3 Burst results for "Greg Kreindler"

"greg kreindler" Discussed on Effectively Wild: A FanGraphs Baseball Podcast

Effectively Wild: A FanGraphs Baseball Podcast

05:59 min | 8 months ago

"greg kreindler" Discussed on Effectively Wild: A FanGraphs Baseball Podcast

"Thank you Dan. That was a little lost on that bridge, but you know, it was pretty high too. Well, that was wonderful. This will tie this over until we can see you live or until the next baseball album comes out or maybe if all of our listeners go to the Dan burn song store right now and request baseball songs, I guess that would be one way to get another album of burn baseball songs a little sooner. This has been a great pleasure. I will link to all of the things that we've discussed today on our show page. You can find Dan on Twitter at Dan burn headquarters. You can find his website in the song store and all of his music at Dan burn dot com. And thanks so much for talking and playing today. This was great. Thanks for having me on. I really enjoyed it. Maybe we'll talk to you next season. I hope so. Okay. All right, that will do it for today and for this week. Thanks to all of our guests, Billy Freeman, Greg kreindler, and Dan burn. Just joyous to talk to and listen to. That kind of blank done some baseball music that I do enjoy while I was talking to Dan. I know if you go back and listen to episode 1535 when I did with Sam Miller and Andy McCullough, where we talked about baseball songs, I listed some others that I have taken a shine too. We were pretty hard on baseball music in that episode as I recall, but it hits a bit different when you have a baseball musician on the show to play you some baseball songs and dances are very good. So I'm not sure we've had live music on the podcast previously other than my wife once playing the stat last time. So thanks to everyone for making this series so fun. And as promised last time, I will wrap up with a few more messages from readers who wrote in in response to my conversation with Meg last week about learning to love a sport later in life. Quite a few listeners shared with us their stories of learning to love baseball after the typical time or in an atypical way. I read a few of these emails last time and I will read a few more today. So Nathan says, I want to react to your skepticism about becoming a fan of a new sport as an adult, because I did just that with baseball. I have a French person living in France and grew up playing and watching mostly soccer because it's the thing here and I saw my local team Olympic Lyonnais win several titles, but I got bored of the sport later and spent several years without watching any sport. Then I got into baseball. It took me time to like it and understand it. I definitely lived it like learning a new language as Ben said, and after 6 years, I can assume I'm a fan of the sport, which isn't really popular here. What kept my interest alive is that like many European kids, I was fed by American culture as a child, especially movies. In those movies, they would often be baseball mentioned or even played by the main characters. I think of hook, for example. It was something that was part of another reality, but not mine. Baseball was still a myth to me when I seriously dug into it around age 27, and it was thrilling to discover all the world around it. Stats history, players, the game itself, and the fact that there's always something new to learn. I felt like a kid again, thanks to Nathan, who is a Patreon supporter now, so I'm glad he decided to learn my love baseball. All right, this message is from Tom, who describes his reverse journey from cricket, perhaps like any good pastime, I got into baseball accidentally as a former procrastination. I was entering the final stages of my PhD on the work of Don delillo and thought I could trick myself into wanting to work on underworld by watching some of the what I now realized to be very condensed highlights packages put together by MLB. Maybe it just happened to be the commentary teams on the games I watched or an editorial quirk, but the more I watched, the more being at the warning track were at the wall seemed crucial to narrating the flight of a home run baseball, but this phrase also gave me a way of thinking about how history flows in underworld, how the collective euphoria commented upon and called by Russ Hodges in the 50s, turns into horror and dismay at the ruins of The Bronx in the 90s, ravaged by the logics of capital. The wall over which Bobby Thompson hits his home run baseball in 1951, folds into another wall in the novel, the wall, a ruined section of The Bronx, where a young street girl, the angel esmeralda, is raped and murdered in the novel's 1990 epilogue. I guess in this way, the story of a baseball and the mythologies around the game and its forms helped me think through underworld and its own trajectory from progress to catastrophe, and for that I paid daily tribute to the baseball gods. This was around 2019, so it was very easy to identify and follow that Dodger side. However, supporting the best team with such a flimsy reason to a novel didn't quite sit right. My partner who is American, but cares little for baseball, grew up in the New York suburbs, but supporting the Yankees seemed equally unconscionable. During the pandemic, we started to enjoy bird watching, or maybe just playing wingspan, so she decided that we should support a bird associated team, but unfortunately conspired to pick the most lowly one the Orioles. Oh well, things will be better for the birds someday. And our last message comes from anni, another Patreon supporter who says her fandom is complicated. I'm an immigrant from Bangladesh. We came to Boston when I was two. My uncle often had Red Sox games on, but I never went to a game or understood anything about it. We moved to greater Toronto at age 8 and it wasn't until high school that a rambling geography teacher piqued my interest, mentioning that even a 30% success rate counts as successful for a baseball player, one of my pet peeves, of course, only applies to batting average, not on base percentage on a continued my fandom started with reading Moneyball in the fan graphs glos and the Red Sox were my team automatically for some reason. I would try to hold a little less judgment about people becoming fans late as looking back. I realized my exposure was very much limited by being a broke immigrant family. We had a high school trip to a J's game, but it was too expensive and I didn't actually attend my first baseball game until 2016 at Fenway for the first couple of years I could only see my team for the handful of J Sox games shown available on TV. I remember being so excited after saving up the money for MLB TV and tried to watch every single game. All that said, I'm no longer a Red Sox fan, so Meg might have a point about lacking an inescapable attachment to.

