a scenario where as we prepare for new waves of this virus there is countries enact unevenly restrictions again. And we see a whole new nationalist competition again. Over how open are countries and societies? Should be how ready we should be to help. Other countries and how integrated our collective response needs to be at a time of global crisis and the question of whether this leave some sort of major political impact on both understanding of our societies and how we should live in the future. That's an open ended one and we won't really know what the answer is until we start emerging from this pandemic but now as the moon we're slowly starting to wrap our heads around the kind of huge epochal game changing nature of what we're going through right now. Sean. Thrower writes about foreign affairs for the Post. He's the author the newsletter. Today's world view and now one more thing across the globe public service announcements like this one have started popping up to teach people how to slow the spread of Corona virus. I have a Hanno. What's what's what was around the world. Governments artists are all creating public service announcements to try to teach people about safety during the Corona Virus Affect. A lot of them are truly fun and funny. We my name is Mary Beth. Sharon I'M A correspondent for the Washington Post in Mexico angles for their connect the PSA from Mexico features Soussan distance. Who's a superhero and? Her name is a play on the Spanish for were safe distance and what she does. In these cartoons. Nicholson my vehicle. Don't edit them stance she urges kids especially to keep a safe distance from other people to wash their hands and to otherwise stay safe during the corona virus epidemic the PSA from Vietnam was produced by the health authorities who worked with a prominent lyricist and basically. They re purposed a very popular. How tune to be about CORONA VIRUS INSTINCTS SAFE. Do you think the. Psa from Bangkok shows workers from the Bangkok Train Service. Who are dancing and cleaning surfaces and washing their hands as they sing this very catchy tune that tries to encourage people to be more careful during the krona epidemic. And take the right steps to say. Stay Safe Tom. Black Bannon PREPA. The PSA from Uganda features a very well-known opposition leader. Bobby wine who's also a musician. Everyone is a potential. Gordon is that everyone is poor. Taste your puzzle with these. Psa's have in common. Is I think they show that around the world? There's just intense concern about corona virus. A real sense that we are in a terribly difficult time and it's just vital that people get the word about how to stay safe. Mary Beth Sheridan is a correspondent for the post in Mexico. That's IT for post reports. Thanks for listening shoutout to a listener named Joe in Massachusetts who sent us a message about how post reports has helped him adopts them healthier habits after trying out dry January. He's been psyched about what I am calling sober social distancing if you want to check out that episode from December about sober curiosity link to it in today's show notes and at post reports dot com. And if there's something that you wanNA share with the team email us at post reports at Washburn dot com Martine powers. We'll be back tomorrow with more stories from the Washington Post.

US Europe president China Grenada trump Joe Biden Prime Minister Prime Minister Mitchell Washington Post Washington Sean Thrower Fedex Gordon Caribbean British Airways World Health Organization
3pm Newscast

Houston Public Media Local Newscasts

02:19 min | 2 months ago

3pm Newscast

"Reporting this is. Npr news eighty seven in houston. I'm gail delattre. We're hearing this afternoon. From local officials who are asking people to get ready for a different kind of holiday season because of the pandemic mayor sylvester turner told a virtual town hall that with cases starting to rise. It's crucial for people to practice social distancing so the city won't have a spike in hospitalizations and social separation in isolation i just the deficit of who we are if you want to be protective of one of his health as well as your all. We're just gonna have to do things different. And as cases soren el paso or did you hear what happens with a new lockdown order. An appeals court has been asked to rule on whether that order is constitutional. Dr david purse with the houston. Health department says local authorities of the ones who should respond to rising cases. The formal disaster response plans for any community the region and then the state and federal government. They sent in support to help that local emergency now while this may be a pandemic at the end of the day it's still a local emergency parts appeared on today's houston matters. Texas now has over a million active covert cases news at eight seven. Laura eisenson is watching developments at age. Isd after the board decides to resume its national search for a new superintendent. That's after passing over. Its interim superintendent. Dr grenada leith and has been invited to apply for the job but supporters. I board member one to adams say late and has already proven herself during tough times for the district. Everything the john's said you're looking more than has done it. She's dining looking for h. Isd hasn't had a permanent superintendent in over two years for the latest on the corona virus. In greater houston. You can go to our website. That's houston public media dot org are forecast for this. Evening is calling for mostly cloudy skies. We could see some patchy fog later on tonight overnight. Low dropped down to about sixty seven for saturday. Mostly cloudy high around. Eighty one seventy six right now on the campus. I'm gail daughter news. Eight seven support for npr comes from npr stations. Other contributors include i-drive with remote.

gail delattre sylvester turner soren el paso houston Dr david purse houston matters Laura eisenson Npr Dr grenada leith federal government Texas adams two years john Low npr
Zapping : les 'fails antennes', les moments de radio qui n'taient pas prvus (avec @MemesDeRadio)

Des Ondes Vocast

18:01 min | 4 months ago

Zapping : les 'fails antennes', les moments de radio qui n'taient pas prvus (avec @MemesDeRadio)

"These on broadcast Zone don't get returned to Apple Circus like trade values or Twitter of the first or second choice on pistachio sekunder. It's just the modules distance let there someday have to sign off this up for the page is blank screen. You feel like said we wanted to do something off off. Broadcast, it's just a little more Comfort acceptable wage now. Especially Stephen no idea to our office again. Click on them. I dropped off some new sentence, but because some objects of new missiles as well as special offer them seated and won't actually pull the monies in Bangladesh Raja Babu English. Good, except the one that I don't I don't know all this video because she said well if I do do they decrease messages absolutely. So she wants to strengthen the Flash The Flash The Flash usually so the situation updated he's a dog. I'm not sure if you fall asleep with a present. Yes. Well, I don't know if you can continue off select you work your way out of a school where he's you know, he's dead. And I'm supposed to do some cafes are busy. We look hot dog Avenue poor choice as to the whole May pre-approve what I am going to visit if you are getting all the people that come out to the page. I think the teachers in public policy become successful wage. And I'm interested in Long Beach commemorative when you're finding somebody else. I can help you shovel G wolf noise. How long Google. There's one thing I know about. How long did you keep technique? We do go and secure connection, 620 towards educating. So Thursday morning is recommended for this is Nick how long you can click continue to control consider. Expensive any more often, but I couldn't proceed with this. And on your own seat, but I'm seeing how Jewel tolk non-stop only famous. You know young people there thay Samba music pop Lexus website you go on the line for calling you tell me the MS shippers, Let me know my daughter's birth. It was promoted to 10 a.m. So she took on the phone with Force back to home from Jules off. The main. This is Express from home. Excited to watch over bought just bought a musical National wage age disability business do need immediate only see the four digits that the horse a psychological complex needs a challenge yourself in a place like home. We've done it will be syndicated. I don't know, you know, I mean Non-Stop. And that's all it was a good choice at all. No way Jose Jose Grenada, super multiple Generations the exception that on page. Talking bird talking about two hundred thousand students know more details off and this all delicious K. Mm. Well nuclear weapons on his own the actual oil change interval. How you doing tonight. Thank you very much. I think that's wrong. I don't know. What went wrong. Where am I had a report? It's amazing to us about sexual sin situation when your business, you know, Chris Rock normally more costly to keep us go on ice cream invented the minute to be a black cobra in an office position relation to meet if I be a short skirts you spend down. Situation and even though it's just all slick Street diesel, 2016 result topics assembly says knock knock knock on wood how you got to do editor Mitsubishi still don't know the cost. List that you live in a vote them off. So, absolutely. Yep. Then popsicle know both of them. Are we gonna see a black bezel that you have the choice to do circles and the optimal. Who's the Boss? 2017 Jetta controls as well you today the four, small pulley sort of possibilities the day off because we have our through yet, but it was supposed to Loose Moose. It's probably a new group or insufficient I go under him off and So, but give me a girl told you want to make some noise pollution. It's almost too much about the fact that you were supposed to talk about two months to other students, but also have been to Florida to Blink twice. We'll talk soon as possible. Go North to me. How Collective meal off with a basketball in the winter of my sister-in-law and a message for him if his own capacity is Joe clips that are quite ever been both something but while to get home. Men, have you put that young children? This is Tony. I'm not too pleased with this one who cast the cast.

Jules Bangladesh Raja Babu English Stephen Twitter Apple Circus Jose Jose Grenada Long Beach Google Chris Rock Florida Nick Tony Joe Jetta editor Mitsubishi four digits two months
This Day in History

The Digital Vibe

07:47 min | 2 years ago

This Day in History

"Hello. And thank you for tuning ill. Everybody out there. Thank you for tuning in to the digital vibe at WWW. The digital vibe dot com. This is the net. Glad you can tune into this episode of the digital vibe. And I'm excited about this episode because you know, why? This episode is a new show that we're doing and it's called this day in history. And that's what the digital by is going to be talking about today this day in history. That means something occurred on this day, the twenty fifth of October. That was incredible wanna know what that is. But before I get into that. Before I get into that. I'd like to thank. A couple of while once they spark I I don't call them sponsors. I call them partners because they are. All the partners departed with me that like to thank that. I've made my brand an incredible brand. It is today. So I like to thank them all too many dimension. If I accept this award, I accept this award on behalf of everybody. I seriously mean this on behalf of everybody who has helped me to become a successful person. Successful brand. And the successful human being that. I am today. So like to thank my partners in business. Who have made possible for me to become a success in my business? And. Wow. It ain't easy. It ain't easy. But I tell you. It's fantastic. It's the greatest thing you could ever do. Is to fulfil and live your life purpose to live it in an incredible way that so what you do makes you feel so good. We have to express it to the world. The world has to know about it. It's like having a great website. Right at think the last episode I shared with you. I was I was talking about how if you have a great website. How does anybody know about a great website, right? Nobody knows because nobody can hear about you. So if you don't do any social media interaction, no word of mouth anything. No, letting people know no bragging about it than how people are gonna know about that you exist. You know, you can't you know, you can't be quiet all the time. You have to let people know who you are. You know, what you're out in life. And so I have done that. And I you know, I do that when I need to. And I do it often because you know, why I want people to get to know about what a net Thomas wouldn't that is all about? And I hope I convey that to my audience, but I'd like to really think those of you have taken the time to really enjoy listening to this podcast as well as. Taking the time to take a visit at my websites. But I'd like to thank all my parts of my brand the brand that it is today. So before I get into this little no now, I need to get into the show. Right. We're gonna talk about. Vison history. Right. That's the topic this day in history. You wanna know what went down this day in history. Let me tell you this is Tober twenty fifth and today what happened in history for those of you who don't. Who not teachers who don't get involved in history as a as a subject or or anything who don't care about history? This is where you want to know about history now. Okay. This is history as it is. And it happens to be a believe American history. So it's not international histories American history. So for those of you who never took a history class who didn't like history. Well, this is what you need to listen to now, maybe they'll get a dose of some history here. I, you know, I mean, it's our cast, but I'm quite serious. So. Okay. So this day in history in nineteen twenty nine the teapot dome scandal now member reading this about the teapot dome scandal somewhere. I don't remember where but the teapot dome scandal Albert befall who served as secretary of the interior under president Warren, G Harding's corruption. Fill cabinet is found guilty of accepting a bribe while in office fall least government owned oil rich land teapot dome, Wyoming to friends of the large loans. The corruption was discovered when fall begins to spend large amounts of money. The ensuing investigation led to a series of civil and criminal suits to route the twenties. So that's like the roaring twenties. If you've never heard of that, you can access your parents or if you're grown up. You're ready know what that is. But the roaring twenties that happened in nineteen twenty nine. I wasn't even born. Okay. Nineteen sixty two John Steinbeck is a ward of the Nobel peace prize in literature. He is best known for the Pulitzer prize winning novels, the grapes of wrath and of mice and men now, that's what you need to be reading in college in high school. The grapes of wrath and of mice and men does classics today, those classic people still read them. I mean books are books books. Books books books. You can read them yesteryear today. Tomorrow doesn't matter, but the grapes of wrath and of mice and men does classics John Steinbeck, so you may want go check that book out somewhere. Nineteen Eighty-three the US invasive Carribean nation of Grenada ousting the government and taking full control of of the country within three days. The pew the Pulitzer prize was established by Joseph Pulitzer, journalist and newspaper publisher who founded the Saint Louis post dispatch and bought the New York World Pulitzer left money to Columbia University upon his death in nine hundred eleven a portion of his bequest was used to found the university's journalism school in nineteen twelve the first Pulitzer prizes were wounded in June fourth nineteen seventeen that's my take on this day in history October twenty fifth Thursday. So if you thought you knew history think again, you're in history. Like, I said on my social media marketing water what you're in class now. Enjoy the history lesson. Thank you for tuning into this edition of the digital vibe at WWW, the digital dot com and enjoy this day in history. It's going to be any day. But I'll let you know which day. Thank you for listening to the digital five. I hope you have a fantastic. Halloween trick traits. Don't eat too much, candy, you know, and have some fun. Enjoy the fall weather sputum this time of year and just have a great time. And enjoy this view of the digital vibe this day in history. See ya.

Pulitzer prize Joseph Pulitzer John Steinbeck sputum Tober Wyoming US Thomas Grenada Columbia University Albert secretary president New York Saint Louis publisher Warren G Harding
Policarpa Salavarrieta executed - November 14, 1817

This Day in History Class

05:33 min | 1 year ago

Policarpa Salavarrieta executed - November 14, 1817

"So impeachment Polish. Right if you want to know W T.F is going on right now. Well I've got just the podcast for you. I'm haze Brown a reporter and editor at Buzzfeed News and the host of impeachment today a daily podcast produced in partnership with iheartradio radio in just ten to fifteen minutes every weekday morning. I'll catch you up on. What just happened with the help of other buzzfeed news reporters to figure out what it all means and give you the context you need understand? WTO is really going on right now. Listen subscribe to impeachment today on the iheartradio APP apple podcasts. Or wherever you listen this day in history class is a production of iheartradio everyone. Welcome to the show. I'm eve and you're listening to this day in History Class A show that uncovers a little bit more about history every day today is November fourteenth. Two Thousand Nineteen the day was November fourteen. Eighteen Seventeen seamstress inspired polycarp salary at the was executed for high treason. Sullivan was born somewhere in the vice royalty of new Grenada which included Present Day Colombia. Sometime in the early to mid seventeen ninety s because her birth certificate has never been found exactly when she was born and what her legal given name was is unclear up Alania upon area and La Polla are all names that have been used to refer to her but polycarp carpet is the name she used later in life and that she's best remembered by today. When she was young her family lived in Guavas and Bogota? Little is known about her early life. But it's likely that the family was well off. Considering the appearance of her Childhood Home Guas in eighteen o two while while the family was living in Bogota a smallpox epidemic caused the death of her parents and two of her siblings. The tragedy caused the family to break apart as the the oldest child. Katarina went back to go out to us with polycarp and their brother. They lived with relatives there until Katarina got married and took polycarp purpose and their brother with her polycarp lived in the vice royalty of new Grenada. During a time known as la Petra Nova which means the foolish fatherland the period from eighteen ten to eighteen sixteen was marked by conflict over government and instability though many details of this time in her life remain unconfirmed. It's known that she was a seamstress and also may have been a teacher when the family she worked for a move to Bogota. She went along with them by the time she got to Bogota goto in eighteen seventeen polycarp was taking part. In revolutionary activities. Bogota was a stronghold in the Spanish reconquest of new Grenada and royalist agents in soldiers abounded in the city polycarp was daring and she began spying for the revolutionary forces. She stayed with Andrea Require Markdale. Lozano who provided her home as a base of intelligence gathering and resistance she and other women in her circle gather information and drawing rooms and taverns burns they would urge patriots forced into joining the royalist army to desert. They sewed uniforms and collected money and they organized wagon in transportation beyond holy carpets brother also assisted her revolutionary activities. They recruited more people to join. The revolutionary cause. POLYCARP was under suspicion by the royal bureaucracy. And she was soon captured and questioned authorities found documents that incriminated polycarp but including letters that she had signed given to soldiers urging them to join the Patriots won a man. Reportedly her lover was arrested with a list of royalists compatriot that she had given him. After a court martial withheld in Bogota in November polycarp and several other defendants were sentenced to be executed by firing squad. Her execution was set for the morning of November fourteenth eighteen seventeen she has since been honored as a heroine and Colombia's fight for independence Indi- In nineteen sixty seven Columbia declared November fourteenth. The day of the Colombian woman in honor of polycarp Sullivan. At the I'm used Jeffcoat and hopefully you know a little more about history today than you did. Yesterday you can find us on social media at T D I H C podcast ask on twitter. INSTAGRAM and facebook. Email still works. Send us a note at this day at Heart Media Dot Com. Thanks for listening. And I hope you'll be back tomorrow for more podcasts. From iheartradio is the iheartradio APP apple podcasts. Wherever you listen to your favorite shows what is it that makes us human connects us? I've told her enough told other people I mean. I overheard in my life. What are those moments that turn the ordinary into extraordinary? The birth parents have decided that they want you guys to adopt the baby. Instead I'm calling Balfe host of love. I love what matters presents your story in my new podcast Kwan. Shing November fourteenth. I'll be sharing real stories of love and compassion from real people all over the country listening. Subscribe on the iheartradio APP apple podcasts. Or wherever you listen to podcasts.

polycarp Sullivan Bogota Grenada apple patriots buzzfeed iheartradio radio WTO Katarina Buzzfeed News la Petra Nova La Polla Brown Colombia Balfe Andrea Require Markdale reporter Alania
12pm Newscast

Houston Public Media Local Newscasts

02:19 min | Last month

12pm Newscast

"Us live from dhcd. Eight seven houston. I'm gail delattre as houston public. Media has been reporting houston. Teachers were bracing to have to use some of their sick time in case ahead to quarantine for clothed in the new year education reporter. Laura is see tells us age. Isd backing away from that policy. H isd interim superintendent grenada leith in told the district's nearly twelve thousand teachers that she's considering their feedback on their cove. Leave policy before any. Final decision is made in a letter to employees. Leith said she's drafting a resolution for the houston school board to consider in january. It would mean that. Educators personal sick time would continue to be protected if they have to quarantine due to covid even if the exposure occurred off campus earlier this month s. d. proposed a significant change in the leave policy requiring teachers requiring teachers to use their sick time unless contact tracing showed they were exposed to the corona virus at a district facility and laura eisenson houston grocery store employees. Say they want to be counted as essential frontline workers that so they can get the covid vaccine sherman. John's is a houston area kroger employees. He says he and his co workers are often in contact with hundreds or even thousands of people from time. Going out to the store. Kind of you know when it gets too many people in the store and just In the risk of Awfully contact and some kind of virus jal grocery store workers have to show up for work so they can keep their jobs but the risk of coming into contact with so many people including some who don't wear a mask makes him as co workers worried the win the virus home to their families. Cvs health says it will start the cove in nineteen vaccination program at nursing homes and assisted living facilities and texas next week next monday. Cbs says it will start going to about two thousand locations around the state. The goal is to reach about two hundred seventy five thousand patients. The company has partnered with about forty thousand long term care facilities around texas on gail lauder news. Eight seven support for. Npr comes from npr stations. Other contributors include c. Three c. three.

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Episode 235: Operation Just Cause (Entry 869.EZ4510)

Omnibus! With Ken Jennings and John Roderick

52:19 min | 11 months ago

Episode 235: Operation Just Cause (Entry 869.EZ4510)

"Nothing we are Jennings and John Rodrick. We speak to you from our present which we can only assume as your distant past the turbulent time that was the early twenty first century during the great cataclysm that will surely befall our civilization. We began this monumental reference of strange obscure human knowledge. These recordings represent our attempt to compile and preserve wonders esoterica. That would otherwise be lost. So whether you're listening from an advanced civilization or just reinvented the technology to decrypt our transmissions. This is our legacy to you. This is our time capsule this is the you have accessed entry. Eight six nine dot easy four five one zero certificate number one nine three four five operation. Just caug- Mr Purple. That sounds good to me. Poppy Mr Urban the purple. Some guy some of the job is Mr Purple. Your Mr Paint. Who CARES RENAME? That's easy for you to say you're Mr White Cool sounding name. I look if it's NO BIG DEAL TO BE MR PINK WANNA trade. Nobody's trade. Would anybody just 'cause what we we see that joke in blockbuster video about once a week there was a? Do you remember the early? Ninety s thriller. Just cause with Sean Connery. And Laurence Fishburne. No so I've never seen it either but there was a plethora of these kind of bad sean connery thrillers in the early nineties badly reviewed end a. I would always grab that one and be like hey do you guys want to get this and some say why and I'd say just because people love to. Yeah there's no pasta before the cause them. Yeah I feel like I feel like my desire to make that joke and then your story makes me feel bad about my. That's kind of why I wanted to give you the background have you. Do you remember you remember this time? Of course the nineteen eighties. Reagan era into the into the Bush era early ninety s with with some Clinton hangover of Of just being excited about. Us overseas military adventurism. This so people could not get enough of that on Cable News. You Know I. I was the target audience for late seventies early eighties military adventurism but after the invasion of Grenada and the Falklands War I transitioned into like a radical peace. Nick and so all this stuff. I was no longer excited by it. I was enraged. I was protesting in the streets. I was one of the one of the hippies that was out marching around me John. I'm supporting the troops. I know you were. I mean it's hard to imagine because we now live in an era of constant endless global war. Isn't that kind. It's fantastic. I know everyone. There's no downside. As an investor in several a munitions factories. I always interested in a new front. We're always looking for military contractors to advertise on omnibus. We're looking for Raytheon or somebody to buy some time to put your new missile system on the omnibus- just Just right at the omnibus project. That gmail.com we will load you on the bus and so it seems odd for people of this area and I assume I'm speaking to a future. War ravaged Earth where they are still in the middle of endless global war. Yeah they're just listening to US between raids right. Thank you by the way we appreciate being your voice of Voice of the blitz or whatever but there was a time not so long ago when the memory of Vietnam had faded a bit And I mean not for anybody. Who is there cut for anybody not for us either for Gen Xer? The memory had faded a bit. And the you know. The beginning of the current nightmarish war on terror hadn't happened yet. And so and Cable News crucially had just started. Twenty four hour hegemony in needed. That's right it's content within the first. What ten years of Cable News Right? I don't know when Ted Turner when when did CNN start going round? The clock early eighties. The problem with it was that it had a half hour loop. That never changed right. I mean they would update little bits of it but just David Good now on headline news saying the same stuff. It wasn't this con- It wasn't like a news anchor standing there like real new real time using you. It was. It was prerecorded. It was like watching the the Walter cronkite thirty minute newscast over and over and it makes me angry. That doesn't exist anymore. Like you turn on headline news today. They haven't changed the name. Maybe it's now but it's just reruns of cold case. It's like reruns of true crime shows from the nineties. Yeah but they still the CNN. Still call the station. H. L. N. But it just airs twenty cold cases in a row. I REMEMBER WATCHING CNN. In those early days. Just praying for something newsworthy. Because for whatever reason I would watch thirty minutes of news and then it would recycle and you'd watch it again. Just the idea that it was. It was happening that if something did happen. The plane crashed or or a war. Started that it that you'd be the first to know. It was super excited. We were the first people I think. For whom foreign policy and natural disasters and stuff became real time real time television entertainment and of course that led to the the end of the American experiment. Pretty Much Roselle but it was. It was super exciting back then to see what's going to happen to Mount Pinatubo. We'll get another update at half an hour last night. I logged onto twitter to tell some jokes and whatever the latest foreign policy disaster just rolled in as it was going down and I felt that I had to comment course and we're recording this early. Twenty twenty when we're at another. You know the endless series of flash points in the war on terror which is not reduced my terror at all no although it's really kind of a war reinforcing townhall though you know the terror that Americans kind of like to like to experience personally isn't real Iran. Iran. Iran has no capacity to strike against the United States. What Iran is going to do is set off car bombs outside of embassies for the next twenty five years so as long as you don't go to an embassy or overseas. Well Yeah you're fine. But what if you know anyone service as long as you don't know any will be deployed to as long as you're not in the military or do not have a child that's going on foreign exchange or do not do business with any multinational corporation and that's okay employed in live in? Seattle and you know. We don't actually know that many people who are deployed we do. I got I got a lot of messages last night from people who are either deployed or have family or friends that are deployed. And it was. It was shocking to me. A friend of the show who listens from his bunker said that the very close friend of his WHO's in the military police just went to Kuwait like three days. How I saw. He's like she's over there now. And what can I do? She she usually. I have her back but I retired and she just went on like a milk run. It's a lot less academic. Yeah for for hundreds of thousands of people and also the million eighty million people who live in Iran who are now going to find hardliners. Much more appealing option. The four hundred million people live in that region. Read who were already like Kind of amped up so really. It was really pernicious. This idea that the occasional Reagan era military adventure was a fun thing to watch on. Tv were you in high school in eighty nine. Yes Desert Storm Slash Shield right Remember they remember the the support? The troops we are the world like Kevin Costner engineered Asher thing it. Eight hundred nine was also the Oh. Sorry operation just costs so yeah shield is ninety one. That's true. I was in ninth grade in eighty nine and I remember really round the clock coverage of the invasion invasion of Panama and it had a neat three act structure that our cable anchors loved. I mean seminal moment there is Bernard Shaw John Holliman and Peter Arnett under a coffee table at the Sheraton or whatever watching the first bombs fall in Baghdad and everyone just watching it like it was a video game with night vision cameras and Americans just eating it up. That was released spoonful of sugar and the cool thing about all these military engagements is that they all ended about four days later in resounding victory and we got used to the idea that when the US declared war it was good TV and then it was over by the weekend. The problem with Noriega is that he was such a tinpot dictator. It did not feel like he was worthy of that much American attention and also even then they didn't thirty thousand guys for one for one drug lord even then yeah the connection to drug money laundering and the way that that had all just recently played out in the arms for hostages. Sort of scandal of the Reagan administration. We all were very suspicious at this point about CIA and involvement in drug trafficking. And so it very much. The stink of conspiracy was on the invasion of Panama and and particularly those named operation. Just cause really. It was a big big cesspool. See this is your peace. Nick take you and your buddies are already talking about how this is. Just cover up north all over again man. It wasn't th this was. This was the era when we were starting to recognize that the that the drugs from Panama get turned into crack and sewn in the streets of American inner cities. Creating an epidemic. You know we were. We were tying it all together. George Bush was the first president with a crack dealer. That's right as we've covered so just to set the stage in nineteen eighty nine. Manuel Noriega the dictator of Panama. As you mentioned had been a operative. He had been our guy in the region for decades but it turned out he was everybody's guy in the region for decades Reagan's secretary of State George Shultz said. You don't buy Noriega you only rent him. He's like beer. Apparently because at the same time as he is happily taking a six figure check from the CIA every year to advance American interest in Central America. Because I'll be cared about back then. The form just had one question that said the Sandinistas and Noriega was like wait. I got one hundred fifty thousand a year. Oh Yeah I hate the Sandinistas Eight home. Much eat them. But as it turned out he was also funneling aid to to the Marxist rebels Salvador. He was minute. He was giving intelligence to Cuba and other Warsaw Pact nations as a anybody with an open. Checkbook Manuel Noriega became their best friend and a few decades into his run as a US CIA asset. He also became president of Panama essentially dictator for life of panel and we had recently had very complicated relations with Panama American Public Relations. Wise because Carter had had negotiated the transfer of Panama Canal to Panama. During the late seventies leaving tens of thousands of US troops based there but yes giving them back the canal zone which was which was a very controversial thing and it was politically controversial in the sense that people on the right side of the spectrum felt like that was a betrayal. I will never forget my seventh grade. Social Studies teacher when we'RE DOING. Latin American history saying until the SE I. I saw the end of the sentence until the canal was given back. Thank you very much. Jimmy Carter and with such venom inner voice. Suddenly she thought about her anger. The Panama Canal Zone was no longer American. The bumper stickers said keep our canal giveaway Carter. I don't remember them. Yeah keep our canal giveaway cards Panama Canal Zone Anger Drum. If you retrace Carter Anyway so yes Ken. The canal zone had been given back but leaving the US troops in the area and has tightened his hold on power while he did a few things. First of all he started to traffic drugs more flagrantly right leading to actual indictments in US courts and was part of the Iran. Contra scandal exactly right of the Reagan administration. This was the dawn of Seymour. Hersh to or not the dawn but like this was he wanted Vietnam era reporting. But this was one of his This was one of his later. Saurav exposes a right. I mean he he did. My lay was his his. Yes debut but this was the dawn of him just sitting at like in his New York. Times basically being the connecting pieces of yarn on garage. The Ronan Farrow right just like hey guess what gets called Seymour. Hersh he so Noriega. In addition to his during trafficking was tightening his grip on power at home He had lost a national election because he was just massively unpopular flaky character. Everyone they called him pineapple face he had yet acne. Just because this guy is murdering political prisoners doesn't mean you can make fun of his acne scars in my opinion no punch up exactly matched up exactly like trump is fat. But it's not. That's not why we hate him. Does Not why we hate them but we don't hate him. Santa's fat we love. That's right exactly so. So there's lots of reasons to hate Noriega. You don't have to call him. You don't have to call him custody fat. Yeah now I really hate. Maybe you should be eating more pineapple having a face. Short like triple threat. Oh is he really short tall. He's a squat guy if he is actually tall then he's got to be four feet across he had been soundly beaten in an election and then the opposition pre count and saw they had one and so he nullified the election. Could man and send out. This is one of my favorite dignity battalions to just start beating up opposition protesters and leaders. I mean that's what I would have done. Dignity Battalions is very good like. It's got the kind of Orwellian thing where the thing means it's opposite you know the Ministry of Truth does but really what he's saying. Is that what what gives you? The most dignity is to beat up your political rivals. St Sure there'd there'd be undignified by voting for for some lefty Weirdo with a college diploma. Instead of the Generalissimo feel like dignity. Battalions are things that would appear in those late seventies German porn movies where there was some sort of Nazi dominatrix and listen. It's some lady slapping a writing battalion. I'm going to take your word for it. The dignity battalions and he and when the when the US started rattling sabres about these actual indictments in courts in Miami or wherever they were He he retaliated by sending his battalion's after US soldiers again. There's over ten thousand soldiers stationed in his country. You'd think that would worry him but no he just starts having them beat up on the streets. What really yeah. He doesn't support the troops. Sean Female Service members are getting groped and harassed and worse. There are about one. Hundred incidents of these dignity battalions guys just roughing up some some guy out by souvenirs off the BASS. Don His me when a when a like a regional warlord. So confident defies the United States to the point that the is prepared to like go like tip over into cruise missile time and whatever. It is whatever 'cause they're all kinds of dictators to find the United States all the time but that they wouldn't be able to read the room if you know like they're going to rain bombs down on me if I don't like back up a little and the weirdest thing about Noriega is that unlike Kim Jong Java whoever he literally has multiple US bases in his capital city you know he's he's miles away from the nearest Delta Force seals special forces right like one mile away but but he also has the phone numbers of like twenty five high ranking members of Congress to call North's Pager. Just all right all right all right what is it. GonNa take to settle this factor. That must be what he thinks. He must think his connections with the Reagan. Bush axis is going to you know. Keep him safe and this is all just sabre-rattling for the press right look like to keep America safe. That's that's their number one thing. They do for generations in fact the night of a few days before Christmas. Nineteen eighty nine the. Us Says No. We're serious we're going to invade. Panama Noriega says Nah and goes off and gets drunk when the when the You know in thirty thousand. Us forces arrive in Panama City. They cannot find Noriega and it's because he happened to be hiding from his wife the night the invasion started. Wow this is a man after my own heart. This is what I would have been hiding from my wife and oops an invasion. Maybe in your early era so Noriega's off drunk in so they surround the presidential palace. He wasn't there and his wife doesn't know where he was. Because he didn't tell her he went off to get drunk and some REC center at a at a Panamanian Air Force Base. And had a sergeant go out and find him a prostitute genius and when the troops come and he's like. Oh Bush was serious. He's just he's dressed in a T. shirt and boxers and flip flops. And he's running for cover and he just heads for his secretaries apartment in the city craze. Like they'll never look at The Marianas House or whatever taxi and he's right days go by and nobody can find the guy. So this is why it's perfect for Cable News. So we've secured the capital. Tell us what's going on on the ground there but we don't Noriega's slipped through the net. He's allusive spider hole except it's just suburban apartment and because this is the pre nine eleven time line this all gets wrapped up for two or three days on the next day. He makes it to the Vatican embassy a day. Later we start. You May Remember. We start cranking Yeah Classic Rock at the Vatican embassy in violation of Vatican two. You know of course. It should have been should have been bluest. Her cult. No it should have been. Those Gregorian chants popular minute. Einste- about an issue. I bad one song. Sadness part desire or whatever it was How did Noriega get to the Vatican? What point did he make the transit from his secretaries apartment? Oh it was just easy. Nobody was watching the secretaries apartment. Why didn't you just stay there at some point? They're going to. His secretary doesn't have diplomatic immunity right but the pope does so he. He's banging on the door. Sanctuary sanctuary and the nuns. Take Him in so I knew a guy who was in the army during this invasion was in Panama. My sister's ex boyfriend Damian. What did he? What a Damian do Damian was an infantryman and and fought actually like like fired bullets and And like shot people securing strategic targets occurring strategic targets. And and. So I've talked. I talked to him quite a bit about the invasion. And of course he later became a like adjacent to alternative culture enough that he had lots of lots of things to say about. The invasion of concern confirmed our worst. Dighton the cynical nature of the Damian on our side now Damian was one of us the you know the detail that cable news loved that we were blasting annoying music at the Vatican embassy to try to get rid of trying. To get Noriega out seems like really are we? I mean the real. Do we have no other ankle? Real victims are the nuns. I mean Noriega Opera. He did not want to hear sticks but in fact the real story is pretty interesting. The reason why the OPS guys who showed up started play music at first because there were new American news media and international news media on the balcony of a nearby motel or something with parabolic. Mike's and they were afraid. That tactical stuff is going to be over hurt so they just started playing Steve Miller band so the mask the mask the sound you know if they had played the they'd played Kenny. Loggins like front to back like greatest hits of Kenny loggins. I think the war would have been over with an hour. Well they started taking requests and every and every soldier. It'd be like Oh you'll be funny like strange days by the doors a Panama by Van. Halen I it was all in everyone of the play League Greenwood a God bless the USA. I have a playlist here. Let's pretend you're in the Vatican embassy and you hear these which of these songs I'll name a song and you say whether you stare you go. Okay you've got another thing coming Judas Priest into it. Yeah you stay blue collar man by sticks totally into danger zone by. Kenny logged out. We actually did play dangerous. I Bet Kenny three songs in and I wanNA hear you didn't last long. I don't know I can put my head under the pillow for the dead man's party or and go bowling. Go hang for that. Don't look back by Boston. Yeah for sure. Electric spanking of war. Babies FUNKE DELIC. Yes. This is a great party. This is claiming is amazing. I'M GONNA put this on my heaven's on fire by Kiss. Well you know. I'm not the biggest kiss fan. But that's not a bad song. I like that the army and the army are now. The same diagram has overlap. I've always said that That as the army becomes more and more motivated by metal and country Western. They will just end up being kiss army. It's just a battle of whether the Gigolos or the kiss army takes over the US armed forces. I if I had a rocket launcher Bruce Cockburn. The seems like they're just going by funny. Titles right but but it's gotta get they got to run out of funny titles pretty fast in my time of dying led. Zeppelin sure ironman Black Sabbath. Come on we should be playing this for this. Episode of Nuns are probably mashing at this point. Judgment Day Whitesnake. Oh no I'm back under the pillow for that a lot of songs with jungle in the title. Because this is what they're army guys thought was funny play. Welcome to the general so Judgment Day by Whitesnake jungle. Sorry sorry jungle. Love by Steve Miller totally into that. Yeah welcome to the jungle obviously differences Paradise City. No More Mister Nice Guy Alice Cooper. Yeah Lava Paranoid Black Sabbath. This is a this is like pre. It's when metal was still heavy metal. Rather than I mean I think these days you would just hear one slayer song after another or some black metal from Norway up the guys would be well. You know what they'd be doing. They'd be playing like hip hop well. I think in Guantanamo. I think it was a lot of ironic. It was like the Barney theme. I think is what we do now. Oh just play like the worst like imagine like you have a kid like Sri songs by the wiggles over the car stereo and I was ready to surrender to Delta Force. You'd give it up give up all the and obviously renegade by sticks refugee by Tom Petty. You know you can tell what they're you shook me all night long. They're going for funny. This means war by Joan Jett. The party's over by journey. They're going for funny. I was at this party in one thousand nine hundred nine. I just didn't realize that it was the same number. Yeah you had no idea and after a few days I think I think Noriega realizes he's stuck in with nuns. Yeah like there's there's really no. This is boring. Good way I was going to be able to talk his way out. Once he gets out he he walks out and surrender Marino olof where he do that more. Why don't we? Why don't you speak Spanish on every episode? I don't I didn't know you were Jamie. Lee Curtis from a fish called Wanda. I just keep hoping you'll you're going to switch over to Russia and the strong. Yeah John cleese on the plane and so the invasion ends happily the audience applauds. Vh One. We've become convinced that American invasions on TV or a great idea which the Gulf War does nothing to not me changed me. I was I was. I was sitting shaking my fist. You and Damian are mad. I was listening to refugee by Tom. Petty but totally mad. But you've already mentioned what what people have. Our political stripe thought was one of the most pernicious things about this. Not just that it was on TV and had greg readings but that it was called operation just cause seemed so cynical so it's on the nose just in case you're wondering if this was a just cause hey it's right in the Chiron at the bottom of the screen right. It is And it made me feel like the people that that get to name. Those things had no sense of humor anymore that was that was not the first name for the Panamanian invasion. It was originally called operation. Blue Spoon Seem. That's a great operation. Name Operation Blue Spoon. You'd prefer that. I think that's so cool. That sounds like a special ops operation. Just cause just seems like 'cause please I'm the dignity of attendance being. It's it's for it's for no one right. It's I mean it's for it's not for the public like you'd have to be one of the twenty insiders on earring of the Pentagon who know what Operation Blues. I would write a song called Operation Blue Spoon. The problem yeah. It's not too late now. The problem is that during the run up to the invasion the Pentagon is getting more. Tv aware general. James Lindsay commander a special operations command calls the operations officer. 'cause there's a bunch of mid-level. Pentagon guys who worked for the Joint Chiefs. Who are coming up with these names and he calls and says. Do you want your grandchildren to say you were in blue spoon. Yes see but they don't think so. They think it sounds trivial wool. That's the thing about it off a secret name. Yeah you call it like operation candlestick and it ends up being like the carpet bombing of like ten villages. Well here's the thing like those names. Go back to the Germans in World War One. They were the first ones to pick. You know to say you know. We'RE NOT GONNA call this the the offensive to take operation four to take whatever operation for the date. We're going to give it a one word name and we're going to say this is operation. Crates Burger Barbara Rosa or operation Valkyrie. The plot to kill Hitler was a great operation name. Although integrate operation I mean it didn't. It didn't succeed obviously in our timeline. They'd call the Blues Boone. Maybe we'd have a different outcome run by with an eye patch. That operation has a lot to like about it so the so the Germans were the ones that started naming operations like to keep the to keep them secret because if your operation is named Operation October fourth and that falls into enemy hands. Hey wins it wins. I it's counterintelligence sex on February thirty twenty nine February thirty nine. The on the ninth of never so it was. It was just German commanders. Planning the Western Front in one thousand nine hundred nine who who were the ones who kind of gave us the modern era by saying no no. This should be Operation Archangel. I love that just something from mythology like and thereby creating the Robert Ludlum the James Bond era. We live in their two thousand paperbacks that would not have titles if it weren't for whoever those mid level German commanders. Were I mean they were the ones who decided you had to put initiative or ultimatum? Or something we hadn't got to the second word yet but they had figured that out and And so that caught on especially Winston Churchill. Great had written a four volume history of the Germans in World War One and so he was very aware of how important this should be. He had very strong ideas. About what Konate abuse in the Central Eisenhower figuring out the interstate highway system by watching the German autobahn like Churchill came back and listen. I've figured out how to name operates. It's GonNa be so cool. Check it out and he actually wrote down principles and sent this to his generals. You know this is the prime minister and he's saying hey operations and rich. Large number of men's me live. There may lose their lives. Should not have a boastful overconfidence sentiment? 'cause you don't want to say tell a thousand moms that your son died in never fail. Yeah exactly operation. Your son lives. They shouldn't be frivolous. Because then you'd have to tell some widower mother. Churchill noted that her son was killed in operation. Bunny hug or Baillieu like it's got a sound good on a on A. We were at to Inform Telegraph. Churchill said Operation Bunny Hug. That's his idea of a of a no go navy because that sounds like a green lit comedy central animated show now Improv group operation. It sounds like you would like bunny hug. It's a blue spoon type. Meaninglessness makes it. Perfect well but bunny. Hug isn't meaning stunning. Hug is cute right it. It does suggest well. There's a lot of irony in it right because if you're if you're killing people and calling the bunny hug who that's not what you mean or it is what you mean the. Us mostly started using colors operation to go and then when they ran out of colors. The joint chiefs approved like a a pre written code word index that each each theater got assigned blocks of masculine sounding common. But not too common nouns. You get you know. The European theater gets market. Pacific theater gets flint lock for example and Churchill actually would veto names They'd come across his desk and he's like no no nope. We are not doing soap. Suds for example. Which is what the American bomber raid on. Romanian oilfields was going to be called. I'm reading from this seems like Churchill's down in the weeds about some stuff that he should be thinking at a high level she'd give that to a to to grow trump's our joy. We show blood sweat soap suds and tears. I'm reading from an article by military. Historian Gregory Seem Sieminski in nineties wrote the definitive history of twentieth century military operation naming the Normandy invasion which eventually it was called overlord for her fixed name. That's heavy because it worked. I mean failed. You'd look like a real dummy kind of a bummer operation. Five hundred pound gorilla but originally the operation was going to be called it was it was a combination of two planet had previously drawn up nine hundred forty two sledgehammer and nineteen forty. Three's round up. You switched over to Gabriel. Before right and so as a result they decided to combine it and it was gonna be called round hammer and churchill absolutely did not want round hammers brow although it sounds a little bit like some kind of Nordic like a like a mythical Nordic town yeah. You don't WanNa go to Germanic when you're invading hopefully when you're hopefully getting all the way to Berlin right the thing about all these names as they were only used internally. I mean today we all know. Operation Sea lion never happened. Operation Overlord was a huge success. But at the time these never made the papers even after the foul wasn't this part of your Your entry in the omnibus about the crossword puzzle. Revelations of all of these nags actually. That's why it freaked them out that suddenly Utah and Omaha overlord appearing in the Daily Telegraph Crossword or whatever. Because nobody was supposed to know these although the name doesn't give anything away but it did suggest like a that. Somebody's interpreting for for someone else who might have part of the answer. Yeah but in the years following World War Two. This naming gets a little more public. Because obviously if you're already selecting cool names it's a bummer. The nobody gets to hear them right right. The Guy who got arc light the guy heading. The A-BOMB TESTS ON ON BIKINI. Atoll for example was very carefully. Chose Operation Crossroads for the name. It's the crossroads of the Pacific. But also it's the crossroads of a new era in Warfare Etcetera Etcetera. He was very proud that he had thought of this and he wanted to any he he used it in Senate testimony. News articles began to include accounts of these words. Right it didn't carry over in Korea Macarthur. Just use the code word list but when so that's why you got like Operation Chrome or whatever just a meaningless name but when ridgway replaced him he decided this could be a propaganda tool and he just chose very violent aggressive nicknamed operation killer. Operation Thunderbolt Operation. Dauntless right like one of the one of the bombing campaigns of North Vietnam was called Operation Rolling Thunder. Well this was the problem in the Vietnam era. They decided they decided to go the other way. Johnston started complaining that the names were too violent. Because now you've got these guys on the ground trying to one up each other with Gung Ho names operation ripper operation Masher operation flaming children. And I'll be right. Well that's the problem. Lbj's dealing with shrinking approval ratings at home people don't like the idea of the war as visceral violence. That's what's that's what's leading on the news. So he gets mad and Westmoreland has to scale back the names to be a little more neutral up huge proper names. Operation Niagara still suggest a cascade of bombs on the North Vietnamese. But it's it it you know it doesn't it doesn't make a sound like bloodthirsty butchers right. It's like a honeymoon spot. After Vietnam the practice becomes to semi automate. These names a system called Nigga is invented in nineteen seventy five. That's the nickname for the code word. Nickname and exercise term system the CW NATO which it doesn't choose it doesn't spit out a nickname for your operation. But it's a database now. The hurricane naming conventions are those chosen by a an algorithm or does every year a does like a committee. Sit Down and say this one's GonNa be called Lawrence. Every Year Committee makes a full alphabet and they know they're not going to get to. W but they do it anyway. Well I think the big change there was that it used to be all women's names should be God intended. Well I feel like it's important representation. How many storm Gods Mythology are women none? Yeah that's right but all storm Gods in America used to be and now we've got Hugo and these things that are like I think the idea is it was it was called Daphne. It was considered misogynous to continue to associated force of of destruction with with female energy. Why not make sure every other one is Andrew? Well that hasn't been my experience in the dating world. See this is exactly the kind of hilarious Johnny Carson take. They are hoping to avoid by putting male names on the hurricane so what they did with the what. The military did with their naming operations that they divided the alphabet into sequences and assigned one of these two letter sequences to the twenty four component dod agencies in commands worldwide. Started in seventy five. Yeah so the US. Atlantic command gets assigned. It's like the dewey decimal system. Okay Atlantic calm you get. Ag THROUGH A AL. Es THROUGH EASY J G jail they get these segments of the alphabet of NAFTA PICK and they they're segment ends with. Um through you are which is why they chose urgent fury some staff officer somewhere recommended urgent furious the name for the Grenada Invasion Invasion. They're going through a specific urgent fury. Think how urgent it was to invade and furious. It was to invade Grenada. Nineteen eighty-three that's exactly when it starts sounding super dumb like blue spoon really cool urgent fury. It sounds like it sounds like a comic book and Comic Comic Book by un-imaginative. Right but here's the problem. In the era of twenty four hour cable news. Who loved the stuff is news anchors? Who now get to sound like a Robert Ludlum book right time. They say the Pentagon could not believe how often people started saying just cause operation urgent fury because they just thought of it as an internal thing. Where if anybody asks it sounds cool? That's all they were thinking. They had no idea that these bozos on CNN some guy some guy doing a stand up in front of a an embassy is going to want to say operation just in front of the embassy operation. We are three of operations because it makes them feel like they are right. Delta force operatives because they know the Secret Super Code Word you remember the the war journalist character from Doonesbury who like parodied exactly that kind of Like flack jacket wearing a chorus war correspondent who who loved the jargon and who you really situated himself in conflicts as a somehow as a participant even though imagine the Pentagon pivoting from Vietnam era thinking where the liberal press is the medium to realizing how quickly they could coop. These guys you know and and you get the whole practice of embedding journalists. Because that's actually not dangerous. That's the best thing you can do. Because these guys love to feel like they are part of the troops. And that's what we see in the in. The the first Gulf War is the complete neutering of independent journalists as they become just sort of I dunno embedded tools of the of the military. No one's no one's allowed off the reservation. I guess we don't say that anymore. No one's allowed off base off base. I don't know if it's a military base or a baseball base but just causes the pivot on which this turns in which Centcom realizes see. I just I said send comment. I felt so cool for a second. I felt cool to say it again. Said Com San and Spanish Cinta Kamal and they realize that this kind of What contact coolness is incredibly valuable? And so a lot of thought starts going into how these things get named. It's not just one guy being like. Hey Captain Lopez. Let's not use blue spoon anymore. Something cool they long conversation. Start to happen. Memo's go back and forth leading into Desert Storm. That was not the original name for desert. Shield it was originally peninsula. She'll because I think maybe p. e. was the right prefix and Schwartzkopf didn't like that became crescent shield because they thought if you give it a symbol are Saudi Arabian allies will. We'll see us as a force for good in the region and not a force of Western meddling crusaders but that didn't read very well either not compared to desert. St- right once once they realized how Cool Desert Shield and then desert's a sequel like you could storm pretty. Tv viewers decimal eventually but desert shield turned a desert storm. And for American movie franchise audiences. You were like Oh hell yeah. I Love Desert Shield. Let's up it. Let's turn let's tune into Desert Storm now rank volume and one thing that thing. That happened very quickly as that. All these foreign operations started to get this verb noun kind of a thing like you know you re Operation Restore Hope. Yeah operations to sounds like bad star wars ler absolutely. I don't even remember where these were restore hope is that is that Clinton in Somalia maybe promote liberty uphold democracy stop. It just became like what you would think of if you didn't have an idea and what's crazy about these and the thing about the thing about the invasion of Panama was that it felt so much like like an operation that was just a training exercise right then. All of these. It was a training exercise. But everybody got real bullets like there was never a threat. If American troops got injured. It was just that they they twisted an ankle in a hole or maybe a couple of people got shot but probably by accident and that became our baseline expectation. Yeah it really was. The people won't get hurt but we got to Durken's we'll get Americans but we got to do all the cool stuff. We got to drop paratroopers. We got to have gun. Ships got have bombs so it was just a it was just a way to like expend the ammunition that was about to expire in our in our ammunition dumps right like well. Let's get all this stuff we're about to retire. Let's give us up into that one one time around. It's ominous to think that what led to the advent of drone. Technology was not so much the microprocessors make possible but just the Pentagon realizing the public now demands this kind of bloodless war entertainment war on our side. What are the technologies that we can advance to get us there? Five Americans dying. It's like we can't. We can't sustain these losses but But we can spend thirty billion dollars and nobody bats an eye. This kind of propagandistic operation naming continues today After nine eleven the immediate decision to invade a Taliban held Afghanistan was at first called Infinite Justice Boy. Churchill would really. You can't want us deb. Out His cigar. It's like a school yard thing where infinite just what are you going to say infinity plus one and I think it was actually American. It was you know the Council of American Islamic Relations or whatever it was it was local Muslim clerics who were like doing the fingers to the throat. You donate this j exactly like this sounds like crusade rhetoric and that's when it became Enduring Freedom in during freedom which really is the perfect name for an operation that is now what year going into year nineteen going going into year. Twenty truly is enduring it has really endeared. Good job yeah the. I mean all of that naming convention and particularly like Homeland Security all that stuff just suggested the sort of anti intellectualism of that of administration and that whole era like for anybody to say Yeah Homeland Security it just it sounded so and nobody there said hey have you guys seen starship troopers. Yeah it's like Neo Nazi sounding. Yeah and but but to feel to feel like that's the flag you WANNA raise it. That was I think. Maybe the a tipping point for me where I felt like there is a real dividing line now between between an administration that would put like thought into making the thing not sound to Taliban versus an administration that would that would say you know what that name doesn't sound to tally. -Tarian enough this is maybe the kind of thing we should not be saying on the record lest know a dignity battalion. Show up at our door. Well you know. It's one of the reasons that I have fortified this compound. Because there are a few dignity battalions already expecting of the sort of seventies porn variety. Well they can't get in either and that concludes operation just cause entry eight six nine dot easy four five one zero certificate number one nine three four five in the future links in the unlikely event that social media exists in your era and that you've been a listener to omnibus long enough that you can stand sustained liberalism that we've exhibited in this episode. Snakes Knicks be second. Have to do it a couple of Snow Flake. Cox over here with our anti-bush is it doesn't mean that Kenan Ir are brainwashed. Progressives far from it. We're freethinking individualists we just. We're just not persuaded by the invasion of Panama. Yeah if you want to know more about us in our personalities you can go to Ken Jennings and at John Roderick We keep it all going at omnibus- Project on Instagram. So you can see me and fact I'm GonNa take a picture of you can put on my instagram. So if people want to go and look they can scroll back far enough that they see your real person. Don't finally no. There's plenty of photographic evidence of meat. I guess that's right. Well especially after your recent TV conquering hero status. Now your pictures on the cover of newspapers worldwide. I I really do think the odds are now fifty foot statue of me all over the future. Some of them probably rebel others already already in warehouses owned by tech millionaires. Here stands Mandy as king of kings. You can email us if you have. If you have corrections or addenda you can email us if the if you have mash notes for us if you have naming conventions for episodes you WANNA play a game of mash with us. It's an apartment. Oh darker game. What does s mention apartment you can write to us and tell us what the s stands for in the mass game? When Act game or mash game never played this mash. What is it? It's just an eighties trapper. Keeper thing you draw spiral and depending on where you stop the spiral it tells you who you're gonNA marry in where you're gonNA live and it's the most powerful form of divination ever invented by. Man. I never even heard of it. I don't think ancient peoples used it to find fertile grazing lands and water. No no I'm at a complete loss normally I I just might have to be. Its own under the century right well. Email us at the honorable project at g mail you can go to our facebook and Reddit fan groups under the future. Ling's umbrella you can mail US things at Po box. Five five seven four four shoreline. Washington nine eight one five five and if the if the mood strikes supports the show with a financial contribution at Patriotair dot com slash omnibus project? There are lots of bonus materials available only to Patriot supporters. Ken is now opening mail. We got a bunch of holiday cards that I didn't open in time that I'm now opening belatedly. That's nice this. This test says that her cats PIPPI and buster often listen to us but not her boyfriend come on bill well I think you have a new year's resolution which is to get bill to listen to the show and donate to us at Patriotair Dot com slash omnibus project. Jennifer appears to be some kind of Yoga instructor. Well past our yard over here. You keep the card. I don't need. I don't need to learn anything about yoga but I do need to learn about yoga instructor. She sent us events of Tillamook creamery temporary tattoos and Buttons Through Canyon. Crest Athletic Club. Let's see where that is. It doesn't sound like it's around. John just cares about his two nearest yoga pants wearer. But I'm interested in what she said what she sent us a Nestle Quik Rabbit Rabbit have a name. I don't know. Is he the one that kids can see or can't see but snuffle up? Can you crest? Athletic Club is Oh. It's in the inland empire. I would have assumed it was somewhere down in in Arizona. But it's really the next time you're in the valley. Let's see here. She also sent in Riverside California. It's not our into inland empower. I area and let him. I assumed you meant the San Fernando Valley when you said no inland empire is what we call that sort of Idaho. Spokane dominated Eastern Oregon. I've never had to refer to we. Call it the inland Empire Land Empire. I've been saying I've never been. I don't know what to call that part. Well no you know we also got she has tennyson. Buck Minster Fuller stickers reach. What are what's Mine? Mav It's saying don't fight forces use them and he's holding up his hand like he's using telecommunications say he's a very old man and he appears to have powers in this in this picture not just powers to to create uninhabitable geodesic. Don't no he's he's doing? He's doing Jedi. Mind TRICKS ON US. Right now listeners. Future Ling's from our vantage point in your distant past. We have no idea how long our civilization survived given the escalation in military operation naming. The trend line is not great. We hope and pray that the Catastrophe. We fear maybe averted thirst. Come soon this recording. Like all recordings maybe our final but if providence allow we hoped to return soon with another entry for you in the omnibus.

