30 Burst results for "Greg Good"

Fox's Greg Gutfeld Weighs in on Perceived COVID Vaccine Risks

Mike Gallagher Podcast

01:55 min | 3 weeks ago

Fox's Greg Gutfeld Weighs in on Perceived COVID Vaccine Risks

"Greg gut failed to lisa boothe pushing back against the narrative that the vaccine is highly dangerous data. The is weird. Because it's self reported and you it's not actually controlled. I mean there's people can write in and say whatever they want. cdc's still uses it as a source of information and that's reflagged early warning signs. And yeah you're right it's self reporting. It's not one hundred percent verifiable but if you look at for one year loan since december twenty twenty till now had more deaths than all other vaccines from nineteen ninety two now and i'm sitting in for me. There's no. I don't think there's any deaths caused by the vaccine. Yes there has been caused by maybe one. No there's been verifiable. Where poor title and henry. I think out of the millions. It's probably close to zero. But that's if someone is not at risk of kobe why would they have to go get vaccinated. It should be up to them in their own personal risk. No but that's an some people should get kobe. That's a different argument. what you're saying. I'm not disagreeing with you. People individual choice dot disagree. When i'm saying you can't say that the vaccine is high risk right now. The data says otherwise. It actually says that it's probably one of the most low risk things anyway. We've got to move on. And i tend to agree with greg. Good field i mean. I don't think it's high risk at. I don't think the data's data supports that at all. But you you get to determine for yourself if you're wanting to take the risk ultimately you get to decide whether you're going to risk getting cogut and that's that's a risk that everybody can take and in a sense. We're all taking a risk with the breakthrough infections that we've seen. There are lots of people who have been vaccinated who've gotten co vid and the vast majority of those people have stayed out of the hospital but this is. This is a decision you get to make. Why doesn't the left wanna let people make that decision for themselves.

Greg Gut Lisa Boothe CDC Henry Greg
Pentagon to Mandate COVID-19 Vaccine for U.S. Service Members

Morning Edition

01:57 min | Last month

Pentagon to Mandate COVID-19 Vaccine for U.S. Service Members

"On Covid 19. That's right. Secretary of Defense Lloyd Austin says he's going to ask President Biden for permission to make all members of the U. S military get vaccinated. He's expected to officially asked the president by mid September because of the Delta variant infections are rising in the military, along with much of the rest of the country. NPR national security correspondent Greg Murray joins us now. Good morning, Greg. Good morning, Debbie. Why now? The vaccine has been available for some time. Now, why hasn't the military ordered this already? Well, the military can give us troops all kinds of orders, but it can't force them to take a vaccine that is not approved by the Food and Drug Administration. The FDA hasn't approved or fully approved any of the covid vaccines that could happen soon, But for now they have emergency authorization, so to make it mandatory for military members, President Biden will have to issue a waiver on national security Grounds and defense Secretary Austin said in his memo yesterday. That's exactly what he's going to do is to ask the president. If this just needs a presidential waiver, something that could have come sooner. Why wait till now? It seems there were several factors The military really does want the troops to buy in. So it's emphasized persuasion up to this point. And there was also some thinking The FDA approval was just around the corner, which would remove the need for a waiver also took some time to review some of the legal issues here. But with the Delta variants surging, the military seems to be saying it just can't wait and risk a new wave of covid cases. And we should note the military vaccine vaccination rate is very much in line with the overall rate among the US population. In both cases, a little over 60% are fully vaccinated, The military says. This just isn't good enough More troops need to get the shots. Pentagon spokesman John Kirby

President Biden Secretary Of Defense Lloyd Aus Greg Murray FDA Secretary Austin U. NPR Debbie Greg United States Pentagon John Kirby
Biden Gives Venezuelans Reprieve to Remain in U.S. Trump Had Rejected

Up First

01:14 min | 7 months ago

Biden Gives Venezuelans Reprieve to Remain in U.S. Trump Had Rejected

"The biden administration is extending temporary protected status to venezuela so this means hundreds of thousands of venezuelans who have fled the political and economic turmoil. In their home country can now legally remain and work here in the us. The order affects more than three hundred thousand people. Many of whom currently live in florida. Npr's greg allen joins us now with more good morning greg. Good morning scott. So what does this mean for. Venezuelans living in the united states without this status. Well you know. Venezuelans have been coming here for more than well over a decade fleeing the economic and political turmoil. Back there in their home country. Those who've come here on visas like student in tourist visas that expired have long. Been in limbo. They're unable to work and they can't really return home safely. Feel so onto this program. They can now legal. Remain here and apply for work permits. It applies to people who arrived here by yesterday march eighth and it goes for eighteen months but it is likely to be renewed as long as the conditions remained the same down there in venezuela in some ways the biden mirrors one that was signed just weeks ago by president trump the day before he left office that wasn't order called deferred enforced departure. It remains in place There similar programs in some ways but lawyers say tps may have some

Biden Administration Venezuela Greg Allen NPR United States Greg Scott Florida Biden
How A Cybersecurity Firm Uncovered The Massive Computer Hack