baseball Dan Dan burn headquarters Billy Freeman Greg kreindler Dan burn Andy McCullough Patreon Olympic Lyonnais Sam Miller Nathan Russ Hodges Bobby Thompson Meg Don delillo Twitter soccer France Ben cricket
"greg kreindler" Discussed on Effectively Wild: A FanGraphs Baseball Podcast

Effectively Wild: A FanGraphs Baseball Podcast

07:15 min | 8 months ago

"greg kreindler" Discussed on Effectively Wild: A FanGraphs Baseball Podcast

"I am Ben Lindbergh of the ringer, my co host Meg rally of fan grass is off this week, she'll be back next week, and so in her absence, I've been doing a podcast me series of conversations with people who make cool baseball stuff that's different from what Meghan I do, so not primarily writing or podcasting a couple episodes ago, I talked to baseball YouTuber Bailey Freeman of foolish baseball last time I talked to baseball painter, Greg kreindler, and this episode will conclude the trilogy. Maybe I'll do a sequel trilogy at some point because those always work out well. So we've covered video. We've covered painting. What else is there, really? Well, there are many more options actually, but today we'll be devoted to music. This episode will be a combination conversation and concert. So let's get to our guest whose name is Dan burn, Dan is a singer songwriter whose music sort of straddles folk and rock. He's released about 20 full length albums dating back to the mid 90s, along with numerous EPs and other projects. He's written music for plays and also for a few films, including walk hard. He's also a baseball fan, and he's released a couple of collections of baseball songs, including double header, a double album, and rivalry, which came out last year. So lights down curtains up, please lend your ears to Dan burn, who joins me now. So the conceit of this series is that I am talking to creators who work mainly in a medium other than writing or podcasting. But my guest today works in all the media, I think. I'm not sure there is a medium that Dan burn hasn't hit on at some point. He is an author. He is a podcaster, but he's also a visual artist and most famously a musician. And he is here today to talk about his music and also about baseball Dan welcome to the show. Well, thanks for having me on. So I know that baseball is really just a small part of your musical output and it's an important part to me and many other baseball fans and appreciators of your work. But I think I know more about your musical origins than I do about your history as someone who cares about baseball. And I want to talk about both, but maybe we can start with the letter. How did you get into the game? Let's talk about baseball. Yeah. Well, other than, you know, playing it with my friends and always thrown and hitting and catching and doing all that stuff. I sort of came to the game like the big game, the major league game. Kind of in a literary way for quite a while. I grew up in a place where they weren't any major league teams for any in the state of Iowa and you know you had to go pretty far. Yeah. These days you can't even watch major league kittens in Iowa often with the blackout policy on MLP TV. Well, at the time we had radio, of course, the occasional game of the week once in a once in a great while, there'd be like the team you wanted to see. But anyway, so there were a lot of books. So I read all the books and so I had this feeling for the lore of the game. I think before I even started going to a lot of games, so that was that's a lot to sort of bring with you when you know I started going to games in Wrigley when I was just out of college and I was living in Chicago. I moved like 8 times in two years in every move. Coincidentally or not got me closer to