Us Checkbook Manuel Noriega Panama Reagan Ken Jennings Winston Churchill Vietnam CNN Cable News Pentagon Damian Iran Grenada Vatican embassy Nick George Bush Sean Connery army Reagan administration
POG #33 Active Impact Directs Money & Talent to Companies that Make a Different

Pioneers of Good

40:38 min | 1 year ago

POG #33 Active Impact Directs Money & Talent to Companies that Make a Different

"Create a business you can be proud leave a legacy be a force for good leave the world a better place become a pioneer of goods connect the game changes of the world's these entrepreneurs are uniting the world of making money on the world of doing good and they're succeeding more komo people are joining the community of doing good whilst doing business listen to these interviews with a hunger to learn more and youtube contract to changing the world's let me paint you a picture your company is growing and you're <unk> at the point of needing investments this many places you can tune but there's a catch u k about the environmental and social impacts impact of where the money came from you wanna make sure that's the people who lend you the money have been values and purpose in alignment with us can you turn quite gratuitously mike winfield is founder a managing partner of active impact investments it's an impact venture capitalist with ten million dollars in assets under management and what's great is active impact exclusively support support small to medium sized purpose driven ventures to scale their impact on profits by providing funding and also supports to to their portfolio companies how did mike get into being a venture capitalist and also what services does he offer that extends above from beyond listen to this interview with mike to discover the answers to those questions <music> welcome to another episode of pioneers of goods and i have a great privilege on itunes fights mike winfield today who's the on managing partner of active in <unk> investments and i'm really excited to hear about this because being a starts at myself we hear lots of the financial an actual journey all businesses how can get capital raised also look different resources as well so it's have you on the other side of the coin when offering these this suppose quotes i'm really excited to hear how one you got into this will serve to what you're offering to your investments so welcome so you based in kazakhstan and we have touched i just hitched now that you are finally open investment company can you share about what's active in impacts office to its spence yeah sure we are new to the venture capital station were quite small relative to norris owlish chapel ans but really the opportunity to to prove decision and so really what our thesis is that we invest exclusively the in companies that are solving an important environmental or social issue and do that alongside being or for profit and trying to use returns so the companies <hes> more specifically we're supporting are headquartered in the u._s. you ass they have released age revenues specifically being two thousand two million and in canada there's funding gene gap <hes> saved a lot more hunting open up fulton's companies and i hit a couple million in revenue and above and business this model that were most interested in are either subscription software so sas companies b._2._b.'s ask companies or companies that have a high growth services mall in the reason we chose those is invest my across ray on leadership and operations roles and so it allows us to hopefully make better choices and firm which ones will ultimately succeed when twelve mall also plays into her second part of your question which is how we help these facial in addition to just providing capital and making investments in company re also help them operate so we get involved is for the role of a free her her heim executives who all i was doing some research at <unk> advent tuxedo ism and quite a few offer either than many all seat on the board but very rarely they offer it sort of together so it signs that you've got quite a winning formula well hopefully hopefully a winning formula very full mast answer companies that i can see that you will retroactively invested in companies as such as when is jada there's zero waste office supplies online mental health with ink blots and solar energy with jessica breath sounds like you're you really sort of focusing on the companies that leave positive impact for the society as well as environments as well yep for sure i mean not sort of the price of admission you've been veterans who are are due diligence screening processes that you know our team is sort of inspired by what impact could be created with positive created these apples seeded and it can't just be sort of a company conducting a traditional business where they how hard apartment corporate social responsibility department where they do nice things getting by certain percents or other things where they contributed to the community we look for the business model way that they meet their money to be intertwined with the the benefit of creating society in the environment so that the hand you know the east yup rated so you can imagine you could invest in a company that has a a really great c._s._s._r. initiative save you know one percent or something like that where they'd volunteer hourly gay crawfish or have you but the concerning concerning things sometimes fuss anyways is depending on who the leader is anyone sort of much value baked into the d._n._a. d._n._a. company what decision is going to get aid during hard class when there isn't the prophet and when there's a decision whether you need to let go go one of your long term really value employees or whether you make at tony and so that's where we feel like that model breaks out at times and it it also doesn't necessarily engage all him boy jr and so when we just take an example of go java they ages they don't exist unless they are providing the benefit they're providing with jiro away so i mean their entire business models predicated on on delivering healthy office snacks and water and coffee in favor shredding services all all these things offices consume our regular basis but doing it in with a view to a close lou circular economy where as they do their boss they also provide the bins where everything gets sorted weighed in by java and then apply golden recycled appropriately and show we may have put their statistics on their website they are not meaning revenue their naming their competitors so they're talking about you uh-huh trees they planted number hounds of waste of riff ranville these talking though number coffee pot up cycled into reason building materials else and so if that was the customer contractor winging it was i'm buying your services instead of your competitor services has now now i get to see what my on part was will that means every dollar they may avenue is also creating jobs so that that's what leila for yet it's really adequate described as well in as you just said it that business would not exist The views that could be related to buy literally anybody to my son's financial advisor. They consume by my errands errands or my grandparents were my. F- so we try to be awful as as well as the solution to that because we we do not tree after a few years in the same same industry slip into using the acronyms the the best words of that industry what you offer as solutions make sure that that is still offered to its <unk> within easy access last. Oh I you know I think it's just trying to be pragmatic about it in a Rwandan talking about listen. You know people here. Thank you for a year or you know any other sort of men are and and I was listen. This is very then parole I asked around in my neighborhood and how many of you are magic hand and half the People Neighborhood Grenada China and I said well great just understand what we're doing. I used to be on the leadership team of other sort of small and medium-sized successful uh-huh fast-growing or offices and all that were doing and put together collection of money a group of people and we're putting money <music> into how funny is that our life ones that I have led before that are privately owned by individuals. You know not unlike some of you. You need this money to to grow to the next level. That's really what you know. It's Kinda shippers way that we can describe what is reviewing yeah. That's amazing <unk> goods on. I'm curious how you got into it because I mean you ve also been voted top forty under forty so you've got <unk> sounds like <unk>. You've quite high-profile backgrounds with a lot of successes. I'm still curious in your back. Home was before starting this company yeah I I started with <hes> you know maybe a fairly traditional business or background but had an opportunity to learn and be exposed to a bunch of really interesting challenges and small business have to go through so the turnaround guy one boy. Oy Or company for underperforming divisions regions by lead and integration ran no lone win a merge with another another copy issues around that rebrand combining offices and cultures and algae Yang Homes Asian a. and all those things are company one that I worked for one point <hes> primarily <hes> back in travel <hes> Shakhtar one point in Torque last and other times so got kind of live through without experience as an employee in a leader aware money kind of getting injected in from the outside world and what expectations were around Bro. You know gone opportunity to to do you geographically stanch ends product launches so gay she had a career of you know around bitching years and a handful the executive leadership role like I say for what I what I describe as as small and medium-sized copies be handed to rain wrong about bitty Durians US three hundred million in revenue in charge of the piece that I was responsible for and and <hes> honey you're not doing that sort of the whole time looking for my way to use something more entrepreneurial and and finding with the you know a new opportunity presented itself and you know maybe the more money you I would learn earn and and it captured delaying my path into moving towards doing something on my own but not with any not with any regret I just I ended up usually when I went off in digital near my own that someone had really paid for my education it yeah it sounds like what whether you have a job or your business how you perceive it that you can gain most valuable seagulls within what your experiences reinstall answer extends like you obviously taken what you've learned and applied it to this current business and you also offer advice is that rights sir different companies as well if not just investments yeah very much so mostly with her proposed companies but then I use I'm just trying to support not go system cross Canada's email photos calling Yaro executive in residence <unk> eyeballing tear sometimes as well and it's a good way to get to know the bigger of my on later but specifically within refund you mentioned you know some dis will take fourteen and they'll help in that regard and that's true but you know. I would say you know. Sometimes these cheese or not more because they want control. Nobody want that. <hes> that vote so if you contrast that with what we're doing we look got more from a support standpoint folsom point and if you talk to her portfolio companies they would tell you that they spend more time talking to me than they've been caught in any after four members because we do. We do a weekly one on one C._E._O.. Of everyone our portfolio so <hes> yeah I mean I literally have a phone call how with neo in our proposal every single wound and basically just how can I help while best ethnic quite a novel approach search but it sounds like you're getting the results as well and it's humanizing it so some weeks we might need you. We are not invested by that at some weeks. They might need you mole. Evan weeks maybe less but you're also giving them the space to own what they need rather than as we said control them and tell them what they need to do. Breath Lord by when's the flu so with regards to active impact ice tea just before the we went lives that you are currently investing only in North America Jeff Bezos <unk> Canada and you have any sort of future plans full. You'll investment to reach different areas of the wills. Yeah we would love that I mean you are ambitious has really that this becomes that they can be additional bligh more more money than we can move more house and move to these ventures and so- geographically the only reason why we started the home. Tom Is it's just a matter of practicality now. When you run a small UN you have fallen out of asset management views you have a small team. She don't really have the resources. Che's the getting on airplanes and no visiting nurse geographies and so on and so yeah I I would say in the future would be should try to have you know a series of funds that heater to specifically awful wet people want the wet stage of company people want wants to support when geography or well particular impact severe ause people loss or I think you know the larger you can get and more granular regard then you really give people a chance to put their money. You specifically wear you know. They have a passion auctioned. They have an inherent. Perhaps you were. They how you know talent or network interview of Chicago have have you noticed any patterns at the moment with startup companies. I mean I appreciate your look you predominantly for companies that are making a difference and oversee all profitable symbol but leaving a legacy full full the planets as well other nations that you're seeing the growing or win. The is moving towards yeah well. I'll start with an hurricanes this week which is new we started looking for our investment offer as company. B Might WanNA invest investing specifically out of that would your to you know entrepreneurs founders that are are in the impact round you know they they know that they are a social inches venture. They know they're seeing conscious. Apper number term you WANNA use physically they know that that is sort of the kindness of their businesses degenerating all issue and then we'll we started noticing he going to traditional hitch event so you know and one of the traditional salary eaters or local universities or `incubators or angel eventually you is you would go in listen to force a number of businesses that have no sort of defined or earn. Herranz on society he but even at those traditional as we're seeing more and more and more more our category visas and so now are we the first positive and we're seeing is you know along with the probably more so than millennial generation where there's a little more awareness of some of these issues and in a little bit more of a connection to them or concern them they are choosing more often than not to launch assesses that that addresses issues so exciting trend that we see in then. I guess you know not a worrying trend but you know something that we we see not that we try to provide a little bit of coaching and guidance on is we see a lot of companies that are quite early. In looking for funding as the I guess they're using running a little bit too much crash and so oh no we we prefer companies that are very exciting very viable on their own. They've already sort of figured things now. They've got a great team they they can show that you'll be able to generate strong growth. Martin strong profit at sale in the funding is simply there to help them accelerate pro WPRO on something in a winning on the one that worry us are the ones that you know they really don't have much bigger the food and are looking for funding to be able to figure it out for them and and I don't I just don't think it happens on our <unk> equitas saying that I apply to more individuals but this might be quite when you're as many as magnify so what you just said about funding being debts accelerates if the team isn't competent or trains all enough than it's the money will not solve this might my tax recreates <unk> potential issue in the future rate a word. I think the status interesting they say the same thing out of personal people who didn't have a lot of money. We're not very hot new when they win. You know they have a big windfall water something they tend to very quickly. Go by the stays and people who you know were already inherently how year Aurora continue being nationally so I mean we're dealing with people whoa you're right so yeah so your comment of money at Lega fire your shirt her needing persona again coming back to the question you asked every C._e._o.. C._E._O.. Every week as well what you need for me it's also the human element that person can be kristen. I'm even shit may be something that's not naturally business related but still so maybe impacting performance in work absolutely got wish you and we definitely see there are weeks. Where does the I won't cry on? What they want to talk about is is an issue they might be having with their family personal life and they they know it's not I mean that's we're? We're human knew about the off of these things and you're out of your letters and how they're showing off the work yeah. That's really posted some. It's great <unk>. He Nia Union you are offering. That's from day one as the Mall I looked some of your expertise that you list as well and it's not it's not just offering them a a question to be there for them so they can come what they know. They'd like from you but you can also look into their blind. SPOTS MAY BE AT SM extra value in the areas where they need. Maybe upskilling for the level of scheme they growing towards also look. I'm sure I'm I'm a pain in the ASS. I'm asked him crashing. They don't have the answers were don't want to answer but <hes> the I think hopefully we're achieving a good balance or help him for any help Alpe but also challenging them on where they could grow themselves and grow the business more so for any business Hinson that they wishing to scale that company listen maybe top level areas that they need to address the full seeking investments that you know the flags the looking for so as a good deal for you to be able to quit. I mean factions really nice the senior his when you can see the market been really grabbing hold of something some of this this created and so the other require customers at arise as or revenue growing rapid basis. It's sort of validate and that would they have of a need wealth delivered so we certainly look at then you know the revenue has to be healthy right. He's got to deal with and I'll look at it. You you know the unit economics and say are you hunting giving only this service people are buying it or people a fair price for willing it comes down to this concept of you know a raving raving clients. We talked to one of your clients that your company was going to go away tomorrow service anymore. What would the reaction be? You know it'd be simple. You know shoulder shot and that's okay. There's lots of people who say oh man you know. It's such a value offer service in my life right. Now should 'cause you know bunch of a bunch of Vesey's exists so we look for those things I would say in terms of <hes> of that fraction or the health business by you know. I will say more than anything what we're what we're looking. Indoor is talent at we realized when you investment release as I mentioned or were typically two hundred million in revenue as sweet spot not raid yeah I mean generally are suites. AUSE is one hundred thousand million and at that stage they would have nearly had hand too early and flute and so you cannot attend to thirty employees in the needs of the few people that <hes> even specifically the founder that we really believe in because the business is so early they're probably going to have to change you know markets go after several times of crises gene for power another product or services delivered several times but the piece is remaining constant hopefully founder hugh members of executives and so I mean we need really more of that. One person that that on a company or a night yeah we look for people who we think are are quite exceptional in that way not backseat what you said Dude in which is at the end of the Jabril human so it's as if you're investing in the person you see potential with them and they've proven the that track records as you said with the metrics because while you're looking at absolutely for everyone so sieve interested for the listeners out there who would love to sort of wait a bit more about your services services products in what you offer as to investors as well as entrepreneurs. What is your websites and contact details yet so the website is W._w._w.? You W._W._f.. Guy Investments DOT COM in hockey honest. We don't do a lot and a Hersh Sean. Thanks to the site and so some people calling me on link the end and I'll have to grab you know article or story video entrusting gene. We're GONNA show <hes> any of your listeners are interested in calling Mike when Sherefield on minutes waits a thing not tell us and yeah despite one aspect of this I- opportunity to to do it is just just to ask people to you know get involved in however they can and yet evolved. You know I feel like there's a huge disconnect there and you ask the question. Earlier end didn't necessarily get around you know wildlife the corporate world wile after no pushy executive salary gigging and decide to eight the rest of the road and start my own business. I fully that ambition and really kind of came down to a moment where I was seeing and not <hes> going on in the world that troubled me right she she documentary or used key posts on social media yeah were you were however we kinda consuming. You're seeing these things and again a whole bunch of us. We're going to have to find a way to contribute to not rely on charities and governments to sort of arouse if you do that then you have you know ninety one hundred percent of the planets revolving however they want and hoping that the ten percent that's in government man jared he is going to be all to exit on us and obviously not working and I didn't want to be a part of government. <hes> not cutler's anything wrong either one of those just wear my emotions were so then it turned in the head scratcher moment this is okay. She'll I just by asking that question. How can I can assure you it's not gonNA be revolved? Here is feature donations. It's not GonNa be through you know. Working through censored are eating like ask the question I thought it was like turning on the fire hose first public how much surely coming up in just realized that I had never asked question in that. Other people aren't housing or share so there's this disconnect where I think most people we hear about these problems and we think well someone else taking care of it or I don't know if I believe that is true or i. I believe it's true but what difference would make if I did something like no. I'm one person or several billion on this planet. I don't I I don't I don't know what it is. I don't know what's going through the hand by Tom once before them those are some of the sentence for list is sort of you know. I guess it's not complacency sometimes played at sea but with other kinds ensure I would not help. I only want to hell if I feel like what I would do. You will be and so I just became a firm leader that more Winner there's a few things climate change included did it just require a lot of it and and a lot of people a lot of money solutions very very quick. Now I would like our generation each thing while they're still containable verses dealing with the aftermath of you don't trying to rebuild things are until it started really really simple when you ask that question. All of a sudden starts to appear is okay they will. There's actually lots of jobs. They're working for companies with really interesting roles. The no pay market rates that have just as much the opportunity to advance and learn how filling rear but they're working for companies that are addressing these sounds and so the very first thing you can do you can go to anybody foyer and say. Are you thinking about where you're working what your company does and would you rather be were wore in in making acura rejoice. There's no sacrifice is only upside and then you can go to the consumer and you say we'll everyday. We vote her while we own yeah whether you buy this piece of cheese cheese or you buy you know. I won't use specific examples so any particular brand or industry end of the boss by bottom line is we all have a consumer cyrus down what results in purchasing of everything we buy whether to banquet you have your mortgage rift with food you buy which no brand hurry you buy. All these things the consumer level and you know. I think it's not easy the level that Moore also changes happen on and then the third only half is marine so what stocks and Montana your portfolio you invest in mutual funds or leaky ass haven't yesteryear screening nor are you are you looking at the impact investments small privately owned company through either investments alcohol and there's lots of vehicles that you can make these trust with green bonds and so forth and so so that kind of an interesting why so and then the tracks the final one is people who have the emotions were running of this than start the be some of these sensory. There's things like the worser case or just this genus choosing to open as I did. My story is one that lots of people could repeat righteous to take a point in time in her life. They say cumulated you know the money I feel like dirty. Accumulated certain feels that <hes> assigned for me to do my own thing and meets me you know some money and also you know saw one of these vicious so that's what I will are on being able to do. Heart from the money were diverting into right places. I hope we're all so inspiring. Some change in that will just by listening to that. I I mean spy <unk> Shiaz myself how county countries because I think I'm doing my bits. Where else can I do a bit more and not saying we have to strive for the facts you know the pit bull effect looks like but how can I come to racism. <unk> is a hugely powerful <unk> question to us and just hearing her that I wouldn't say trump's food but it definitely shifted your cost to be able to leave the world's knowing that you do your bit and then Som and inspiring the next generation as well so he just he. It's the it's really important. I'm since by me as I said it's about inspiring story what you've just shared so thank you will note the and thanks again for giving me the platform yards area to share ca or that reason we are as many as over speaking on panels talk at conferences right our goals here. I and you know we're not the only people doing which is right and so it's nice to see is really growing moving. I would say it is the number one similar trend. I was as the the number one growth area from an investment standpoint is actress angle. That's members wonderful to see and we're seeing it also <hes> <hes> in an employment standpoint you don't wear millennials are choosing to work and this important to more and more people understand what the purpose and any of the astronauts are. You'll business. You acted impact investments. You're offering choices as well so maybe ten fifteen years ago. Even if we want to do a better thing or a better consumer it might be more tricky to find those companies yet. Nag thanks to your company and at a company similar to yourself were able to ask. You seem as make that decision as easier for people to do the right thing. You're right. I mean the the level of transparency is going up which is which is very helpful and I think just the level of education is going on in in terms of you know what are these global issues and whether the thing can you possibly contribute to you since all so you know. Hopefully we've dot a combination of equal rules. y'All like the amount of Asia and is worth it was worth it now that it would move the kneel you know it starts with one hundred people moving in the right direction and thousands of billions and then we can get there by we seem to keeps <hes> stock in our tracks where is still is such a minority of the law population that is actively involved in this and I guess to summarize what I was saying anything. There's a disconnect. I think there's an urgency required and I don't think there's a sacrifices may not really devastating people with US donations and volunteerism as a sacrifice where they that that I'm talking about in terms of references an investing where you work. I don't think they need us on the investments earned Zimmer terms are higher but choosing thing their values align no but choosing your lawyer who made the same amount but how a more fulfilling job and career so there's no sacrifices really upside there and then on the consumer side of things the issue of way you're buying and consuming <hes> you'll you'll actually even feel ratification there as well you know we're we're inundated with choices in today's society and we actually just kind of you know. We want some more data on more me. Why should I pick one brand versus another. You're not the color anyways on yeah. It puts us back in that position of choice and knowing billion people is one poston time slots so we do cans so Mike. Thank you episode tying and being on this podcast. I am definitely going to the following active impact investments seeing way we you're active which companies yours backing in supposing and also what she urine personal genius while grown flourish church. I really hope that you each year and the rest of the world as well with your investments so thank you so much for being on the podcast thank you. I'm not with the feeding but Mike and his team from active investments k. not just for the profitability of the companies they invest in the for the well being of the founder. Eh and its stock. I have never met a V._C.. That cools every single company. He invests in on a weekly basis. I'm basically just asks. How can I help you do what you need from me. It may not even be a business assistance but something they might be eating within the personal life yet. Mike takes the time and to reach out and connect with these people striving to grow a bigger and better company and Famille so it's refreshing to hear that there are venture capitalists opportunists out there who wants to create hesitant and impactful businesses that yes the profitable yes giving back to community that way but also making sure his into wines with their purpose that there's no way they can't keep delivering greater and better impacts throughout <unk> out the business journey. If you want to hear more about Mike and his business then visit his website at active impact investments dot com and as always <unk>. I'd love to hear from you. Subpoenas drop me an email or a message at hello at pioneers of goods dot Org and until the next episode he in positive action. Are you ready to step up and be a pioneer of goods if yes get in touch with me. My name is strong and I'm on a mission to to create more businesses that are profitable and doing goods so get in touch with my email is hello apply news of Good Dot Org. I promised I don't Bite Saritchai. Drop me an email and we can catch up over a virtual coffee to see how you too could could join the tribe of Pioneers and if you enjoyed this episode then teams like subscribe and share this Cla past the more we can share the message of creating profitable on purpose driven companies the quicker we can change the world together unthought just involved she her senior on your social media channel still until the next podcast keep in positive action.