Morning Edition

05:36 min | 10 months ago

How A Cybersecurity Firm Uncovered The Massive Computer Hack

"David Greene in Los Angeles. And I'm Noel King in Washington, D C. Good morning. How should the U. S government respond to a computer hack that breached both government networks and private companies? Most cyber security experts think Russia is responsible for the Hack and NPR's national security correspondent Craig Marie has been talking to some of them. Good morning, Greg. Good morning. No. Well, perhaps most importantly, is the half over. Absolutely not. It's still ongoing and we're continuing to learn details. We've heard now that the Treasury Department hack occurred in July, and like other government departments, this was just uncovered in recent days. Email of top officials was hacked, though apparently not. The account of Treasury Secretary Steve Mnuchin, also no evidence that classified systems were breached. This information has come from Democratic Senator Ron Wyden, who was briefed on the matter and we can expect this kind of information to sort of dribble out in the weeks and months ahead. As government agencies and private companies go through their computer networks. But clearly much of this is going to fall on the Biden administration to make sure the hack inside government computer networks is over that there's clear attribution on who did it and then to decide how to respond. These major breaches have happened before. Does the government have a strategy to deal with them? No, absolutely not. Again. There are no rules or red lines are clear consequences for adversaries who get caught Now, today what we end up seeing is lots of hand wringing and ultimately some sort of limited responses. Right now, With this current hack. We're seeing wrestling over the definition. Some members of Congress called this an act of war. Now, cyber experts and the intelligence community do see it is a big deal but more along the lines of traditional espionage, albeit on a massive scale. I spoke about this with P. W singer cyber expert at the New America think tank. This was not an act of war. This is more cold War style back and forth espionage stealing of secrets. That's why you've seen the reaction from the intelligence community to be a mix of Oh, my God. What just happened? And Gosh, we got a tip the hat to them. What a coup for them. So if there is no clear way to respond, Greg what of the range of options here? Traditional spying might generate public criticism, kicking out suspected spies, perhaps, um, sanctions, But when this has happened, it really hasn't changed the behavior of Russia. Any other adversaries they still seek. Hacking is a low cost high return proposition. Singer says the U. S can and needs to do much more and should create deterrence in two ways gave a boxing analogy, saying US needs to punch back harder and also develop more resiliency to absorb the growing number of cyber blows. Make the parallel to Mike Tyson. You don't hit him because he'll punch you back in the face vs Mohammad Ali rope a dope right through resilience where you don't hit me because it just won't work out for you. What else do we know? So we know that the government and private companies were both hacked. What do we know about the private companies? We haven't heard that much from them. Have we? No, that's right. But we are hearing more of the hackers clearly targeted. Many tech companies in this makes a lot of sense. They hackers Coley want these cutting edge cyber tools that these companies have, so presumably the hackers can use them themselves. And the first organization to detect this hack two weeks ago was fire I, a prominent cyber security firm, Fireeye CEO Kevin Mandia spoke with NPR's all things considered yesterday. And he said, these hackers were extremely sophisticated, and once they got into the system, they carried out an operation that was specifically designed to attack fire. I he realized very early on as they launch their own investigation that this was a level of tradecraft he'd never seen before. And he said the scale of this hack really drives home the need for a strong national cyber policy. It's time this nation comes up with some doctrine on what we expect Nations rules of engagement to be And what will our policy or proportional response beat of folks who violate that doctrine Because Right now. There's absolutely in escalation in cyberspace. It just seems astonishing that we don't yet have the doctrine in the year. 2020. The US, however, does have a lot of cybersecurity might what is preventing us from using it more effectively? No. Well, you're still seeing a lot of things that are in the works. Homeland Security Cyber Agency was just launched in 2018 and focused on the elections this year. And and by all accounts, did I did I did a good job. Right now, There's the military authorization bill on the president's desk waiting to be signed. It has money for additional cyber upgrades, and by all accounts, you're seeing a lot more cooperation between the government and private tech companies. But this country is losing huge sums of money due to the cyber attacks. And a couple years ago, the N S a director Paul Marcus, Sony was at his confirmation hearing. And he was asked if adversaries fear the U. S and cyberspace, he said the answer is absolutely not. MPR's Greg Marie, Thanks so much, Greg. My pleasure. America's hospitals are really

Noel King U. S Government Craig Marie Steve Mnuchin Senator Ron Wyden Biden Administration David Greene NPR Greg Russia Treasury Department Mohammad Ali Rope New America Treasury Los Angeles Fireeye Kevin Mandia D Washington Wrestling
Experts Weigh In On How U.S. Should Respond To Massive Computer Hack