Wrigley to the point where I could hear Harry out my window. And so but yeah, I never thought that I was riding a collection of baseball songs. I just every season there'd be another baseball song or two, because I liked it and it spoke to me in the rhythm of the game as has often been noted is a very conducive to literary daydreaming. Right. You know, so it just kind of came naturally. So you didn't initially have a strong affinity for a particular team or particular players. You kind of became a cubs fan eventually or yeah, I mean I did have strong affinity at a very strong affinity. First for the Giants for a long time. And then when I was in Chicago, that kind of faded out. And you couldn't help but be a cubs fan. And then I went to Los Angeles and to some of my the horror of some of my friends eventually swung over to the Dodgers. But much later I was a Giants fan in LA for a long time fighting the winds, and then as soon as I kind of gave up the Giants and latched on with the Dodgers, that's when the giant started winning. So a little karma there. So you didn't have any trouble switching loyalties was there a poll that you found hard to give up or it was just, hey, I'm in a place that's a new phase of my life. I'm rooting for you. I mean, when I was when I was in New York for a while, you know, you can't you get swept up in in those teams, whether it's the nicks or the Yankees or the mets or, you know, you just kind of do. If you're gonna let yourself, I mean, there's a school of thought that I mean, I think like a Red Sox fan. They don't drift too much. They, you know, they go to wherever, and they're still like, they just can't give that up. But I think maybe because I was from a place where people's affiliations were kind of fluid, you know, and like this guy would be the Cardinals and this guy would be the twins and this guy would be the brewers and then these guys would be the cubs and occasionally there'd be a White Sox. You know, it's like, and then you hear them all on the radio. So I think I became more a fan of the game itself. I mean, at any one time I'll be rooting hard for someone, but I have one of the things I'm proud of is a collection of songs and paintings called rivalry, all about giants and Dodgers, which to me, I mean, that's such a great rivalry. I think the rivalry that rivalry may be better than all the others, just because they moved, you know. I mean, that's an amazing thing, and then you pick up your rivalry 3000 miles later. Anyway, it sort of came of, I guess, at some point being a fan of this one and some point being a fan of this one. But at the end of the day, just kind of psyched about the rivalry itself. Yeah, well, no one would know better than you about that rivalry because you've been on both sides of it. A lot of people who've only rooted for one of those two teams in their lives. But what about you? What's your diet in the wool? Affiliation. Well, I grew up in Manhattan and still live here. And so I was a Yankees fan as a kid, and it was a pretty good time to be a Yankees fan. I was born in late 1986 and so I was kind of coming of age during the dynasty years for the Yankees. I lived a few subway stops away from the stadium and they were the best team in baseball at the time. So it was kind of inevitable that I would gravitate toward them. And years later, I worked for the team briefly and then came to cover baseball professionally and at that point you start to pay attention to all the teams..

baseball Dan burn Ben Lindbergh Bailey Freeman Greg kreindler Wrigley giants Meghan cubs Iowa Meg Dodgers Dan Chicago Yankees Harry mets Los Angeles Red Sox LA
"greg kreindler" Discussed on Effectively Wild: A FanGraphs Baseball Podcast