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Introducing Fiasco: Iran-Contra

The Gravy Train

42:21 min | 1 year ago

Introducing Fiasco: Iran-Contra

"Hey It's Jordan and I have a new podcast for you. Hope you enjoyed the story of Mayor Rob Ford but now I want to tell you about another show. It's one that I don't host am a big fan of and it's called fiasco in the new season. You will hear the true story of a secret war a secret deal scandal that threatened to destroy a US president until somehow it didn't does that sound familiar. It is not what you think so. We are pleased to share the following episode of fiasco from our friend. Lyonnnais faulk and luminary media. We think you'll love it and when you're done you can hear the full story only on Luminary so enjoy this episode and then go to Luminary. Podcast DOT COM or download the luminary podcast APP and get the full season a fiasco Iran Contra on October thirteenth. Nineteen eighty-three a long island. Dad named Kevin Khaki spent his day at work dealing with bullshit. Khaki was a maintenance engineer at a macy's department store in Bay shore down on its luck. Hamlet about an hour and a half east of New York City. Khaki came home exhausted from a series of disasters of the store I the escalator had broken down. Then someone poured out of Greece down a drain which caused the pipes to back up all over the building. Then the elevator stop working. He was really tired in a terrible mood when he got home and his wife was making a racket in the kitchen vis nita renfrew a former journalist who got to know. Kevin Khaki while reporting on the Iran Contra Scandal. They said it was the worst day he'd ever had at macy's as renfrew later wrote in a story for New York magazine. Khaki walked into his house that night to find his wife mad at him for being late for dinner and his ten-year-old Daughter doing her homework in front of the TV then little after seven thirty the phone rang online cap keys author life and all of a sudden he got this phone call from from the White House. The person calling from the White House was a contact of Khakis a career. Ca Officer who had recently joined the staff of the National Security Council and he says to Kevin. I'm turning you over to Colonel North. And he gives him north number and he says call him in the morning. He's waiting to hear from you if you know anything about Iran Contra. It's probably the name Oliver North back in October of. Nineteen eighty-three North was not yet the star witness in an international scandal. He was not yet a poster child for unencumbered American patriotism. He was just an obscure figure in the White House bureaucracy. Neither Kevin Keke nor anyone else ever heard of him still. The National Security Council had a direct line to the president of the United States. Khaki was excited at the prospect of making himself useful to someone so high up in the government. He'd been trying to make himself useful in this way for several years together with three friends stockbroker a building inspector and a carpenter Kevin Keke had formed what amounted to a volunteer intelligence gathering operation. They traveled abroad. They made contact with people who gave them information about foreign governments and they tried to get important people in Washington to listen to their findings. They were like a Tuba. Boy-scouts you know. They're out there. They wanted to have an adventure and do positive things while they were doing it. You know that's what boy scouts do. Oliver North would later tell iran-contra investigators that Kevin Khaki was a right wing ideologue compared him to a rogue agent. I doubt Khaki would have taken it as an insult. He was self professed Patriot and enthusiastic foot soldier in America's Cold War with the Soviet Union when Nita Renfrew interviewed him. Khaki told her that if there was ever anything he could do to set the Soviets back peg. He would do it no matter what he believed that communism needed to be defeated in the world and that we had pulled out of Phnom and when we should have won the war he felt that the government needed a lot of help that we as citizens of the country needed to help the government Kevin Khaki and Oliver North had a lot of that in common north had been an unwavering believer in the Vietnam War since his days the US Naval Academy in the late nineteen sixties each man who wears the academy ring embarks on his splendid worthwhile career highest traditions. The United States Navy he looked forward to deployment when he was injured in a car accident during his first year. He worried that it would delay his graduation and caused him to miss the war entirely during his recovery. North was so focused on getting better in time that according to Niebuhr he took to jumping off the roof of garage over and over again in an effort to strengthen his legs during the war today. American B fifty two bombers dropped tons of explosives on dense jungles near Cambodia. North ended up fighting in Vietnam for about a year casualties and while overseas he wrote letters home to his parents expressing his frustration with Washington lawmakers who were unwilling to fully get behind the war. Most of all he wrote. I wish the politicians would get off their fat soft postures and come through with something one way or the other to clear this up. I think that reflects a frustration. Common among military guys with Congress or the administration for Tying their hands battle that's journalist Ben Bradley Jr. He's the author of Guts and glory the rise and fall of Oliver North which was published in nineteen eighty eight two years after North became a household name as a result of the Iran Contra scandal and you know these guys would would typically feel in our shit if they could just unleash us. We'd have this thing wrapped up sooner rather than later. The Vietnam war dragged on for years after North returned home finally after losing nearly sixty thousand men. The United States pulled out its troops in Nineteen seventy-three in Saigon today. The last of the American troops got on airplanes and flew out of Vietnam ending the longest military involvement in the country's history as far as North was concerned. The politicians who had ordered an end to the war had committed a grave sin. Both against American forces had been prevented from fulfilling their mission and against soldiers in South Vietnam. We've been counting on the. Us In their struggle against communism the politicians had caved to pressure from uninformed public. They raised their their placards and the march against the governor as North. Later put it. America lost the war in Washington. Not In Vietnam. When north went to work for President Ronald Reagan in Nineteen eighty-one? He carried with him. A single-minded resolve to never let his country abandon its values again. And though he was part of the government now he was not going to be precious about accepting help from like minded outsiders. It was that openness to collaboration not just with department store engineers but with arms dealers mercenaries and shady international fixtures that would later drive north and the rest of the Reagan White House headlong into Iran. Contra but I north needed to talk to. Kevin wanted his help overthrowing communist regime. I'm Leon Nathan from Luminary Media and prologue projects this is fiasco season to Iran. Contra the story of a secret war secret deal and a scandal that threatened to destroy. Ronald Reagan's presidency until it didn't Washington. Still in shock over the secret diversion of funds to the conference with soccer about secret sales of missiles to Iran questions of illegality and cover up. I don't use the word cover up. I would use the word protect. They were lying to the press. They were lying to the public. They lied incessantly to each other. They did out of loyalty and anticommunist. Um That's why the government of the United States gave me a shredder. How could the president love have known this week a preface to the Iran Contra affair in which Oliver North and gang of amateur spies helped Reagan administration? Turn the page on Vietnam. Kevin Cat keys wandering path into Oliver. North's orbit began in the early nineteen seventy s when an eccentric neighbor started bending Khakis era but the political situation in Jamaica. The neighbor said that counterrevolutionaries. They're plotting to overthrow the socialist prime minister. Maybe Kathy can help here. Again is Nita Renfrew. Kevin was very charismatic so he could get people to do things that nobody else could get them to do. He could walk into places and you know he just had an air about him that he was in charge. Khaki started taking time off from work that he could make regular trips to Jamaica with his neighbor. They hung out on the beach developed relationships with right wing dissidents and then tried to tell the CIA about what they were hearing eventually. Jamaica elected a right-wing Prime Minister and no longer needed. Khakis help but spending time on the island had activated him politically when Iran was taken over in nineteen seventy nine by religious extremists WHO PROFESS TO HATE AMERICA. Khaki went to Wall Street and sold t shirts. That said Iran sucks. He spent the money organizing an anti Iran rally on Long Island then in one thousand nine hundred eighty. One Cat Cay turned his attention to the tiny Caribbean nation of Grenada. Carry a coup and Petit Martinique makeup. Small country in the Caribbean Sea. Bernita had a population of about one hundred thousand people. Since nineteen seventy nine. It had been run by political party. Young Marxist revolutionaries they took control of their lives and their future through a revolution on March thirteenth. Nineteen seventy nine. I revolution the English. Speaking Caribbean despite its small size. Grenada was a top concern for the Reagan administration. They were aware that the Marxist who ruled the island sought the help of Fidel Castro. The communist leader Cuba together. They were building ambitious. New Airport in Grenada theory in the White House was at this. Airport would be used as a base for Soviet reconnaissance planes to Regan. Grenada was part of a red triangle that included Cuba the north in Nicaragua to the West in March of Nineteen eighty-three Regan. Give a televised address from the White House advocating for an expansion of the defense budget and making his case he emphasized the emerging Communist threat in the Western Hemisphere on the small island of Grenada at the southern end of the Caribbean chain the Cubans with Soviet financing and backing are in the process of building an airfield with a ten thousand foot runway. Grenada doesn't even have an air force. Who is it intended for that? By the time Regan gave that speech Kevin. Keke was already in contact with several Grenadian. Dissidents who had emigrated to New York among them was a lawyer who had worked for the Canadian government before the Revolution in seventy nine. The lawyer told Kathy that he wanted to get the Marxist in Grenada out of power and Khaki along with his neighbor and two of their friends from town decided to help him in his quest together they created a think tank style organization that they christened the Grenadian Movement for Freedom and democracy. Catchy also at the lawyer live in a boat dock behind his house and they went and they bought clothes at Thrift shops for him. So He'd have some nice suits and ties and so on and then they would drive him and other people down to Washington to talk to the Congress and so on whose during one of these trips to Washington that khaki met the man who would later put him in touch with Oliver North. His name was Constantine banks and he was an ideal audience for a group of guys advocating for regime change in Grenada. Constantine Mangas was was He was an idealist very much Kevin. Was you know like Kevin? Emmy he believed Communism was taking over and they had to Combat this for the good of those people the night mangas called Khaki tell him about Oliver North. The White House was keeping especially watchful. Eye on Grenada. There's a real power struggle going on tonight. A tiny island country of Grenada in the Caribbean among appeared that a radical faction Grenadian government had staged a military coup in the capital city of Saint. George these radicals seem to be closely aligned with the Soviet Union and they had placed grenades prime minister who's comparatively moderate under house arrest. Diplomatic sources warned that the situation in Grenada is still confused and uncertain. They say it's still not clear. Exactly who will emerge as the new Prime Minister of Grenada? The coup in Grenada touched off a series of meetings within the National Security Council. You almost certainly heard of the NFC. But it's worth stopping to provide a bit of background on it because it ended up becoming the central staging ground for the Iran Contra affair basically the NFC was created after World War. Two as an arm of the executive branch that advise the president on foreign policy its members included the head of the CIA. The Secretary of State and the Secretary of defense it also included the national security adviser who oversaw a staff that work specifically for the National Security Council for the most fervent anti-communist on the NFC staff like Constantine Manguson. Oliver North. The coup in Grenada Required. Immediate attention if the radical leftists who had started the coup were allowed to take over would only be a matter of time before. Moscow started using Grenada as a base for its planes nuclear submarines. But I there was a more immediate problem to deal with. Grenada was home to about a thousand American citizens. The majority of whom were students enrolled the Saint George's University School of Medicine? There is concern for some one thousand Americans already there. It seemed possible that amid the chaos the communists would take the medical students hostage. Medical students like Jonathan Becker whose mother has not been able to reach him by telephone. I have now is exactly what is going on. And I'm quite apprehensive. Jeff Keller who had enrolled at Saint George's after getting waitlisted at Med schools in the US remembers the first indication that a military coup underway one day were inanimate class in fact. We'RE HAVING AN AD exam. And they SAM finishes were already to go back to the dorms and the buses and come to wait a while they announced. It's going to be a little late. They don't tell us what's going on. Finally the bus does come and we're headed back. Dorms in a tank comes by US and another thing. Another tank another tank. And you're all going to Saint George's the capital Tanks cut through the lush tropical paradise. Where Geller had just started school a few weeks earlier ordinary college students. And so you know seeing tank up close you know not in a parade and not as a museum. Exhibit was very different for us. You know we barely fit the bus and a tank on the road. These are very small country roads. They're just earth it was against this backdrop that Kevin Khaki got the phone call from NFC staffer. Constantine Magus Mango have been working with Oliver North on a plan to intervene in Grenada. Ever since the prime minister's ouster a few days earlier Manguson had two goals one get the medical students home and to turn the crisis into an opportunity by restoring democracy in Grenada Manga Stop. Khaki and his contacts within the Grenadian exile community could be of some use and he wanted khaki to call north the following morning in order to receive his marching orders. Meter renfrew describes this as the moment khaki had been waiting for well. He was elated that he was being taken seriously that he could really help the government now because he had all the grenade and contacts. White House didn't have them. You know that what he'd been doing was was bearing fruit. You know that somebody had listened to him. In after they'd been working so hard after the conversation with Angus Khaki called his friends told him to come over the following morning. He wanted them to be there when he spoke to north. They wouldn't think he'd gone crazy when he told him. The White House wanted their help. I get why he was concerned. When I first read Nita Renfrew Story About Cat Cay and New York magazine. My first question was why on earth anyone in the government. Give this random guy that time of day. It was something Kathy himself wondered about in one of his interviews with renfrew. You know there's something wrong. If the government has to use US even so khaki seemed to make consistently good impression on the governor officials he came into contact with in an article published Newsday after the Iran Contra affair became public unnamed intelligence staffer described khaki an idiot savant on foreign affairs. The staffer said that even though Khaki had no background and no training he consistently stumbled onto interesting things. Unlike lots of other people who drifted across stage and these investigations? Everything Kevin said more or less checked out. This is Jack. Plum a lawyer who worked for the Senate Foreign Relations Committee before getting hired by then Senator John Kerry to investigate Iran. Contra Bloom got to know Khaki in the course of that investigation and came to rather like him. There are people who get involved in things like this who are evil. There are people again involved and things like this where you have. A sense of. The motivation is ugly. None of that applies to Kevin. What you get is what you see. And that's that blunt told me I shouldn't be so surprised that can be useful to someone in Washington on the subject of Grenada. If you're looking for intelligence in the Caribbean in Nineteen ninety-three. He said you could do a lot. Worse than spending time in New York Brooklyn has any number of these ex pat communities from places all over the world and frequently. If you WanNa know what's going on in one of these places the best place to go is assuming Brooklyn where there are experts who were talking to the family back home or communicating. And No. You know this is what's happening. Bloom said there was another even more important reason. Why foreign policy officials in the Reagan administration might have found Kathy to be an appealing collaborator his very anonymity and the vast distance separating from the corridors of power. Were exactly what made him valuable when you have? People like can't can company. They're kind of perfect people to put to work on the project because they're motivated they go in. They think they're doing the right thing yet. They're not government employees. They're you know they're strictly volunteers. And that makes it. Just perfect because there's no attribution. No fingerprints left on whatever they do later. When Khakis Adventures and foreign affairs came to light amid the IRAN CONTRA SCANDAL? They were written about both as a comic diversion and as a tragic sign of the. Times on one hand khaki and his crew quote oddball operatives and a bunch of nut cases on the other hand. They were symptom of the Reagan administration's privatization of foreign policy on the morning of Friday October fourteenth. Khaki and his friends crowded around a phone and listened as Oliver North told them what he wanted them to do. It turned out. The Medical School in Grenada was headquartered on Long Island. In fact it's offices were in Bayshore. The same town as the macy's khaki worked north wanted khaki to go over to the medical school office and ask the administrators to formally call back their students from Grenada. Essentially to put it on the record that an evacuation was needed. Khaki wasted no time before showing up with one of his friends at the Saint George's office and requesting a meeting with the schools. Chancellor Charles Monica here is how motorcar members it to visitors. Came in to the Us headquarters of the school and ended up speaking with our attorney and profess to be involved with the United States government. But it never got the level where I even wanted to meet them. We thought there was something fishy about the whole thing. Frankly and so kathy and his friend were turned away. They had failed to complete their first mission for Oliver North. But that did not stop north from coming back to them with another task when the situation in. Grenada took a turn for the worse. This is NBC. Nightly News reported by Tom Brokaw. Good evening. There's been a brutal and bloody coup on the tiny Caribbean island of Grenada on October Nineteenth. Six days after the Grenadian prime minister was put under house arrest. He was executed by firing squad along with several members of his cabinet. Then the leader of the coup announced the twenty four hour curfew warning at anyone who was caught violating it be shot on sight. Grenada has shut down. Its airport to all visitors. Military troops patrolling the streets with orders to shoot to kill. The violence was a turning point in the crisis. It convinced Reagan administration officials once and for all of the American medical students had to be evacuated or else they really might be taken hostage by the communists and while it's hard to assess how much danger the students were. Actually in. They could hear gunshots outside their windows. And the feeling inside the compound where they were staying was tense and fearful here again is Jeff. Geller progression. I you like what's going on. Everyone's worried you know you're again. You're in a foreign country I have no idea. You can't call up. Joe Down the road and say hey what's happening and now there's not twenty apps on your phone telling us in news every five seconds like we have now and get progressively worried. I hear the shots and they you quarantined in your in your area and this will you can speak on the phone and all of a sudden. You can't speak on the phone so you completely isolated and then you hear gunshots in the distance. And then you hear that you know people that you knew of being with the house heard from that the gun was complete toppled and we didn't feel protected at all. The day after Grenada. Prime Minister was killed. Constantine Mongoose north and other members of the NFC staff met to discuss their options mangoes made the case for invading the island getting the students to safety and permanently removing Grenadas communist government after the meeting mangoes went to North Office. There they worked with North Secretary Fawn Hall on a proposal to Vice President. George H W Bush as well as the Secretary of Defense and the head of the CIA. According to Manguson Memoir North was relieved. The invasion seemed to be coming to fruition mangoes. Quotes him saying when you show me the plan last week. I never thought it would get this far. Maybe we'll really do something for a change. The invasion of Grenada would be the first Major. Us military operations since the Vietnam War and if it was successful you'll be the first instance of the US actually ousting a communist regime as Manguson north envisioned it. The mission set an inspiring example for other anti-communist freedom fighters throughout the Caribbean and Latin America on Saturday October. Twenty seconds two days after the NFC meeting North once again enlisted Kevin Khaki in a covert operation. This time he asked Kathy to do something more substantial than just meet with the administrator of a medical school here again is Ben Bradley. Jr. another assignment. That north gave cat was to see if he could organize a government in exile among the Grenadians living in New York. So that if and when the invasion proceeded and and obviously anticipated success A government would then be ready to step in. The idea was that khaki could call up his Grenadian associates including the lawyer living on the boat behind his house and have them former political body could swoop in once. The radical leftists in Grenada were removed from power where the government wants to get rid of government overseas. Because we don't like it. You know we get a group of exiles to declare themselves the government. You know to sort of agree with themselves. Okay so and so I was going to be the president or the prime minister or something and these other three people are going to be whatever you know. And then you fly them into the country and make a coup. Khaki gamely said he would do it. And according to renfrew succeeded at gathering a group of Grenadian in Brooklyn the next day but in the end khaki once again couldn't deliver in part because he couldn't take time off from his job at macy's Kevin had to be at work that day so he couldn't be there so they couldn't agree on anything So they didn't form the government in exile and Kevin felt really badly because he knew that if he'd been there and he would have told them how to do it and they would've done it when khaki called to inform north of his latest failure. North sounded frustrated by this point. Hit other things on his mind. Reagan had signed off on the invasion fleet of ships including an aircraft carrier was streaming toward Grenada carrying nearly two thousand soldiers. Ten American warships are sailing toward Grenada. Onboard are two thousand Combat Marines ships and Marines left their east coast ports earlier. This week bound for Lebanon. But we're giving a change of orders out of concern for the safety of the eleven hundred Americans on the island of Grenada operation. Urgent Fury had been set in motion in total secrecy in fact when reporters were hearing rumors about the invasion asked to White House spokesman about it he passed on a comment from deputy national security advisor. John Poindexter called the idea preposterous the ships that have been sent toward Grenada. The White House said had no intentions to land. They were quote just swinging by in case a rescue operation to save the Americans on the island became necessary. This misdirection was paired with a total media. Blackout the invasion itself which one critic later called unprecedented in modern American history. That weekend Oliver. North once again spoke to Kevin. Khaki by phone he asked his fellow anti-communist to take on his most high stakes mission yet with the American landing. Imminent North Wanted Khakis contact and Grenada to local authorities. By lighting a bunch of fires north referred to it as sky. Red Sky read was North's term for a diversion that he wanted to help. Create North. Hab this idea to have operatives on the island who were secretly supporting the United States to set a series of fires in order to create chaos throughout the island which would divert The official attention away from the beaches. Where the Marines and other? Us soldiers started to land. The invasion was scheduled for the early morning hours of Tuesday October. Twenty Fifth Constantine. Mangas worked late the night before on his way out. He stopped by room to await the old executive office building where he and North had spent a very long week planning for the invasion according to his memoir mangoes found North Asleep on the couch and before heading home he covered him with an overcoat. Meanwhile Khaki got in touch with a Grenadian auto worker in Brooklyn who had a lot of contacts on the island. Catchy told him about. North's idea for skyrocket and the guy seemed confident that he could make it happen but the next morning as helicopters carrying American troops flew over Grenada. The Sky was not read. No one had said any fires. The invasion started before dawn. This morning about one thousand nine hundred. Us Army Rangers and Marines. This morning assaulted. The small island are paratroopers have fanned out there now. Insane Saint George's the capital and other communities around Saint George's and the point Salinas Airport. How the invasion of Grenada went depends on what you emphasize on the one hand? The Americans made relatively quirk of the communist resistance setting the stage for elections to be held about a year later on the other hand. The operation was marred by abysmal. Intelligence according to a Miami Herald reporter who was able to make it onto the island despite the media blackout a Marine platoon leader asked him during the first hours of the invasion whose side the Grenadian army was on later. There were reports. The Mapping Agency of the Department of Defense had not been asked to provide maps of the island until the absolute last minute which meant that. Some troopers arrived carrying photocopies of maps intended for tourists in the end the invasion cost nineteen. American soldiers their lives it also resulted in the accidental bombing of a Grenadian Mental Hospital. Left eighteen civilians dead the. Us Army did succeed in getting the American medical students off the island. Here's Jeff Gallery again. You know you get bang on the door open up this a US rangers. You know what we couldn't believe it you know. And they basically got us back into the lecture halls and got us altogether woke everyone up. They were treating the wounded in a library the library into a little medic area and they took over the place basically and we're very very very happy about that. Thirty five minutes from now by our clock. The first plane loads of Americans who have chosen to leave Grenada are expected to arrive in Charleston. South Carolina when Geller's plane landed on the tarmac. He and several other students got on their knees and kissed the ground in an apparent show of gratitude for being back on American soil. There's somebody kneeling down and kissing the ground. The number who've done that as they begin to get on buses to go and be debriefed in part by the State Department before they make their way to their homes later. Oliver North regaled group of Reagan aides with the dramatic story of the students rescue specifically about how? You've been nervous. The students would get off the plane and say something damaging to the press about how the invasion had been unnecessary but north said when he dropped by the White House living quarters to bring his concerns to Reagan. The president wasn't worried. Reagan a flipped on the television and was live coverage of the students landing and the first kid got off the plane and kissed the ground. Reagan looked at that and said cialis stuff into worry about. You have to trust the Americans Bradley discovered. There was just one problem with the story. President Reagan's press secretary told me north. Never set foot never set foot in the private White House. Residence at story was bullshit and never happened. There's one other funny thing about that moment. When the students kissed the Ground Jeff Gallard told me that at least his performance on the tarmac had been partly tongue in cheek for him. The gesture is about sixty percents spontaneous expression of patriotism about forty percent the punchline to joke that he and the other students had started making on lockdown gallows humor basically the Joe for the whole time. Was You know five against US rock? I'M GONNA kiss the ground if it was a joke. No one watching on. Tv could tell. The Grenada invasion was a huge political. Victory for the Reagan administration Washington Post. Abc News poll in early November of Nineteen eighty-three found that seventy one percent of respondents approved of operation. Urgent Fury Sixty three percent. Approved of Reagan's overall job performance his best ratings since his first year in office in their book about the Reagan years landslide journalists Jane Mayer and Doyle. Mcmanus described the invasion as a metaphor for nothing less than the country's willingness to overcome the paralysis that had followed the Vietnam War. Oliver North embodied that willingness later when newspapers started writing about him in the context of the Iran Contra Scandal North's role in the planning of the Grenada invasion was typically listed as his first major contribution to Reagan's Foreign Policy Agenda here again is Senate investigator Jack Plum when he actually persuades people to get in the line and they're doing the Grenada invasion usually hero day. That put him in position to be. The Guy says this is what I think we ought to do next. And that's where the fund the an Kevin Cocoon. His friends came out ahead. To despite the repeated failure to carry out missions Oliver North assign them. North didn't seem to hold it against them a week. After the Grenada invasion he invited the gang to Washington and thank them personally for their efforts and Kevin from that point he thought that north was his hero. He thought that North was lily. White that he was a complete idealist and that he wanted to help the world and so on and I think North was what Kevin would have wanted to be. I've been trying to put my finger on what I find so ominous about the story of Kevin Khaki falling in with Oliver North. There's something about it. It just feels wrong like it's not how the government is supposed to work. Ben Bradlee theory just that Khaki had something. The White House didn't in some ways he was seemed to be the only game in town He was down on the CIA north and didn't think that they really had any Reliable on the ground intelligence of what was happening in Grenada so I think it was a question of Khaki Cay filling vacuum as north side so therefore he came to be reliant on him Jack. Plum put slightly differently. I think it was a time when lots of deranged things were happening inside the US government. I think it was a time when people who came into the administration. The Reagan administration believed that the world was there toy and you could do anything as long as it was all. Covert natty Communist. You can go play and I think there were people who you know like fat idea and ran with it. Iran-contra is a story about running with it. It's a complicated story that spans the globe. And if you've gotten through life not knowing exactly what it was all about or what. The Iran part has to do with the contra part or the contract even refers to. You're not alone. Compared to Watergate or the Clinton Lewinsky affair iran-contra is relatively obscure scandal. Most people just don't have a firm grasp on what happened and there aren't that many big comic moments associated with it in this season of fiasco we're gonNA take shot at rectifying that over eight episodes we're going to look back at the tangled narrative of Iran Contra and in addition to reconstructing in a straight line. What exactly happened and why we're also GONNA TRY TO FIGURE OUT WHY? The scandal failed to leave a bigger mark on American culture. Why did a story propelled by so many audacious decisions and tied into a knot by so many high stakes lies ended up being so easy to forget? It's a good time to remember it whether you support the current administration or not. It has shown Americans in dramatic fashion government at the end of the day is really just a bunch of people. The fact that they've been temporarily put in charge of institutions. That are much bigger than them. Doesn't change that. If anything it reinforces the need understand them as individuals men and women who act on their obsessions their ambitions and their delusions. The story of Kevin. Khaki and his friends in this context feels to me like a parable in which all the themes of the Iran. Contra scandal were on full display the use of non governmental actors to carry out government policy the secrecy the improvisation logistical gambles undertaken in the name of sincere but possibly misguided ideologies. I should add by the way that I tried really hard to get in touch with Kevin. Keke I called emailed. I couldn't find him and when I reached people who knew him the declined to help me get to him. The Best I got was a former neighbor. Who told me khaki wants encouraged him to Google his name. There are quite a few search results. Khaki remained very much in the mix after Grenada and he continued cultivating relationships with people he thought could help the US eradicate communism heading into Reagan's second term that meant raising money for the counterrevolutionaries in Nicaragua semi organized fighting force known as the CONTRAS. So when cockiness friends met a wealthy Saudi prince who said he wanted to donate fourteen million dollars to the contrary 'cause Khaki was over the moon in uh the guy was wearing these robes and he had rang with a lot of diamonds that he described as being like his Royal Rang and he started taking them to dinner all the time and he wanted to give money to the contras and of course north was running that operation when Khaki told North about the prince north was apparently so excited that he discussed the perspective donation with Ronald Reagan himself. Then a bank in Philadelphia discovered that the prince had signed a fraudulent check for more than two hundred thousand dollars in the FBI opened an investigation. North initially intervened on the prince's behalf and asked the F. B. I. to hold off on interviewing him but the donation never came turned out that Khakis prince was a con man. He wasn't a prince at all he wasn't even from Saudi Arabia and he didn't have fourteen million dollars for the contras and that meant Oliver North would have to find the money somewhere else. When I was young it's to me. The whole wide world would soon be free but communism is on the rise and say avenue. This guy fiascos presented by luminary media and prologue projects the shows produced by Andrew. Parsons Madeline Kaplan Lula Culpa and meet Leon Nathan. Our editor is Camila Hammer. A researcher is Francis car additional archival research from Caitlyn Nicholas scores composed by Nick Sylvester of God mode. Our theme song is by Spatial Relations Music Licensing Courtesy of Anthony Roman learn audio mix by rob buyers Michael Raphael and Johnny Vince Evans a final final V to our artwork designed by teddy blanks at chips and why lies them dies the USA muscles. Thanks Jodi again Carey Baker crisper Ruby Nina Ernest. Stephen Fisher. Emily Ganic Alice. Gregory Ellen Horne L. E. Jones. Latiff Nassar Mike Pesca and Bruce Wells special. Thanks to Peter Jazzy. As Well Sam Graham Felsen and Sarah Shockley next week on fiasco Iran portion of Iran. Contra. Wow IN WHY? Ronald Reagan authorized a plan to secretly trade weapons to one of America's greatest enemies. I reminded him again. That look this may not work and he said well. We don't know until we try. Thanks for listening. See you next week. Hey It's Jordan again I am back. I hope you liked that episode. We were happy to share it. The story is fascinating. And it's timely. If you care all about US politics so I really do encourage you. To dive into the full season makes great stuff. And he's only on Luminary. Luminary is a subscription podcast network with great original shows like fiasco and new podcast from Trevor Noah and Lena Dunham and Roxane Gay Guy Razz and many more. You can get a subscription for as little as two ninety-nine so start your free trial at Luminary podcast dot com. 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Grenada Oliver North Kevin Khaki US Iran Kevin President Ronald Reagan North government Nita Renfrew White House president White House Reagan administration Caribbean Angus Khaki Washington prime minister Kathy
Las sandalias de Ulises 114  14 Consejos para viajar a Ucrania

Podcast RadioViajera

24:39 min | 1 year ago

Las sandalias de Ulises 114 14 Consejos para viajar a Ucrania

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KOMO Grenada Yoon Lee Gwenda Lisa Lisa Murkowski Obama reporter Gamonal Mandela Trinh Komo Komo Zillow Mazda Marijuana director Bromma Sola Alexa Gronya Gordon
6pm Newscast

Houston Public Media Local Newscasts

02:19 min | 2 months ago

6pm Newscast

"Npr news by from new city. Eight seven in houston. I'm gay lauder. Rents here in houston had been falling because of the coronavirus pandemic but florian martin tells us rents in the suburbs are now back to pre pandemic levels rents had been steadily climbing until the pandemic hit houston in march then rates started dropping. According to houston-based apartment data dot com. Rents have declined by one point seven percent since the end of march but this is not true for most suburbs were rent growth has been flat. Many are actually seeing positive growth. Bruce mcclenny is the president of apartment. Data dot com. He says renters have less of a reason to be in the urban area. They work from home now. You know so they can move out in the different area and still work and not have to commute. He says add to that. The closure of many bars and places of entertainment in the urban core which may have attracted people to live there before the pandemic and flora and martin in houston the houston. School board has decided to resume. Its national search for a new superintendent. Has after passing over. Its interim superintendent. Dr grenada lay than had been invited to apply for the job but supporters. I board member. Wanda adams say late and has already proven herself during some tough times for the district. Everything that john said you looking more than has done it. She's donning dotted looking for h. I. s. d. hasn't had a permanent superintendent and over two years from around the state this afternoon some democratic lawmakers are using the recession caused by the pandemic as an argument for legalizing marijuana. The texas tribune reports several state. Lawmakers have already fall bills for next year's legislative session. The pandemic has led to a four point six billion dollar hole in the state budget but measures legalizing marijuana still face opposition for the latest on the corona virus in greater houston. You can go to our website at houston public media dot org. Some patchy fog tonight overnight. Low near seventy right now. Seventy six on the campus. I'm gail delattre. News seven support for npr comes from npr stations. Other contributors include i-drive with remote pc providing.

houston florian martin Bruce mcclenny new city Dr grenada seven percent Npr Wanda adams texas tribune School board flora six billion dollar martin two years john gail delattre npr
5am Newscast

Houston Public Media Local Newscasts

03:17 min | 2 months ago

5am Newscast

"In houston i'm eddie robinson. The houston school board has decided to pass over. Its interim superintendent for the official role for now as it resumed a national search for permanent leader. Dr grenada late then has been invited to apply for the job. But our supporters like board member. Wanda adams say she's already proven herself since she's lead the district some tough times everything that john said in more than has done it. She's dot doing four h. I. s. d. hasn't had permanent superintendent and over two years and it's not clear yet. What the time line for the new search will look like. The board approved the new superintendent search. It's meeting last night with a six to three vote. All right. let's head to north texas cook. Children's medical center out in fort worth is seeing the highest number of cova cases per day since the beginning of the pandemic as marandus juarez reports from fort worth doctors. There blame the increase on the surge in cases in the community at large doctor. Nicholas wrister is an infectious disease specialist. At cook children's. He says there are many more cova cases out there than the ones. The hospital happens to catch especially your kids. A lot of kids do fairly well so they may not ever need or present for testing. So you know. There's just reflects the portion we see or able to get a hold of long gone are the early days of the pandemic when people wondered if kids ever developed cases of covid dr. Mary whitworth says cook children's is currently treating eleven. Kids with three in the icu. And i do think that's the most that we've had since the pandemic started as far as i can remember. We may have had a day of twelve but not really more than that. Starting november sixteenth. Cook children's will once again allow only one caregiver to visit a patient. The goal is to limit exposure for everyone at the hospital. I'm miranda juarez. In fort worth the back here in houston researchers say men and women continue to be differently during the coronavirus pandemic. Dr elizabeth gregory is director of the institute for research on women gender and at the university of houston she says data shows men in houston are fifty percent more likely to die from the corona virus are combination of more cavalier attitude toward health More smoking worse die. Fewer doctor visits less care. Lead to men's worse outcomes overall. Greg retold houston matters. Her research also found the pandemic exacerbated the previous pay gap for women in houston. She says now. Many women also face higher rates of continued domestic abuse and mental health issues along with lack of childcare while harris county is moving in the wrong direction in dealing with the pandemic. According to county judge lena hidalgo the judge condemn state and federal leaders for endangering the health and economic well-being of residents will have more on that story coming up at five thirty with her with her reaction. I'm eddie robinson support for. Npr comes from npr stations. Other contributors include i-drive with remote pc providing.

houston school board Dr grenada Wanda adams Children's medical center eddie robinson marandus juarez Nicholas wrister houston Mary whitworth cook north texas miranda juarez infectious disease Dr elizabeth gregory fort worth institute for research on wome two years john houston matters university of houston
Coronavirus 4 1 1 news, updates, hotspots and information for 06-30-2020 COVID-19 AM Alert

Coronavirus 411

04:46 min | 7 months ago

Coronavirus 4 1 1 news, updates, hotspots and information for 06-30-2020 COVID-19 AM Alert

"This is corona virus for one one the latest covid Nineteen Info Am's new hotspots, just the facts for Tuesday June thirtieth, twenty, two, hundred eight. We all want this to be over. We all want to get on with our lives, but the hard reality is, it's not even close to being over noted the head of the world. Health Organization yesterday he continued. Although many countries have made some progress globally, the pandemic is actually speeding up. There are ten million, four, hundred, fifteen, thousand thirty five global cases. Cases and the world has seen five, hundred, nine, thousand, four, hundred seventy four deaths due to covid nineteen growth continues across the US with Florida Texas and Arizona especially hard hit. Sixteen states have paused reopening plans Oregon and Kansas have made facemasks mandatory indoors. When social distancing is not an option over one thousand inmates in California's San, Quentin prison have tested positive for the virus five times higher than last week. Corona Virus Task Force member doctor. Burks said she would like to work with mayors and governors. Governors to use some new testing techniques and test large populations at the community level doctors fell ci Redfield, and others will testify in front of the Senate's Health and Education Committee today Victoria Australia will reinstate lockdowns intend Melbourne suburbs, Leicester England has seen a surge in cases, and will remain under restrictions as the rest of the country eases lockdowns, the WHO is sending a team to China to investigate the origins of the virus, the locations of hotspots into us and country diagnoses in a moment on the latest. Latest edition of vaccine for one one, a potential vaccine candidate that could not only prevent covid nineteen, but may also treat it find out more by subscribing to vaccine four one one on your podcast APP or ask Your Smart Speaker to play the vaccine, four one one podcast hotspots displaying fester rates of growth as of June twenty-ninth. Getting to the New York Times Idaho Guam McDonald. County Missouri had Spring County Arkansas Grenada, clayborn and Sunflower County, Mississippi, lesson and Marin County, California, homes, Swanee and county Florida. County Tennessee Oceanic County Michigan Charleston County South. Carolina Levada and Newest Says County Texas Cass County Illinois. Cameron County Louisiana Glynn County, Georgia Globally Morocco, Kirghistan Luxembourg Croatia West Bank, and Gaza Paraguay Equatorial Guinea Montenegro Namibia and Botswana there have been two million, six, hundred, eighty, two, thousand, eight, hundred, ninety seven confirmed cases, of Covid nineteen in the United States and one hundred, twenty, nine, thousand, five, hundred forty four deaths, there were forty thousand forty one new cases reported in the last twenty four hours, the ten states with the highest. HIGHEST CASE COUNTS NEW YORK. Three, hundred, Ninety, seven, thousand, six, hundred, eighty, four, California, two, hundred, twenty, three, thousand, nine, hundred ninety five new, Jersey, one, hundred, seventy, three, thousand, one, hundred, twenty, six, Texas, one, hundred, Fifty, eight, thousand, seven, hundred, fifty, six, Florida, one, hundred, forty, six, thousand, three, hundred, thirty, three, Illinois, one, hundred, forty, three, thousand, eight, hundred, eighty, five, Massachusetts, one, hundred, eight, thousand, seven, hundred, Sixty, eight, Pennsylvania, ninety, thousand, five, hundred, fifty, three, Georgia, seventy, four, thousand, eight, hundred, sixteen, Arizona seventy, four, thousand, six hundred. Hundred to the five countries with the largest daily increases for June twenty-ninth, according to the WHO Brazil thirty, eight, thousand, six, hundred, ninety, three, India, nineteen, thousand, four, hundred, fifty, nine, Russia, six, thousand, seven, hundred, nineteen, south, Africa, six, thousand, three, hundred, thirty, four, Mexico, four, thousand, four, hundred ten, the ten countries with the highest overall case, counts Brazil one, million, three, hundred, Sixty, eight, thousand, one, hundred, ninety, five, Russia, six, hundred, forty, six, thousand, nine, hundred, twenty, nine, India, five, hundred, sixty, six, thousand, eight, hundred, forty United Kingdom three. Three hundred, thirteen, thousand, four, hundred, seventy Peru. Two, hundred, eighty, two, thousand, three, hundred, sixty, five, Chile, two, hundred, seventy, five, thousand, nine, hundred, ninety, nine, Spain, two, hundred, forty, eight, thousand, nine, hundred, seventy, Italy, two, hundred, forty, thousand, four, hundred, thirty, six, Iran. Two, hundred, twenty, seven, thousand, six, hundred, sixty to Mexico two, hundred, twenty, thousand, six, hundred, fifty, seven, for the latest updates, subscribe for free to corona virus, four, one one at your podcast APP, or ask Your Smart Speaker to play the coronavirus four one podcast sound. That brands.