NPR's Business Story of the Day

05:30 min | 10 months ago

Experts Weigh In On How U.S. Should Respond To Massive Computer Hack

"Should the us government respond to a computer hack that breached both government networks and private companies mo- cybersecurity experts think. Russia is responsible for the hack and npr's national security correspondent. Greg myra has been talking to some of them. Good morning greg. good morning noel. Perhaps most importantly is the over absolutely not it's still ongoing and we're continuing to learn details. We've heard now that the treasury department hack occurred in july and like other government departments. This was just uncovered in recent days. The email of top officials was hacked. Apparently not the account of treasury secretary. Steve mnuchin Also no evidence that classified systems were breached This information has come from democratic. Senator ron wyden who was briefed on the matter and we can expect this kind of information to sort of dribble out in the weeks and months ahead as government agencies and private companies go through their computer networks But clearly much of this is going to fall on the biden administration to make sure the hack Inside government computer networks is over that there's clear attribution on who did it and then to decide how to respond these major breaches have happened. Before does the government have a strategy to deal with them. No absolutely not again. There are no rules or red lines or clear consequences for adversaries who get caught now today. What we ended up seeing is lots of hand-wringing and ultimately some sort of limited responses right now with this current hack. We're seeing wrestling over. The definition some members of congress. Call this an act of war now. Cyber experts in the intelligence community. Do see it as a big deal but more along the lines of traditional espionage albeit on a massive scale i spoke about this with p w singer cyber expert at the new america think tank. This was not an act of war. This is more cold war style back and forth espionage stealing secrets. That's why you've seen the reaction from the intelligence community to be a mix of. Oh my god what just happened and gosh. We got a tip the hat to them. What a coup for them so. There is no clear way to respond greg. What are the range of options here. Traditional spying might generate public criticism Kicking out suspected spies perhaps some sanctions. But when this happened it really hasn't changed the behavior of russia any other adversaries they still seek hacking is a low cost high return proposition singer says the us can and needs to do much more and should create deterrence in in two ways gave a boxing analogy saying the us needs to punch back harder and also develop more resiliency to absorb the growing number of cyber blows. I make the parallel to my tyson. You don't hit him. He'll punch you back in the face versus muhammad ali rope a dope through resilience where you don't hit me because it just won't work out for you. What else do we know. So we know that the government and private companies were both hacked. What do we know about the private companies. We haven't heard that much from them. Have we know that's right. But we are hearing more of the hackers clearly targeted many tech companies in. This makes a lot of sense. They that hackers want these cutting edge cyber tools. These companies have so presumably. The hackers can use them themselves in the first organization to detect. This hack. two weeks ago was fire. I of prominent cyber security farm fire. Icao kevin mantius spoke with all things considered yesterday and he said these hackers were extremely sophisticated and once they got into the system. They cured out. An operation was specifically designed to attack fireeye. He realized very early on as they launched their own investigation that this was a level of tradecraft he'd never seen before and he said the scale of this hack really drives home the need for a strong national cyber policy. It's time this nation comes up with some doctrine on what we expect. Nations rules of engagement to be. And what will our policy or proportional response speed of folks. Violate the doctrine. Because right now there's absolutely esscalation in cyberspace it. It just seems astonishing that we don't yet have the doctrine in the year. Twenty twenty the. Us however does have a lot of cybersecurity might what is preventing us from using it more effectively. While you're still seeing a lot of things that are in the works Security cyber agency was just launched in twenty eighteen at focused on the elections this year and by all accounts did a did a did a good job right now. There's the military authorization bill on the president's desk waiting to be signed it has money for additional cyber upgrades in by all accounts. You're seeing a lot more cooperation between the government and private tech companies. But this country is losing huge sums of money Do to these cyber attacks and Couple of years ago the nsa director paul nakasone was at his confirmation hearing and he was asked if adversaries. Fear the us in cyberspace. He said the answers absolutely not. Npr's greg mary. Thanks so much. Greg my pleasure.

Greg Myra Steve Mnuchin Senator Ron Wyden Biden Administration Greg Treasury Department Us Government Muhammad Ali Rope NPR Noel New America Treasury Russia Kevin Mantius Wrestling Congress United States Boxing Paul Nakasone
Russia denies involvement in hack of U.S. government agencies

Morning Edition

03:12 min | 10 months ago

Russia denies involvement in hack of U.S. government agencies

"U. security officials had been preparing for Russian interference in the U. S election. They say that kind of attack never came. The main disinformation instead came from the departing president, but it does appear that Russia was busy. Elsewhere. Itwas allegedly hacking US government agencies that were not directly involved in the election. NPR National security correspondent Greg My areas covering this story, Greg Good morning. Good morning stated what was hacked. Well, um it looks like it was the Treasury and Commerce Department's The leading suspect is the Russian foreign Intelligence Service, known as the SVR is sort of the equivalent of the CIA in Russia. Russia has issued a statement denying this. But according to two American authorities, it seems to have been going on for months and was only recently uncovered. We don't have many details at this point, but both the National Security Council and the Department of Homeland Security have acknowledged that a breach took place and they say they're working to sort it out. I'm trying to think through these couple of agencies. The Commerce Department supports American business, especially overseas. They oversee a variety of other things like the census. The Treasury Department, of course, is deeply involved in the economy and the operations of the government. Is it understood what kind of information may have been stolen from those agencies? Well, we don't know precisely. We do know the email systems were hacked. But as you note was, it's just routine office email. Or was this some more valuable? Important classified information with business and financial information. That would would be quite important on Ben. There's the larger concern where other government departments hacked as well. We don't have an answer to that right now. Is it just random, The treasury and commerce would be targeted. We don't know that you know, They certainly have their own value if they were hacked, But there's certainly the expectation that other parts of the government would have been targeted as well. If the Russians or whoever was able to get in to those departments they would look elsewhere. The Russians were responsible for a major breach back in 2014 and 2015. Which included the White House and the State Department, right, one of the thing how if it all does this connect with other news from just a few days ago off another suspected Russian hack? Well that the previous report involved the cyber security firm Fireeye, a major firm that said it lost some of its valuable tools that it uses to look for security, and when it checks out the networks of clients. The company said they believed it was a state sponsored attack and they didn't name Russia. But analysts that was clearly the implication. And they are looking for links between these two attacks. One possibility seems to be that the hack was carried out through software updates that are widely used both in the U. S governments and in many private companies, So that seems to be what they're checking again. It speaks to Russia's ability to go after very hard, well defended targets. Great. Thanks very much. My pleasure.