Effectively Wild: A FanGraphs Baseball Podcast

05:34 min | 8 months ago

"greg kreindler" Discussed on Effectively Wild: A FanGraphs Baseball Podcast

"Each of whom has to have their own personality and has to kind of look a certain way whether there's somebody who's reading a newspaper or somebody who's smoking a cigar or something like that and they're all dressed differently. There's just there's a lot of visual information in there. There's a lot of stuff happening. I don't know if I don't know if I should say how long it took to do the painting, but it took a very long time and it nearly killed me and thankfully the guy who commissioned it is he's a friend. So he was very patient with me and really just loved watching it kind of come together, but it is out of my life and it's on his wall and that's all that matters. Well, I will link to those two images and to a lot of other coverage of your work and videos and your website at great crank later dot com. That's krt. You can also find Greg on Twitter at Greg ler, where he tweets a lot of images of his work, which makes it a great follow. And I'm glad and I'm sure many others are glad that you found your muse and that it happened to be baseball that we have all gotten to enjoy that. And I'm also grateful that I haven't received any PR emails about Greg kreindler, NFTs, which my inbox is overflowing. These days with NFT this and NFT that and I wish I could unsubscribe from all of them and all the future NFT related emails. So thank you for sparing me. At least that seems like an area that you have not delved into. Yeah, no, not really interested. I think it's great. It's just not really for me. I don't know if I even think it's great. The environment that's fixed. That's true. That is true. All right. Well, this has been a great pleasure to talk to you and learn a little bit about the process that produces these works and thank you very much for coming on in for your time today. Thank you, Ben. I really had a great time. Thanks so much for having me on. All right, that will do it for today, thanks as always for listening and thanks to Craig for his time. He sent me some high resolution images of the paintings that we talked about today. So check the show page if you want to appreciate them in all their glory. Last week, I had a conversation with Meg about learning to love a sport later in life, we talked about how daunting it is and questioned whether we could do it having grown up with baseball the way that we have. And when we discussed that, I invited listeners to write in with their stories of discovering a sport later in life, I don't mean on their deathbeds, I just mean not from birth the way that we are often inculcated into our sport of choice. Many of us hardly have a choice in the matter, or the choices to renounce a sport more so than it is to embrace it. It's just forced upon us and most of us are pretty happy to have it, but it can be tough to replicate that immersion that you get as a kid. But it can be done, and we received quite a few responses from people who told us their stories. So I think I'll read a smattering of those, I'll read a few today and read a few next time. Thanks to everyone who wrote in about it. So this is a message from Patreon supporter Andrew, who says, I'm a late baseball converti from the UK. I got into it as I work often at night and wanted something sports based to listen to. And I got dragged in by the club's Cleveland World Series ESPN radio broadcasts. The main joy for me, which perhaps does partly come from being in the UK is that I had minimal prior knowledge of baseball beforehand other than some basic understanding of the rules. This means I get the satisfaction of learning and figuring out the subtleties of the sport all by myself and without the conventional wisdom handed down from parents, Friends, and or broadcasters that I've ingested about soccer and crickets since birth. For example, I never had to unlearn the value of betting average versus on base percentage. I just thought the objective is not to get out, so why would batting average carry more weight, so I get additional enjoyment in following baseball as a lack of preconceptions and historical cliches is fun. This may also just indicate I am weird and antisocial. You know, I don't think so Andrew, I understand that completely, and I hadn't thought of some of the advantages of flirting his sport this way. You don't have any misconceptions drilled into you before you can understand why they're wrong. All right, this question is from bohan, who says I write to you today to tell you a tale of how I got into baseball. I did not get into baseball late in life as I don't consider myself later into life yet, but I do think my story is rather unorthodox, and you might get a kick out of it. I love a baseball was born out of video games and math. For some context, I'm 26 about to turn 27. I reside in southern Ontario and I emigrated to Canada from China with my parents just about 20 years ago this November. As you can imagine, with my parents both being Chinese, I did not have any familial introduction to baseball, not one bit of it. We initially lived in Montreal in Canada, and so I was very much immersed in hockey culture. My first exposure to baseball was through torrenting PSP games to play on my handheld, which I cracked myself so that I could play downloaded rams. We did not have too much money and my parents were generally pretty against video games, so I couldn't ask them to buy me more games. I simply went online and downloaded them illegally. In middle school, I was looking for new PSP games to play when I noticed that MLB the show O 8 had really high ratings on PSP. I didn't know much about baseball at the time, but I did play FIFA and Madden already, so I knew that I enjoyed sports games, and so I decided to give MLB the show a try. I fell in love with it immediately, fascinated by pitcher batter matchups and how different pitches moved. In 2009, my family would get cable for the first time and I started being able to watch baseball on TV. I became obsessed with watching baseball putting on every.

baseball Greg ler Greg kreindler Greg Meg Andrew Twitter Craig UK Ben ESPN Cleveland bohan soccer Canada Ontario Montreal China hockey