County Tennessee Oceanic Count California Florida Newest Says County Texas Cass United States County Missouri Arizona Texas Cameron County Virus Task Force Sunflower County Spring County Arkansas Grenada Georgia New York Times Brazil Russia Burks Covid Mexico Marin County
No Show This Week

WTH Podcast

05:03 min | 6 d ago

No Show This Week

"Hey everybody welcome in. I just wanted to drop a little bit of audio here to let you know. We're not going to have a full episode this week. I did a video for livestream on monday. Because as moon when we livestream basically. There's a few reasons why we're not having a shot this week. First of all my business darlene in media is in the process of moving and so pretty busy with that moving from one location to another another reason. Was we normally record on monday nights. We're we're always set a record monday or tuesday nights. The inauguration is wednesday and this is being reported before that. So who knows what's going to go on tomorrow and as much as we've been talking about the issues in In washington with the election with the insurrection. And all of that i would. I would hate to drop an episode and then have it be completely outdated within a few minutes so that was another reason and finally our last couple of episodes then very important. I think it's important to talk about these things to play the entire. Donald trump whole to the georgia secretary of state which election interference at its highest level. Which also an impeachable offense i believe. That's what he was impeached for when but it was a foreign agent that he was trying to recruit in brain And then the insurrection and we talked about that. Which would be was actually impeached for so a lot of those things. Coming up thing is. I'm a bit exhausted from talking. About all of those things are. Podcast is at its core. Yeah we talk about. We talked about going on in the world where we try and find humor in everything and this week. I'm struggling to find humor. So that on top of the potential of everything being outdated on top of the business moving just decided this week to take break recharge cells mentally emotionally and get everything done that way but i wanted to let all of our subscribers. People subscribe download and listen every week. I think it's important to give you a heads up when something's going to be different and we didn't get a chance to do that when we recorded the last show because we thought we'd be doing a show so i wanted to drop this and let you know let you know also that I appreciate each and every person who downloads listened to the podcast no matter where you listening our listeners in australia according to our analytics you're all in melbourne soap. Hey thanks for. Thanks for downloading and listening are new and large audience in india. Welcome thank you for downloading and listening and all throughout the world. We've got you know a person in this country five people in this country here and there. It's just little pockets of people who look forward to our show. And i wanted to make sure that i just said hi. We're thinking of you are important and we do appreciate you and we'll be back next week with another episode. Hopefully a little bit more light hearted. We'll still have some of the stuff because nothing is going to be over. We'll talk about. Whatever happens on inauguration day the impeachment trials should be underway by that point and whatever else is going on now. That's that's that's where we are right now Quickly touch on kobe before i before as they by Cove in california. Where i am is out of control. We had a million people diagnosed with covid. In the last thirty days in california grenada's forty million people in california that still a huge number and again most of them are in los angeles county. But it's it's a problem pretty much everywhere so take it seriously i. I have several people. I know who have gotten cova and become sick and to varying levels and degrees i have people who have lost friends and loved ones to covid. Nineteen both people who are older in risk group and people who are younger and frankly didn't have underlying condition so you just don't know this is a deadly disease so please take. It seriously wear masks socially distance. Wash your hands and be careful. Because you're all important and i want to be able to talk to you for years calm so have a great week and we will see you next. Time on the w. t. h. podcast five.

darlene Donald trump georgia washington california melbourne australia india kobe grenada los angeles county
Episode 22- Me vs. We

Post Session Podcast

47:09 min | 6 months ago

Episode 22- Me vs. We

"Good morning wonderful listeners huge tuned into post session podcast. A podcast filled with the still of a surf session. And the wise guidance of an ocean voyager. Your water loving hosts, I ready to share this infectious state of mind while encouraging inspiring you for your next adventure. Hey Laurel. Hey Ash Tae Tony. Tony's in the house he is, but before we get started. We need to give a shout out the Kayla in as Oh. Yes, absolutely Kayla's a good buddy of ours. A longtime evolved free diving. and now he's opposed sess- supporter. We'll talk about some beach towels with our Victor Yeah. Well, he's A. He's going to be a drying his butt off with pictures of. He's a Patriot now to. He signed to be a patriot. So that's really cool. Does he know that's a monthly giving account? Not just one time he does now. I've told him YOU'RE GONNA. Put The doc in the mail documented. Bharti Ready, yes, so, Caleb sinister and justice of the weekend. We'll get you go and buddy. All Right? What are we doing today? Well wanted to I introduce Te'o Tony. If you've been listening to our podcast for any length of time, you've certainly heard me mention Te'o. Tony out on the waves. He's always there. He's filled with stoke in today. You sitting in the big chair, which fills me with stoke. Tonioli talk about himself, so I will. Tony is a lifelong surfer and neuropsychologist in a professor at our local college. UNC W he's a Wadi weady neuro-psychologist. Don't ask me what that is. Ask me either. So Google that everybody. So he travels around the world, giving talks and speeches too I'm not sure who maybe he'll tell us. But uniquely Tony is from Cuba and immigrated to the US when the government turn Communist. Also, he was in another country that turned communist as an adult where he was teaching, and he had again, he had to escape again, so but my favorite thing about Tony. Is His stoke well. Obviously, that's the best thing, but we are talking about individualism versus collectivism today so I felt like he was going to be a perfect guest. Totally perfect guests. He likes to surf. Yeah, he has at least some questions about free diving, not many. He does something that we have no clue what he does, but it sounds super smart yet. I think he's definitely smart and and yeah. He has experienced with both types of culture, so he's going to really bring. He's GonNa break some depth to the conversation today which. Is As. Both. Obviously so today. Let's do some posession notes as usual and we'll let tony join onto this. gives us his take on. What's happening in the water. In just the week, Tony brought one that he hasn't told us yet. So that should be interesting. Surprise dive deeper talk about some culture types in tread into the God waters. Right. Yeah did us. We'll take any. Would you like to share a little bit about what's been going on in the water this week? Well, the water is beautiful clear. Just appealing and it's the perfect antidote for a chaotic world. Yeah. He's right about that. Prescription Saltwater. Nothing like it. The world's going bad to hell in a handbasket. Go find your piece in the ocean. It will take care of all your concerns so let me just read a text that came on my little taxi this morning from our little group of servers. One of our little buds grace, who was he goes out surfing often with US and Gray said again. I'm headed to the beach for Sanity Sake Not really a wave out there, but we will see. That was at five fifty eight this morning. Tony posts at six three attacks to our group. I am a psychologist and specialize in surf therapy. My first appointment is six thirty. That's hilarious. You know what I find about the water, even if by getting. When even if I'm teaching, what am my swim lessons? I'm not doing anything strenuous It's not a workout, but just being in the water when I get out. I feel like I've had a workout. Yeah, I feel refreshed. I think it has something to do with your sinus cavities opening up because of all the water going up there. It makes your brain feel rushing clean. I like it. I think after Surf in a lot of times. We get coffee together and. We've all filled with the little stoke. We've seen the sunrise. We've maybe seen a dolphin or a rainbow. We've exercised, and then we go out on the pier with our coffee, and and really feel enlightened to solve all the world's problems as it s when Tony's hard work really kicks in. So DART's. Sometimes, it's a little too easy isn't. Laurel! Woody want. Do you have some post session notes or Just enjoyed the water with Tony all week, so that was nice, but we did have a surprise wave session. It has been summer Tom. Surf here in Wilmington. A will beach north. Carolina or the East Coast of North Carolina and generally that is. one to two foot peelers Navy if you're lucky, and then we had this one day where we went out, and it wasn't really projected in the surf predictions. Walking out, you can see anything from the camps of your laying in bed, and you pull up your camera your surf. Cam Surf checks and there's nothing there. He could easily go back to sleep. Right. I don't know the sun was looking like you could just see the beginnings of it, and we just decided to make the call to go and walking off the sanding onto the sanding and looking at the waves i. see like a chest high set. Come through. You like what is like winning the lottery. You were rewarded. Yeah, usually. Tony makes good call. That got to be the one good call that day. Yeah well, if you go every day, one of the calls is going to be good, right. Can you claim that really not really I think you should anyway. Is it my turn. Yeah, tell us let's go in the water with you. Ask well. I don't dive dive again until mid-july, but I thought because collectivism because Cuba because Tony. I WanNa talk about diving in Cuba awesome. Yeah, A lot of people will some sailors know this because they've sale. The southern coast of Cuba everybody knows that Cuba especially in the south coast is littered with. Sensational Reef. I mean we were I? Remember sailing along just this past year and You know you drop the the hook in the middle of nowhere because you just come up on this huge. Reap Ball I. Mean it's just I. It is just explodes. It erupts out of the out of the bottom. They are in its pristine. Government so tightly controls the fishing the lobster in all those things, so you see everything that you wanna see so there's less pollution in the water there. As far as pollution goes. Is definitely clean. But I think that has more to do with the. Situation? The Beach Direction House situated because there's many places in the Bahamas that are completely desolate. No one's there, but the beaches are littered in s only because prevailing east winds and. Healthy else's litter gets there right exactly how the beaches geographically situated in Cuba didn't have that so much. Says a dive destination it is the water is clear and beautiful. It could be a dive destination. In my opinion of things were politically. A little different would be the perfect dive destination. Yeah. Scrape Interestingly one side of my family are marine biologists and the other side are physicians slash psychologists, the ones that are marine biologist. Tell me that there is are countless recent Cuba that are on charted on fish to and not dived and they really relish taking the family there because no one's ever been there too pristine, virgin yet, exactly virgins, a good word because I, really feel like a lot of places in Cuba are like. Going back in time. You know this is how the refused look in believes this is used to looking under. That would be exceptional for Marine biologist for sure. Are Just delay free diver, yeah awesome. Well is it time to move into the injustice of the week? Yeah, I'm nervous though I into what's ten? He got birthday Ronald so nervous Good let's rip them a new. Right Hey Linda the grill. Well we're doing this around the time of July fourth. And, of course, we are not quite reached our peak for the pandemic. At least in the United States so July fourth I suppose is a reflection of our democracy. We've been around for well over two hundred years reflects. You know the greatest experiment in allowing people to have a voice. The greatest injustice, we'd have misunderstood that voice. And, here we are in the middle of pandemic, and we're our country, theoretically the one that's most advanced in the entire world. Has had the poorest results in controlling the pandemic. Largely, because the justice of the interpretation of what the market see means. that's super interesting i. just read a quote. I forget which forefather. Quoted this, but they said we don't want a democracy. We want a republic because I guess they understood the nuance between just a blanket, democracy and a republic. With a right of democracy unfortunately comes responsibility of a democracy and we have forgotten that the right to do our own thing. Comes with the responsibility of doing the right thing. And unfortunately. The injustice the week for you is that we believe in democracy, but forget in our country. And we're not doing the right thing and this particular pandemic specifically, and we're not taking care of business. Do! You think there are situations when. Maybe not the rights of the people but the right. Of the people to make their own choices should be doesn't circumvent the responsibility of maybe the government or whatever to. Kind of protect people against themselves. If you will, if you have the right to be living in a democratic situation, which were so fortunate to have where the greatest living experiment in that particular area that's produce unbelievable results we also have the responsibility goes with it, and that is to take care of not only of our own individual. But the rights of all of us. So we have no choice but to call this week's. unjustice of the week are failure to understand where to really means to have a right and the responsibility over democratic nation. Maybe, we! Take full advantage of our rights, but are we thinking of the rights of others? Bearing the weight of the responsibility segues perfectly into dive deeper because I can test that we don't think about the other person because we are at the very heart of our country in individualists. Almost incapable of thinking about the rights of others where. taught not just taught where. An updated right into this. This idea of individualism collectivism this this whole concept of putting the other person I is not come naturally to an American. That's true guy. I don't think I'm full-fledged American I. I mean I go to other places that. More Latin American country in Puerto Rico and the just the family orientation is so different and beautiful. But I it's almost like you have to. You know even though I have my immediate family and you know we're close, but I don't feel that responsibility like this is an unusual example, but I think it maybe is. Kind of an American thing. Growing up have a little brother. That has a disability. a severe brain injury He has cerebral palsy and small to and. He is just amazing, Benjamin, brother, nothing, but as Benjamin Als but as when he was young, my parents looked to like new like you know what the future have of his life look like. And they didn't want my older brother and I. To feel or bear the responsibility of taking care of him as an adult they wanted to. They envisioned a better way. They envisioned a way that not only could they if they're setting up Benjamin. They have chosen to set him up for the rest of his life. But they decided or felt called to if we could set Benjamin up than. Couldn't we set up more than just Benjamin, and so they built the Benjamin House for equipped for twelve young adults to come in. That couldn't live on their own, but were half functioning with disabilities and. That would self sustain itself? You know that Mom's vision was that they would not. People wouldn't have to pay to stay there, but the you know they would have. Income from providing services for them, and but I think the idea of. You know maybe in another culture that would have been expected of my older brother. To have him come live with us which I mean. I wouldn't mind you know, but what A. I was a gift from my family to, but but not only did that become something even bigger like they. From that I thought to building something like the Benjamin House that became something for so many people. And those families that got to have their places, and you know you stick somebody in a home. This is they have jobs, and they go out in the community and is really neat, though among rabbit trail I think. As an as an individualist, individualist culture, it totally speaks to our entrepreneurial nature and that's why. I think America has historically been good at so much. Even though we're so young because we have that drive the. The reward is the success that we feel as an individual and the monetary gain that we get as an individual all those accolades or super awarding, so it does drive some cool things that are positive. It's not totally negative. But I mean Tony. Do, you feel like. Code would not have been so rampant in the US if we were more. Collective I on ever since see. Statistically, that's probably true. Well as low on those I like to tell stories have let me tell you story on March twelfth of this year. I was in Congress lobbying. For what we call tell US psychology. Not knowing that code. Actually Comey and that's the idea that you can provide services to people like. And on March twelfth at the end of the day. I took a fight to Salvador to do some of my work down there. I was arrested and detained because I had actually been twenty three days before in Spain. Yeah. Yeah hotbed of Covid at the time. So in this particular case, the president of our Salvador's said we have to come together and not allow people from other countries to come to our country, so we can Euratom. Covet. Well guess what they've all but eradicated covet. On the other hand our country. It's my right. To not wear a mask. Is My right not to social distance and is my right not to take a vaccine at one is provided so as a consequence. It's all right to be the number one country in the world in. TERMS OF COVERT CASES COMA. Death. Municipal something else. That's interesting way we were. Because I think everything you said is spot on, but we were in Belize, and there's one radio station in the region that we were in we were in believes. During covid, things were ramping up here. Things were still open. Their things started shutting down there. They sustained without even one case for very long time, but there's one radio station in the region that we were in, and they made a commentary about the United States they said it's just seems like instead of focusing on the virus. They're politicizing everything about the virus and I think that. Divisive up politicisation, politicisation politicisation. I think it. Furthers that? Idea that because you were saying? It's my right I. Think people do feel that way, but I think people are also very confused about what the truth is about the virus you know. They feel like if they wear the mask all the time that they might be conceding to a more democratic approach if they don't wear the mask than they're standing for their republican values in. And I feel like most people are a mix of the two value system, so it doesn't make sense to have such. A division will almost like the division. The wedge that it creates or the animosity or the. The firing of which people disagree just drives people further away into extreme, and from their own common sense about what they feel like they should do. Yeah, so, how do we fix? This adjusted I got a suggestion at suggest away. Yeah, let's bring all of Congress to Right So beach and take him surfing. letdowns gray. That's you're you're not mine. Discover that we're all in this together ass. Don't you feel like most of us live in the middle? My life is very gray very little about my life is black and white. And I feel like we are. But. I feel like a lot of times. It just depends on how someone presents information. That was another thing you talked about to me while you're in believe. was that on that same radio station? They were promoting like maybe five specific steps to be taking. Repair repetitively right? Were they saying hey, this is what's going on. This is what you need to know. This is what you need to do. Continue on. It was great there was there were no politics involved. It was just the facts and just the course of action however. As far as Central American countries go. Blazes has definitely a mixed population, but still when it comes to culture believes is a lot more homogeneous than the United States so. The believe what to do. I think is a lot easier than in the United States because you're not speaking to a Muslim household, a Christian household, a non believing household Blm House. You're speaking to kind of one culture still and. That's not problematic for. Why can't we have both? WHY CAN'T WE BE? Individuals have our own rights. But why can't we think of all of us? At the same time? It's not mutually exclusive spur Nana this. Is that a democratic issue? This is Republican. This is not a partisan issue. It's even not even a public health. This is our issue. And the only way we fix. Our issues is by starting individually, so we can both be individuals and have tremendous responsibility for ourself, but we should also be collective and realize that ultimate personal responsibility maze mate collective responsibility. They're not one or the other. It's the same head and tail together. It's a quarter. You know what? I WanNa do a whole episode about personal responsibility. Because this is another subject that is so interesting to me. I feel like. All of the world's problems after a little SALTWATER DUNK Is there solved by just accepting personal responsibility, but so you're. You're saying it's a heart issue. Really, it's an individual issues. A hard issue I agree and it's hard to legislate. Heart issues in this situation though it might be necessary. To to legislate it until everyone's on the same page. So they stopped disagreeing about whether we wear a mask or not. It's either a mask all the time indoors for this period of time or known ask you. Fascinating ESA Tissa come out. If we look at the international numbers, one of them is the most fascinating to me. Is that many of the countries have been successful have been re led by females. I I'm again. Who is in charge of Denmark, male or female? I don't think anybody is. Kidding. But his other one, that's fascinating is countries that decided. Collectively. That were on this together, and we got to shut this down by individual responsibility. Individual Action has been the most productive so when everybody agreed that we have to do this together. Six feet apart where mass wash your hands. Took care of business. It's not that hard. Why can't we do it? I really I really think the reason. We can't is because. Because of how political it is I think that's why I think people are afraid that taking an action that looks like it might side with an opposing position keeps them from. Being more sympathetic. Well, this is not siding with any position except. Health this. Position My my mentor was. A Republican or Democrat right now. My mentor was still be Rogers sperry's. He said to me. We have two options. We let biology take his course and provide an answer, or we use our brains and figure it out before bounds she does. Why can't we do that? Why do we have to wait for Choas? To tell us how we should behave? Why not think about? As! We're very fortunate. Other countries have been there before is why not look what other countries have done see? Who did it right? See who didn't do so well. Do the best we can with that data and then move on, but collectivism is important almost or maybe more so than individual, but together together is how it works. My. Own Personal responsibility bears on collective. Solutions. It's easier. I think. I'm a Christian and a you know loyalists. But I feel like. From my perspective, having a more collective outlook is not beyond the realm of what I can. Handle because of. What we're taught in. Belief system. I mean I agree with that. I mean I guess. Because I really wasn't aware of what individualism versus collectivism is a a like google, some videos and so when I was listening to some I guess. More An a A A negative with collectivism I guess is some of the things that I was listening to. That the power. Like the majority, the majority rules like a completely democratic, we're not we're repub. Republican, but our country you know is based on some democratic principles and a lot of people who will walk in just be majority rules, and so like fifty one percent at fifty one percent rules that this is the best thing then that is what it is, but that's not how it is with our republic, because we have the different checks and balances in place that that doesn't happen exactly because sometimes fifty percents, nuts will yeah, or or like. This person gave an example of a mob. Right right for a minority or for one, you know if there's a a mob and they're gonNA Lynch someone. The majority is choosing. And so that's one example of collectivism that I think people go. You know. Oh well, that's why we're on this side in. So that's the scary side of yeah, collectivism, though. But how do you protect you? Know like I guess. Think of your brother I yeah well. That's where I think Christianity comes in or or at least faith. are we ready to head into God waters? I do WanNa say I read to counter our point here because what we're alluding to is that if you're Christian, maybe you tend to be more collective. but an have that kind of. Outlook because you are taught to think of your brother, I but. I was reading this article about Touch and how touch in more collective cultures that that's that's what keeps collective cultures. Bound together is that they're more willing to touch each other and make that connection personal connection right in individualist. We have a bubble around us. We want our personal space. But not during. We're not talking about just political systems here. We're talking about like Cultural Systems like families, but also religion and. Their report was that atheists ten to touch more. Oh so, how does that Jive Tony? Can you analyze that for us i? Don't get it another research, but I I didn't have a question for both of you. Since birth. Christian for that matter. I'm a practicing Catholic isn't the path to having an individual path. Yep. It is but it you. But the route by which we get there. Is marketed collectively. Collectively because you know the the, we are taught also to pray together and that you know. More many Kohl's burn hotter than just one coal, so we're meant to be together. The church itself. The collection houses to come together does. To come together, but it's rooted in our personal responsibility to make those. Christian based decisions I think to follow Christ as an individual choice. But it's outcome is very collective, because it also causes to a life of servitude. Although accuse world alone and I suppose I'll probably Aloen, but I carry the path or I participated the path in a collective fashion. Totally yeah. Well and I think we all will eventually stand before. Our maker by ourself. You know yeah, that's that's what I'm. That's what I'm picking up to. Which is a very very scary? I mean just one last thing before we go into dot com, the guy waters is so what seems like a lot of people who are anti collectivism are afraid of communism and the does. At. That is a form of. Will Communism's kind of abstract this? Type of government, or whatever or socialism, but underneath that it seems like collectivism collectivism is. The ideology behind that in that. we decide what's best for everyone, or you can't have these rights, because this is what's best for everyone sure well having lived in two countries that when Communists I certainly have A. More unusual perspective than the average individual the difference between democracy and communism is they're both collectivism, but one is imposing the other one is. Evolved any problems by input from many many sources, and that's the beauty of democracy that from many voices come one a message, one nation in this case in places like Cuba and Grenada where I lived. for many voices still it's one group of very small set of folks at the side for theoretically for the best of us. Here's how things are, so it's still collective. Democracy or communism, but the beauty of democracy is that collectivism is. Emerges from all of us, not just from Humus. Yeah, that's exactly what I see it. The idea is great. It's the imposition of that idea that. Makes a dictatorship, so dangerous and bad, and what a weight of responsibility on us as? A part of a government everyone of us who live in the United States bears that responsibility because all our voices. Count. that. We need to speak. Our, Our voices very important. Every voice is important and. What A Beautiful Song! It is that if we win we. Look to each other and care about each other. The yawned ourselves. Without? Hurting someone else's rights with when you're looking out for someone else's rights in your defending your own rights, but also the rights of others. I that is miraculously that many voices. So as we are on the verge celebrating our nation's birthday we have to remember that collectivism and democracy is a bunch of. Individuals that. Come together to make us a better nation. We need more of a surfing. When anymore communists. People deciding to live together collectively? On their own in the woods I I've I've? This is totally not totally off subject, but I don't want to derail, but I have also read that. The. Present state of our. Say, present I mean. In the, Very recent past up to now present state of our democracy is more like an oligarchy where you have an elite. Powerful few that really! Head up the whole system, so are actually. Leaning a little more towards. A collectivist political system than we might think. That's. Hopefully, one of my young children was applying to school actually. An Ivy, league school athlete was Yale and the question is. Do you think that we represent a diverse society at university? And he said No. All the presidents have been alive during my short life have either graduated from Harvard or from Yale. That's a bubble. That's a bubble. Would it be nice to? Somebody graduated from UNC Wilmington That's really more like the rest of the world. Absolutely. Yeah, but those people are not. Not In the club you know and you gotta be gotTa have the. Status I think that elite. You. Know when you came here from Cuba. You were a child, so. What you are able to see. Was Limited based on your age, but when you in Grenada. Were there. Signs. Were there things that you recognized her I mean? You Teaching for a college. There are teaching near Anatomy at a medical school. Yes. And so you know, what would you say? How sudden whether it. It was fairly sudden, but it started with things that are seen. In cities. And really difficult to understand, they took over the radio station, and they shut the water down, and they suspended free press, and and then. It just got slippery in to slid and it was all for the betterment of people. We're doing this to better all of A. And maybe unfortunately, we're still only better a few of us. Said then didn't really take care of business for either country. Plus going back to personal responsibility I don't want somebody making all of those decisions for me. To beating a democracy. Yeah, all of us have a voice. Maybe. It's time to move into some Godoi thinks. We can go forever. Well I in choosing the Scripture vers. Kinda had thought about obviously were called to love our neighbor. But then I thought maybe going a little bit deeper because. When we look at the world today when we see the divisiveness. And even with the subject of individualism versus collectivism, and it was nice. How during this podcast? We realized that there each part of the other. And is not verses it's they're all interwoven and so I thought. Maybe it's good for us to hear or be reminded of some of Jesus's words about Loving, your enemy. because. Maybe your enemy. Is Not your enemy. And maybe if you better understood. Your neighbor. Then you wouldn't be enemies I mean. God does say in in the word that you know we don't wrestle with the flash. We're not supposed to be fighting amongst each other, but there's other things that are that we should be fighting. That are spiritual not not my neighbor, not next person beside me, who has a different opinion than me and feel strongly about it. So here is Luke. Chapter six. First Twenty seven. But I'll tell you who hear me love. Your enemies do good to those who hate you. Bless those who curse you pray for those who mistreat you. If someone strikes you on lunch. Turn to him the other also if someone takes your cloak, do not stop him from taking your tune it. Give to everyone who ask you if anyone takes what belongs to you did not demand it back due to others as you would have them do to you. And if you love those who love you, what credit is that? Do you even centers love those who love them and if you do good to those who are good to you, what credit is that to? You even centers do that and if you land those whom you expect repayment. What credit is that to you? Even sinners lead Linda Centers, expecting to be repaid in for, but love your enemies. Do good to them and Lynch to them without expecting to get anything back then your reward will be great, and you will be sons in the most high because he has gone to the ungrateful wicked. Be. Merciful just as Your Father's merciful. Sound simple. Sounds pretty black and white to me. Yeah definitely. It's not one or the other that it is. It made me think of this story in the Old Testament. And I'M GONNA get wrong because I didn't look it up before this, but the story about Elijah and This this army that was coming in to kill them and God's told God told this army is. They're not gonNA. They're not gonNA hurt you. And so instead of killing them, because they ended up just kind of fighting amongst each other, or could be confused in that story, but basically the end is. He feed them. They feed this army and send them home. Because basically, it was just like they're cooked. You know we don't have to worry about them. Let's feed them and send them back to their country. Just saying you know. If we believe in a God who is all powerful Almighty sovereign over doesn't relinquish any responsibility on individuals parts, but it does not. You don't have to be your enemy into the ground especially, if it's a person, you know if. If that person has something against you. You still are called to love them. It reminds me at I. Read recently. There's this guy follows skied Itani. I've talked about him before. Probably Anyway, he details. He Co host with Veggietales Guy. anyway. He broke it down into three rules. So there's the silver. He called the silver rule, which is what a lot of religions teach do no harm to others. Okay and then there's the golden rule. Do unto others as you would have done onto you, which kind of? A step above the it's a step. About do no harm, but it kind of. Advocates. It means that we don't have to do anything. More than what we would want to us, and then there's the what he called. The platinum rule do unto others as God would do. Unto us all, so it holds us to a much higher standard. Then just! You know. What what do you want done until I? Don't care if somebody smackdown a face, so I can go smack and people in the face. Well. We've got have us all do. Well what would you want? It is a little different than what added mind and what? I would want what I want somebody to me when the treat me well Does God treatise speaking more to what you were saying. How does God treat us? He doesn't just. Talk about not harming our enemies. He would feed our enemies. He would clothe our enemies. He would. You know! Break them down with love What do think Tony Yeah. So individual rights resulting collective responsibility. That's basically bringing the whole idea of the silver roll, the golden rule and the platinum row. that. We have to do a lot more than just think of ourselves. Yep Silver Silver Rule just doesn't cut. It maybe it's a good start. Maybe, especially, for young people were undeveloped minds. And then if we get a little further down the road, we can do the golden rule and. If you find that, you're, you're ready, then you can go to the platinum rule. Don't you find yourself on this journey Ville yeah all the time there was a time when I wasn't even the silver silver rule was at a my reach. Yeah. I'm just trying not to do harm to myself. And I was failing that. And then you're like okay peace. Bro I want you know. And then you get a little deeper and find yourself and find God and then. Then you've got some real responsibility, yeah! No joke ouch well. Since we. Kinda. Come to the end of this little portion. It on this. Invites us to give out some homework like what was little. Tiny make make Tony. Give them where yeah it's for us to. You know it's not like you know to do the homework, but he's got to give the homework. Okay, I like yeah, you're the professional. It's our High Margaret. Well! I wasn't ready. Necessarily the give you homework, but I tell you what my homework tends to be on a daily basis. Yeah, great first of all, make sure that at the end of the day that you leave the world to slightly better place than you started with it, and also in in the meantime go ahead. You made a just thinking. How was the world when I entered it? How is it now? I'm thinking doing my homework already. Yeah, just every day I wake up here, here's the world. And at the end when I'm going to sleep. Did I leave it to slightly better than it was when I started? That's a that's a big load for homework and for you that you're so Christian. the Bible gives direction of how to achieve that. Totally start there. It's it's. It's a load of homework, but it's digestible. If you take it day by day like you were saying you look at the whole timeline. The history of the world say is it better. I think every day. Are you doing something to kind of keep a positive growth. Yeah! I feel like. That's one thing that I do look to Tony four her. He is an example to me in the water. At times I can get. Psycho. As suddenly, I found myself paddle battling a ten year old. In your best. Competition with the twelve year old right? Now Zola. Hilarious that was an actual event contest. This is just day to day surfing. But I'll you know? Look over and I'll see tonino like he's got one of the bigger boards out there. He could grab every wave. Nan we've thought about way hogs on this. podcast before, but he is. So, generous on the water and in the waves, and he's very encouraging. He's always looking to make someone feel better about themselves or their surfing. If a young kid of seen him out there recently, and you know the kids kind of not sure if he should take the wave and Tony's encouraging him to do it and then. You know Is Tonia a golden rule follower platinum rule following. ooh! I would say platinum I sure. Now. Let me, challenge you on that one, so people say. Do you think in in my world? Are you self actualized? Self actualize I'm. I do remember a story where turning ran over this girl and put her. Okay so, he's maybe back at the Golden. Golden. Be told US HIS HOMEWORK DAILY BATTLE He. Admitted that, What we just wanted to say. Thank you Tony for coming today and. Being a part of our podcast. Really appreciate it. I remember a fan of you both. In the real world as well as in the. Recorded world's great to be part of it. Look forward to hearing others and to all of you. Make sure that you leave today a better day than it was when you started. Bam. We're done amen.

Jive Tony US Cuba Google Tony Yeah Benjamin House Linda Centers Lynch Kayla Wadi weady sess president Tonioli North Carolina Benjamin Bharti Congress Surf Grenada Caleb
Vendor Negotiation with Art of Procurement Expert Philip Ideson  Episode 53