Russia Itwas Npr National Security Greg My Greg Good U. Commerce Department Russian Foreign Intelligence S Treasury SVR National Security Council Department Of Homeland Securit CIA Treasury Department Fireeye United States BEN State Department White House
U.S. economy suffers biggest quarterly decline on record

News and Perspective with Tom Hutyler

01:18 min | 1 year ago

U.S. economy suffers biggest quarterly decline on record

"33% annual rate in the April June quarter by far the worst quarterly plunge ever. When the viral outbreak shut down businesses with Mohr on this historic drop. I'm joined by bankrate dot com Chief financial analyst Greg McBride Greg Good morning. Thanks for being with us the Commerce Department's estimate of the second quarter decline in the gross domestic product. The total output of goods and services marked the sharpest drop on records dating to 1947. And I think that's as far back as these quarterly records go. Yeah, and Tom it wasn't even close set a record setting records for all the wrong reasons, but it was about Three times worse than what had been the previous record holder, if you want to call it that, and and so, you know, listen, not that we needed to wait until today to know that it was bad, but I think it does certainly put it in and you know in Stark, uh, you know terms for everybody. I will say, however, that number is annualized, so it's not like the economy's only 2/3 the size now that it was the end of the first quarter. Now the economy shrunk 9.5% still the worst ever by a wide margin during the quarter if it had maintained that pace for a year. That would equate to a 33% contraction. So they're like the ballplayer hits three home runs on opening day, projecting that they maintain that pace throughout the season. Right? Okay, well,

Greg Mcbride Bankrate Chief Financial Analyst Commerce Department Mohr Stark TOM
White House Says Trump Didn't Know About Russia Bounty

Morning Edition

04:03 min | 1 year ago

White House Says Trump Didn't Know About Russia Bounty

"How much did the president know of reports that Russia offered bounties on U. S troops and how much should he have known? Both questions have become part of the debate over the reported program in Afghanistan. News reports have said the president was briefed long before the information became public. President. Trump denied that, and the White House has said the intelligence information was not fully confirmed. Former National security adviser Susan Rice writes this morning in The New York Times that that doesn't matter if she had known, she writes, she would have told the president and people in any previous administration would have done the same. So how does the process work? NPR National security correspondent Greg Meyer is on the line, Greg Good morning. Good morning, Steve. How would the various U. S intelligence agencies analyze information like this? Well from from what we're seeing. And then some of the reporting is that there were some Taliban members who were captured in a raid about six months ago and they were interrogated. A large pile of cash was uncovered and In Your times is reporting today that U S intelligence found evidence of financial transfers from Russia to a Taliban linked account. But the US intelligence community is still assessing, and there's no consensus and this is a classic problem for the intelligence community. You have to put together a puzzle with missing pieces, and I spoke about this with Dan Hoffman. He's a former CIA officer who was the Moscow station chief and also worked in the Middle East. I served, you know, three years in overseas combat zones, collecting this sort of tax bill in intelligence. It's not like fine wine getting better with age. You've got to get it out to the people at risk. That means our soldiers but also coalition forces. Does that mean you sometimes have to distribute intelligence information before everybody in the government agrees on what it means. Right, Exactly Steve and the CIA seems to be driving. This seems to be the agency that feels most strongly that this Russian bounty program Israel, But we seem very unusual development the past couple days where the defense secretary, the National Security Advisor, the director of National intelligence have all issued statements saying they can't confirm the bounty program at least at this point. Um And and Trump is, as you noted. It said he was never told about the program before it broke in the news, But we are seeing reports that he might have been briefed as early as February. Well again. Let's talk about what the standard processes is Susan Rice correct that in any administration, this kind of explosive information would be shared at the highest levels. Yeah. When I spoke with Dan Hoffman, the former CIA officer. He doesn't know the details in this case, But he said it was his experience that really critical explosive intelligence should and would reach the White House. Here he is again. My concern as an intelligence officer would be. I don't want the president or his national security advisor to be blindsided when Prime Minister Boris Johnson says Hey, about that reporting, we received that the Russians have a bounty out for our people in Afghanistan. You know, I wouldn't want the president not to be aware of that information. The reference there. Two reports that the British knew the UK was told of this U. S intelligence finding, however incomplete it may have been now let's take this information at face value. What does the report of this bounty program say about Russia's strategy in Afghanistan? You know, Steve, I thought back to 2001 and I was in Kabul right after the Americans drove the Taliban out. One of the most striking things I saw was Russia set up a field hospital to assist this US mission because at that time the U. S and Russia had a common interest in defeating Islamic extremism. But Russian President Vladimir Putin and now is consistently pursuing policies aimed at undermining the U. S. And Afghanistan is just one example. We got a hint of this four years ago, Actually, when our NPR colleague Tom Bowman was in Afghanistan and was told by the Afghan military that Russia was already providing arms and training to the

President Trump Russia Afghanistan Taliban Dan Hoffman CIA Donald Trump Susan Rice Steve National Intelligence National Security Advisor National Security United States White House Greg Meyer Vladimir Putin Greg Good Kabul Middle East Officer
13-Year-Old Girl Hurt In Deadly Pembroke Crash Sues Driver, Company

WBZ Midday News

00:31 sec | 1 year ago

13-Year-Old Girl Hurt In Deadly Pembroke Crash Sues Driver, Company

"A girl critically injured in a crash that killed her friend in Pembroke sues the driver and his former company thirteen year old Kendall's modal was one of three people in an S. U. V. that was hit by a highway safety systems pickup truck on route one thirty nine the driver Greg good cell of Marshfield was fired by the company right after the crash and police say he ran a red light confessed you've been drinking using cocaine at a company holiday party thirteen year old clear resistors and was killed her mother

Pembroke Kendall Marshfield Cocaine Greg
Dave Grening, Rick Hammerle, Gabby Gaudet

Thoroughbred Racing Radio Network

10:08 min | 2 years ago

Dave Grening, Rick Hammerle, Gabby Gaudet

"McGee Jay Brennan and Dave Greg Good Morning the hard act to follow right there well. I think you're up to it and much like we did with Jay. Hey we didn't get a chance to talk last week. Day I saw some of your thoughts on paper and on twitter but quick hit from last weekend the Jockey Club Gold Cup Diku and everything that came with it didn't agree with the call but that's par par for the course for me and the stewarts here good rates by both horses of Abu kind of the call takes away from the performance of both you know Roseville in sort of honor. I thought it was Kinda. Overshadowed what how well they ran I thought it was in solid effort. You know Roy Moore your skin and people give them credit for so he's tactical enough that you're going to go back to the race. In California that he won he was four why but right up on the pace so he can be he can play from the start and still finish finish which is a good thing for him to have going into the classic and Code of honor you know stepped up against a couple of quality older horses and and still continues to show improvement as Shug shoveling transfer your kid and I'm glad they didn't go into stuff. it'll it'll spice it up a bit very much and we talked to show yesterday what turned into a was supposed to be a you know. Tell us about the decision ten minutes turned into forty because because show and you can talk about the current horses and then you can talk about his Breeders Cup record you know he's he's run horses in the Classic Eight Times. He's got two seconds and third and I asked him if he thought you know this was as good or the best one of the best chances that he's had in a classic and he kind of feels it is I think so in part because he's got a quality improving horse and in part because I don't see a real stand out in the division there you know I I was even if Mackenzie had one last week is still affected him at a mile and a quarter. I think come back with a pack a little bit and now I think he's you know emit commit pack there. I you know he he he was not impressive last week and and right now he doesn't have a jockey so that could be a hindrance so I I think the the you know I I think the visual the classic is releasing. My is right now pretty wide open well it it certainly enhances the classic and we got some. Jay's thoughts will also wait for some other news in decisions. Tacitus you know who I could send as many as three with a late and Yoshida. We'll see what the tacitus call is but have you talk to Jimmy later in the week about preservationists. I don't think the preservation and the clock berry good yeah. I kind of. They were Iffy iffy. Even before we got through the jockey there pretty traditional people. You Know Oh you go to the classic going for a good race. You don't go you don't travel cross country now. It's in your own backyard. Maybe maybe say okay. I'm hearing but the put him on. A plane ain't off that race. just doesn't make any sense to me and. I'm not sure what it was tales right now. I wouldn't be surprised if maybe they they just you know. Have you know conclude are dealing. Just say thank you. Thank you for the memories. They were well some other thoughts thoughts about the weekend the the two year old swept by Chad Brown and not necessarily by Chad Brown surfers Dave that were all that highly regarded regarded coming into the early fall. It looks selflessly ran a decent race when she got in her debut. She was a bit why she was just what about a half length behind her stablemate and you know. She got a very nice trip. The other day and you know you beat a field that I didn't necessarily I think was seller but that didn't necessarily like her either so I can't you know I'm not saying that I choose my choice but look it's very you know. Handicapping is hard art. When it comes to the Grillo it's simple to spend on Chad Brown. It just just do it. Does it seven and eight. I've never seen I've Nev- I don't know of any race that he may be bad for our security security and and and dumb or something that just a guy dominates the race like Chad Brown at least in New York dominates the race Jeff Brown dominates the Mus Grill and just you know next year when it comes. I'm just circle the Chad. He's got more the ones at about boxing and you'll walk out with a little more money so any payment structure solid rates you know. I I liked about structure that he showed you different dimension in the first race. It was a slow pace. He was up on it and then he finished and then they got a bit of a faster pace and close close so you like versatility show. I need to know more about what else is in that race before. I say an annoying Kim and enter a the you know a victory in the Breeders Cup Juvenile Turpin juvenile fillies served interesting I said they were aware of it at the time but selflessly not nominated to the Breeders Cup now looks set clemens got that money hidden in his closet somewhere so he can easily put up the supplementary see but it it was a weird kind of a strange thing maybe just crack but be supplemented for the raiders stuff to run and I'm sure she will do well. beyond the two year old stakes stakes midnight zoo in the Belle Dame and got you got you got her legs stretched and did what was necessary. The race as that ended up surprising to some degree aside from everything that went on in the Gold Cup four Horsfield in that Vosper that ended up being really exciting and forensic fire and imperial put on some show down the stretch cool horses you know he's still still Harvard have trouble taking that race threatens fire and last year the parts race horse averaged one the rate just a cool towards I mean that's a super cool horse right there in so small but he's got such big hardy so fast and you know I think they call it a little bit adviser prize when Friends Fire Collared Him and he still had something more to offer and he gave it to him and you know maybe maybe hard race before the Breeders Cup will help him in the Breeders Cup opposed to a couple of cakewalks that he had especially last year Vosper. You just walked around there and now last year Frears Cup. Chances may have been compromised the fact that he just doesn't run it and go to Churchill downs I mean I think he's on there three times. The probably three worst races throughout the worst rates is I thought he may well enough to del Mar a few years ago when he was in the Mitch Breeders Cup and second. I believe but maybe there's hard rates will help him. battle tough because it's a tough rate expensive very very competitor's. Maybe one or better rates on the car to the totally and chance a lot on you know. I guess you have to see what Omaha beach that rates for tomorrow how he runs. A and B what they use it for work. the the the sprint has potential to come up here one of the best races on the card and I think that race will have imperial head registered. Well turn our attention attention to tomorrow and there's a lot there's a lot of intriguing match-ups paper going into Saturday at and there's actually a nice set races on Sunday with the thirty the flower bowl in the present. We gotta start with Champagne and a green light. Go Ah to forego the hopeful. After the track was a a a slop. I don't blame Jimmy Jerkins at all for taking that route however he comes into the champagne now having to go a mile and there are at least is three others that are are major players here not the least of which is Barkley tag and Saka Toga the last time they had a two year old like like this. They kept funny side against New York breads until going to Florida for the holy bull this time they're going to go for an early open company opportunity the and it's at the highest level the first thing. I want to say that this race is there is a major scratching the race three technique. Jeremiah texted me this morning and I put it up on twitter a little while although has a lung infection and we'll come out of the race and I thought he was a significant player in the field so it's down to six source field going at that. Tis The law law you know of course is very impressive. Beating New York reds first time out had shin issue that Barkley took care of list about three weeks total of training but it's gotten back in I saw I saw at least two if not all three of his three of his works here and they're very solid workout you just wonder if the layoff going a mile with the one rate is going to happen ready to do it now. The layoff is very similar to green like oh the day difference so it's not that sort of balances out but green go with tested in stakes company and also has races opposed to one and I just like I just really liked it. I I don't know what he's going to become. I don't know how far is GONNA WANNA run but I just like the way both starts getting solid well built for uh-huh hardy type of horse who just has a great hind end you know where the power generated from and I think like the mile and beyond and I think this has a moment for Jimmy. Sake that the horses say how down and continue on the campaign Jimmy. He says out born whatever that might be but I think it'd be awful strongest training like that rate.