Build Business Acumen Podcast

41:59 min | 1 year ago

Vendor Negotiation with Art of Procurement Expert Philip Ideson Episode 53

"Welcome to the Bill business acumen podcast where we deliver practical, knowledge and powerful guidance. Here's your futuristic. Oast Nathaniel Skoula introduce you to Philip Edison, Philip is passionate about the role that procurement professionals and leaders can plan in creating a competitive advantage for their organizations over a two decade, Chris banning beans. Har- procurement value chain from Boya to head of procurement as a practitioner and consultant Philip observed first hand the challenges that procurement professionals face in fighting the status quo and ultimately in fulfilling their potential Philip found. It ought of procurement in two thousand fifteen as a way to empower procurement professionals at all levels to deliver change with confidence. Whether from the inspiration of the popular weekly podcast he hosts or with targeted solution offerings that guide clients on their journey to transform the impact of procurement. Let's dig into this interesting episode. Well, thank you for joining me, I'm ready pleased to learn more about each exciting topics on that. Thank you very much for inviting me on the show. So I think it's best. If we start with start with procurement, and then we sort of lead into negotiation. If that's if that's alright show. So where would you start if you if you thinking about buying something? And you might be inexperienced procurement officer or you might be just just learning how to buy something when where do you stop so firstly who's within the procurements kinda side of the business, and the helping somebody within the business by something what's really important to me is understanding truly what the outcomes that person wants to deliver because you know, a product our service that you buy is really only vehicle for an outcome. And I think that's something that often gets really lost as we get to fixated on. This is what a the specification of this widget is are these are all the different elements of this particular service. We get so kind of. Stuck in the weeds of that that you lose the sight of I actually wants it because we need to increase, you know, the some customer satisfaction. Let's sale we want to bring in Inc increase the conversion rate within our marketing though by one percent. It's really focusing on the endgame random thing you buying itself. I think is just something that's very important to do that we often forget, that's really good advice. Yeah. I agree completely of many people that certain marketing for one example that just kind of that told to kind of go and do these things, and they might be tracking the wool metrics. So I think certainly finding out the the right place to stall is definitely definitely the way to go. Yeah. At metrics is a struggle for procurement, folks. Because most procurement folks and measured on cost savings, so they measured. That's they are y to that business is is saved this year a million dollars. Let's just say, and that's how they measured. So that leads to. Oughta shot tem thinking far per Kevin groups one I think they have a challenge of how to change the metrics the way the measured some of that relates to how they position they row within the business because in for time is position itself as the cost saver, and therefore it's just easy for people to see them and think of them as being that somebody who only is concerned with saving money and saving money at all costs. You know, obviously, that's no often. The best long-term is a strategy is just focused on saving money. For folks are thinking beyond that that they're looking at before what are the train? What are you trying to help the business to achieve? I always tell people are not gonna get fired. If they did a great job in helping the business buy what they want an achiever the results that they want. They could get fired for saving more money than the business wanted them to save. But by obsessing, everybody in the process. When you mean upsetting everyone in the process. You mean the supplies right? Yeah. The suppliers the stakeholders them that's not to say that you have to be. Subservience those. But I think the so much of what we do is based should be based on relationships. And there's a tendency sometimes to push a supply of for example, just using the word vendor suggest is very transactional relationship. Whereas most relationships with suppliers I want a partnership, and we often lose that. And so we just get what we, you know, we by the spec, we get spec, you get nothing mall and for procurement to really be a competitive advantage business, you need to find ways to go above and beyond in terms of the value the gang from supply relationship, and you don't do that. By just having a transactional relationship with the supplier yell throwing not so nothing. I think is the attic family is well that can be I mean, you might be buying one thing. But they might actually be able to you know, potentially might give you free advice on some rain actually consult with you. So if give you give you ways to actually save. Any other areas, which are related you're being open to ideas of because the supply is no better than you. Do how to approach a problem? Now, you may not think that that's a big leap in mindset, where they work in this area of whatever you're buying from them every single day. They've seen what works. They've seen. What doesn't work? So be open to suggestions of how to approach particular challenge rather than telling them what y'all approach to solving that particular challenges. I think is one of the things that's really important. Yeah. Another also I mean, I did a little bit of purchasing dodgers to run a winery. And for this sort of last year. I was there did a bit a purchasing. So I would I actually did some negotiations as well with the we've some some customers distributors, but it was very difficult negotiating I mean, they're you know, when you gloss bottles. There's a very very high price dos bottles are one of the most expensive things to buy in the in the. Wine industry. And it was it was it was amazing that you know, you would look very few different supplies. They're like properly three maybe more supplies that you can deal with. And in fact, you know, you had to sort of look at the quantities and say all right what I'm gonna buy unites small amount for companies, but for us and for the people in the wine industry law. So we would we would buy like one or two related lorry. Full of bottles may apps every in with a traitor on the back that was the gum. And it was it was really tough negotiating with these guys because almost like in that industry, so in some other sectors. They've actually pretty much. I'm not gonna say fix the price. The I would say that they have benchmarked. Let's have it like that. Yeah. Upsets anyone, but I think benchmarked the price to degree. They know exactly where surprises so that, you know, you might negotiate a little bit. But they're not good guy down beyond that base. Yeah. They know the markets yet as well as you. But you know, that doesn't mean that there is an opportunity to negotiate you. So an example from very early in my career east responsible by light bulbs for an automotive company. K and there were three suppliers in the world that essentially supply lightbulbs automotive market. So not quite a monopoly. But can almost everyone again knows the prices for everything that's that. But you know, you start digging into each one of those providers, and you're the same could be true of the the fall providers of Gus bottles. The wine business that have certain manufacturing lines that are. That have less capacity are the they have less utilization. I'm sorry. They may wanna work with particular Browns were certain reasons are in certain geographic locations because it's their expansion strategy was things that you can find out. What's the actually you more attractive? What hap- you would expect? If you just went and did a traditional. Hey, tell me price isn't doing ago. She says move out so times of the year, for example, minimal quantities delivery times and missile stuff. Or is that more to it than that? Yeah. I mean, one of the things I was fortunate enable that was able to bring out lightbulb spend down by about twenty five percent over quickly. And that was you know, there was number different tactics in doing it's switching business. You know, actually shows that y'all serious when you go and ask for the best pricing. Because if you don't get it, then you will move the business. The first time you do that people a little bit. They don't think he gonna follow through on that. Because the businesses never followed through befall once he's not following through a moving business because you know, you're talking to expensive for example, then they'll soap notice the next time. You do go. She action and the latte be a lot more trust in what you're trying to tell them. They don't look at it. As just being know, the just trying to pull the wool of my is because they want better price. But the other thing that really helped us do that was when you start thinking about innovation so even within a category that says traditional is liable ABS which haven't changed much in a hundred plus years, there are still new innovations west each one of these free supply as wanting to bring you products to markets, and you helping them bring those products to market. Means that you're gonna get concessions on some of the traditional commodities products that just turning out by the million because you helping them in another area that business, and so that was really a way for us to stop building on ships with some of these the bowl bunny factories as opposed to just looking them as they share. We're gonna bid everything out. And it's whichever is always price wins. And that way kind of Utah throughout the benchmarking before. That's what you get. You get prices that are all pretty similar tweets. So it's understanding what they actually need in business, and how you can help achieve it helps you build ships, which then gets concessions across the rest of the book of business. You wanna buy from them? Yeah. It's it's not it's not an easy one. But I think I think you've really summed up actually quite nicely. It's it's there are many different. Variables variables are in procurement. You know, for example, he got delivery terms, having your ego service. But what else what else would you think affects procurement actually sitting Aaron say you're going to buy something from from mitt? Would you? Where would you stop? If you buy something from an inside. There were ten people in the world did exactly what I did. I'm will just to step back. You know what? What's a procurement person trying to do? They have four basic priorities. You know, one is to make sure the they ensure supply. So the businesses never without the prototype service. They want to buy two is to save money, or at least feel like the businesses getting from money for what they spend with a supplier, though, it is to reduce risk this associated with buying the productivity buying all that associated with the supplier the working with and the last one is to increase revenue. How do I help through the purchase of whatever it may be? And it may be when he starts talking about innovation. How does that pie to help my company spend sorry, make more money essentially, bring in more revenue? Now, if I was looking at buying something from you for the first time. Most become a professionals will be trained to look at the product and service that buying from you, and basically book it into one of FOX's what the book thing of is doing is basically saying, hey is this a commodity products where you're one of many different suppliers. I can if you fail I can buy easily from somebody else. The price range is a pretty similar between all the players in the markets. The greater risk has easy. We switch to a different supplier of something goes wrong are on the other end of the spectrum. This is highly specific very few players in the world. We want to build a really strong relationship with you. When your company because we feel that that's going to be beneficial for our company we like the things about your business. You know, all the things that position you is someone we want you to be real strategic partner with will look at that continuum of I'm buying a screw versus on buying a ten million dollar system does integrate into our indicts him or that we're going to outsource, you know, twenty percent my business to you. And so therefore you so critical to success wherever you found that spectrum is going to determine the way the procurement person works with you. And an understanding way you fit. Is hard sometimes because we all believe that we provide a lot of value to prospects. So you got to be you got to really think. In real terms about why you feel on that continuum because if you one end where is so important to them that obviously means you have a very different discussion, a very defending Gauchet Shen, if they think that they can just go to the next business down the road and get exactly the same from you. Yeah. Yeah. There's a big big big problem with it's just it's just KOMO ties. Ing everything is named putting into the same the same sort of area. Isn't it? Yeah. I think that's one of the things that we fortunately as procurement do Maughan, honestly, what the show the app acumen that I host is trying to help people. Get out of mindsets run is the not to try and bring everything down to an apples to apples comparison. Because that's what we often do those the tools that we use at the and make everything seem like it's Oatley the businesses making a price based decision when obviously from most of the things we buy there are a lot more facts involved in it than just price. Yeah. Yeah. Of course. I mean, a lot of it is to do with just tons payment that payment terms, isn't that there will sort of sort of things I think we should skip onto this. You wanna sort of did you want to cover those are the those other points that you sort of because he covered one. Didn't you outs? Yeah. No. I just wanted to say I think it's just important to know when you working with the procurement person, they just have those fall kind of priorities in their mind. And I just think that I think. When you look at the relationship between procurement sales, we often don't know sometimes why the party exist, and that leads to a lot of conflict just understanding and an empathizing with what the parties trying to achieve. I think really just helps to develop solutions that I will win win as opposed to just seeing zero-some game. Right. That makes sense makes sense. Okay. Okay. Yeah. I mean, I think it's it certainly important those relationships that you'll get a Bill would again help you in all areas on the end of the day. Yeah. I mean, it depends. What kind of company do you wanna be do you want to be known as the kind of company that just really sees? That relationships is transactional with supply base odd. You want to be seen as a company really values Bess as partners, and you know, you look over the last twenty years or so I think fortunately, this is changing there, but the auto manufacturers. Now, the US based auto manufacturers, and I say this having worked within the industry. Would often see that supply as as. Not as partners. But as a say transaction, you know, we're gonna buy this. We don't really trust them every negotiation is win lose. And it just builds a. He really struggled to get the best innovation from your suppliers when you do that. And then you look at the Japanese suppliers Japanese manufacturers, for example, and they see the world very different way in the way that they work with suppliers in. So if you are a supply of where we are gonna take your innovation. You take it to the subpoenas that treat you as a pawn versus a tree a transaction. Oh, of course, you all because they treat you better. I mean, you know, it's. Yeah. It's so what you think about sort of impecunious like actually. If you were trying to sell import would you think about kind of entertaining, you'll customers like, you know, you might invite them to win would you mind vitamins, the box at the all pro and a missile stuff is not it's not gonna make any difference to us if acumen professional or not. It's an interesting question. And I'll be honest, you know, the last ten fifteen years procurement folks of being a lot less likely to accept offers like that because they don't want us to be seen to be any impropriety of bills. I've been there. I've had been invited by supply to the box at Wimbledon until the open to many different events know to be fortunate to be able to go to those. But one of the suppliers I was telling you about earlier in the light, bulb example. They were probably the one that we're invited me to go and do those things, and they hit the most I did the switching around the business. So as openly has on a per person printed limited impact, I would say a most show them. Maybe some that it has an impact on what I would say is the as somebody setting into procurement. You know, you wanna make the procurement person you advocates so became a person they ultimately buying decisions. Made by stakeholders present, he's helping with the process a lot more. But that's a key part of the role is supporting the stakeholder in making a decision. So a lot of people work with acute and see them as I wanna sideline them and go around them because of head all these horror stories, what that's going to do is gonna create somebody within procurement who actually is probably not in kind to wanna help you win the business. He wants to win. If you build that for somebody in pajamas, you're open, you transparence, you don't it's not like you trying to go around them if they believing product they're going to do everything they can to help you in that business. So it really how you approach the acumen person. I think at does have an impact on whether you win business away the wins that I say sustainable term business 'cause you could go round to begin Pessina win business. Once the likelihood is it's going to be much much harder fee to win business with that company again while that became a best is still there. Right. Yeah. I believe I believe in that completely making friends in businesses or you know, people who trust you you trust them. Good relationship. So absolutely came down out that. I think I've had instances where I've built really strong relationships with prospects. If P process, for example, you can do I may have advocated for but for one reason or another they didn't win the business. You know, maybe they just weren't right for the business that time being about the fact is two years three years five years down the line, whatever it may be while we may mail being different companies, and you build that relationship. And you know, I would go back to that person of found a way to work with them in other organizations. Yes, you know, you never lose that. If you at least are trying to be open with the upper in person, I want to build a relationship with them as well. Even if you don't win the business time round, there's a chance he might you may be working with them again in the future. Oh, definitely. I mean, I think there are many many criteria all its hikes for a few bits and pieces on that will not form to fit, you know, you'll business. I mean, it might say, well, you know, we're not gonna work with any business below five million turnover more or it's fifty million or it's it's only been in business for five years. You know, it could be all sorts of different criteria writer. You could actually just lose the business from much just be down to the spec of particular coats service, right? Yeah. Yeah. The seventy variables that, unfortunately, as I've been on the other side. Now, you never really know e can do everything that's you can try and find out when the what criteria business is going to be awarded on the road of Abel's. Now the end of the day, you know, people. People who are buying from suppliers. Most of them they want to minimize risk adverse instance, and whether that's risk for the business, a whether that's a risk on their own personal reputation. Both. Yes, they're going to be looking at the buying decision through. Yeah. Yeah. That makes that makes sense. Definitely. It's not. It's it's it's not really complicated is it. But I mean, there's a lot involved. We joke around. The fact procurement soon isn't rocket science, and when you trying to distill it's very common sense. But that was the main like you said, it's easy. No. But that's the same with sales, isn't it? I mean, I think if if sounds marketing and procurement actually got on better life easier. Wouldn't it really me too? Yeah. That's what I try not vacate for. Because as your great things can happen when people trust each other. Yeah. But there's a long way to go. I think before sells procurement folks, Jen we trust each other. Oh, very much. So, but it is great stuff happening in the supply chain these days, I don't think we should talk too much about that today. But I think you know, we've sort of offficial intelligence dates. Ron. Being able to actually track things all the way all the way from the field the bottle all all the table. Just as one example. I mean, I've heard the food prices apparently while food costs are actually gonna come down by fifteen percent is what head on food wastage that was in her. So someone about that the other day, and that's purely because of supply and demand and actually making sure that when overproducing but also with the water and actually being able to to monitor the amount of wool to this actually need it the all today's wasted racer. Yeah. And victims in the soil and an old as sorts of fertilize as this. I think we would quite exciting future ahead providing that is actually given back, you know, the needs to be kind of ethical policy doesn't that to human and also doing business in general Yaron for Kim folks that certainly getting more involved in sustainability. And helping with sustainability. What's was interesting to me? You know, I do the podcast of mention before in procurement space still the episodes that have the lowest numbers of downloads, the ones where I talked about supply chain sustainability. I think we still got a long way to go in terms of that really being a scene has being a call like we have to do this. Within supply chain. You know, I know. It's not an area. I've spent a lotta time in for a while though, I say that I did co author a book recently within supply chain, but looking at supply chain visibility at it's interesting to me because it kind of took his on the point that you said before around data is we are now becoming so more so much better informed about where a particular item. That's within a truck, for example, is any point in the supply chain that you can plant around that rather than just waiting for it to show up somewhere. All you can within the food example. I I used to which Kita the banana grower is again. And. We would have you know, you never quite know what the temperature is on the truck while. Now, you have senses everywhere. They can tell you exactly what temperature that banana has been exposed to from the moment. It was picked the plantation. So it goes in the stall. And so you can then quickly make adjustments. If you see in a container, for example. That's the banana is the temperature within there is to WalMart Monto cold. Yeah. You can make those adjustments because you have the data that tells you at whereas before you just have to wait. So they end up with the pots, and you have a container full spa bananas. So the definitely is possible. These days to have so much more insights into what supply chain looks like essentially anything, and then he can punt around it, which takes out the efficiencies. So the inefficiencies in those processes in the hall quality of sticking to took to gentleman the other day didn't view with him. He's he's actu-. Launched. He was the he was the chairman of Brooke Latina distillery in Scotland. And it's like if you're into you single moans than this is the generator when it kinda came in sort of disrupted, they they kind of age-old spirits business. And it said will we're actually gonna use ingredients from local farmers, and we'll get a work with local farmers to actually grow the ball him. Yeah. And an idea that then they basically sold sold the business for a big chunk of change to to big big company, and since then they've actually gone on to create to two new distilleries once once in Grenada for rum, and they're actually growing the rashly growing sugarcane in Grenada. But they went to Grenada a nice said we'll win ROY putting this distillery on. And we want to help you to make money, and they went and spoke to. The people that owned the land, and they said, we'll get a pay you more than you've ever made on this piece of land. If you grow this. And then we're getting give it a give you the sugar cane to grow get to tell you how to do it. And we're gonna provide you the tractors and we're going to help you. But I said no because they were suspicious because it just because they couldn't understand it. And they've actually done this in oil Lund's and basically working with the local farmers in Auckland's with with growing the fall and to create an Irish single moats whiskey by and it's so interesting to actually be able to try the flavor from each one of those fields. So they can actually turn around to. He was telling me that the fall farmers in Islay where actually speaking to each other and saying well tastes the whiskey came from my field testing is the difference between her whiskey there. And it's an it's just it's messing up the drinks industry completely because it's making the. Huma realize that each flavor that comes from the soil, and then it is possible to buy local local products and work with local farmers and people get paid a fair amount of money for that great and ball in every instead of the cut-throat Euromarket of oh, we combine whiskey now in Scotland. Oh, it doesn't matter where the body comes from his just from the euro kit. Right. Yes. Just don't have the money fracturing process. I stand gross exactly which annoy annoys me cheapness. If ingredients annoys me, I mean, I think you know, quality. Yes comes up price. But the actual processing greetings for things that are, you know, the amount of money, you could save in transplants overplay 'cause that comes into the negotiations doesn't it? It's interesting. How stunned is Asian basically leads to quantitaive Asian. The fact that, you know, people in this example, a probably less concerned about what the taste is over. Let's just create something cheap. We as we possibly can. I'd lucite we're going back to what we said at the very beginning of what the outcome is the trying to drive versus what's the cheapest way to get something that looks like it way. Would you start then with with negotiation, which you would you determine the price and then the other person determines the terms? Or would you would you draw to the other way round? How would you begin with the guy she action here? So I think in the much additional precare model. It's you know, I'm gonna put a scope out to you are a a specification, you give me a price, and I'll decide whether I like that are not trying to hit accordingly, and you know, what's whether what goes into I decide whether I like that has of cost many different factors. A could be on the. Say the bad end of things just hey, I'm going to tell you like it because I think I got leverage over you. It's not particularly ethical to do that. But it's it's just to try and get as much as you can. Because you think you've got a position of power, which is something that I hate to be honest with you is our a dynamics in negotiations, but it works in some cases. So the other end of the spectrum of you know, I've done a detailed cost. Cost modeling you've you've given show me your books because we're in a partnership. I think that's your take your your profit margin of twenty five cent. You've applied there is to expensive. And the all the reasons why based on what I know of the markets. Between that I've been on that side of things I had to negotiate with us always sending some Mead, Honey wine. Yeah. And we used to export to the states. So my dad went to MIT and the other guy he went to Hawford. So dad was teaching me how to negotiate against this guy from Harvard rights and it was raid. Really interesting spirit. I've never learned so much in the space of three days in my life service. And and it was not everything we would go back with he would come back with something else side. We would say well the price of Honey is going up, but it's gone up by thirty five cents in X amount, and blah, blah, blah. And then the bottom prices going up, then the price of this is going up, and then he would come back with. Well. Yeah. But you know, I think the price of us is the pound, right? So we would it's a bit like being in a time market in Bangkok. You you know, you you kinda stall little bit. Why? From where you won't get. That guy. You know, so much of it is is how do, you know, your business as much as they know your business? Yes. An example, I can think over his and this is back when must be ten years ago now, and when prices would just going through the roof, you know, every single day, and I was helping a company by trucking logistics can and the CEO of the company at committed to the market. They will public traded company. We're gonna save all this money now on which is sticks because the price of oral now stats default. So it peaks hours it was starting to fall. We just going into the recession. Now, it was let's say sixty bucks a gallon a barrel, whereas before it was a hundred and fifty bucks about. So he's studying Wall Street, it's gonna save money. He didn't realize hadn't factored in was that actually that may be true. But the cost of oil gas petrol in shipping is only fifteen twenty percent of the total cost. A big cost is the humans, and there was a shortage of drivers. Yep. So anything that was coming down in. In the gas prices was is going to be hit. Because now there's a shortage of drivers and his employment costs can be higher. And so they just reminded me of the backwards. Fall. Was you say before because ultimately the things that you may think irrational, but when you start looking at the data behind them, it may tell you different story. And so it's one thing is just not to assume the ino- the impact of cost driver without truly knowing what the all the cost drivers in how those build up. Ultimately, what final Costa's if you could see me now, I'm noting away. Right. Because let not just so Trey is because if you don't know, it's just you get that's why taking the process and taking time and not rushing into things is is really important and planning. I mean, what do they say? Prior planning beats his pool, full months. I don't like to swear. But that's what they say. Yes. You know, when when you told me we're gonna ask. Questions about negotiating. I wrote some tips down the number one tip was be prepared. You know, ninety percent preparation Tempus execution negotiation an people struggle with that. Because we're all running like headless chickens from one meeting to the next, but a planning doesn't mean have a strategic plan of how are you going to approach negotiation? It means how am I gonna plan for the next Email? You know, how am I gonna plan for the next call? How am I going to punch the next meeting? How does that fit into my overarching negotiation strategy? That's that I've planning that we really need to be doing. And it's planning that very few of us, myself included. Struggled to do. Because it you always find it difficult. Find the time, but you can be pretty Shaw that the press on the side of the table who is going to be commissioned based on the voice final price is probably don't that preparation. Oh, yeah. Which is gonna leave you at a disadvantage. Oh, yeah. So so would you think good place to start is to write down on a piece of paper to a one line down the middle and on the left what he wants on the right? What you want? Yeah. I would say that. And. Understand it goes to something. I said about the liable example again Ilya when you doing that on the stand what's important to them. Because what's in palm might not be what looks like it's important on the face level. So I give you another example, we know one of the things I bought him. I passed a childcare center. Weird and wonderful random things. So. This was a pharma company in the UK K have they had their their head office in the UK was in a very remote location. So they have to do everything they could to attract scientists essentially to come work for them. And one of the things that they wanted to do was to develop and build a childcare center on sites because they were targeting employees who were who may have kids who will, you know, five ten years old whatever book probably lower before school age. Yes. I would know notable five. Yeah. But they couldn't afford to build it themselves. So we went to markets. All the bids came into expensive boy found a provider who is a US based provider who actually wanted to get their foothold in the UK markets with such a big company as a big brand. Like we were. It was only from understanding that that we were then able to turn that into a deal where Oldsmobile was no cost to us. You know, we gave them a building because we had an building amnesty. They ran the center they run that cost. We rebel to provide the service back to the employee's without costing as a penny with only like the opportunity cost of not using the building. That was already nicer if we'd had gone to market just thinking, this is a price based decision. We would have never got that. We would ultimately never been out of when when I got cut we'd never been off the childcare center in place, but by understanding that different motivations led to a completely different deal than we thought was possible. When we started. Well, that's that's fantastic. As really exciting. Do. You know, what I think I've actually read about that was in the newspapers. I've no idea. I mean, it could have been by idea which the country was in insures in Kent. Yeah. I think I've read something quite a few years ago. Yeah. This will have been two thousand. I was there two thousand for two thousand five I remember reading something about that in the paper Gruden idea. More businesses need to do that source stuff is no doubt about it. The day of just thinking what did I want? Maybe just ask them ask them find out about their business. So because you may be surprised. Yeah. And you may you made it to make things possible that you didn't think were possible because he just assumes the all they wanted was the best financial deal. It is a small business. I know that while yes, I always wanted to have as good if I as I possibly can. It's not the only thing that's important to me saw make concessions for the things that may be, you know, additive for my business, would it might be just an introduction in. They might say to you will tell you. Well, you know, I'm only get by fifty as or two hundred as but I will introduce you to very good friend of mine does the purchasing for very large chain of shops oil helps all whatever our other a case study with you. In use you can use this testimony on your website or just things that don't actually take that much. But have a big different big impact. But also when I was buying labels. We came up with a good a good good idea because we didn't want to have the stock in all premise because it was too much to buy the minimum quantity that they wanted us to buy. It was it was too much. So we had to commit to a certain amount of labels. But we said we'll tell you what you guys need to keep seventy five percent of these labels. They're onto your temperature controlled. Environment. And we will grow Ripon them as we need them. When we did we will come and pick them up. So there are who sort of different different ways to kind of skinny cat. Right. Let's say it's getting a cab. Yeah. Yeah. Yeah. Well, it it's it's been a pleasure. And so if people wanna go listen to your show, how do they do they find you? Yeah. The easiest way is just go to our website, which is arts of procurement dot com. And they'll be wearing theft the podcast or just go to any way. You get your podcasts. Whether it's on I tunes yet podcast app. You can just such arts of procurements, and it'll come up and subscribe listening that we basically every single week we talked to different people within the German industry on outside the an industry to help inspire folks within procurement to really think more deeply about the value proposition. How they can make a difference for that company how they can pot or the Liz interesting, I get a lot of feedback from folks outside of pajamas like in sales business developments account management who listen because it helps them get a better understanding of the psyche of camera professional yet on get listen, there's a tender working on coming. All right, thus. What you started saying about ten during really so hit hugging that unite a lot just working out well enough, they actually won't is the most important thing is just like put yourself in their shoes. Right. Yeah. Don't assume anything, unfortunately, you know, they're going to be procurement people who are much traditional people who there to run a process, and there will be people who are that the Amal commercially minded being into stand being able to figure out which of the two that is will really help you determine what's the best way of approaching welcome in that person. But the relationship is will not as long term. Yeah. And help them help you. Yeah. Yeah. Yeah. Well, thank you as been. It's been fantastic. Not it's been my pleasure. Thank you for inviting me on the show. Thanks so much for listening. Please subscribe, and wherever you prefer share with your friends. And if you enjoyed the show drops review on I tunes, all wherever you listen.

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ICYMI - Lewis Hamilton Breaks the Mold in Formula 1

The Daily Show with Trevor Noah: Ears Edition

09:39 min | 2 years ago

ICYMI - Lewis Hamilton Breaks the Mold in Formula 1

"You're listening to comedy central. Please. Welcome Lewis Hamilton. Welcome to the show. Thank you. It is so good to have you here. And I think for for many of my view is I have to situate you, and who you are because it's a little bit crazy. You are a four time Formula one world champion formula. One is one of the biggest sports in the wool. You're a race car driver. But oftentimes when after explains people like Formula one they go like what is that? Yeah. And I go like it's NASCAR they turn the other way. And like is it strange reason to bit surreal being in a position where you are in a sport that genuinely hundreds of millions of people watch around the world. But in America has many people who have no clue what you do. I wouldn't say it's strange. I think no here the people grow in the driver's grow up to do NASCAR. So dislike NFL, for example. He have. That's I'll is soccer. Right. So we don't have one race here. We've not had a race here for for many many years. Those got we had to think up until two thousand seven it was Indianapolis, and then not till two thousand twelve so, but it's growing here. But yeah, I'm educating every time I meet someone I'm telling them something new. And particularly when I talk about like, the weight that I lose like, wow, how much we do lose. You know? Well, the most I've ever listen, the racist ten and a half pounds in an hour and forty five minutes, and that was like Malaysia and Singapore, right? And so every time I tell that to an American that like, wow, I need to be racing. You don't think one of the reasons if one is going in America is because of your presence, you you're not a regular racing driver. That's only on the track you out and about people love your story. So what what I think a lot of people have been really attracted to when it comes to your story is the journey that you will on. So I mean, you grew up in sports that is really reserved for very rich people. Right. But you did not grow up rich at all and your dad made your career possible. Like, how did that all begin? How hard was that journey getting into f one it was it was incredible. I mean, I go up on my dad's couch and in a normal council estate, and it was a weekend. Hobby for me, my dad, we kind of stumbled across it. We started racing RC. 'cause when I was four right. And the thought I had really good hand to wacko nation. So he bought me a go cop is really old from the newspaper, and we arrived at the at the track for the first time. We would not welcome with the only I the only about people their rights, and you know, and it was very very expensive. So my dad had four. Jobs just to keep us going. He was going to London doing his normal job, which was IT at railroad railroad station, and then he'll come home. It'd be put enough for sale signs vending machines anything you could find a little bit of cash to because it's so expensive, right? But I was lucky I got signed when I was thirteen. So that's pretty but the goal, and my dream Saudi windows five was to be like it's an center, which you know about. And and kinda we never lost sight about my dad dad, they want to what not to do is to struggle as he did from Grenada came to London and sh struggled really finding money funding. Good job, and he also my brother's disabled. So he was like I don't want. My my kids to struggle like I have. So he worked to the bone to create an opportunity for us. Right. The two of you were a team. I mean, you've got your dad teaching you how to race 'cause you get signed at thirteen and that's really the beginning of journey because many people have said in the world that f one is the pinnacle of driving. I mean, these are the fosters causing the world, you know, this is zero to sixty in. What is it? How is it a second? Now what what are you at now? What does it? What does that tell that to? I'm sorry still. Two seconds. You have this machine that you were controlling and you're driving against the fastest drivers in the world. You went from nothing to being a four time world champion every single day is a challenge for you. And now you're going to be racing in Austin in America, and you could win fifth world championship, which which is record breaking on so many levels, you sometimes take a moment to pause and go like this is this is surreal every day. I'm you know, I get to travel the world. I'd get to see a meet so many different peach people and racing. The car is just the greatest thing, man. I'm from the first day that I got to drive a phone car until two thousand six and when I entered phone line when I was twenty to thirty three now and my goal is always to emulate this older. No, legendary driver who was a Brazilian who died in the spoke because it is a dangerous sport. And he was three time. We'll champion is you know, right? And so two years ago, I equal him which was kind of. Just an incredible moment for for me. And then since then I've kind of been trying to carry on the bathroom from him. Because as I said, he was the guy always wanted to be right? And you you're still the only black f on driver, and it's always surreal interesting. Because like when the camera goes down the paddock they'll show all the drivers all the drivers. And just generally I mean, like F one in many ways, it's sort of like a Christian sports. You can see what a person looks like when they're in it. You're like, hey, do you ride the horses? You are the host. You're like everyone's got that look, and then it gets to you. And it's like, I'm sorry. So how did you get into? More people complained about that initially. They were like is he bringing hip hop to the sport. Is he gonna put like a sound system on his car was happening here that you've shown that you can still be yourself and be a professional racing driver at the same time has that been an important journey for you. It really hasn't. It's been really difficult to break that mold. You know? They there was the saying that you have to this is what a racing driver does is how they look. And this is how they talk. To break that mold has taken a little time. I've been as I've been here now is my Levin season. But I think in today's well, you have to transcend you have to do something different. You have to show uniqueness and not shy away from that. And that's really something that I've really worked hard on. And now it's accepted when I do all this traveling which is a lot more than in the other race. I've ever does. Right. And then as I always going to be distracted and the tone up a win. And then oh well. So one of the things, that's that's really fascinating. Is that difference that you bring right? The way you dress has been one of the key things, you yours in the magazines full for your fashion sense. And now you've taken that's the next level. You've teamed up with Tommy hilfiger, right? And I think it's the thing is Tommy X Louis, which says Thomas, this is Tommy X Lewis. And I feel like we need to get this sorted out. Because like the iphone says, it's not ex-. It's ten. Say by it's ex. And the like we go to agree on what this is. But the fashion itself is being really well received. You had a show in China, which was phenomenal. Like, you had everyone from there, you you. You have the world now looking to your clothing, and they're gonna like your fashion designer how do you go from racing 'cause to designing clothes like they don't because like racing drivers are very like very like. Yes. Returns and thrived, and we go staves and they come back. That's a racing driver. And then you're like, yeah. Like the shapes and everything like where did that come from? It's been an incredible experience. I meant tell me here in New York like five years ago and every time I saw him. He I love how you're dressing. We should do something together night. And I was like no way told me wants to do something with me. And I didn't truly believe what he was saying. But I've had the same thing. I had H M say like, yo you dress. So I mean, same boat. That's how we roll. So yes with Tommy hilfiger says he likes how you dress. Yeah. So the partnership came up, and I was able to bring them to the team. So then other teams one, and and the design my own clothing collection. So I really took it on as a an internship, really. Because I get to learn from an icon like told me, and I did a lot of homework. I'd been going to load the fashion shows, we'll fashion it's just something of always been into. And also just discovering the looks that I like and discovering how I wanna feel a Halloween address and express myself, right? So and it's going really, well it's sold out in one thousand Tokyo soda out there thinking the states for the first couple few weeks came out. It was a large. I seventy seven percent of salesmen sales was my collection. So it's amazing. Yeah. You also have really been advocating for and you implemented in having models who are diverse you like when I show the runway show. It was everyone who looked like everyone. It was really beautiful indifference to see on the runway. And that wasn't a mistake. Absolutely. So I I like to get involved in their everything and micromanage everything. So so what music you can place. So I did the music the playlist for the French when we had the is meant the men show. So it was just going to be men, and I was like I really wanted. It'd be mixed. Do want women to walk and dress in these clothes because today as well women do women's clothes rights, and I think diversity in inclusivity as every is such an important thing. Message to get across today. And so that's what I wanted to do in my clothing. It's been testing max. The one US grown in often. You'll take place on the twenty four and the tummy X newest collection is available now Lewis Hamilton everybody. The daily show with criminal years a digital watch the daily show, weeknights at eleven ten central on comedy, central and the comedy central watchable episodes and videos at the daily show dot com. Polo us on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram and subscribe to the daily show on YouTube, exclusive, content and move. This has been a comedy central podcast.

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Turn Travel Into A Lifestyle With Goats On The Road