Jimmy Jerkins Chad Brown Mcgee Jay Brennan New York Twitter Tacitus Barkley Dave Greg Classic Eight Times Chad Frears Cup Roy Moore California Boxing Stewarts Jeremiah Roseville Mackenzie Vosper Grillo
"greg good" Discussed on Newsradio 700 WLW

Newsradio 700 WLW

09:43 min | 2 years ago

"greg good" Discussed on Newsradio 700 WLW

"Can hold conversations check your email all that stuff while the car is driving itself from here to florida and that's pretty cool of course your daily commute that that in the basis though car really does one thing it's to be no question that electric stuff is great you know it's all extra stuff really didn't need sixers today but they're nice cars i agree getting them in a stupor cool but it's the same thing that nineteen seventy eight a beat and along for people who don't have vacation time like i can't take you know i have to drive i can't afford to fly so it's just a time that you that's all you of course replace it electric wise and then it'd be just like asphalt it'll be electric lumps but you can figure tank up and ten minutes if it thoroughly there's advantages both namely as well the people are not paying for the roads they're using that's that's really late for news i appreciate the call seven hundred w driving everyone's favorite topic i've liked to about car commercials is in all like this gets the marketing thing is i'm sure somebody's done a better job of parenting this than than i have but just the top of my head it's you know the person driving is always like super fit and young and has a especially the luxury car you gotta have the pretty woman sitting next to you or the woman driving you gotta have a bit of a smug look on your face as you look in the rear view mirror and there's some sort of smug i'm not sure what the smugness comes from maybe because you realize you're in a car commercial and you're the only one on the street you don't have to deal with the holes that we see on a daily basis on the road love to see a commercial where it's like literally just a guy banging his head off we have the softest steering wheels in the industry why because you're so frustrated you're banging your head off the steering wheel like that's the kind of car i could get behind the options got a little pillow on it five one three seven four nine seven thousand eight hundred the big one and pound seven hundred eighty and t it's a greg in inglewood up to no good on seven hundred w._w._e. got greg Good morning, sir. Well, I would never defend a municipality in terms of making more revenue, I wanna be. very explicit thing the reason you're wearing to say seat bill is not the municipality revenue if money oriented and take a wild guess what it is what it is your insurance people statistics on just how much lists yeah pay out if you're be is involved in an accident yeah they are going pay less because you were injured less staff back that up i'll tell you i mean that is greg that is really a great it's so true because you can see it right is if i'm in a car accident in my car is deemed okay it's a car but if i'm in a car accident and injured or someone else's injured well we know how much healthcare is in the insurance companies of course are trying to protect their own self interest which is also the interest of all the pool of insured out there to keep their costs down but it's sold to us not like that because it's the insurance lobby pushing this team sure thing with helmets you may not be old up there used to be in ohio helmet law and there was a big bro test and guys wrote on seventy without a columbia jakob without illman you can't stop us all so any thought that's what did it no the insurance companies figured out that if you're on a motorcycle and that does save your life you have still got serious injuries but being the spine to feed for people laying there like a vegetable instead of dying quite frankly and i would be willing to bit that is why wonderful politicians instrument said let's make these people happy insurance is telling us it's cheaper let somebody dying anyway greg i love the citizens i love the cynicism thanks for the show it's like wow it's you know what not a conspiracy guy but it's hard to argue with that logic is they want you alive or dead man if you're in a hospital that's where the real money starts kicking it play place a car no big deal but healthcare health care that's where the big money comes into play i can't say he's wrong about that so it's the insurance lobby in but at the same time don't don't hit me with you know freedom and it just it's so contradicting is what it is so it's insurance companies are driving this whole thing is there a way to to to for you to pay more if they can find out if you're not wearing a seatbelt i mean i think that's probably going to come to as i was talking about electric vehicles in the technology in these things is absolutely incredible that there's no way they're not gonna know if you're wearing your seat belt or not which then gets reported well look at those devices that you can get you know to reduce your insurance costs when flows on telling because you put the thing the insurance company wants to monitor you see how fast you're driving so that they can either charge you more you know kind of keep an eye on how you're driving which keeps their costs in check which then allegedly gets trickled down to you that's how the certainly how the the system is set up at five one three seven four nine seven thousand eight hundred the big one and pounds eighteen david columbus thanks chicken and brother what's up Dave, Dave, David their day. Dave Dave, Dave. Dave. We're headed to how about John John, you there? Hey, what's up man? That conversation about the electric car you having earlier. yeah i mean a lot of people have families across the united states and they can't afford to fly you know they drive and let's say you get that electric car i mean what's the range on me You can get the extent of the one I drove. I want to say what the extended batteries like three hundred seventy miles something like that tip of the day. That's a lot of miles. No. Most people don't drive three miles a day. No, not in a day. I may not my day to day commute your final down. I'm talking about long term on vacation. Every year, you're talking and a half hour drive, and that's his gasoline. Right. And now you're saying your carcass three hundred seventy that's great. But how long the charging time, well here's what's cooling. Here's what's cool about this. I mean, you know, I'm not schilling for Tessler or anything like that. they're gonna hook me up at that that's a question in when they talk about the solvency of the company you got to remember that if if i were to build let's say traditional gas car there's gas stations all over it's just talking to guy from gas buddy right tesla had to go in and put all these charging stations in all over the country and i think they said something like twelve of them open a day which is all on their dime so they have these superchargers okay and you go in and it's obviously more high voltage than you have in your house and you hook it up and you can get eighty to ninety eight eighty percent charge in your battery in less than i think it's like forty five minutes so what do you do you go okay i gotta get launch anyway i parked car go get lunch and come back and i'm all charged up so yeah there's that delay there but here's the thing if you're driving long distance though i tried this when we got on the highway to test this thing and it went from you can take it from exit from on ramp to exit ramp so if you're driving like you said florida you get on the highway the computer drives itself i mean literally you you have to have your hand on the wheel at least one hand and the computer will pass lower cars in maintain the lane curves hills all that stuff in it will stay on the road so you literally can sit there and well on the town on the computer it's like a big tablet they have video games on there and they're not telling you to play video games while you're driving but literally you can hold conversations check your email all that stuff while the cars driving itself from here in florida And that's neat Niagara pretty cool. Of course. Your daily commute that yet. Yeah. in the basis though car really does one thing to be no question that electric stuff is great you know it's all extra stuff really didn't need i don't need today they're nice cars agree getting a minute stupor cool but it's the same thing that nineteen seventy cars from eight to beat and prolong for people who don't have time like i can't fake you know i have to drive i can't afford to fly so it's just a time that you that's all you know of course replace it electric wise and it'll be just like asked on soil be electric pumps but we can fill your tank up in ten minutes but thoroughly question there's advantages of both namely as well the people are not paying for the roads they're using that's that's around for news i appreciate the call seven hundred onto i heart radio online on your smartphone ipad and tablet seven hundred wwl w. dot com normally on a day like today where it's absolutely beautiful you wanna get off work early now some golf so may go and do gardening whatever it is but typically go out i love to find a nice bar more sit down have some additional day drink in late afternoon drinking and watch some sports problem is the reds of course are not playing to later and even if it were a day game or whatever the reds are well kind of kind of hovering right now let's put it that way i'm trying to be polite here we're not quite yet football season we do have this going on today three o'clock our time we'll be nine o'clock over there and that is the women's world cup twenty nineteen u._s. versus france so you may not be a big soccer or football fan i'm not really trying to get into it but at the same time you look at okay it's it soccer and women's soccer most people typically would go pass but when you talk about country versus country the united states of america versus the birthplace of democracy in france you look at this and go kay this is almost like the olympics i i don't know much about it but i'm cheering for the red white and blue so hoist a cold one today go to the bar of your choice and watch them a women's world cup twenty nineteen because well it's a beautiful day and you're supposed.

florida Dave Dave united states soccer greg Good sixers inglewood John John golf tesla france schilling Niagara america
"greg good" Discussed on Newsradio 700 WLW