Zero To Travel Podcast

1:16:45 hr | 1 year ago

Turn Travel Into A Lifestyle With Goats On The Road

"Turning travel into a lifestyle. My guest today have done it for many years, and they also teach people how to do it on their very popular website goats on the road dot com. We've got the goats in the house. Today, we're gonna jam on travel as a lifestyle long-term travel, what it takes to keep yourself out there on the road. And some of the moments that they've encountered over the years where they've had to make some tough decisions on what to do with their lives, so they can keep travelling, and we're gonna get into all of that, and much more today. Plus, I'll share some thoughts on what it takes a mindset perspective to make travel a long-term part of your life. It's all happening in today's show right now to strap on in reclined. Thank you for being your aunt. Welcome to this year to travel podcast, my friend. You're listening to zero to travel podcast where we explore exciting travel based, work lifestyle and business opportunities helping you to achieve your wildest dreams. Now, your host, world, wonder and travel junkie. Jason moore. Hey there, it's Jason with zero to travel dot com. Welcome to the show, my friend. Thank you so very much for relying meets bring a little travel into your ears today. Wherever it is that you are in the world. This is the show to help you travel the world on your terms to fill your life with as much travels, you desire, no matter what your situation or experience. And you hear me say that intro on all of these shows and never been truer than in today's show. We're talking about turning travel into a lifestyle. More specifically sharing the personal story of how one couple did it and giving advice on the way and how you can do it too. So you're going to get a lot of nukes and crannies like when I say, nooks and crannies would that be the right where a lot of nice juicy tidbits may be to help you make travel a long term thing? I always go to nooks and crannies because I'm a big English muffins fan. I'm not gonna lie to you English muffins are. One of my favourite breakfast treats when I'm back in America. I don't know if it's a treat, but I love a nice buttery English. Muffin I know I'm getting off topic here. But hey I miss my English muffins right now back in Norway. We can't get the English muffins here and I'm closer to England. What's up with that? I don't get it. Anyway. I'm really excited to bring you this interview because there are so many lessons that can come out of just hearing a real story from a couple who has been traveling long-term for many years, nomadic -ly for many years, but it started off. Well, I'm not going to spoil it for you because it's all coming next before we get into that. I do want to say quick. Thank you to Tortuga backpacks for supporting today's show if you zero to travel dot com slash Tortuga you're gonna see all the backpacks and gear that I recommend from them and you can get ten percent off anything you order. They're just by using the promo code travel. Just use the word travel when you check out, you'll get ten percents off, just for being zero to travel podcast listener. These are backpack. And duffle bags and other travel gear it's made by travelers for travelers really when they were designing their new bags a little while back. They called me up and asked me a million questions on what I love about travel backpacks. What kind of features I love what are the things that I think are essential. And they did this with a lot of other travelers. So it's not just some snappy tagline by travelers four travelers, it's not even one of tag lines. I just say that because I know it's true because I've had conversations with them while they're constructing backpacks. So they're getting it right. And when you're on the road, your backpack is your home, so you wanted to have all the bells and whistles you need without too much stuff, and you want it to be comfortable and durable. And of course, the right size. And if you want to get a backpack that you don't have to check, you can save money on checking luggage, but you still want to maximize your space. They've got the goods your travel dot com slash Tortuga. Promo code travel. Just the word travel when you check out you'll get ten percent off anything you order over there. And if you do. Decide to make a purchase. Thank you, because I'm going to fill it for them. And you'll also be supporting this podcast. So I so appreciate that. Okay. Let's get to this interview with the goat's and stick around. On the other side, I'm going to give a shout out, and I'm also going to talk a little bit about what I think are some of the key personality traits that can help you make travel into a lifestyle and we'll have a little chat about that later. So stick around for that, please enjoy listening on my conversation with the goat's, and I will see you on the other side of my friends. Are you guys ready to have a good time because we're about to get into this? I'm so excited to welcome, my guest today, the dynamic duo behind goats on the road dot com where they can help you make travel a lifestyle by teaching various ways to earn money as you go to recent Nick welcome to these year to travel podcast. My friends. Are you having a blast? I've, I've been so excited for this because, well, we've kind of known each other an internet land the last couple years, you guys have been part of the paradise pack, and we've been talking everything, but we actually did get to quote unquote meat as we say, and Skype lands, I guess, over video just pretty recently. And I was like, I get to know these guys more because they just seem like so much fun. And I just wanted to share with you, some really excited to have you guys here. Thanks for taking the time. Thanks for having us. We're still to be here, and it's been a long time coming this because we've kind of in shot in about doing the podcast for awhile. Glamour finally done fun are doing it, and I kinda wanna hear a bit about what you guys were doing before you became these rockstar travel bloggers road. I, I, I want to know where you guys met. Where did you meet? I'm gonna go Barbie here. This is deep. We're going to do the hard hitting questions man. Hard hitting hitting. Okay. I'll go with that one. So we are both from Canada and be met in the big city of Calgary. And so big city is like one million people, and we actually are from the same small town, but we didn't meet each other until Calgary. So that's kind of weird, like we have so many mutual friends, and there's only like a couple of high schools where we're from and where the exact same age. But we didn't meet 'til the big cities. So it's like, yeah, it's pretty cool serendipitous. All right. So I know we'll tell me about the first date. That's what I really wanna hear about. What's the first thing we're friends. We're friends for a long time. So friends for like four years in Calgary, and I was just trying to make moves but it wasn't playing. It took me for years to come. It can happen. Do what was going on? There man was one of those like, I got to get to make this more of a friend thing. But you you got stuck in the friend zone. Zone. Got no game apparent. To Reese, how did he get out of the zone? What did he do? He grew up a little bit. Up or. I think we're like twenty two or twenty three when we started dating. Yeah. It's all because actually this one is really serendipitous. It's all because of a landslide that happened. We like went home to our hometown small town to visit our family and stuff. And we're all friends, we were just friends jury sny. And then on the way back to go back to the big city to go home. There was a landslide covered the highway. So like we had to get a hotel together. All of this is if I can't do it now, I'm screwed. Really? So we were driving back. There was a landslide. And it was just the two of you, driving as France. And you never gone date or anything like that. No day. It's like mother nature wanted us. All right. We'll no, hold on. Because now putting myself there because that could go the like the energy, the energy, and vibe change as soon as you guys were like, oh, I think we have to get a hotel where you're like. Oh, yeah. Like, or is it like an unspoken thing or was it like oh, it's on now. Or was it still like, oh, I'm not sure what's going on? I feel like there was some certaines like the couple of months leading up to it as soon as I knew we're going to get a hotel just heard the sound. And the back of my head. It was kinda like Jacob bound. The sound sick. Threes. Yeah. That's awesome. So that is pretty. Back in the day, stuff ups, like twelve years ago. Now it's been a long time. I mean at that point. Yeah, you're kind of forcing the issue. Right. If you've been flirting, and it's kind of been building up. It's right. It's here we go. This is going to go one way or the other. So anyway. All right. So that was in two thousand what then? Okay. And then you guys started travel or took a trip in oh, eight. And that kind of kick started the idea of traveling around the world. Is that right? Yeah. That was the big chip. That was like the thirteen month backpacking trip. So these days Asia, but I know what you mean. Sorry. We did a one week inclusive like little holiday together before that. Okay. So, and then, like, after that, it was so that wasn't too long into your life. I guess, but you've known each time so yeah. People were still kinda like really used selling your stuff. You're going travelling for a year. You've been dating basically a year. Shirk people get an old judgy. Yeah. Or just being like yeah. Uh-huh. This'll work out. You know, probably thought we're going to break up or whatever by. Yeah. Why me with travel can kind of that's kind of the thing, right? After two or three weeks, you can kinda know sometimes this is going to out or not. But in your case, I mean the one week at the all inclusive was enough to be like, oh, hey, we want to do this more, and we're going to make this thing happen. And you guys made it a concerted effort to save up and was reading how you saved money made a lot of sacrifices to, to make that first trip happen. And as you were going to that first trip was that the thirteen month trip was there any inkling at all of the fact that, like, hey, if this works out, maybe there's another thing after this, or you just taking that chunk chime, and you're going to say, like, hey, I'm going to we're going to have this experience together, and then that's going to be at them. We're gonna come back to Canada and live our lives like what were your mindsets at the time? I think that even going for a year was so beyond our wildest dreams before that point that when we took off on that trip that's as far ahead as we could really see, like we just thought, oh my God. We managed to save enough money for like a year of travel. This is insane. So just going to be a year and then going back to Canada to save more money, but shortly into the trip like maybe a few months into the trip we were like, okay, we want to do this all the time. But even at that point, we didn't know how to do that digital Mohmed thing we hadn't heard of a lot of people, you know, making money on the road. So all we knew to do was to go back to Canada. Go back to those jobs that we didn't really enjoy and start saving money again. But yeah, it's so true. It probably was like three months in or something. We were both thinking, no, we need to do this full-time like we can't go back to normal life, kind of thing. But I mean we had to, but our mindset did shift after a few months in. Yeah. So mazing what were your jobs before the trip where we doing so I was working on? Office as real estate paralegal like a legal assistant to lawyers, and I was making bags in a plus their packaging factory. Go to horrible jobs for the environment. I worked on the oil rigs for a little over a year to pay off some debt, and then I started working at this, plastic packaging factory. So. Not very eco friendly at all those two jobs, but they allowed us to save up money. Yeah. So how many years were you working on the oil rakes? So I did a little over a year on the oil rigs and then I think I was with the plastic packaging company like oppressed operator. So I was print running a printing press, and I did that for about seven years. Late night. And that's our both pretty physical jobs. Right. Yeah. And the printing press, one like Nick was doing graveyard shifts as well. So there's a whole period but we like didn't see each other sometimes like for a week or so. So, yeah, it was difficult work for sure. When I started getting into the whole online world, I had a really hard time going and sitting in front of the computer for long periods of time. Like I just hadn't done it before. Did you struggle with that at all? Like even if you didn't miss your job, working at the printing press, or whatever, was that a hard adjustment for you. Yes, I think it's kind of hard to not have the automatic fitness that you get from, like a labor job, if you work in labor, you basically get your exercise by default. And then for me when we when I went to the blog, and I've found up on the computer for four hours a day. You start kind of blow out a little longer PA. We wrote a post voted, like called dealing with the struggles of blogger Bod or something like that. And it's like the fact that not only do you sit on a computer so you're not doing physical labor anymore. But you also get a lot of like sometimes, you know, when you build a blog, you get free travel. So you've got tourism boards and dine in you and you just eat the crazy. You're drinking like crazy in it, and they're sitting, and you're sitting all the time, other than the travel days when you're out explorer and stuff. But ends up being put a bit of sitting so. Yeah. I think it's something that we're working with still kind of the balance of I mean, I guess for me. I already worked at a computer. I sat at a computer all day. So it wasn't that big of an adjustment for me. But for NICU. Yeah. For you Therese like Boston out of the office, there and going on that first trip. I mean how far into the trip was it that you decided a just that's not going back. Like, was there kind of a flip that switched in your head where you just kind of said, hey, this isn't happening anymore. Like, we gotta make something happen that so I can get out of this. Definitely. I mean like the thing is too. We had good jobs, right? They were bad jobs. But you're sitting in an office fluorescent lighting one time. I didn't have a window, and I worked there for three years. And it's just kind of like you get off work in Canada, in the winter, and it's dark by four PM. So you're you go to work, dark. You get off work at star is just like pretty depressing. Actually, if you think about it, so when we were in probably that was Thailand, or somewhere. But we were both just loving the beach life and the fresh air and the nature. And we were just thinking there's no way that I was thinking I can't go back to the office. Absolutely not. So yeah, yeah. I got a breakthrough that cubicle. But the money ran out like ooh. Have to go back then worked for another year to save up money. But that was the last time because during that year we were like, okay we had a goal save up this money enough for year again, traveler year and a half or two years, whatever it was, and then we're going to find ways on the road to make money. So we knew we had kind of an exit strategy, even though we had no idea what we're doing. And we just knew knew we had to make it work. Dickey mentions this first trip kind of being the first big one that we're still talking about here, the thirteen month extravaganza, if he will kind of being like almost that was like beyond our wildest dreams. The first time we did that. I mean is that kind of travel something that you guys ever did growing up or what were you raised on where your parents working sort of traditional jobs or how did you guys grow up in terms of how release to travel? Yeah. I think it was just like typical kind of candidates over went camping on the weekends and the summer and fishing and stuff. But I had never done any trips with my family. Yeah. You'd never left Canada. And right. I just been to the states that I was three one trip. And that was an me, too. When I was like seven or something one time. But with our families, and like all of my friends, families, it was like we're small town Canada yet. And there wasn't a lot of traveling like I didn't know very, many people or anyone actually my circle of friends that had done traveling with their family, even abroad, you know, and definitely by the time we got to the graduating high school. It wasn't really common for any of my friends, I don't know, one person who did a gap here. The reason I was a couple of people and they'll yeah, one person. But that's it like everybody in Calgary in BC that we lived in so yeah, we definitely didn't grow up with travel with our families. But then, like you meet all these people traveling from Europe. And we say, oh, did you do travel when you're with your family in its own? No. We didn't do any traveling. We just went to this country this country this country and they don't consider it traveling. Because all these countries in Europe are all like next door to each other. But I'm like, what are you talking about? Like that's ten countries while Europeans have been to like twenty countries. Yeah. Time to fifteen like we've only been in one province of Canada's, massive rate, and so is the state so to get anywhere it takes a while. How did you guys push past this whole thing being just an idea and actually making it happen. Was it like the excitement of being together making the decision together and kind of having that accountability with each other? Or did you have did you seek out some other circle of friends that kind of did this? How did you guys manage that back then? Yes. So we had like, no circle of friends is to turn to when we had friends. Hi friends right losers. Travel friends, so we did actually was a ton of research on, like online with lonely planet, and we got into a TV show called departures. There's a plug departures everybody great shows Canadian watch it. If you haven't seen it before such a good show. So it's a series about these guys who took off for a year like they left their jobs behind on. There were just kind of sick of the regular routine the nine to five and stuff. No went to see the world. So we got into watching that episode every week and it really inspired say, like we kind of had the idea. But then that gave us the push, I would say definitely gonna just backpackers guys doing basically exactly what we wanted to do. So between them inspiring us, and then reading a boat, actual budgets and stuff from online. Other blogs in out of save money, all that stuff. Yeah, it just became kind of an obsession. We like we're going to save this money. We're gonna go. Yeah. Yeah, me were so early in the relationship relatively speaking. Years ago, and it sounds like obviously the, the trip solidified that you guys are still together. So. What traveling is a couple is a different thing. And I do kinda wanna get some tips on that since we're on the subject, and then I kinda wanna get back to the, the chronology of your story. But what, what are some of the things that you've learned along the way? Traveling as a couple that could be some advice that you would give to others. Whether it's a couple or maybe close friends, you know, there's always going to be compromises when there's somebody else involved. So what does mean things you guys learned? How do you guys manage that? Yes, question. Definitely. Compromising is an important thing. Something is, you know how would you're at home. You have your usually your work shift. You were like nine to five or whatever, and then you see each other after work. So that's a lot of time apart during the day. So I think it can be a difficult challenge to see each other twenty four seven, which is something that, like people are used to is not normal. So it can be important to start having that time to yourself. Like if you starting to, you know, get bitchy with each other, or you're fighting a bit, or you just want that space just be like, well, I'm gonna go for a walk here, or like dick go scuba diving or I'm gonna go check out the spa, or do whatever you want to go read my book and just have that kind of like away time. I mean that was our thing. Maybe at first, I don't know. Now it's just so natural for us. It feels normal. I'm trying to think of when we first started when we first started, we were like. Yeah, but no, it just takes time to kind of get used to the scenario because it's so foreign to most people to always be together with. Anybody else like significant other friend, twenty four hours a day, seven days a week. So, yeah, I think one of the biggest things would be compromise and not being too stuck in your ways, if you if there's something that the other person wants to do you can't talk about, okay what we could head over to see that town. Yeah, you're interested in snorkeling, we'll go do that even I'm not that into it. I can sit on the boat or just kind of Yang, you know, like you, Don anything, and then that you wanna do in the we do one thing, I wanna do and then something else to, to keep the romance alive like to still make date nights or still make special moments because you can kind of forget that some tough times, like plan a picnic or do, like romantic dinner on the beach, or does something special. It's different from everyday travel. You know, it's something I do, I've never actually talked about this such a small thing. I did it the other day because we went to a concert. So when we're getting ready to go of stupid, but it does something works. So I leave the apartment and then I'll just walk out right outside the front. Door and then I turn around and I knock on the front door. And then my wife opens the door and it's like we're going on a date, you know anymore. You know what? It sounds silly. But there's a weird thing. You know, even though I just saw three seconds ago and I know she's wearing and all that. But then I have, you know, there's some fake bands or like, oh, hey, you know, you look so nice. I was your day. It's definitely gonna do that. Out, Nick, you know, and then sometimes you have bus through and be like, wait a minute and a glass of water before leave. Don't know. Yeah. But, but no. I mean, also will you guys work together too. So that's a I mean, that's another huge layer me can't just say, well travelled together so you work together, also because the work thing together is totally different animal breeding business together. So when did that start? So twenty twelve we decided we started the blog in June. I believe twenty twelve June or July and but at first, it wasn't really a business that we're running together just a travel blog. We were tired of it was one of those things where I was like, I'm not going home. What are you gonna do to fix it? Basically, I was like we have to do something. So we just started this thing. And we thought we'd heard of a blogger shadow to Johnny ward, one step forward ways. We had read one of his blog posts, and he said that he was making, I don't know, twenty five hundred bucks a month or something like that. We had read that post from an internet cafe in India and debris, spread it first and she says, knit community command. Check this out this blogger this travel bloggers, just like writing about his travels taking photos and he's making money from it, and at that time, I mean, we were travelling in India on thirty dollars a day. So if you do the math on that, that's a lot of money, we could save or we could travel longer on twenty five hundred a month that he said, yes. So we thought it was like. Amazing. So couple months later, we found the time to start the blog. But at first, of course, we didn't know how to do any of this stuff. There's not there was not much information online that we have these days. So we were just kind of plugging at it, and just writing blog posts that we're kind of our dire. Yeah. They were basically a diary like we used to have a free blog. You know, those free online one's called lake blog spot, or whatever. Yeah. Yeah. Yes. If you're like writing for a family. So we just basically wrote for families, but on this website, we created we topping and pace was like, you know, not what you do really. But that's what we did back then. So, yeah, that's when it started was twenty twelve but then, like Nixon, we just basically created it and wrote, a diary, and then it took about a year to start making a little bit of money and probably a year and a half in is when we were, like, okay, maybe we can turn this into a business. We can. Yeah. You know, start working on this a little harder and take it a little bit more seriously. Yes. We've been a business couple properly working. I would say since what like when did it start? So maybe fifteen fourteen two thousand fourteen probably was like five years. Yeah, yeah. I guess you never know exactly what you're getting into, of course when he started this as you guys know. Sounds like such a fun way to kind of get started, like, hey, we're writing for our family. And like, yeah, you got that momentum but almost like a very organic way. I mean, I remember there was not much information out there at all. Have you guys? Always enjoyed writing is that something you like to do, or is that something you grew into as a necessary. Component of what you do. I think I kinda grew into it like I used to diary in stuff when I was younger, and then I knew a lot about, like typing because I worked in law firm and stuff, but I wasn't a writer writer by any means. But like Nick Cueva rating, Nick secretive one Hayes like the artist he, he does all this stuff you musically inclined and whatever. So I think you're a good writer, creative, I liked creative writing when I was in, like high school. Yeah, I liked writing. But I don't think a lot of those skill some of the skills translate into blogging. But in creative writing your writing a novel type. Story. So it's good. If you're a blogger till like to have an understanding of the language, you're writing in and to be able to articulate your stories and your your words. But when you get into blogging, you're also doing something different, which is really trying to help the reader as much as possible. And by doing that you're often cutting out all that flowery language that creative writer would be proud to put on a page. So it's kind of just talking to them like they're you know, the person not doing the fly. I'm just trying to help them. Get from twenty two point in one way, shape, or form. So yet, but tend to your question in a really long way. Yeah, I was already into it a bit. I liked writing and I like photography, but I wasn't very good and Dury's instill. Good writer, but just never was into inasmuch. Yes. Yes. But then I definitely love it now. So I guess it's one of those things like the other aspect too, as you start to learn different skills through blogging that you didn't know you had maybe or you actually learn them like you have to learn how to do certain things. Yeah. Exactly. Yeah. A total side note question, Nick do you play any musical? Instruments. Wouldn't Theresa was musically inclined. I can play very basic piano. I think I know. Nick used to be a rapper destroying that. No way. All right. Well, it's been nice doing the sod cast with two juice. I'll talk later. But hey man, don't don't even go there because guess who else used to be a rapper? The host of this podcast page. Yes, I was in a rap band in high school. So jason. I mean, you know, maybe we'll have to drop Hake do maybe we got a drop a drop a single out there. You know, do something on nomad life, or something, right? Something that no one will hear. Maybe I'll I hung up my. We can put it on the podcast. Maybe a few people will hear it. Maybe. What was your MC name? That's what I want to image. Nice nice emcee in front just image. Now just image. Okay. That's cool. That's dope. That's does. Mine was while I had I had a few interational, I think, in ninth grade, I got into this whole idea why started writing raps. And then I was. Was that? What was I then I think it was. I tick tock or was that somebody else. I don't know. I was chased. Mc chase one point. And then I became the jester or you drop the c. Yeah. Why just went to the jester. I didn't I didn't do the MC thing. Yeah older. That was like early nineties. I think there was all MC and then it just became rap names. Yeah. Yeah. Just total. Yeah, I miss this really learning a lot about each other here. But you know what? That's, that's tough. So fun. I look back at suffer so fun like just to be able to I still see value in that now. Even in what I'm doing now. Just I'm still, I still love audio, you know, and just knowing hey, you create something, and make it and it's cool and like having done that before, and I mean, we're all creative, I think in different ways. So I mean one of the aspects that I love about this work is the creativity. It sounds like the creativity is, is a part of it that you guys really enjoy as well. I mean, how do you balance the, the joys of that part of the work with sort of the nitty gritty stuff that you don't like so much? And what, what are those aspects of travel blogging that you kind of? Don't love. Let's think I we just had to do it all ourselves. It was nitty gritty and we didn't like it. We still have you still have to do it just kind of. Yeah. Just do it. Yeah. I think now like there's some sort of a basic tasks and stuff that we hire out to get people to do, and then we can focus on doing quitting videos. Now quite a bit more things that we can actually be in ourselves at put our face more on the website. And like the other things like braiding SEO content, there's certain posts I love to write about if we haven't if we haven't if we're not experts on a topic. We don't want to ride it right. So we'll get somebody to write it. And then we one thing that's kinda tedious is going back over other people's work. Like even if we have an editor who goes over their stuff, then we go over it afterwards can be tedious to make sure like keywords are now in place in everything set up properly, the way we like it. So that can be slow going on the nicer to board and I go into the kitchen and I'm like can hungry or like we'll go for swim. So, yeah, but you do have to sometimes make yourself, do the things that you don't want so that you can get those out of the way in the move onto something else that you enjoy doing on on the with the business. Yeah. My, what my I don't know what your I'll ask you after actually some interested. But my favorite part of the logging that we're doing now is kind of the marketing speaking to people and not just trying to get them to buy something. But it literally like Email marketing to me is, like forming relationships with different people, and, you know, when you're writing a blog post or a page on your site, even if it's a sales page, you're kind of forming that relationship. I love that part. And I love the actual design of those pages. See the creativeness that's I love that stuff. I let communicate with people yet the design. What's your what's your statement? This chatting with you guys getting today, yet other people that are into travel into sort of not having the traditional thing, in and just open minded, and I think travel blogging or whatever you want to call the travel industry, and, like the part of it, that Warren, I guess, just two tracks a certain kind of person that I really enjoy being around and having conversations with really is what it comes down to it. So when it comes to that aspect of the work now, one thing, I, I don't do it in the way that you guys do it. I don't go somewhere and then try to cover it as a destination or anything like that. And that's because I actually don't like to do that because I've just not so detail oriented that way where I wanna track like everything, I spent and talk about all the places I've been on and I'm not saying that you guys do that or not. Everybody does their destination coverage different. But it's just like a personal thing for me. I just don't. Love it. But then when I went to Nepal and I went trekking, and I did an audio I captured a lot of audio on the track. And shared it that way. I loved that. I just got way into it. I just did it for fun because. Yeah because it was like I could just have conversations with people. So I just tend to gravitate towards the conversational stuff because writings part for me, I'm not talented like you guys. Yeah. That you found it because you you're so good on this podcast. And then also with paradise park is well that was perfect that the video we did with you. What was it the live stream event that we did? That's part of the reason we're doing more video on our side now. And trying to be like, you know, have us communicating with people that way because you guys it's such a wicked job yet. It's fun vice for some inspired by the writing that you guys do on, on your site goes on the road dot com, and I actually really want to focus more on kind of creating some stuff and writing so it's cool. So you guys have inspired, inspired me in that way. So thank you for that. All right. So just kind of get back here to the time line because I'm still curious because we left out of chunky years here from when you started the blog. And I know we started getting to the blogging thing, and I want to pick up on a few things I want to get some more blogging travel, blogging type tips on that online business and, and kind of earning money while you go. And I know you have lots. Say on that. And I think some of that's gonna come into play here. When we talk about this section of your lives coming from, like a slash oh nine or whatever to, to when you started the blog, what were you guys doing to stay on the road and earn money then? Okay. So we went back to Canada for that year that we had run out of money after that first trip and we spent two thousand nine. So it doesn't intend we spent in Canada. And then we left February two thousand eleven and we haven't lived in Canada since that date. And what we did was we saved a bunch of money during that year that we were in Canada, for with the idea that we were not going to go back. We were going to travel for a long time. And then figure out ways to make money during that time that we were travelling so ended up doing sixteen months of backpacking, and it was like Africa Asia, Middle East Europe, sort of all over, and then the money started to dwindle, and we hadn't quite figured out. Nick money, yet, customization because an issue, we're having too much fun. So then I had sort of meltdown on the beach, and I'm leg go to Canada. Can't do it again. And Nick, what are we gonna do one of those stories? And we heard a lot about teaching English in China hailing from other backpackers on that trip. And so we thought let's go to China and see if we can find a job. So that's what we did basically from that place that we were in. Thailand, that was on the beach of Copenhagen. I think so. Yeah. And so d reset her meltdown. And then we shortly after that we flew to Beijing, and we started traveling around China, and we ended up spending a month there, but the whole time we were there for the first seven or eight days, we had it all resumes, and. Resumes. But like we saw ads on walls and bathrooms at hostels in, you know, cafes for, you know, whatever it was like, we teach his throne chairs needed as happens in China, like English teachers needed English teachers needed. So we started emailing are resumes out to those ads and after about a week or ten days of doing that we started getting calls back and luckily, we landed a job with a really good school in China, and we were able to basically start teaching and start making money, even I couldn't believe it was like we actually have really response within that first week. And then we ended up living in young Joe China, which was about two hours from Shanghai rage to three hours. Yeah. So we lived there for year, teaching students, am I kids. They were kindergarten mostly and the Nick had kinda like junior high, and we had no prior experience. Really, we, we did volunteering in Myanmar. We had met some time when these people that were traveling there as well, and they'd come back every year. And they were teaching kids in this little tiny village in the north. Of Myanmar, and we happen to meet them at, like a restaurant. And they said, hey, come with us in volunteer. So we spent a week volunteering teaching English in, like a in a field in a village. And I was the only experience. We had. And but they didn't really need it at that time in China. You know they, they paid for teff unique tesla certification in order to get the visa. So when we got there, they paid for our training for Tefoto wounded gave us a bunch of training like in person, and we were able to start jam English. Yeah. That was amazing that lasted a year. So this meltdown was pretty bad meat sounds like it was a pretty major thing. Like you guys both remember as. A turning point that sent. Yeah, it was typical. Yeah. Yeah, you have to have those moments sometimes right? I was like, you know, are we just going to go back and do this all again living Canada for another year and try to save for another year? And you who knows you might end up getting stuck there or something we might not go back again, when you guys were going to try, and you kind of have this loose plan to teach English or whatever did you have any doubts like that. That might not work out. Or were you getting confident at that point? We're, hey, we can keep this going like this is going to we're going to make this happen. No matter what, like, what was your mindset then? Yeah. Basically, it had to work to work. We were a little worried because we don't have university degrees and a lot of the schools in China. And actually, now, I believe the government. Enforces, it more strictly. But they needed. They wanted university degrees, which we didn't have. And so we were worried about that. But we thought you know what? Like go there handled resumes. We'll do the training. We'll try to get a job and university degree doesn't have to be an English or in teaching so it's really a relevant to the quality of teacher that you can hire. So we felt like we could be good. Teachers. We already did that volunteering, and yeah, that was the only hurdle that we were worried about. But we knew we had to make it work. Yeah. This is kind of every step that we had done everything since saving money, we just sort of had these goals, and we just, you know, what's meant to be, we'll be attitude and we just went for it. I think it's really empowering story because a man, no, they're Ben travelers in that situation where you kind of want to keep going. But. If the pullback of, maybe what society, dictates you're going to do or you think you should do or parents or friends or the pressures come from different places, and people with, with each individual, but there is something to just kind of saying, hey, we have to make this work and going until you make it work, right? And it's just nice when you hear that it like in that case that was you guys. And it did it, it works. So it's just empowering. I think too, I just wanted to highlight a bit of that because I think that's encouraging for somebody listening that might want to keep their travels going. And hey, don't give up. There's a lot of ways to do it. You guys have lived this sort of Swiss army knife of making travel a lifestyle because you've done the working overseas thing. You've gone back to save up money to travel you've done that thing you've now have your own businesses. I mean, what are some of the other thing how sitting I think you guys have done a bunch of house sitting. Right. And. Well, what if somebody other things you've done the save money in sustain long-term travel lifestyle? We didn't a little bit more volunteering besides that we did bartending, but just so that we can have like a drink drink. I think you just nailed the main things though, like it was like before we had our web when we started our blog as well. What we did with some freelance writing. So I guess that's kind of a different part of the Swiss army knife. But mostly it was teaching English house sitting the whole saving money for travel, and then the blogging aspect to those are the four main for sure. I guess when it comes to sustaining long-term travel how, how things changed from when you guys started to how it is now. I mean back in I'm manly. Remember when Airbnb started, you know, a lot of things have changed in travel. So I'm just wondering how how you guys have evolved with some of the things that have changed in travel like your travel style. Yeah. It's made it a lot easier. All come up, that's for sure. Like even when we first started traveling there wasn't even Tripadvisor was there. I think there was. But we wasn't populate. You didn't know about it here about it. There was no smartphones actually. So we, you know. No smartphones. You know, you're older net cafes and all that. Yeah, exactly. But now it's changed for us in the sense that we can pick where we wanna stay temporarily will moving around a lot easier because you, you can find a place on Airbnb. Like you said that's got high ratings. You can see the floors. It looks beautiful. It's not like you're just showing up on a bus. Like when you're backpacking in two thousand eight and you show up and you look around for a hostile or guest hosts now now they're so easy. You know, you can find a good reviewed place so that parts of of it's better one does not better as the smartphone thing for it used to be in. We're gonna sound all old nostalgic. But it used to be in hostels, everyone would sit around talking which other playing games and it's sad now to see just ten years later, that people instead have their heads down rather than up looking each other, which is what it was all about. And that's a big part of the reason we stopped staying in hostels now, we do more Airbnb and stay in a nice apartment, we used to do them just for the vibe yet. But now the vibe is changing a bit in. It's a bit quieter. So I mean there's nothing wrong with hostile still, there's still fun. But they just lost that communal. Live in a way in some places. Yeah. And I'm egos have been on the road long enough where obviously, this is not your aunt, just traveling. This is your life. You just live out road. And you've been living on the road now for. Kaid right. Queued. I guess, debt cabinet. That's so true though. Hey, like you're not gonna stay in hostels forever when you're living the lifestyle when you're traveling, it's different, but yeah, like Fresno now we're apartments or sort of boutique hotel, or an eco lodge, or something cool like a unique space or the house that we're in right now. Where are you right now? We're in Grenada in the Caribbean. Okay. Cool. Yeah. You're still where Yan last time we kind of. Yeah, we're kind of basing here in the traveling from here for a while. Tell me about the base is it? Did you buy a place where you're renting it? Do you have a lease a month, a month thing like how committed are you guys to this place? Yeah. It's kinda month-to-month. Yeah, we're we, we did buy car renting the place. We know we knew the people that own it, and they they're never here. So we have it fulltime yet. And yes, which just renting it really nice little place. It's like a house. Right. On the sea, with a dock so I can go down the dock and go meeting. It's going to fool. It must be great fun to be in a spot that you love. Yeah. Yeah. Exactly. You can kind of have some things that you couldn't have things before, like we still aren't all about possessions, because we got lost that when we started traveling realized, there's more important things, but it is nice to have, like I now have some necklaces. You know. Right. Right. Have more than one necklace. Yeah. Exactly. So just a couple little things is nice to have well on that note, I because I was reading the post that you guys put up. I mean I don't know any put it up, but it was all about. We talked about before how you save money for your first trip and some of the things you cut out and that you sold your take your condo and Calgary threes. Right. And I know it was a while ago. But now and you've been traveling for so long, but I mean, one of the things that I think I took with me for the rest of my life from traveling for so long early on was the minimalism. And that's impacted my life in a way that I couldn't really have predicted when I didn't really associate minimalism with travel. I just thought I was traveling. And, you know, there were all these sort of, in Cillari benefits to traveling. Right. How has other aspects of travel change your life will minimalism was a huge one for sure with the travel aspect. How else the question was how? Has trouble impacted our lives? Yeah. Oh man. Yeovil in so many ways. I mean we when we were in Canada, we had a house, and we had a car that we, you know, we owned a house, and it was work had such a big part of our life. And we didn't get to meet a lot of new people or learn a bunch anything about new culture, so travel and shifted our mindset to the in the way that the most important thing to us is kind of meeting meeting people and learning about different ways of life around the world, and experiences and experiences are so much more important than house or counter than the TV. I think also like yearly things on the news and the media vote various places around the world. And you're almost like terrified to go and visit them. But then once you're there, because we've been to quite a few these places you start to realize that they're not that dangerous and people are just people all around the world. And they just want to have community and to be healthy and have their families and. Yeah. I think we've been shown that actually quite a bit because we would have believed that news when we lived in Canada. Most Canadians are many Canadians. We would have been watching the news and be like, oh, must be so dangerous in Iran. And that's when in reality, both hospitable, friendly Wilson is way safest places because there's very little petty crime, no gun crime. Yes, yes, there's been a couple of incidences, but they're so far between. But the media makes it seem like it happens every day. Yeah. Yeah. Like it's basically travel is life. Altering life changing. Sounds cliche. But it completely is absolutely what is the what is the visa situation where you guys are right now? So for Canadians, we get ninety days and then we have to extend or go and come back that's for tourist visa. So you can stand up to a year like you extend for three months until you've been here for a year, and then you're supposed to leave and come back, but you can leave for like an hour on a flight. And then come in your. Yeah. That's the other thing too. I guess about choosing places to stay when it's like temporary or whatever is you have to watch the visa situation. Does it feel temporary for you guys now? Or is it feel like this could be home for a little like for like, yeah? Like definitely for a while, and I'm happy to travel from here. And there's also still a ton of stuff that we haven't seen on the island, and now we have friends here, and it's, it's been nice to have a community for sure. But we we never say forever like we've never said forever. Have we except for, you know, we're gonna be together forever. But it's you know, it's you never know what can happen. What do you guys do to get plugged into either a community like situation you are in now or just to connect with locals in a place? Do you have any things that you kind of do that have been great for you? Well, actually one single year. That's how we met a lot of our good Grenadian friends is hashing. They have here. It's to have it all around the world. I think it started in Malaysia in the seventies or even before then but it's basically a walk or hike or run. And they Plotto to path for you, and you just go on this, walk so here in Grenada. It's really popular and there's probably like, one hundred people going and to call out at my hopefuls hashing, like hash house harriers is the full name, and they're all around the world. Like I've seen it in Mexico in Asia in the states and Canada yet. So it's a good way to meet locals because they're out the have a good time. Get some exercise and defining thing is. I don't know if it's like this in every country, but here in Grenada their motto is drinkers with a running problem. So, so there's always beer at the end like it starts and ends at a little bar. Yeah. To call him rump, shacks here, just like a little nothing bar, and then you have some beers and hang out and meet people. So it's a good way to meet people. I also check like on face. Book you can see different events going on, you know, like in the city or the place that you're visiting, so you just like type in the search bar like goo Bali and ex pats or Chengdu, Bali festival events and stuff like that. And then you just go and see whoever shows up and maybe you can meet people that way. That's cool as that's great vitamin have to check that out. I wonder if they do anything here in Norway off, to, to see I think it's probably do they have it all of it states to other places in Europe. Yeah. Yeah. It's cool. All right. I'm going back to your work now. And the blog I wanted to hear a little bit more about how that evolved me said, you started telling stories to your family you were copying pacing into the blog. I mean at some point it morphed into what it is today, which is giant resource to help people make travel a lifestyle. But of course, that doesn't happen overnight, and the what are some of the I guess, tips or strategies are just general vice you would give to somebody who is considering, hey, maybe I'll document my travel and travels and share it. And maybe I could travel and also right about travel and earn money from travel and that could be my dream, and you guys have my dream job. How do I do that? What kind of vice do you give those? I think the main thing was, when we switched our mindset from just writing those diaries, like we said to, I mean, the blood still has personality. So it has some diary. Yeah met. But mostly now it's switched over time to how can we help people solve a problem when I think that the most successful blogs and websites online have a lot of pages imposed on them that actually helped people answer a question or resolve a problem that they have in life or travel? So a problem can be, how do I get from? Mexico to Guatemala by bus that's one and you can answer or it can be. How do I quit my job? And traveling ours is or how can I travel more eco friendly? Or if you're not if you're not even writing a travel blog it can be something, you know, how do I lose weight? Whatever anything that can be. But kind of decide that it's good to have your own personality on there. But also to be focusing on how to help people as much as possible. And then when you start doing that. You see that, like people search questions and Google. Right. So if you're answering those questions, you're going to get more traffic from Google, and that was the shift for us. We just kinda realized any like, we write a big long guide on how to travel Thailand on a budget. We're going to get more people to the site. That's our most popular post. It's long and a lot of questions. So we started doing that more often. Yeah. You definitely have to have the reader in mind for sure. I mean what are some of the other trends that you've noticed lately, because it's changed a lot. What's kind of changed where do you see the future of travel blogging going? Well, since we started a big thing is actually destination marketing, like the whole thing, where you're invited by tourism boards of various destinations to promote like the city in the country, the province, whatever it is. You see a lot of that brands and companies utilizing bloggers now to do some marketing. That's huge. Yeah. That's, that's getting bigger and bigger. I think as well these, these like different countries. Different cities are starting to have more budget who because they started to realize that if the higher the right bloggers, they vet them properly, and they bring them to the destination. They can get a lot of exposure, where we would just talking to one, provincial. Tourism board candidate said there are making a lot of money per dollar, like twenty dollars per dollar spent on marketing and a lot of the loggers with bloggers. Yeah, a lot of their marketing effort was with bloggers, and there are seeing huge ROI, so I think, more and more of these tourism boards that are doing proper vetting are finding that. Hey, like this is a good place to put our marketing budget, and therefore, trauma bloggers have more on virginity space. Yeah. Do you ever get burnt out on it? Like, do you ever feel like this is I'm tired, I kind of missed the old days where we could just travel. Hang out. Like that's actually such a good. Okay. So that's kind of what our Ecuador impro- trip was that we just did. 'cause we were like, you know, we do a lot of travel and work at the same time, like simultaneously doing both. So you have to stay places longer so that you have the time to work and see the place, and then you're like you're the guy that's in the cafe on his computer on her computer. You're not like just enjoying it. You know. So we both wanted to kick it old school, just go traveling. So that's what we just did the past two and a half months. And it was great. And we, we haven't really we haven't got fully burnt ho. No. We, we're pretty careful not to spend more than three or four hours, a day, five days a week on the computer. Like we peel ourselves away to make sure we're not spending too much time on pewter still enjoying or life, whatever it is. But we do get to that point like the recent where we felt like we needed to have a holiday where we just went back to traveling. Yeah. I don't wanna be working and travel, I just want to travel. Yeah. Yeah. I mean, it was it hard to get out of the, the mindset of. Oh, hey, we should be writing this down. Like this is a place. We should be, you know, because you can kind of get into that. When travel is your work. It's it's a habit. Right. Yeah. I don't know. We somehow quite easily. That's great. Did you even bring computers? Did you leave them? We did bring them but did answer emails like once a week and arrested social sharing. We left like the drone here at home and our camera here we just bought like iphones for photos, and that was it. Yeah. Yeah. And I think the hardest part actually was not not working, it was coming back to work life. You know, we have to be on the computer and we, it was hard to get back in that group. Because when we last year in this just released SEO course, and we were like working every day, like really had projects going. And then we had scheduled and ready to ourselves for this trip. So when we left, we didn't have to do anything that meant when we come back, we didn't have any projects ongoing, and we were kind of like what do we do have to like it was this lull back into work? But good for you guys. I mean, you must feel super fresh to just have a dabbing how long had it been since you had just a pure travel experience like oh since twenty sixteen. Yeah. But we did video. So we did a trip to Colombia in two thousand sixteen once again, and we did a mon- Colombia, where we didn't work on the computer so much. But at that point, we were still doing video for you. So I think it was I don't know. I don't even know since we started like. Yeah, because we were always kind of working and traveling in Tennessee. Right. So, yeah, it was nice to have this as an actual trip to long. Would you say? Yeah. No, that's a mind, working and traveling as well. That's the other thing, it's, it's look it's a luxury to have. Exactly. Sure, so. Yeah. We just we was nice. But when you come out from the perspective of gratitude, it's like, oh, this is amazing. But I'm sure sometime. Yes. Also, it's like any job and it can be a struggle. I'm sure sometimes. How do you manage the, the line between like staying in the moment enough to understand the moment and be present with it, but then also knowing that you're going to be maybe writing about this later or somehow incorporating it in your work. Or maybe you have to do some video stuff, and it's like, oh, one should I take, you know, shy take video? Now, I'm talking to this local this'll be a cold shot, or should I just like stay in this conversation? Do you know what I'm saying? Oh, yeah. We know that how well for us. That is video for us. The way we did our YouTube channel before was one video every week while we were traveling like you said, interviewing like you know, having locals on trying to stop the situation so we can get the perfect shot. Yeah. Like if we were out doing a coaching classes, like don't make that Ed yet. Let us get this video of it, and that we really started to realize was taking away my travels at the same. Also at the same time, our blog was shifting towards helping people find different jobs. So we were already researching interviewing people who are doing different travel jobs, to, to have blog post about that on our site. So we didn't have to document as much are like with the video of travels. So when we started to notice that it was really taking away from our and how we created to because if you start getting frustrated with having to record every moment, and you feel like it's taking away from the experience that kind of shows, self on the video as it comes across the to cross. So we basically at that point decided to sell drone and sell our gamble men, go much more basic with our video, because it just got to the point that it was too much to handle to make it natural. Yeah. And then now we have a drone. But now we just use it for fun, kind of, like, when you want to get like a cool shot or whatever, but in terms of documenting, I would have a little note pad or I would just put some notes on my iphone, but really, we're really focused on, now making sure that we're actually enjoying. Because that's the whole point of this lifestyle, enjoying the moment being present. A later, probably in better, you know, with a better attitude if we read about Elaine, actually. Yeah, you soaked it all up. So you actually probably could write about it better. So that's kind of the whole thing with Ecuador improve like I am writing about it now. And I didn't really even take notes, but yet and finding it easy to write about because I was present in the moment, did you get to that point because you have some kind of existential crisis around it. Like did you guys have a conversation about it? Or did it just kind of organically? It's we just like really, there was a few points when we were traveling one was literally, a cooking class, we were trying to film, this cooking class, and those with other people in it, and we'd be like, wait. Oh, can you hold on? Just don't cut that yet. I gotta get it. He'd like, you know, Nick coaches down to angle and like, what are we doing? This is actually in Barrasso, because people are also trying to enjoy this cooking class, working with the company in that case. But still, it felt like we were hindering not only our experience, but everybody else's around us, and we had so much camera equipment. And I remember a couple of times. When trying to get a shot and like the drone battery died, and then to gamble battery dies simultaneously, and then something's wrong with the gopro at glitches out, and we just get so frustrated. Sometimes I couldn't spot the drones. So, like, Nick, it's all frustrated at me. And this is like, oh, God. Cummings fights ensue. This is not worth. It really for us. The writing part is easy in the photography to an extent is easy. But the video was really ten or so. And now we've changed, our style of video for something that is more us more relaxed. And is not as stressful does not like the drone clips, and this and that. And a weekly thing it's just chatting to the camera, mostly and a few travel clips. So it's, it's different now and it's better. That's great. I mean it's great that you guys also are able to talk about those things are maybe argue about the place and talk about them later. I don't know. It's something that I think is hugely important for you, as an individual with your work or not. You, you guys specifically. But anybody that's doing this type of thing. It's it does change the travel experience. Right. So just being aware of that and understanding how to manage, I mean, I think this is one of the cool things about what you guys, do, what you get to do when you run your website or businesses that you, if you don't like the way you're doing something you can just change it, right. All right. We're just going to do like more relax videos, and this is going to be more awesome. Who we are? Now, you know. Yeah. And I think for other people who are listening to. It's important that, that's why your blog should be something you're passionate about and it should be centered around things are going to be interested in anyways, so you're not forcing yourself into situations that you don't like and you're not going to have a good time end. So if you're blogging about I don't know. Thanks. What does your blog you want adventure? And then you always have to be like jumping off of a building or something to make to make your readers follow. Maybe then if that's not working for you anymore. You get a little older. You don't wanna do bungee jumping, everywhere you go, then you have to kind of let your blog evolve with you. Yes. And, and not being afraid to let your readers know that this is who I am. And I'm part of this blog so yeah. I'm sure even acid a million times. But where did the goats thing come from? So that first trip that we did through southeast Asia, and India, there was goats like all over the road everywhere, and they're still are, like, in Grenada here, too everywhere. But we started calling each other goaty as well and like a pet name cut thing, and then we were like, well, there's goats on the road and we're on the road. And so go on the road, still meeting, a lot of thoughts very deep. I love it, though. It's catchy. You know, this is, it's one of those things that, like, at least it's memorable. Even if you don't know the name, you can just Google like goat travel, or something, you know, we'll come up. That's awesome. Well. Thank you guys. I know the power the power come on yet. I don't know if that. Dalley or sign. Your audio probably went got worse. Because now we're on my iphone. Yeah. Sorry about that. No, no. That's all good. I really appreciate the time that you guys gave us today. And of course, the website goats on the road dot com. And do you guys want to share anything else? You've got some. Of course, they're in different things. If you just want to let people know where they can find you. Sure. Yes. Sure, yeah. Go dot com is our site in it's all about. Like Trump's said, try to find different ways to make money on the road. So Jason said nice pack. Are we talking to you? How to make money on the road in different jobs. You can do and we also because our favorite job that we've found is travel blogging. We also have our own course that we do for new people who are starting with WordPress. And we show them how to start a brand new blog, and then how to start building it up and how to write posts that. Can you know get traffic like we were talking about today, and how to build a personal brand and the courses free. When you started up through our link, and then we also have more courses to help you grow and evolve, like our SEO course to help you learn how to get more traffic from Google. So that's, that's our favorite things about the website right now. Yeah. And then, of course if all of our articles about different jobs, you can do around the world. And we also have an e book, if anybody wants to come grab that one hundred one travel jobs, you can do abroad, also free also awesome guys. Well, I mean we both love helping people travel and I love to talk to you guys today, and I'm glad we finally got to chat with you. Yes, it was so fun. I hope we get to do it over beer in person at some points. It sounds like shit. I'm going to have to get down to the crib. Though. I don't think so. I'm getting the sense that you don't love colder weather. Huge fan. We're away your Norway now. Yeah. For sure you're Norway, Norway, what I would love to go to Norway. All right. Well, hey, the destination boards are listening Norway, get them up here. Ready to hang out? No. Thank you, guys, so much. I really appreciate your time and keep doing what you're doing. I'm following along and love it. And you look forward to saying, touch, thanks so much. Jason. Thank you so much, guys. Yep. There you have it. My chat with the goat's. I wanna thank. Nick in degrees for stopping by this show, but they couldn't be any cooler. I love those two cannot wait to beat up with them in person somewhere. I know it's going to happen. It's got to happen because I just really love talking to them. If you guys listening to this. Thank you again. I love talking to you guys and you could probably your that in mind during our conversation had an absolute blast end to always love to hear a story, a real story around how somebody builds a life of travel or their life around travel, and like anything in life. There are always twists and turns and inevitably some things come to a head where you have to make big decisions. And these big moments these big decisions can define what the next path is. We can oftentimes maybe put too much weight into those too much pressure on them, but they will send you on some kind of new path, and this is life in a life of travel is no exception. Now even if you're just traveling whenever you can and your base somewhere like I am right now, that is my life, I still know I love to travel, and I wanna make it a part of my life. So I stay very aware of the fact that my highest value is personal freedom, and that means freedom to travel, that's a big part of that. And how I do that. I'll give you an example is I live in a two bedroom apartment with two kids, only about six hundred square foot apartment here in Oslo Norway, which is an expensive city. We could move into a bigger place. We could pay more in our mortgage and get in that loop. Maybe we will do that some day. I don't know. But right now, I know this is a place we can comfortably afford, and it's not going to restrict me from doing other things later on down the road. And my wife and I, we've talked about a lot of different may be trips in adventures and things we wanna do, and we don't feel hamstrung by our mortgage and our lifestyle here. So that's one personal example of how I've had to change my life around to continue to adapt to make travel a lifestyle, even though, again, base somewhere and I'm not traveling nomadic -ly, but even being based somewhere there has to be some adaptability in order to be sure that you can still keep those values that are your highest values at the top of the list, and staying aware them making sure you're living in a life, your life in a way to serve. Of your own highest values and it's not always easy. Trust me, some crying, kids, small -partment. Hey, we want more space man. I'm not gonna lie to you. But that's not what we can afford right now comfortably, and we value our freedom more than we value getting into a situation where we have to just work all the time. So we can afford a place. So these are decisions that you have to make an impact your daily life, for sure. But when you wanna turn travel into a lifestyle over the long term, there are a few key things you can do there. Many key things you can do, but I want to highlight three of them right now before I do that. I wanna say quick, thank you to Tortuga backpacks for supporting today's show. Yes, you can get ten percent off anything you order with the promo code travel, when you check out. And if you go to zero to travel dot com slash Tortuga. You're gonna find a page where I've curated, my favorite backpacks from Tortuga. I love to travel with the Tortuga out breaker, and. Obsessed right now with the Tortuga out, breaker, daypack and also been heavily using the Tortuga set out backpack. So this is all going to sound like a foreign language until you go check their stuff out, but there is a backpack for you that I guarantee we'll be perfect for not only your next trip, but many trips to come and also many things that you have going on at home. I use these backpacks all the time at home. This isn't the type of thing that just sits in your closet when your home and then you only use it when you're on the road. That's what my hiking backpacks, too, unless I'm going on a long hike or something. But these backpacks, I use all the time so they are in incredible investment, and you can get ten percent off with that promo code travel just for being zero to travel podcast listener zero to travel dot com slash Tortuga. You can't go wrong. You're going to love their stuff. And if you decide to purchase anything, thank you, because I'm going to fill it for them. You're also going to be supporting this show. And I really appreciate you. Supporting the podcast, thank you so much. Okay. Let me get into these three things. I just wanted to highlight when it comes to turning travel into a lifestyle over the long term. The first thing is what I just alluded to during that story. I was telling you about our small -partment here in Oslo, and that's just staying aware of your highest values for me. My highest value is personal freedom. I really value freedom in a way that I want to have freedom with my time, whether that spending time with my kids or being able to travel, or see family when I want to or friends, or whatever, I know, personal freedom, is my highest value. So when I look at decisions on things, I might want to spring into my life. It may be material possession, for example. A car. I don't have a car here. Now, I could look at it and say, we'll card gives me personal freedom. It does. You can hop in your car. You can go wherever you want. But when I look at the financial aspect of the car, it takes away from my freedom because it's something that I need to constantly maintain. It's something that I have to invest my money in monthly with insurance and all that I'm not saying, I'm never going to have a car again or that it's a problem to have a car. It isn't I love having a car. But right now, we live in a city we have free public transportation because my wife works for the public transportation company here in auto, so there's really no reason to have a car for me right now. And I feel like that's the right decision to serve that value. Right now, again doesn't mean I'm not going to change my mind. But that's an example of serving my highest value personal freedom in the moment right now where my life is right now. And how I feel about that right now? So, of course I keep saying right now right now right now because checking them with ourselves. Right now in the present moment in who we are. And what we might want in the next few months or six months or year, whatever we don't know who we're going to be, of course, but we can check in with who we are right now and make decisions based on our highest values right now, based on who we are two day and knowing that we're going to change. But that's okay. We can only based on who we are today and travels going to change. Of course, because we change as people, we grow our situations change. And that's totally cool. And that's why the second thing I wanna highlight is the idea of being flexible and adaptable when it comes to turning travel into a lifestyle because let's face it. There might be situation say you're wanting to be a nomadic traveler, and you set yourself up to do a house it where you're going to house, it somewhere for six months is gonna launch your trip. You're gonna live in France by the vineyards and take care of this farm and all this stuff. And then the week before. It falls through. Well, are you going to cancel your trip in not start your travels? Or are you going to be flexible and adaptable? And maybe find another solution. And these are things that can happen. Of course, if you're out on the road long enough, and you want to keep the travel's going, you're going to have to keep finding a way going to be flexible and adaptable in the less picky. We are about the things that we do to keep us on the road. The more options, we will have as individuals. I gotta say I'm older now. I'm a little more picky than I was. But I've been through this time in my life before, and certainly have done different jobs and things that I wasn't necessarily in love with totally, but it could keep me on the road. It could keep me traveling. And that was good enough for me that superseded the, the fact that the job had to be super interesting or something that I was really into because it kept me on the road that was good enough for me. So being flexible and being adaptable. And the last thing I'll highlight here is a quote from Tony Robbins. Now, however you feel about him. It doesn't matter. I still love this, quote resourcefulness is the ultimate resource. Resourcefulness is the ultimate resource, and of course, being resourceful. I've, I've shared this quote on the show before, is such a empowering thing knowing that we are all resourceful, individuals, and that we can solve problems and get things done and make things happen. And that's comforting, that's a comforting thought to lean on when you're going into a situation where it might be little unpredictable a little uncomfortable and just gently reminding yourself. Hey, I'm a resourceful, dude or do that. I can make things happen. I can figure this out, and that's in power and also comforting so wanted to share those three things with you just staying in touch with your highest value, and who you are today being flexible and adaptable and resourcefulness being. The ultimate resource that you are resourceful individual. Those are three great things to keep in mind that I wanted to highlight around turning travel into a lifestyle for your whole life, which is one thing. We'd love to talk about on this show, as you know, if you are new to this show, by the way, welcome, welcome to the year to travel caravan, my friend. If you're not new, welcome back. I really appreciate each and every one of you spending time with me today, and I love to highlight stories from the community. I'm gonna do that right now. Just got an Email today from Kyle read you little bit. He said, I started listening to zero travel about two years ago to keep me motivated when I decided I wanted to quit my job one day and travel indefinitely. I listen mostly at work, which is a great way to conjure up an escape plan LL. He goes on to say, I dream of being a filmmaker focusing on the travel niche. I have decided to take the leap of setting a date, and buying a plane ticket to finally go travel indefinitely and create travel films while experiencing. In the world. I've been planning on this for about two years, which is led me to working various jobs, to save money in prep for travel, but as life, happens things keep getting in the way, and I had to spend what savings, I had and have accumulated debt the years fly by so quick? In my creative fire is so hot right now. I can't wait for another year to prep. So I'm just going to wing it and figure out the business along the way. What do you think? And he just says Jason if you've made it this far thank you so much sorry for taking up your time in your busy. Thanks again. I'm never too busy for you guys. And thanks for the Email. What do I think it sounds like you're ready to go? My man. I mean, I think if you just listen to the outer of this podcast. And those three things I highlighted I mean, you're hitting them all to a T. Right. Putting in your highest value of travel being flexible dabble knowing that you're resourceful individual, I cannot know what your exact situation is, and what your debt exactly is and everything like that. You. To do what you think's. Right for you. Nobody can tell you what to do it. But judging by this Email that you wrote, I feel through this Email that you've already made your decision. And sometimes when that switch is flipped. It's really hard to go back the other way. And of course, you don't want to have any regrets in life who knows where this will take you one thing certain. You can't be a filmmaker focusing on the travel niche. If you're not making travel films, and honing your craft and doing that now whether you that on the road, or you want to do it at home, or whatever, that's totally up to you. I can't tell you what to do. I can only tell you what, I think. And I think I shared that in my little soliloquy here in the outgrow this podcast, so you can take those words. And yeah. Stew on them. Think about them. Let me know what you decide. I don't want I never wanna tell anybody what to do. I believe everybody can of course, decide that for themselves. And if you really dig deep down, I think you know what you need to do. We all know what we need to do. And sometimes that's easy. Sometimes that's tough. So it goes so goes my friends. Okay. That's about it. It's a wrap. I want to thank you again for listening. And if you're not subscribed, please do. So if you haven't left to review, you know, I don't ask from very often, but I sure do love reading them, or you can reach out to me, Jason at zero to travel dot com and semi note, like Kyle did, let me know what you're up to, and where you're at in the world in life, whenever I am here for you, my friend. And I love to hear from USA. Let's make this a two way conversation. This is a community powered show I make the show for you. And I hope to hear from you one day. So thank you so much for your time, and I will see you next time my friends cures. This podcast has been brought to you by Zealand to travel dot com ideas and advice to make your travel dreams yellow.

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Wyatt Cenac

The Three Questions with Andy Richter

1:53:39 hr | Last month

Wyatt Cenac

"In a weird crossover of leg cartoonists and and sex perverts. Let's just call them perverts. No just like people are into these like these like sub dom parties spanky parties. Tiny up stuff and we would throw these fundraising parties were just ran out of space. And then they're just kind of the beginning and there'd be some performances but then definitely the night would start to shift to where it's like. Oh no this is when the dildos come out in the real sort of like stomping on each other happens and then we would cut out but we would show up like we would show up like for the first part but then when it's really get serious then we're going home trumpet of dildos begins. That's right that's right. Imagine we've already started the show. I mean that's what it seems like A hello everyone. I'm talking to white. Cynic it senate. Right smack snack snack. Oh see. i didn't even. I didn't i didn't have it right there now. So that's a very easily bushra bull lab and i've gotten accustomed to getting butchered but as i said you asked and thank you. You know i like to. I like to try and say people's names right so anyway. Yeah and i had never heard your name. I have never heard your name pronounced with the proper accent with snack. I feel like i. it's a strange thing of. i'm not. I'm not at that level of fame air. I have a publicist who is going to go around sort of correcting the will. I think i'm still just happy to be in the room and yet so it's just you you didn't call me. Jeff tweet is that that probably is a problem a lot. It's most of you being jeff. Tweet was here because this guy does not know any americana all not none of that sort of old folk. Yeah well guitar and couldn't do anything you're are you in brooklyn. Are you at home in brooklyn now. Yeah and how is your i. This is now. I mean it's so fucking boring but it's just how is your pandemic been is been a. It's been long. you know. i think. I've been very fortunate. In that s- nobody in my sort of immediate circle of of people was sick too badly. I think of got sick but nothing nothing. Am same aaron. And so i think in that way. I feel very very fortunate Brooklyn has now kind of said. Well let's start at the beginning with you. You were born in new york city. I was born in new york city. But you are of caribbean descent. I am a father's from grenada. Yeah those who don't know grenade is one of. The lower antilles is an antiquity. I know it's it's a virgin island. L. it's burcin island okay. Yeah and it's right off the coast of venezuela Trinidad tobago grenada. And maybe a couple others right. They're spitting distance from venezuela. Yeah very small. Small islands a beautiful on kind of unique to the caribbean islands. In that it has a volcano and it has rainforest and black sand beaches mountains. Yes it's it's kind of a unique one that some people is it's hillier in as opposed to some of the islands are a little more flatland and yet there was. I think some people like to believe that. It was floated away from the hawaiian islands. it's not true but he's selectively. That's ridiculous yeah. I don't flow. Well i'd like to meet those people. Do you go back much. Do you have family there still. I mean because you're from like a fairly prominent family. Didn't you have like some fancy politicians in your back. Ground sword of so. I don't know if it's a fancy background. I come from a line of of people. Oh yeah timely. So i went back through the first time a couple years ago. I'd actually never. I've actually never been my mother and my father split up. When i was pretty young as my father. Father died when i was when i was young. Who's four and so. I never a never went back until i was dulce. And but the thing i knew about my family is my. There's an uncle in my family was part of maurice bishop's news jewel movement at a new jewel movement i. They came into power by pushing out the prime minister airy geary who had also coming into power by pushing out colonial colonial rule. And so both maurice bishop and eric gerry are seen as two people who helped bring grenada. Its independence but my great uncle of mine was yet he was maurice bishop's number two and then apparently he there was a coup within that coup and my uncle great uncle who i do not know nobody. Just save the record. Don't know the guy but still alive. I think so. Yeah but he. I is spending on who you talk to he. Either or the arrest and execution of maurice. Bishop who is a beloved figure tonight. The airport is named for him or he was being used as often by. Us military and this coup within aku precipitated. The us invasion of grenada. I think some you know days later and so yes. It's a weird. Even when i went back i was like i'm excited to go back but i don't wanna get too much into the story in this with anybody. I don't want them to be like wait a minute your nephew of really late. I never gotten. Yeah my mom remarried know. We're not even that close. He's like remove father. Don't tie me to this guy. Yeah so have you when you went back. Did you try and reconnect with some of your your dad's Relatives are yes. I actually have some half brothers. And i met one my half brothers when i was down there which was really wild. It was it was really like. I didn't expect that i would get as emotional as i did. He on the other hand not very much. I was definitely the little brother in that moment. Via because i was just it was the closest to my father that i had been The whole trip was really just like emotional rollercoaster forming. But yes so. I met that brother and then i went to my father's hometown and my father is buried in his hometown. Inside went to go find his grave. Because i'd never ever seen it. And while i was there grids such a small island while i was in the laws insanitary and couldn't find his headstone and i was just kind of looking around and i've walked through the whole place in the grounds keepers of the cemetery. Were three goats. So there's an element where the goats are near some headstones new like i can't i don't know if they're hanging out by. Is emily weirded out at invite myself. And after a while just say i can find this and i happened Across the street where there is an old woman sitting and i started talking to her and she was like. Oh wait a minute your father. He wants to new york and he was. He was killed in new york. Yeah and she's like. Oh yeah i know. I know that story. He as she starts telling it should basically is telling me we're related. She had i but she's not saying related. She's like yeah. He's the nephew of my husband. Or something like that in like that makes you my on. No no he's the nephew of my husband. And i'm like okay. And then she tells me where cold was among family know no no. She's not getting off our but it was very strange. I she told me. Oh your family is buried. Like reddish walk in right to the left there and i went back in and stood there and was kind of what my altruism felt life in that i'm standing there and i can't find my father's had some. He has an unmarked grave And so i'm standing basically in front of my my father. But i can't see him. Yeah and that's kind of what the whole trip going back was like as i was on beaches looking at the ocean the way that my father probably did growing up but i don't know his experience in his hometown and i'm seeing things but i really am alone and i don't really know like you know i'm stumbling across people. Who are maybe my aunt. If they so choose to be. Yeah yeah and it was another yes. It was very odd. Kind of kind of thing. I i would love to go back again. It's a beautiful beautiful island. And i definitely felt a real a real ton of emotions while there But i but yeah it was. It was a strange sort of thing can just reconnect versus a to connect with my half brother. Damn yeah it's yeah. I think that that is kind of all of you. Know the kind of it's the way everybody's like you know. Now it's getting their dna tested in everything about where they're from like it's always weird to me like the the the the ads where they're like. We thought we were greek. And then i found out. I actually from israel you know. And and then they change all their garbutt. You know like there's garb and it's kind of like. I don't know which which matters. More like that. The action of what you're sort of commemorating or like the supposed truth of what you're commemorating and to go back to a like a hometown of someone that yes you have that genetic connection but it's like so this is me but it's not me you know it's like a rather it must be a weird disorienting feeling and especially to when it's like from such a beautiful place like i the locked like i. I can just project that i would feel like. I wish i had some ownership of this place rather than just kind of the detached kind of ethereal attachment that. I have to this place. Yeah i i definitely had buzz your life to there. It was this strange thing of i. Don't i don't sound like anyone else in the island. It's an island. That is the a black island. And yet i am may fair skinned black person so i don't look like most of the people on the island so i kind of their. You know there are people my complexion but they're rarer on the islands so there's this aspect of it mean i don't have the accent. I don't really look like most of the people in seeing you know. And so i don't i feel kinda trapped between two worlds liang's way where this is like you know i can tell someone. Oh yeah and i talking to a bartender. Yeah by my father's from here and he kind of very nice. He kind of looked at me and his way of life. Okay let's father you're not really. Yeah yeah. I don't. I don't see you as one of us End so it serves. It was definitely in a lot of ways very a very strange experience but one that i'm incredibly glad that i have the end one. That definitely like made me really get introspective. A way that was like. Oh yeah i did. This was doing. This was a doing this. Hoping that i'd get off the airplane and people would be life returned. These lifting and shoulders accurate happens. Wherever i go. Sure yeah cleveland. Yes air oh i would love in cleveland streak to see your point tonight. Good to all the roller off the line. Yeah it's the american dream now you didn't grow up. Though in new york you moved to texas correct. I did i moved to texas Little right yes. very small. Young mother and my mother remarried on my stepfather. And then he got a job than sent us to douse taxes. And yeah so i did. I did most of my most of my grown up their child like almost school. And everything and i would come back to new york. Is my grandmother lived. Here's sergeant back and see her and spend time dallas's it's where i learned. It's books book stuff. Yeah yeah is an. And what is your. Are your stepdad. In your mom's still together or they are. Yeah so you did. You had a you know a a male presence of a father figure it least. Yeah yeah yeah. I think it's. It's a strange thing. Because as i did but there is always still that thing. That is like as appreciative as i am for all the sacrifices that my mother and my stepfather made so that i could go to school to go to college. You know go to the dentist do all those things. There's also the part of it. That's like lawyer biological parents biological parents and especially losing very young at. There's just always you always wind of morning that loss in the unfilmable whole that. Yeah and then you. It takes a long topic defended Recognize that override unfilmable whole and. That's okay and i can appreciate other people people in my life but also. I know that i have this void here. That will always the here. Yeah yeah well you could fill it up with drugs and drink that's wild. He's actually drinking moonshine out of a jar. It looks like no. I've been some people baking bread. I've been making my own. He really is folks. he's really drinking something. Clear out what looks like a pickle jar jar. Making my back to the jim What kind of kid were you. I mean you're kind of a laconic person you know a little bit You know on the quieter side. You don't you don't you. Don't like scream. Your presence is what. I guess i should say you know most fair yet. Yeah i think i was as a child. My stepfather would refer to me as an old man ally and he would call me at boo which she said man old man where he was from an eastern. The island trinidad my allow. My mother had a thing for review. God's errantly yeah yeah. She is trying to book those vacations early. Which why don't we go to your family this year. But i i definitely. I feel like i was around my family. I i got very used to being quiet and not being a disruption. Yeah and i think outside the house all that pent up energy would sometimes show up. And i could be a little hyper outside of the house and in the house i felt like i couldn't get away with anything And i had to be the model citizen. And so i feel like yeah outside of the house. Sometimes i would kind of life wasn't much of a screamer. But i i definitely was a a low more hyper but i think i was constantly at war with myself of life. The hyper wanting to be hyper but also terrified if we're got back to to mother and stepfather also. Were there other siblings in the house. When i turned thirteen my i had a cousin who moved in with us who was ten and so he grew up like a brother to me. Yeah and so. I think of him as brother And so he moved in yet when he was thirteen But you've already had at least ten years of of being the solo. Yeah the so low attendant at this quiet church. You lived in library search. Where's that where they strict where your folks just strict your mom and your stepdad and just kind of value to a quiet calm environment. They're pretty strict in. I don't know if like they weren't necessarily quiet. I think it was kind of like you know i. I got the sense that children should be seen not heard the And i think the way that. I carried myself in public as well as in the house it was. There was a sort of strict rules. About what i should do and shouldn't do. Yeah so yeah so. They were definitely pretty pretty. Strict and number kids would say like you know they work. They would always want me to come sleep bothering their place. They were nice as excited to come sleepover at my house. Yeah yeah Did like was there points of rebellion in your teen years. Like did you start to get tired of having to be the naming one. Yeah yeah. And i mean it's your as i got older. It turned into not feeling you know not feeling like i want to be that and trying to find ways to rebel in then i think ultimately it turned into a thing where at some points in my twenties not solely for that but for other reasons of became a thing where we had to go our separate ways and i it just became better not to communicate with With my folks. So for just for i think at least you know mental health so yes away so i think my rebellious face. The kind of it turned into an estrangement yet. Yeah and did that. Continue throughout your adult years. Yeah that's that's continue still. Oh that's rough. I'm sorry about that up you. Yes it's it's a strange thing. But i think you know there are a talked about a little bit holiday. I try not to talk about it too much. Only because i have chosen a life in you know in a public space. They haven't yet. And so i'm trying to be as respectful of that is again but i've talked about it a a little bit and i think ultimately you know there are some relationships in your life and civil down. Can't be family relationships. That aren't the healthiest. And yeah you know you. There is a a and trying to bridge that or figure out how to make that were sometimes it means walking away from it and yeah you know and that's something that i it took a while to get to And i feel That is the best decision for me. And has been the healthiest thing for me. And i hope that it has provided down some something as well. Yeah and today Has there ever been any like attempts at reproach mall on either side like you know from their side. Yeah yeah ya not always in the healthiest ways. Yeah that only can observe choices. Yeah yeah i have. I'm estranged from my dad to sorry for. Yeah i thank you. i mean you know. We're in the same boat. But i e everything you're saying is exactly the same it's like yup it's sad and yet it's a loss and yup. It's it's too bad. And it's regret regrettable but Yup it's for the best like just. That's just yeah. You know it's like when you i swear. The one of the biggest parts of being a grownup is accepting. That things can be many things all at once. You know like you know. A person can be your deepest love and a wonderful caring person who has an absolute answer and your life different reasons. Just it's you know it's a it's a long life and there's lots of stuff that happens and you just got to kind of keep moving forward helpfully as you can. Yeah and i think what's important is checking in with yourself about those things absolutely seeing those things and those relationships and figuring out what it is that you need and being okay with the idea but like okay may not be the it may not fit the mold of what society says a relationship should look like or you know what adulthood should be whatever and. That's fine there is now. There is no definition for there is no one box that we all fit in and if we tried it would break all of us and so it is really about being. Okay with recognizing okay. Well this is what. I need to to be a healthy and happy person. Nba healthy person. Not just for myself. But for other people in my life. And i said if a person your life is toxic and is a cancer in makes you not just feel bad but makes you a worst version of yourself to other people who need you and who aren't involved in that scenario at all the Projecting onto somebody else. Yeah because you know cause cancer has spread and so that that toxic relationship. That is impacting you. It is going to filter out into the relationships that you may have been then you are not being the best version of yourself that you can be for those other people in your life and so i think it's it's recognizing that the out when you do these things sometimes it's like selfish. Feels like i'm not being a model person but it's also recognizing away but this is what i needed to do to be the healthiest version of myself. I can be not just for myself. But for other people to you and for that person i may be nibbling behavior that is only encouraging that toxicity from known causing them to do the work whether they choose to do it or not is right but the choose to do it to be a better person not free you but for other people in the is i could not agree more and i relate so strongly that because like something that i said to people in my life is like i. I can only carry my own baggage like you meet a carry your baggage to like. I have to do like while. I'm serving my own neuro season and like you know like the crying child. That wants watts like a in me. Like i'm serving that guy now. I got to hear your inside baby crying to and follow that. Oh that's that's you know. We carry our own baggage and and to expect. Otherwise i mean it hap- especially when you're like in a in a any kind of close relationship. There's like a little bit of like a is it. Okay if i misbehave in this way and you're gonna be okay with it. Yeah okay then. We'll do that for each other. You know like there's a little there's always a little bit of sickness you know just to keep vic- but i mean if you're but really truly if it's like no no not only do you have to worry about your neuroses and your fears and insecurities you have to worry about mind to you have to adjust your day to mind to like that to me and i mean i'm fifty four. Took me a long time but like no. That's no no. I'm not going to do that. I'm not gonna like new. Not just not gonna do that. so High school dallas. How's that for you. It was it was an interesting experience. Went to an all boys catholic high school in dallas. That was also an art museum. Wow yeah wow so. We were kind of always surrounded by art and beauty. That's amazing that's wonderful. Yeah when you said you soon. You mean the catholic priests arts beauty. Yeah i said no. I mean why it was one of the priests named art. Is that what you're talking about arts in uni. Yeah yeah no. But i mean it must have been a pretty place to go to school and had kind of like a feeling of at least in aesthetic. You know a better aesthetic than the cinderblock lime green box. I went to really. It was really cool in that regard because you kind of took for granted while was around you paintings in classrooms and sculptures. That you just you just sort of took for granted that not every space had this kind of life artwork around And also though it is a strange thing where you're kind of like every space could do this and the citizens you could put art places. There is a really high school here in brooklyn called voicing the high school as you enter the building. They have these sculptures. And there's a painting of murals law and it's like. Oh yeah those things really do. They create a sense of magic in a space where it might not always feel magical trying to kind of learn fractions. Yeah no it's like whenever you go to like. Having you know on vacation to europe you know that's one of the you know you go and you look at old churches and and and you do get the feeling of like. Oh wow when the when the district was knee deep in human shit. I bet this place was really really even more attractive and magical than it feels now. You know because it just. It's like it's so pretty and here you know in make sure i it's it's there's a hopefulness to it like there's like a value beauty well because it was a strange strange thing because it still looked like a school. It's still you know he's still had lockers. Any still have that red carpet. Yeah priests and pretty straight out. And so but there was like yeah. They're were these sculptures. That kind of drew your eye away from these lockers that are decades old in this carpet that has stains all on it. And oh yeah. Structures is really cool and it may yet may going. There may go in there interesting. And i think put a sense of life our appreciation into you in a way that you didn't really like it. It just was under the surface. You didn't realize that you were being indoctrinated in these ways. Yeah that you're being catholic. Yeah what kind of stuff. Where were you at athlete. Were you good point. I like to think. I was athletic. I was not an athlete. I was on the track team. But i never want to track practice. I was so i was so bad going to track practice that typically you needed to go practice five days that week every day to run a meet that weekend. I was so in committed that they told me you just show up three times a week. You can run in which may may have spoken to some level of talent. That i have that i didn't realize i. Yeah that they're willing to make that kind of exception for me but even at that point just showing up three times a week still couldn't do. It was disturbed. Yeah yeah yes just not committed and was kind of like kind of a burnout without actually smoking. Anything apathetic to it. And so and so i did that but then i also i enjoy draw and i enjoyed art classes and you know anything in another world if i had if i felt like i could have done it. I might have focused on that. In a way that i would've made he said like oh i should go to art school. That was something that was available to me. What were you doing when you weren't going to track. Was there something you know like or is it just. You didn't like it. It just felt southern was. I didn't like it salva. I point in high school. I had i had started to drive and i had. I had a girlfriend in high school. That i could go hang out at her house or go hang out at her school or when i wasn't in a relationship was because all boy school i go hang out at the all girls school or there was pizza parlor across the street from the high school had an arcade and go there with mozzarella sticks and so i think there was an element of it. You know going back to living in a in a strict house. When i got home. I wasn't leaving the house again so it's time to do at school. Yeah and so there was this elements of having an extracurricular that just bought me time. I see not be home. Where the go you know. I could just go out with friends and nothing. I was doing was untrue. It was just a yeah. I just i know that i can't come home by drought my bags off and then go buy is to go out and go to my girlfriend's house. We're gonna movie or something like that and so it was just like okay. Yeah this is. When i get to do if i want to go play sometimes skipped track record is and i would just go to the gym and play basketball and so i was still being left. Their gear yeah. Yeah just took this outside. I'd actually be doing something towards earning a lettermans jacket right. I never got. We should've joined the alibi team. Because that's really what you're looking for as an alibi like yeah. I'm i'm running track. Mom a i'm not. I'm not filling up on you. Know that dallas delicacy mozzarella sticks what it is what we are known for. Dallas is how is a d like being from dallas. Um you can consider yourself from dallas. I consider myself from dallas but never really thought of it is home. Yeah it's a weird town it is. It's i feel like new york always felt like home to me again. I traveled just in the summertime. And you mentioned cleveland. Cleveland actually felt more like space as i had childhood friend. Who moved to cleveland and so two summers. I would go spend part of my summer with my grandmother in new york and then part of it with my friend. Brian in cleveland. An apartment with my ons in philadelphia. And all i felt much more connected to those faces than i did to dallas. And those people too. I mean it's probably yeah begins with the people and then it just kind of spreads to the location i would guess yeah but some of it is the place again. Cedar point mazing. Yeah yeah bark and you know the you get. They would have chili dogs there. You could get sick off chile. Yeah try that in dallas. They have six flags over texas. Don't they still have that. they do. I feel like as a kid. The roller coaster is in cleveland. Seemed like much more impressive. Because there was wanted cleveland that had. I can't remember the name of it but it was like to roller coasters. That is called the gemini and it was to help the twins. Yeah yeah and they sort of race one another and so you would go like you go. Go my friend and my friend. Brian is brother in. You know whatever other friends. They had any kind of slid off and he'd say okay. We'll ride this roller coaster ride this many try to find seats in cars. And you can be like all right we're gonna win and then Inevitably everyone loses because onset whiplash. That's right that's right. It's ridden a roller coaster as an adult. Yes at but it's yeah the g. four. I'm are you going to say the g. forces excruciating as an adult compared to as a child. Yeah i that from having having actual children going to a playground and then swinging on swings have you swarmed on swings in the last couple of decades. I feel like i have a my equilibrium gets. It's all you just fill your guts sloshing around. I don't know as a kid. I loved it. You know it could do hours in that. When i go like if you really get a good swing on it just feels like oh fuck all god. Yeah no i remember doing a few years back. And i got incredibly dizzy. Yeah and i yeah. I felt nauseous than it was not. It was not a good thing. And i hadn't been on a roller coaster probably is probably in fifteen twenty years this point. Yeah and i feel like the last time on when i was in twenties and the next day my neck. That's that's old s tired. Yeah yeah again. A lot of car. where was college. I went to college at the university of north carolina. Nice that's a pretty place to it is pretty place. Yeah place jenner a happened there. What made you pick it. I wanted to get out of the house. And i really wanted to go to school. In new york i wanted to go to syracuse and north carolina. My mother and i went on like a little visit of colleges and she she believed i could get into duke. I did not have the grays or the ability while we were north carolina though we looked at other schools in north carolina and actually really wanted to go to north carolina state but then saw the campus at north carolina and thought it was a beautiful campus. And that's honestly what like sold a yeah And i think my mother's originally from north carolina that's where our fan heard side of the family is from and so i think there was something that was kind of a. She liked the idea of me being in north carolina. Close relatives stuff. So yeah But it is it's a. It's a beautiful beautiful campus. The first time you remember this the first time you and i met was at north carolina. When i was in school. I do not remember. That was the first time we met. Yes no actually no. It was not something that we met before that. Because i was very briefly an intern at late night. I was an intern at snl. While i was in college. And i dropped out of school to intern at snl and during the dark weeks. I had nothing to do. So i would go over too late night. And how for like a week at a time and then disappear all her for weeks. Yeah yeah so the exploitation of free student labor. It's not like dark weeks. Well that doesn't mean you get off to you. Get over here and work on this other comedy comedy. You know work ship. I loved it though. But we we briefly met when i in turn and then you came to carolina to to speak and there was the thing that they would do the student organizing committee whenever there was a speaker coming. They take the speaker out to dinner and they took you out to dinner and of friend. A good friend of mine has figured out a scam that you could poll was if you went to the student organization and said hey i would really love to meet this person. Who data join the dinner. They would say yes. And you get to take part in the free dinner with this person. And so andy. Richter was thanks north carolina and using my friends sicne finagled my way into the dinner and wound up sitting next to you and chatting with you and you were very gracious and very nice to me and there wasn't aspect of that i think only having now gone through the experience of having performed colleges where they take you out to dinner. There was an element of it. That i i feel like you and i were able to kind of have a conversation about like new york things. Mis show things without it being by. What's it like to me heather round. Yeah yeah you public. So i think they're so you'd so's i i. I don't know if i provided you some relief. But i felt like i felt like at some point. You have gotten sick of people asking you. Yeah those random questions and you just talk a little bit about the internship. Because when i turned it was when the nbc fire had happened all right and so we wound up chatting about like how crazy that fire was working for us. Or you with snl. When the fire happened. I was with you all l. Can so you came out and did our outside show with us then. Yeah it was. Actually a i i feel like maybe maybe we talked about it on one of the times. I did conan. You all actually got some footage. Because i'm in. I'm in one of the shots. When it was acted in front of the ice rink there was like a a boom shot. Where i happen to be one of the people that was standing as like security derive right. Read a riff raff out. Yeah rushing you. All and samuel l. jackson. Yeah who who gave me a foot bribe at five remember correctly Yeah for people. That don't know there was and i mean this would have been what like ninety four and he goes on ninety five ninety six. Yeah there was a there was like an electrical fire in rockefeller center. The didn't burn anything but just because rockefeller center's basically like a huge av system and there are there are columns in that building that are just full of cables running from edit rooms to studios back and forth. Did you know to Satellite feeds and just in one of those where all these wires were there was a there was a fire so we had to evacuate the building. And we you know had to scramble and we did a show out in front of the Ice skating rink and samuel. L. jackson was the guest. Who's probably like the perfect guest to have on a just roll with it kind of show but it was really fun and always it ought whenever the guy always felt our show and still to this day is better. It's at its best when it gets to be about something other than itself and so this was about. I mean it's still kind of about itself because it's it's circumstances but it's not just like a wednesday you know like it was it was. It's the reason that the road shows are always so good because you get to go somewhere and it's about something other than just weird these guys putting on a talk show. So yeah a i remember. It was funny because any immediate moment when it happened there was this talk of. We're gonna go to fort lee new jersey. Yeah there's a studio there and yeah they put me in a van driving. I'm circling van around the block for hours until they decide like okay. We're not going to florida lady. That senator ice rink and then my favorite one that you all did was took over the the today show studio yeah and you were bryant gumbel vast yes and i remember is to your point like what i feel like you all do so well. Is that like playing with the space that you're in and taking full advantage of wherever you are and just having fun with it. Was that like okay. We're gonna station that we're not just gonna do our show as usual. What if our show goes through the filter of the today she had. What if we both wear matching sweater vests and drink with two hands out of warm mugs. It was it was amazing. It's it's that thing of like is it was such a fun thing and it was to me. What the magic of late night. That was what i wanted. That was what i. I i hope for Yeah well i'm. I'm glad it's nice to hear you say that. And i wish i could remember better about like you know. The years of touring colleges which just kind of happened s like kind of a side gig away to make some extra money is i got like kind of with the speakers agent then i he's like you could do college dates and i was like what the hell am i gonna talk about so i just basically i. It eventually. Devolved into almost an entire session of qa. 'cause that's was bon you know But i showed clips of the show and stuff and and i hope. I hope that the chapel hill wasn't the one is that i remember. There was one one. And i don't think it was. I think it was somewhere in pennsylvania. i went and i was just. I don't know what was going on. It was like i do these things on the weekend after. Sometimes you know in those days the show. I would have to edit my own bit. So there'd be some days where i was editing till three o'clock in the morning and then coming back and finishing the edit and putting it on the show but just exhausted and i went to one college date and they said we're having dinner with you which like that wasn't like a guaranteed thing that a data dinner students and i was like you know what i'm really tired. I'm really rundown. I gotta do a show and four hours. I'm going to skip the dinner and a student adviser type person not a student but like somebody that was an adviser called me crying like oh there are kids here waiting to me i here i come you know i. I hope it wasn't that night. So no i don't think you're was. Yeah i mean. The one thing that i remember was at one point you look me dead. He is and you said. I will never ever forget is and then you kissed me on the You flew away. I'm very happy to announce that all of our golden tickets have been released if you're one of the lucky people who found a golden ticket. I'll good luck to you and be sure to listen to how it all goes down on a future episode. Thank you all for playing and thanks to state farm for being a good neighbor and helping me realize my lifelong dream of becoming sort of a weird badly aging red willy. Wonka a weird willy wonka. You're a withered wonka. People thought will the original willy. Wonka was weird enough yet. And i was like nope i could be even weirder and now i've done it with my golden ticket competition anyway. Very happy they're all out there. But lucky if you think you may be depressed or you're feeling overwhelmed or anxious better help. Online counseling offers licensed professional therapists. Who are trained to listen and to help for anxiety loss depression anger self esteem and more. 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But i didn't know how to approach that in dallas and again growing up in the house i did. I didn't think that like comedy was a career that i can really go down kind. Became his little secret. That i held onto like. Oh yeah i really love to be on one day. And i remember when i was in high school right as i was graduating. I my family had put me in this internship program where you would go to this like all day conference take tests and then based on the tests answers they would try to find you an internship in the field that this test said you would be best suited for and so i took the test and a kid you not the answer. One of the answers that came back. And what was the top answer in. My mind was stunt man. I was so. I was like this test gets me sees me knows that i'm not. You know accountants material right and the sorting hat dot shows me and i should. I should be doing car rollovers. That's what i'd be doing. That said the internship program had nothing for me so they through the house. That's hilarious stutman. Why was that even fucking there. I i don't know. But i'm grateful. Somehow that tested they're tested millions of children somehow that one but they they met said that you should you should endanger so physically for someone who looks similar to you who is more valuable. Yeah yeah absolutely fall for someone kind of like you. Yeah yeah a you young man either one to jump out of a burning building that is not a growth industry though. We're now west man. I don't think that's gonna made this shift over as you put out a rap album. But he's not going to action hero right or and if he does he'll do his own just knowing him. Yeah that's true. That's his the that right. That's his brand. But yeah when i. When i got to college i started thinking about out. Do it and I got involved with there. There was a comedy sports At my school. And i sort of tried it. I didn't really take too but There was a guy from there was doing stand up around chapel hill and the raleigh. Durham area. So he kind of encouraged me go to stand up things. I started doing that and ben from their courage from that to get an internship. But snl which i just got from writing letters to death knell. And yeah i just back that. It wasn't like i knew how to from my college. They didn't have a an inroad. I i just kind of wrote them some letters and said hey i want to do and once. I got that internship than subsequently also getting a consignment assignment late night as well in those dark weeds that it was that experienced that. Let me know that it was possible that being around all of these people in seeings creativity but also seeing that. I had found a way to get into this world that i'd only seen on television that that then showed me. It was possible after that. It was kind of like okay. I have to be more vocal. That this is what i wanna do and i really like set my sights this. Yeah it's a fun atmosphere. It's definitely like and those years of the conan show to were particularly well. Just you know and you got to see kind of the the both sides because they were to comedy shows in that building and you got to work on both of them and they both were kind of Those are sort of like the sandler years right when you were there now. I got which after. I mean even before so i was will ferrell had just joined necati. Jim breuer was tightened of the he was kind of the big star of that moment on the show that was like goat boy. Am joe patchy. And so it was him and then like will ferrell cheri oteri. We're doing a cheerleader. Yeah tracy morgan. It was his first year. Norm mcdonald was doing update colin. Quinn molly shannon. Were there in. Collins was a huge A huge advocate for me. Operate a an with someone who even. After i left the internship and went back to college i at one point. Snl was looking for writers and colin. Read sketches of mine Helps me like learn how to write sketches. He suggested my name like two years later to interview for writing job. And i got flown out to new york and interviewed. Didn't get the job but It was a magical time to be learned spirits and that building to working in that building getting to have a reason to get to go to that building. Every day was magical. Yeah i as much as i. It's funny because i for so long in my career. Our one work has now. And i wanna do weekend up. That's the thing i wanted to do at one host weekend. Update and what's interesting is i. I wanted to do that. In whatever ninety six ninety eight. I was like kind of like viewing myself as a failure because i thought i graduated college. I didn't think i gradually colleges do internship and then never go back to school now forever and i and then almost a decade later i wound up on a daily show which didn't exist at the time but the thing that i wanted to do that sort of weekend update like thing now doing a longer version of it. Yeah with the daily show. And so it's but as much as as much as i enjoy my experience of the daily show and learn so much there is something that was very different about going to that building versus the magic of rockefeller center. Yeah i as like as amazing as the show was a part of me always wished it was rockefeller thirty rock. I still to this day. They were like hey. Would you wanna open a watch shop. You just have to fix latches and will livestream. I but you're going to work at rockefeller center. Apartment would be like yeah strat. Yeah yeah yeah just to work in that building absolutely and especially those days of that building because it was just really vital like there was still like a regular old coffee shop in the lobby and it wasn't all like j. crews and and chain stores it was like they were weird little camille. You could go down into the basement. You get your dry cleaning. Don get a key made you know Pick up something for dinner and you know get pantyhose. I don't know why that came to mind. I never spine pantyhose but you know it's okay. You're by of well by that eight. By that time. I was no longer committing robberies so i didn't need the pantyhose In and sometimes you know sometimes maybe like put him on and just sit on the couch and crack. Open a beer day steal that same. That's like saying you know what she felt in those the afterglow. Yeah of a muggy or just put it on to go peep in there good for people and that's true for people No it was just. It was just such a great time it was just Always always will also to just have always going to be proud to have worked on that show because that show just meant a lot to peop- to young people that were serious about comedy in that and there were shows that did that for me into have been on one of those Very nice it's a good thing. So what was your first like writing gig. Where did you because you you were doing. Stand up and then what was your first writing gig so i graduated college and moved out to la man. I wound up after a few years. I got a job on king of the hill. And i got hired as a writer on uncanny hill and worked there for for four seasons for house season. Seven to ten for yeah and that was in l. a. l. at the time yes once i graduated college i wanted to go back to new york but i didn't think there would be jobs i i remember. I got offered a job to be the reception. Snl and i thought well no one goes from receptionist to cast member Didn't think that was possible. There is somebody who has gone from life receptionists to writer and is like the one But i didn't. I didn't have that. That confidence in myself so i so why i was like there's more opportunity in la in. Yeah a friend out there. So i went. I went out there and then yeah been out there for about three or four years and then got hired a writer on the hill now eating out four seasons that you know was that till the end until the show ended. No i left. I enjoyed the job but it was also one of those things. Where i knew that i wanted do more than just right and the longer i was in a job the harder was going to be to pursue other opportunities because on one hand it felt like my agent was only viewing me as like a tv writer and so when other opportunities come around. I'd be like oh. Hey you know maybe we could try to see. If i could go out for this season he would be reluctant to pursue those things End and so for me. It was. I wound up leaving the show feeling like okay if i want to really pursue like you know being a comedian doing stuff on cameras well i may be after sort of take the security blanket and and burn up and just go out there and just try and so it was a little bit of like blowing everything up and starting all over now and you are now afraid to do that because well i mean you got on the i mean th the sort of like most notable one that i think people still talk about is You on the daily show and you quit the daily show You had a a condo. People can eat google it people he had. You had a conflict with the with john. Stewart about he did a herman cain imitation that you felt was i thought it was offensive and i had brought up to my bosses and they heard me agreed with me. He hadn't done it on the area he was planning to do it. And i brought it up to my bosses and they said that they would talk to him and then he still wants to do it. And so then. I brought it up and he got defensive in a way that he felt as though i i was calling in racist when what i was saying was that this was insensitive and i think he kind of went into that defensive posture that many people who may not be that comfortable talking about race. Get into men if van exploded into something that to me was From a power dynamic standpoint. I thought the man had fired me. And he was screaming at me and it was It was a very uncomfortable situation and one that marked my experience there but also as a full experience at the show you know. It wasn't the first or only experience that i had in that show where i felt life. People words being as sensitive to issues of race and it wasn't the first time that i experienced something where i felt offended on because this was something that was racially sensitive. And so i think of a a pattern. Yeah yeah and this was definitely you know a thing. The way exploded. If you know. I think it was one of those things where it's like okay. You quietly experienced microaggressions in some larger than micro aggressions zidan. Bring something up. And if dan was you know response was one that was to me beyond the pale of what you would hope in a professional situation or any situation really right And so i think but it was. It was something that i think for me crystallize. I experience here is not one that feels has felt particularly greg's or one where i felt particularly Seeing or respected throughout my experience year. Yeah so it was. It wasn't just one thing. It was kind of a culmination yemen. I think that that experience cemented for me. I didn't Everything i i have been sealing up to that point and then after that i actually had agreed to stay one more year and there was some kind of shitty contract stuff that happens in my last year that i just life. People were like well. Just stick around for this one last year and just do this get out of here and but yeah the last the last year was honestly like i probably should have left after the blow. Your happened as i was going into a contracting gio boy the contract negotiation was one that yet just kind of like became a thing where i really cemented for me that okay. I don't feel welcome here. Yeah i i had been a writer and correspondent on the show for three seasons and in my final year there are three and a half seasons against and in my final year They did not want to pay me to be a writer. And so i think in very passive way. Yes they were saying by. Hey we want you to leave. Yeah and i you know at the at the urging of people in my in my life but also out of my own sort of naive stubbornness was a fine. I'll just stay. I'll collect a year of his jacket just on air. Despite the fact that yet you are not so subtly saying we don't want you. Yeah yeah they use. They'll give you a reason to you. Know to let you know by like without saying by. Yeah yeah and it's a weird thing that feels almost worse than just saying like by because it's kind of like okay. Well now here for a year. Yeah and i'm just a ghost in space. Yeah that's rough and not life. I was already struggling with this idea. That i didn't feel like i was appreciated. Now you just told me from a business affairs. we don't appreciate thank you. Well now you that. Because you know and i mean and i can i think like i i i hear about that scenario. I wasn't aware of the scenario at the time. But it's like. Oh yeah i see all that like i like that will make sense to me and especially like in those days too. I think there has been a difference. Just in terms of and i think it's been a huge being has been social. Media has taken comfortable white men and let him be themselves out in the world and people go like. Hey wait that you shouldn't do you know like i don't like you're saying that at that's offensive to me or you know. There are people who are hurt by that a or issue. There's a part of this. That's just like not great about the way you are and it has it. It has gotten better let you know they're like within those am i don't mean in the world The in the world. I don't you know i mean who am i to say about that. But certainly within the rooms where it's predominantly white men writing comedy. It's gotten a lot better. It's a there's more women and people of color those rooms now because people finally started to take it seriously and like you know like well. That's just tokenism. Well if you wanna look at it that way sure but it's also like how do you correct something without doing the thing that would make the correction. Like how do you have diversity like this. I think there's still plenty people like. Oh yes diversity is great. But i think we should just lay back and let it happen like no diversity happens by hiring a diverse a diverse staff. You know while in. That's and i feel like that's what's so is it goes beyond it too and i think that's the thing like you know i was the first black. The show had hired. I you know. I was the first person of color as writer the show had hired and you know john has spoken about it this past summer while he was on a press tour he talked about. He didn't take diversity seriously. Yeah the thing is. The vinnie sang in that is he didn't take me seriously. Yeah and that's really the shitty that of subsets of what they say. But it's true and it wasn't. I think for so many shows and especially at that time just putting a person in the room wasn't enough. Yeah but what they weren't doing was trying to engage in that person's worldview right understand. What what that person brings to the room other than simply a defense when Law says your entire writing staff is just white guy and yeah yeah and so. I think there is an element of it that now. It's it seems as though the tides are shifting. What you know selfishly. They're alive us. That got caught up in shum Became sort of the charm of that that there is no like it didn't provide. I'm grateful for what is provided for rooms. Today is still was situation. Where as i said. I'm i'm the person that who you know. Basically was passive aggressively pushed out of a place. Where i wonder if i had been in that space. And there's something. I still say if i had been in that space and truly felt valued and had been actually valued. I wonder if i would have left when i did. I wondered if i would have stayed longer. I wonder where my career would be if i stayed another two years. Another three years. What half it would have put me on. And i think i look at my experience and i see an aspect of my experience. That is one where it hopefully made situations better for the people who came after me But at the same time. I don't want to simply be a footnote in the history of life. Don't do this. I still want to be a position where i can work as opposed to just an example in hr reports of life. Don't scream at your employees when they bring up how you're making them uncomfortable. Yeah so i think there is part of the two that is like okay yes for those and not just for myself but i feel like there are a lot of people who experienced the more token aspect of that you. You wanna save for those folks. Okay well that experience one. We never want you to go through that again by how we repair the damage that you experience because i think there are probably a lot of people who experienced things whether it was like me or similar things that left jobs and just didn't work again. You're left the business or became very selective about the types of work. They were going to do which may limit the type of work they can do. Yeah so. I think it's there's there's an aspect of it where you hope that like the that as we are being better you know trying to push towards inclusion that some of that is also those voices who were the ones that either got silenced or were the examples of these things that like how we rain those voices into the rooms as well so that they can also be teaching aids but also that they can be teaching aids they can be They can go back to doing the thing they wanna do. If that's writing us performing directing whatever those things are you took what you did on the daily show and we is. That was that of the kind of the area. In kind of topicality. Cut a topical kind of humor. Is that what you you're looking for. Yeah i think it's it's funny because in my first year i we didn't election special and i did a bit from stephen studio from the colbert. Four and i remember going into that building and walking around his offices and then going onto his set an living life while this is amazing. Space is great. If stephen ever left. I would love to do some version of like what stevens doing. But maybe do the kind of leading the the sort of arch cornell west version. Yes yeah of what stephen is doing as a riley and that was so for me. There is always an element. I think when. I was working on a show that i was like. Oh that that feels like a space that i would love to have loved to go and do that. And then when i when i left the daily show i still to work in late night and were in some kind of a topical late night show us space and so yeah. I kind of spent a little time trying to figure out. Okay what does that look like. What is my version of that. Look like and then ultimately that became a problem areas. Yeah and you've got two seasons tuesday seasons. Yeah at how is that experience. I mean Making that show was a happy one. were refining like finally. It's my name up there. There was there wasn't aspect of feeling. Like finally. Because i definitely felt by when i left the daily show the daily show. I thought okay. People have seen what i've done life. There's gonna be a market for me. And i lost like you know Oliver had gotten lastly tonight sam full-frontal and it was. Yeah okay if i take idea to market. Somebody's going to be interested in. I went around and did the couch and water toward the different places and view. Really no no thank you. Wow so i sat. So i apologize kind of sitting on the sidelines for a few years there and then when i presented the idea to. Hbo problem areas when they were into it. There was this part of me. That was like finally like okay. Yeah here's here's here's the thing. And and i think even when i think about larry larry wilmore got the nightly show and as i was saying when i first got on the daily show. I thought you'd be amazing to have like colbert studio. Do shout there. And then so i saw like. Oh kate l. larry's doing that at any ass gotta show. i'll show. I really felt like for a while. I was just kind of like sitting and and then there was this kind of finally moment with hbo and then when it came time to make the show it was on the one hand. I was so excited by this opportunity. And on the other hand. I was overwhelmed at the responsibility of all. And just how much it took to make show specifically make a show like that if i were to do it at yen from a scheduling standpoints. We were rushing and we were basically making a two hundred minute documentary. A you know in a in ten episode show. Yeah and we started working on that documentary fall with the idea that it would be done by spring and that is a crazy scandal for a documentary for documentary so to go to ten different cities into try. Especially when you're talking to you know the first season. We focused on policing the second season. We focused on public education. Those are both worlds. where access is always very restricted. Yeah and they're very skittish cops are for people who were body cameras and talk about the transparency. They are the scares of scaredy cats when it comes to delay look behind earn round and so we had like pieces where we had one piece where we landed in the city having secured agreements to meet with cops and do all these things for the confidence. Say we don't wanna made with you. And then they would tell. Some of the other people are meeting with not to talk to us and we only had the first season we had two days to shoot every piece. And so we're just like flying trying to get these pieces trying to put them together at a breakneck pace and so i think it was like from a scheduling standpoint. It was an incredibly ambitious to try to do and truly grateful and also i had learned so much from everyone who worked on the show because we did ask a lot of them and so there was an aspect of it. That was so impressed by everyone. Setting up to the challenge of making this shell stepping up to the challenge of with a first time person being in charge and i think i learned a lot and i. I saw things that i wish i could do. Better as something that. I was surprised we got rights. I saw that. I was like i. Yeah it was such a learning experience. And i'm very grateful oregon. I feel like it was not. It was not exactly the show. I wanted to be but there were a lot of things. I was proud that we that we did. Yeah now it's i mean it's it's you know it was a very well made show and i and i haven't seen all the ones that i have seen. I was always having done so much. Topical kind of remote pieces but definitely remote pieces like i had to learn. I got on the conan show. And they're like okay. Now take a camera to the miss america pageant and make comedy for tv like they. Don't teach you that and improv class. You know so But it was. It was a very very ambitious show with like an you know with its heart and head in a very wonderful place but holy fuck. It was an uphill climb. Just you set yourself a you set yourself a task really difficult task and i wonder like kind of branching into the next question of like. Where do you go from here. And how does that inform where you go after that. 'cause it's been a couple years still but you know but but it's the you know i imagine you kind of want to work in that same vein. Yeah yeah i mean. I love to and i think you know it's it's that thing like i didn't expect the show said end after two seasons. I thought like this is the thing. I'll do forever know. There were the elements of it. Where when we do the top of show stuff that felt like a fund silly stuff where we got to. You know where. I think about the late night that i wanted. Yeah that i saw you know places like late night. Snl oh yeah we are making props and we've got a robot and yemeni silly things and like oh i got that and then i got these sort of more heady serious things that still had room for comedy and and so i. I felt like in that way. It was perfect marriage of the types of things. I was interested in And yet i think for me. I would like to continue down this road. The ambition of what. I was doing with that show in what we were doing. I think the me part of that ambitious idea was like this is the thing i i in my head. I thought it was going to do a decade. So well i gotta throw everything got all of the table has i don't want to do anything else. And and also. I don't know if i'll do outside. Oh no if you know. Nothing's promised that. I think. I think on some level because i felt like i had sat on the sidelines. For a while i think i felt a certain info the certain both gratitude but also pressure that this has to be. I have to put it all out here. Yeah because i don't know win. Or if i'll get again and yet i think going forward i think i always gonna wanna try to be am vicious but also event is not letting that sense of leg desperate gratitude. Yeah overwhelm in a way. That could make something uncomfortable. Either for me or for Anyone else who's running in the in in the space. Something sean optimized. Yeah yeah. I definitely felt like i even some make the show i made a fair bit of compromises and there were things whereas like okay. I need to do these things just to just to get this thing on the air out i was it i like. I'm just so grateful. And i didn't see that like i didn't see myself as also the irish of value adds network. I saw his like. Oh yeah. They're like they're doing me the favor by having me on but also not seeing all right but then brain something to them to like the. It's difficult to strike that balance if you're not a maniac it because you know how rare opportunities are you know what a seller's market you know entertainment businesses in terms of like positions like the for every position. There's a million people want in there so you always feeling like i'm lucky in the fact that you and i are sitting you're talking. We are in the club of lucky people. You know but then you do like. You can't just present rear word as margaret atwood at would puts it. You can't just like you know hair. I am make because i also to have witnessed people that are like whatever you want guys and that to them means. Oh well fuck your a property. Now we'll do whatever the fuck we want with you and we will end because you've never said no to us. We just expect yes sola time. It's it's it takes time and it takes you know You know. There's a certain level of fearlessness. Or just or just like just getting to the point where it's like. Look i'm not you know. I'll a i'll be okay. I if this doesn't work out i'll be okay. You know. I mean. I think for me when i look back at this. Is you know obviously Thank goodness for therapists. And yeah legit can talk through these things with. But i think for me when i look at my career i. There was a certain elements of gratitude. Desperate gratitude that. I felt in part. Because i was often the one i was the diversity higher. Yeah and with my first job. I was constantly reminded. I was the diversity higher. that's fine. yeah there's a lot of fun when someone you respect is constantly reminding you that you're only here because of diverse today and you don't actually cost show anything the network is paying for you so you're kind of a weird freely numb donate that future employers out there. Let's don't say no it's a bad idea. It's hurt it's bad. Parenting in in really is also is. It creates a conditioning that that was my first job in this business. And so it's like well. I guess i should be grateful to be here. And then i got the daily show and some of that continued where continually i. I remember like my first week at the daily show beans old. They're like a cia asked me What i had been doing. Because i break before i got show. My car had been repossessed. Just lost my apartment and moved in with a friend of my life was in the skids financially and i. They flew me out a week earlier than i was supposed to to start the show and i remember him talking about life. Like what were you doing. I was broke. Like i was like i. I had just gotten hired to voice on the nickelodeon kids show and i was like. That's gonna maybe cover my rent. But like i was dead broke. I lost my truck. I lost my apartment. I had nothing at a bar. Seventy dollars to go on a date with a woman. Because i had no i zero cash and he was like wildlife. It's crazy because that's what your experience was to us. You just a card on a bulletin board that we just moved here. And i see what you're saying but you'd like do you understand how life how you're doing is simply no card that you move around isn't real like that's the that's not how you should treat humans yellow cards and like this but for me going into the job. I felt so grateful and every offense that i felt when you know i watch people kind of life hip hop into rat hands in life. Do the weird yoyo stuff. Worry like makes me credit. Jim lay should should just be grateful. You're here like you were note card. That's how that's how. He views you that he could just move. You like a note card off the bulletin board. Yeah yeah and and then and it continues to condition you in this way that they okay your careers like these moments where people are like. That's amazing you worked on this show. It's like yet. But i always felt like i. You know like you know. I concept being told that should be grateful to be in these spaces and so if then yet when it when i got my own thing i never felt like i had that confidence or that. Power truly I i should push back. And i should say what lawns and i should be clear about the things that i need for the space to be the show. I wanted to be. Because i should be grateful to be here because i still felt like i'm just a note card on someone's on someone's bulletin board that they can just kind of move around l. Without regard for what. I'm actually what actually going through. Yeah yeah yeah. The thing that you shouldn't relate to. Is that like these note. Cards are human beings and to me. They're note cards. It's like no the the thing you should relate to his at these. No cards are human beings so you need to think of the human beings not no. Yeah but ultimately i mean but they're also two is the aspect of lake. I mean we're all note cards on god's bulletin board but you know we're that's god you know and and it does great over into show business to where i'm sure that like their grips that feel like regardless of what their race or gender like i'm lucky to be here is a grip you know. And and what that in a capitalist society that's just there's an opportunity for exploitation you're like okay. You're lucky to be here all right well in here. Here's a big bowl of shit. Oh yum yum. Yum. yeah so. That was one of the things having a show that i really really tried to take in and was a a lesson to learn the idea of like their everyone who is working on this show they have value and they mean something but also they're going through something. Yeah and you don't know what they're going through and so don't treat that like note card. Yeah you know when. I think about my experience you know i. It's that idea that. Like i packed up and moved to new york overnight with no place to stay no money to my name and it wasn't because of the way show business works. I wasn't paid for my first few months on show at an. I had just been the of me up in a hotel for a week and then i just had to sort of figure it out while working a fulltime job and it was like. Oh yeah like. I think when i got the when i got my show and i wasn't perfect but i think i try to take that experience and also recognize that there are forty one people in this building who are all being asked a lot but are also going through things in their lives and you may not get a window into those things are but you need to make space for those things and you need to respect that while you want these things done at a certain time or in a certain way that there's also this human aspect of that these people aren't you know they're not robots they. They're not a they're not. They're humans they are not machine parts. Yeah the yeah. And they're not cogs in a wheel and you need to. You need to respect that and respecting that means also carrying the weight of that and the weight of that responsibility that you have to. You have to do right by those people and doing right by those people isn't just simply keeping the lights on in the building is also making sure that you were to make sure they feel seeing that they feel like they have they can come into whether it's you or somebody else when there are problems when there are issues or when they're just things they need. Yeah why we have been talking for a while here. I've been keeping you awhile and we all know it's been yeah it's been it's been a great conversation. I wish we could go on much longer. I mean we. I have i had things. Wow oh i have to be on the. I have to be on dana. Gold doctors aus show sure. That's i'm sure if i look back up. That's the thing you're not just making it up to lease doctor. Doctors ahah show. You don't know about that again station. Just weren't you weren't into. I also wanna make weird shows and animated. Yeah yeah you've done some puppetry i. We didn't have time to really get into the pump work. Yeah yeah. I mean puppet show That's kind of my version of star trek in space or star. Trek isn't eighty six base. Yeah star trek but but focusing on the kind of the the expandable characters on that. Yeah i want to try to get back into animation. I actually learned animation. When i was a child. I community college classes. When i was like twelve or so and so Would like get back into that world too but always love late night Yeah and i'm happy that you guys are still doing stuff in finding ways in a mix of old where the old man of the deal but you know and i mean everything seems to be so much more topical now you know the some of them are. Some of them are less topical than others. Some of them were seemed to be about party games. As as don rickles said when he was when somebody asked him it was in the commercial break asked him like are or maybe it was even on the show like asked him if he was was going to be on one of these shows. He said yeah. I can't get booked on that show. Because i don't play ping pong i- so oh thanks. God don rickles can say it but anyway thank you so much for the time and i hope when this all sorts out we can grab a drink or something when all the world starts up again. I would love that simon. Thank you talked about it. We talked a little bit about it before. But you really what you all did and not just with late night but as we think about what you did with andy richter controls universe night so much of what i think about what i think about the comedy that i have wanted to make and be a part of i think about. Even you know you at improv olympic. Somebody who went through that system. Yeah i you are somebody that i appreciate and have learned a lot from simply by getting watch you l. Thank you and in the opportunities when we've gotten to talk i've always been grateful for them and always Enjoy and hopes that. I would get to talk to you and get to laugh with you. And i i think about when i started doing late night shows i wanted to. I wanted to do conan. That was the show. I wanted to do before i did. Any of the other ones and one of my greatest moments as a late night moment was getting to do calling with you guys and it's nations d. was oh yeah and conan had said perform and when they're done don't give up your seat and he was telling me while they're performing and it was very odd thing because it felt like i was being invited in on the joke. Yeah yeah and i and they came. And i stood up and i wasn't gonna move and they immediately moved me over and i'm sitting on the couch with you and i remember jack. Black sat in the chair in a very odd way. Like i think he just like he'd put his feet in the chair. Yeah and colin started talking about it. And then you and i and kyle all did too. Yeah and it was this thing where you guys made me feel so welcome to this was just we were providing but it felt like you all welcomed me into the space in a way that I was so grateful for and so reached above and it really made me feel okay. Yeah they see me as an equal appear. And so thank you here. That's really about the nicest thing i've heard in months so i i really appreciate it Well thank you. What a lovely way to end This episode of the three questions. Thank you again why. It's an act for a spent some time with us and talking and thank you all. Thank you all out there for listening. i will get back at your next week with more of this. I guess us a no of just this. Oh this whiny voice in the in the way. I'm sad that kind of thing. That boy our yeah anyway. That's right come back next week for more sad boy. Our the three questions with is team coco and annual production is produced by me. Kevin bertolt executive produced adam saks and jeff. Ross team coco an chris. Bannon and colin anderson. Adiel are supervising producers. Aaron blair associate produced by gen samples and to high and engineered by will becton. And if you haven't already make sure to rate and review the three questions with andy. Richter on apple podcasts pro. This has been eighteen cocoa the duchy in association with wolf. If you're feeling depressed overwhelmed or anxious better help offers online. Licensed counselors who are trained to listen and help talk with your counselor in a private online environment at your convenience. Just fill out a questionnaire to assess your specific needs. Then get matched with a counselor in under forty eight hours. It's an affordable option and for our listeners. You get ten percent off your first month with the discount code. Three questions get started today at better. H e l p dot com slash. Three questions talk to a therapist online and get help.

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Side Effects of Pan Africanism, Part 2 (with Noma Dumezweni and Michaela Coel)

Small Doses

50:21 min | 2 years ago

Side Effects of Pan Africanism, Part 2 (with Noma Dumezweni and Michaela Coel)

"Hi, I'm John David booder, host of the hit podcast done disappeared. We both. Now, there are a lot of true crime podcast out there. Crime file true. Crime dump truck my dearest disappearance. Miscreant shovel and pail generation missing. Megan Murphy, professors little kiss ass f- town. But there's only one place to listen to me, John David booder put all these shows in their place done disappeared season. Three coming January twentieth. Twenty nine thousand nine seasons. One and two available. Now you want? Disappointed. The big in big wireless providers. Stands for a lot of things big contracts, big bills and big fees. What big wireless doesn't want? You to know is there's a way to cut your wireless Bill down to just fifteen bucks a month. Introducing mobile the game changing company that's taken everything wrong with big wireless and made it right? Mitt mobile makes it so easy to cut your Bill down to just fifteen bucks a month. You can even keep your old number along with all your existing contacts with any mobile plan. There's no more paying for unlimited data that you'll never use. And if you're not one hundred percent satisfied mint mobile has you covered with their seven day money back guarantee to get your new wireless plan for just fifteen bucks a month, plus free shipping on your mobile sim card. Go to mitt mobile dot com slash podcast. That's mint mobile dot com slash podcast. Cut your wireless. Bill to fifteen bucks a month and get free shipping on your mobile Simcock. Hard at MIT mobile dot com slash podcast. Funky. Welcome to part, two pan. African is with no MS Winnie from Harry, Potter's the curse child and Michaela. Cole joined gum both of them are starring in the Netflix show, black earth rising. They were here last week talking about what it is to be a black person in all different places of the world. That is what I consider and many other people consider pan-africanism the conversation was so real so full, and so hilarious that you know, what guided in two and here it is the second dose. There's two kinds of people people who happen to be white. The flow. Oh. Right now, man. Boom. That's Houma friends. Unlike yet, they have to be that stink. But I fast. I think it'd be fun to me. I need to expand again because. Well, we just at that. Now that I mean that is how I feel like there's there's people who subscribe to deed base people subscribed to this Balaji and the people who don't nine Jay. Among. You'll so. As soon. Much insight always like one, she's like the bass. I. Only. I'm back tonight. I'm looking I've been set in since I so g so. Seventeen. That's not. Pretty. We know that would be my. So that so, you know, what you said, you Airmont housemate mate? He's like updated it with him for a free and hockey is now we live in a full bedroom Smain free while people leave out with I wanna move. And unem-. So well now, and what we just said because it's like he doesn't choose to subscribe to his if light by being booed. It's like, it's. Now, everything with it. Because it's like there's a if almost like he's just the business pupil and it's lying nother this race. Israel. Draw is like it's like all you is like it wasn't your yet show. You say he said. He said I have to cut out of him. It's like, and you can see them going. Yeah. Only just happens to this him. And not just. Ash has Subic knowledge that even though. Oh, yes. The two part the happening to Basil's about presumptive. We have in fact, I cannot say this the same. But for example. Fester immigrants in the riots. We have this whole idea of every go home. You know, we have this as we thought about yet goes you can't. Ah for. Basically, I realized that my house may. Who does not fit in with this petition kind of Brexit narrative? But he doesn't have any good because he's from the so he thought and you can kind of see like stocky. Yes. Yes. He wanted to go with this. Where can I go actually my heart does 'cause we live in love? No, we're not like you. Second. I was always a now is with gratitude we have to notice that we can be. Mice variance that with black American friends. Making. But also experienced that the people who have tried to undermine my access to American culture, my access to knowledge myself as like American because I have a duality haddish mother whose religion and being able to say, I can go I can go to a place that I can call home. I mean, literally a dual citizen I can go. I. Presidency. I could leave anything. And so, you know, there's there's something to be said. And I've knowledge though, that there is something to having that duality within me as someone who's a member of the pan African community. And I think that when it came to like black folks in America acknowledging their severed connection. Yes, yet to the continent in it was you know, what? No where you from. Yes. And it was it was a desire to say like, no, we want to reclaim menace goes back to even like, Marcus, Garvey, and human. I a, you know, the black star line and wanting to reclaim connection that had been stolen from us viewing like you have to like have Stockholm syndrome with a place in ministry track. Like, there's there's there's info then there's also like a concerted effort on the part of certain individuals to say will we need to make a tribe of black Americans. So I heard people refer themselves as send of slaves and that they are specific. Lack Americans meaning that they are the descendants of shadow slavery in America. And so this country was built on their backs. And so only they should have access to the funds and the the positives etcetera that come from being black American in this country. I don't agree with that. Outside. I can understand I can understand with whether it's on some account. Well, I hadn't heard that either. Until like, I've started being called people were calling me a culture vulture day that I was appropriate culture. They were saying that because my mother's from Grenada. I'm not really like American which brings us back to do another question. So interesting I told so many times that I not I've been told so many times that I'm black not African American. So only reason I wanna be African American is because I'm in search for an identity. I've been told that my bloodline probably has never been to Africa. It erupts me that so many black people are pro black. But not pro African I refuse to believe anything else. Do you have any book mendacious or bodies of knowledge? So that I can immerse myself in truth went tougher. She said their bloodlines of not me, I'm sorry. They are not not. But what does that mean? So well, aren't we couldn't we only for Africa? Metal ju- ace is there are black people of this continent who were not. Vice Lavery, correct. Okay. And they're they're considered native American or Indian? Uh-huh. Well, I think that's what she means. I that what if she how much she means. That's what it is. If that's what she's trying to discern not sorta that news hours. These are black people. Yes. Saying that she didn't come on street. Yeah. Point about all of our stores are extrordinary. You also extracted. So the the true to find out who the fuck you all he at let you don't really really know where we're we're basing this on like, ancestry dot. I trust. Telling you you're from. So it's like what you Don. Have you? It's not mainly not mainly black people as in light. It's like everybody is our on its. I'm missing what else on last office bullshit? Any snow is. With her mother was the post. Her mother, they said her mother had an African skeleton. What does? What? With a. Again, into the Victorians commit to about that hot sun blackness because they said the African heads this shape allies yet Alimentos. Our off a lot of people being very intellectual when they say things like that. And I'm like. Because I made him legally something do go here yet. The reality. Yeah, I'm gonna I'm gonna think of some for this young woman. But. But something that happens year happens in America and also happens when you go to different places as black person, we are still judging each other's blackness, always based on based on metrics. Honestly to my feeling were are really not as we've been are the same way that life West Indians will come to America. And then judge Latin Americans be like, you're lazy or this year. That is the same way. Like, but Americans delay the. But it was about the caravans the West Indies Africans vul-, I was me and a the African couple. It was wet you belong Britain because you'll the Africans Africa not Jewish the Jamaicans right nine me on Jonah Brixton, right? All right. Incident gallons visions of that. And you have like Americans will be like Africans are already edited of that that you'll have Atkins. It'll be like Americans are this, you know. And it's like, so what are we doing? What what are we doing? What post office in Peckham Brixton? Kuda? I remember this getting in the place of his queuing. This woman. Spending, man. Hateful africa. It was a. Yeah. I've never heard that before. Wow. Wow. Yes. It was. Is she said that she split to me off to his own from South Africa. Do. Look down. Here's the thing. I think that the other argument is well all white people don't have to get along like white. There's Irish people who didn't like talian Tian's in the British people who don't like there's English people who like low social wells, Billy Wright writing. So why are we expected? Exactly why why are we at a different standard? Why can't we have the same freedom to not like somebody from a different culture that they had? I'm gonna make the same history of other nice lot English. People talion villa snug. Come the personal Unimak dot do literally. I mean, not they England literally stole Scotland. I mean, I industry we got our smell, you know, it's. It's. Economic theft. But it is in a they smell differently. No, no, they do not if people notice. I'm here. But very joining. Outcomes. Hole. What people then take on braces? The agents it call. The Anglo Saxon. British rice, look, how a novel white rice ago, they smell that does not happen. I was we will do that. I'm of a different, but it is different expression. Because the British are culturally, the British are very much more pulled in you know, they're very much like did our labor. I have no problem saying that they smell they smell that food states basic ability to other white people do to India paying on out about me to other people that are Brown. So we're talking end. So basically where taking on the up yet fresh be resin. Yes. Yes. But Dominy handfuls idea of freedom is not about having a magic immigration. Kotova added reaction, why brush say fucking rage. Oh, my God introit overly. I mean, just this idea of like, I'm here tools. I'm here. This is my beach. Now, you know, this is. Ingredient in Cuba. That's everywhere this beach, I'm here. Now, you know, and they come with a sensitive. It's the same all like not. They're not many veal might they cleaned you decrease. You know, what I've been saying basically like I don't wanna hear about not all when most of our doing. Yes. So don't tell me. Like, I if I if I've seen more than I've seen less than. That's my experience like we can all getting getting tired of having to preface everything with. It's my theory. The is my experience. Free percents. I'm like, always his mind. Training people to have to fuck and deal with it. I'm talking you want. If my is I'm not gonna keep saying in my opinion. The thing of cricket is experience until I left. And you hear me say, I don't know about this. Yes. Like that and Cuco fees in this launch unto me. But like all federal on L Remax. If that target, I asked you for something just say, I don't know don't say, no, you don't know. Because when I go to the island, find the shape. You and be like. How kotex tampons with their here? What right where? Telling them is just so is no China win over the wanted these Pacific that to go somewhere else. He's is thinking boy a weapon. Maybe along Lamey. What's important senses? Not make that says at the moment as human being as direction and a half the mass weights. Magic from break. I take night. So let's see what will happen. That's the Martin tell you must be Trump. My story has outgained minds. 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I am going to say again because then bone there. Go dot com slash small doses. To get fifty dollars off your purse Burgess one hundred dollars or more. Don't tell me. You didn't hear what I did? I am an avid traveler at the black American one of my favorite things getting to know, black people's left full juice from elsewhere, the Daf, bro. Can you share particularly enlightening memorable experience that you've had learning about a black culture outside of? I can tell. Yeah. A couple when I went to Ghana. I really had no frame of. I will admit that my famous reference for Africa as a continent was very limited. Right. I had I had sparse out. Like, I k-. I know what is considered the, Dan, I know like Egypt. I think for a lot of people they think the continent of Africa was like, nausea. Like, if they really they really all like, that's what a lot of people think Africa. It looks like he's bars. Bars fun, you know, desert and huts rights, they think it like, nausea. But then like I had South African awareness. I don't have remember if you up. Yeah. I don't have a of reference for Kenya. Outside of like the end of the cargo yet. I don't have have own unless on C films showing me some concept. I genuinely will admit like I was coming in with a splintered big picture. So I was shocked when I went to Cape Coast Ghana at how tropical it was. But it's like you dumb. No, it was wrong to act waiter and strop ical. But it was like I was ingred up. I mean, I really honestly could not believe how Caribbean. It felt it's in those Mojo on educated you were about one hundred percent, right. But it's in the I mean, we literally at a restaurant watching the ocean with palm trees, they're blasting Buju. And we're like really, but yes, but they were eating food, man. I'm like, what is that those moments where you're like, we are have the manual label because this one like, I know there is a diocese because I am in a completely quote unquote, foreign place right now continent feels exactly like the blackness. I not in like the terrain. I know the wanna make a clear I'm not just talking about like all beach on trees. Will they have that insight with you know, whatever. No. It was that. There was an energy in that space. It was a tropical bit with it had like an island energy on. When yet you brought up the so that was very much like one of those moments of like you. We are connected. What is? Again, I want to get specifically what is particularly enlightening experience that you had learning about culture outside of your was it was a painful, it was maybe when people may shoot me down for this. But this was my experience sagana gone of the fed timing twenty seventeen and I'm being to South Africa. Cape Town, Joe hunters bag full seven weeks in my life in twenty fourteen making my family, we engaged with my dad after recite he is a to sing it briefly. I go. Oh, this is once said gonna the pre the Princess in the kingdom's says they haven't gone through a part time. They haven't known in while note, whether they haven't gone through Atlanta window, and I realized that I've been to have a confession is a black person. I find Capetown client haunt. Yes. China is blacks whites college. Let's whites carriage. Everyone says it's a matter from everyone. This is what I observed. I go to Ghana and that people holding bettas up for the prince walking around in the goal has he always back manager, Wes the counters eight, but the place he grew up. How does it? How does it break down to the sun? S drives. Bought sense of. Oh, yes. Roof on all as they evolve. Growing up with world. They look by them, the let black people as strikes people in South Africa have gone out with you know, whether or not whether and. Whoa. I come from this place of pain Dutt's won't mind distances by parents had to flee because they looked like me, and they were not allowed in that place on that could cut with other people stayed. We must understand on the moon. The had to stay a month price make choice without I get to live. This at sprains in growing up here not to congregate. Oh, you guys. Love yourself, more views. L? It's the best out good. Let's get behind. This is my observation with a swipe. But I go I knowledge story. Yeah. It's by TS. I'm like there's like so many which girl I'm lacking good night. Like the light kind of uplifting wants that's. I would say attorney this off the question of my experience for we was really a, you know, I've never been in a place with shaved heads with just doc jockettes Faulk being told I'm beautiful on the street. But were you d you in communities of afro Latino Appalachian ex people? Yeah. As come from Britain in when you were in Puerto Rico yet just as in like lived in L, you'll get the rainforest. I know so wherever the tourists on the beach are coming with just won't bay tour strip event up, but kind of just like either into restaurants, you find west kind of locally Bill restaurants government in. You know, being not having any hair of being very dog. I live my life guy. I've done is taken away every kind of of femininity that I could be have them being there and being like since you're peaceful, woken un-islamic. Oh, this is nice too. That was kind of a. Of blah. What are leaving? Nothing could be learning anything about their culture. I mean, I'm not that together in unity was after the big stone. Many people left on those remained stays on kind of welcome tourists in a didn't learn I mean apart from Smith's financial active on high at an experience where you learn something about black American culture that you hadn't who what gonna grow lad without being give me a pro yet. Like, my mother for her seventieth birthday wanted to go to Memphis, Tennessee music place, which so like for me being an American. I'm like. Fuck you wanna go to Memphis yet? I'm like, why do you want to? But it's like taking for granted the fact that like this is my country, and it's acceptable. It's year. So like with over my mother on. My mother, and my mom is like no when I was in Grenada growing up, and I'm listening to Elvis opening be king. And I'm listening to like watch stacks. They're all making this music in Memphis over her methods. Dislike hallowed race of known lucky vari- or one million percent, I named Elvis, but Memphis as Memphis is in a neat. So Memphis is use it like I mean, the percentage of black holes in Memphis is is. On the site of markings, passing exactly. Lorraine hotel Zillur. Yes, civil rights. You know, we're recording today on Martin. Yes. So this little rights movement was, you know, had an incredible stake in Memphis, and and so you know for her. Yes. So I think Elvis owes it Martin forget I'll get a little about that for her. I'm thinking about like, she came to Memphis because Memphis for her was a site of black American musical culture that she had no access to when she was living in when she was living in Grenada. So for my mom, her injury way into black American culture has been solely me and music. That's it. So like for her going to Memphis, she then also went to a underground railroad via. Okay. Which like she's read about that. But like she'd never learned that there were that they were quilts used on the underground railroad as maps to know where. To go. Like, she'd never learned that like she'd never learned that in in Memphis. You're the magnolia tree outside of your home with a sign that you were safe house. And now, we Netflix fiction to had never, you know. So like, he speaking to her pan-african experience, my like, she had never had access to any of that information until sheet with seventy Joe's to go to Memphis. So okay. So that's yes. I wouldn't say I've had any kind of hilly but not to America. It would be like mom mom. It would be going to Ghana. I learn about. The black experience of a gun in of even guide to costal. Those were that that was kind of leading every other experiences been being a a. A minority in a wide spray. So it's been kind of going to Gary all France. Oh, Taina Dora. Did you ever have any experience with the black culture in France? Yeah. I mean. Yeah. Of course. I did. Yeah. But the people. Oh. Gun. I mean gone either on it now because I have a Wiki with income listening. I'm human, but I I can understand that way. More the payers, like the weeds in Paris. I know people are gonna be texting me like a man of but exit fight mighty. I. Side of we just need about a we've if you're gonna do it. Do it. Right. All the entrepreneur about the what we assigned t the wearing believe in that was put unusual. They're wearing as it's there doesn't matter. It doesn't matter. How good the we've is because as long as you are wary Aleve your bed. One hundred African expensive in Parsi experience, intense only outage. Let's. Us me. Eliza Emmanuel plan checks in that hotel, the joint faces and I remember in that day in old is the front line of the reception was why people not even I. That was a wind because at a week. But I remember those amendment will odiferous people. This is all filming different ways in different people saying places, we will mean by people outside of the garden. I remember this woman coming up to me on the list and say to keep you always Dan is bound woman telling us to keep on his excuse me. She's an she'd been sent out scores. Straight to us and not be so much in the next morning. I wake up then I saw all the people in the cleaning in have yet would not I'm but. The power. The about the the spirits of their son starts people have but any areas. Yes, I get that. That's food for so long. You ought to be here. The by you. If. But then you have to go for that. She's learned as a in a husband fries. All she has learned is that if something she can easily manage black people, but what people outta shame outta jetty richer before we had to say you to become I on. Yeah. I know it's I mean, she came sank. But she was missing we've allow we've been loud, we will really fucking loud radio. It was really lay on with other people will. But she it was a gut instinct that she can tell a nod. Yes, I'm the thing is she should tell anybody try keeping eighty I it's very it's it's this complex. I mean, there's so many spirits is FRANZ was was just intrusive useful for goodness sake. I mean FRANZ artist have I'm gonna I mean, my friends is I mean up and chase on the ship. Had stones thrown to me. Like literally like people pelting new. Starts met running down the streets. This is I mean, we're definitely. Dennis FRANZ study when black. But that's what I'm talking about. Mccain on them. I wanna talk about so to America. Because even if it's just like American like, there's no way that, you know, everything about black American culture. No. About my America know about, but when they asked about like America you rely about no about no, no he relied is that the really that. I don't do. I didn't get out with my. Oh about I've been here. I came to Africa bunk and nothing about little bit. Wait, wait, wait. When I said, I was reborn mininum move you destroyed in the beginning of his car. I said when I came to New York, it was like, oh, this is black people who are like proud of the skin that they were boom with who are not buttery coming view of kind of like research somethings tribal Africa in that adorn themselves in indisp- paints. That wasn't all the different kind of music. What what he's. Yeah. I've never seen this stuff before never walked around in a pug being the president jersey. Yes is prevent being the in the majority as dribble. I don't send that extra festival festival really Jong job couch. It's many though. Yeah. I mean, that's a being hit on the. I know that was none experience like black America actual proper reading about of social as at full teen years old. That's while. There's this an how. Even like, hell, persistence. Glenda, America's tribal in ways that it doesn't acknowledge. Everybody's living everywhere is live someplace and we've done acknowledged like we don't ignore it. Like if you live in states like the bay is like a truck, it's a different experience than living in light emollient Schreiber now inside. Analogy had the whole culturally. We don't typically acknowledged that way. But everyone rep say block everything city same as you. Exactly. But like in countries in Africa, you know, people, you know, I'm I'm thirty. But in America is like stir trick. I made an attempt. See? Was like awesome. No. But there's just like I bring up because even living in black America as a black person. There are elements of black American culture that I have learned about outside of mine personally, Marion so light soar when you go to the bay young gets a whole other shit. How in highs avai? Let's just put this out before anybody gets confused either know anything about America, I live here. I arrived today. Enter navy. I am here for five day. Then I got back to prison. I anything about America. Our by laws could take the hallway. I'm good. I'm actually going to be living in the White House. Today are being heart. In the I'm like idleness on. Yet will too. Friends hit. I. Actors huge. I recently didn't article for British newspaper about gun beckons gonna oppose domains ground, and that's a global Amercia. So it was about being British having parents were born in Africa, and about Brexit where telling people to go I'm going off while yet like why I guess undergoing took him to me 'cause bony, but one gone people have moved back to Ghana, and I left of comments from people in America. Go kind of lucky you you have to go to either behind. Yes. And you go yet is I don't know this place. It wasn't about America. It wasn't for America. So there may be off good about black person. But it's not weighs about America. And that seemed I don't need not what pan African ISM is all about. I'm you go down a lot of Americans who are black are. Fall fate to the same hubris that Americans of all cultural and ethnic backgrounds fall to which is the fact that America positions itself as the beyond Endo, and as black folks, a there are there are black folks in America who fail to or who choose not to grasp that there are black experiences in other places. There is something to be said for being a black American again races grunts down at had real concert. It's exactly actually. No. We've had a knowledge the jury's. What's merica movies? You're there Verde. They planned American the Malacca rain. She -perienced like Barrett's do look to. We have friends K cheat in. You know? Has record with truck with point. The I never Desmond's own a national definitely that really is like a whole new generation we win. Towers. It was like I was watching on Monte pie. It's all about the teeth. 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We are all uniquely and defiantly and definitively back in our in our individual experiences. And that is what pan-africanism is be able to acknowledge that difference while unifying in the community that has had to be created in spite of the colonial attempt to oppress and unfortunately at this thing. It is the only unfortunate issue with with pan-africanism is that it has been it was forced to be created out of spite to oppression for all the services. Pan-africanism happened because ships split up African people and took us to different places across the nation. I mean across the world against our will. So to me, I feel like the the counter to that is to willfully return a connection to those places. Even if it's not by you physically being like, I have to go there to your point. It's by you at knowledge ING, the connectivity of people who are from there, and who you by nature of history, and by blood have connection to even if it's not proven to you by ancestry dot com. And after. If you have a connection to by simply shared experience and by shared history. Diplomats shared history at listen shared history is what has I've Lille driven so much of culture shared history. Now change plight. We have shared it's universal. But a lot of us. Don't wanna have the acknowledgement of shared history for fear of Gessen for fear of you to full babes differences of build ability of couse on but wrecks on the big picture, if you talked to several different resume or will look at the world where the interesting way. I have to just bowling. Aw. Which is about it. Simple still being excessive. Yeah. Look at mount the guy is it to lente now. But just yet I'm through. I don't know. I I really am by that. We were able first of all let me just point out. You guys we made this happen like on the fly. Neither do out there. I'm jet like so. Offended by something. On the line today. But what happened today is black excellence? It's black. You do you of you is? A moment of Yasser. So we have miss nomads. Honey. Hey, it's me get goal can see them both. Starring in back. Is the twenty fifth when they said a window the twenty six racists lead, you all fits? Licks is still starting on the twenty fifth knifeless next day. You can see me. The next day necessarily, but you will never know you from his ally. Yeah. These. Oh, my. I can't wait to see the show and let you all came. This evening was comments your trust change.

America Africa Ghana Memphis Netflix South Africa Africa Grenada John David booder China Mitt mobile Britain hockey Martin Amanda Dan Megan Murphy Bill