Newsradio 700 WLW

09:11 min | 2 years ago

"greg good" Discussed on Newsradio 700 WLW

"The tax increases going to fec monday morning ten and a half cents more per gallon will just call it a nice even eleven was round up right eleven cents a gallon diesel is going to be thousand nine cents a gallon and we're going to have to deal with it but i think it's going to be an interesting dynamic here to see as we increase taxes because we need improve infrastructure and we've got to pay for this stuff is how this is going to change the landscape i'm with you i think in a few years certainly within our lifetime most people are gonna be drying electric vehicles it is the future there's no question yeah that's right and so taxes good for today but in ten fifteen years we'll be talking about how do we tack more efficiently so exactly patrick have a great weekend buddy thanks again for checking in here on the acute hearing patrick don from gas buddy dot com check out the app and like it's up on my blog seven hundred wwl w dot com said the widgets there but you can download yourself over the cheapest gas price and actually is a pretty cool tool if you're hunting for bargains for your bargain hunter right and so i look at this and i i can't argue with patrick at all i think honestly my son is twenty five thanks i'm a complete idiot because as i mentioned the first hour of the show my trucks like twelve years old ten years old and it's seen better days but i'm gonna keep it as a work truck i need to find something like more of a day to day vehicle and i want to get something fairly nice because i'm old and i think i want to reward myself for a change anyway he's he's like you're an idiot if you don't get tesla like he is so hung up on the tesla thing to the point where i went all right i'm gonna go check it out i kind of know about them but i've never driven one i should at least examine this and i can't really pull pull the trigger on it's amazing how many on the roads right now i've heard time eighty to one hundred thousand dollars car is not really is that really scott sloan kind of money you know what i'm talking about cutting am kind of money possibly mcconnell but but may i like blog by four cars for that but i'll tell you what i drove the thing and it's it is the coolest thing i've ever done in the last couple of years i honestly i don't get that much excited about tech and stuff but they're amazing cars i don't know about the solvency in the future of the company because i really think that other manufacturers namely the luxury mercedes b._m._w. and like are gonna come out with the and they're going to be probably as good if not better because they already have the infrastructure in place and i love and admire the hell what would elon musk is done at tesla i think it's an amazing story and it might be the looks like right now the car company in the future there's no doubt But, but driving this is an amazing immersive experience. Like I can see why tesla owners laugh at it. It diesel in regular field drivers because. Yeah, you know, we're paying for the roads. But they are running part about is we talked about the, the democratic debates on, like, it's kind of funny, how they want to have to work and got a little guy. It's about a little got Elizabeth Warren, a little guy, little guy a little guy. Meanwhile, she's also pushing for well extending the tax credits electric vehicles, which only rich people can afford. like how many working class people that joe biden and liz warren represent can't afford one hundred thousand dollar car the answer would be zero so you're giving tax breaks basically two people in your opinion who don't need tax breaks Slow to hear seven hundred seven hundred wwl w driving. Everyone's favorite topic. i've liked too about car commercials in all like this gets the marketing thing is i i'm sure somebody's done a better job of parenting this than that i have but just to top about head it's the person driving is always like super fit and young and has a especially the luxury car you gotta have the pretty woman sitting next to you or the woman driving you gotta have a bit of a smug look on your face as you look in the rear view mirror there's some sort of smug i'm not sure whether the smugness comes from maybe because you realize you're in a car commercial and you're the only one on the street you don't have to do with the holes that we see on a daily basis on the road love to see a commercial where it's like literally just a guide banging his head off we have the softest steering wheels in the industry why because you're so frustrated you're banging your head off the steering wheel like that's the kind of car i could get behind the options got a little pillow on it at five one three seven four nine seven thousand eight hundred the big one and pound seven hundred a._t. and t. it's greg in inglewood up to no good on seven hundred w w what he got greg Good morning, sir. wow i would never defend a municipality in terms of making more revenue i want to be very explicit and saying the reason you're wear to say seat belt is not the municipality revenue it's money oriented and take wild guess what it is what It is your insurance, people statistics on just how much less pay out is if you're be is involved in an accident. Yeah. Going lists because you were injured less. Back that up. dave i'll tell you i mean that is greg i'll tell you that is really a great it's so true because i you can see it right is if i'm in a car accident in my car is deemed okay takhar but if i'm in a car accident and i'm injured or someone else's injured well we know how much healthcare is in the insurance companies of course are trying to protect their own self interest which is also the interest of all the pool of insured out there to keep their costs down but it's sold to us not like that because it's the insurance lobby pushing this team helmets you may not be old up there used to be an ohio helmet law there was a big protest and guys wrote on seventy without a columbia to columbus without illman on you can't stop any thought that's what did it new companies figured out that If you're on a motorcycle, and that does save your life. You still got serious injuries that being the sign. And didn't paid for people waiting there. Like a vegetable instead of dying quite frankly. And I would be willing to bet that is why. Wonderful politicians, did, let's make these people happy because insurance is telling us is cheaper. Let somebody dying anyway Greg. I love the citizens. I love the cynicism. Thanks for the show. it's like you know what not a conspiracy got but it's hard to argue with that logic is they want you alive or dead man if you're in a hospital that's where the real money starts kicking play right place a car no big deal but healthcare health care that's where the big money comes into play i can't say he's wrong about that so let's insurance lobbying but at the same time don't don't hit me with you know freedom and it just it's so contradicting is what it is so it's insurance companies are driving this whole thing is there a way to to to for you to pay more if they can find out if you're not wearing a seatbelt i mean i think that's probably gonna come to that as i was talking about electric vehicles and the technology in these things is absolutely incredible that there's no way they're not gonna know if you're wearing your seat belt or not which then gets reported well look at those devices that you can get you know to reduce your insurance costs when flows on telling because you put the insurance company wants a monitor you see how fast you're driving so that they can eat a charge you more you know kind of keep an eye on how you're driving which keeps their costs in check which then allegedly gets trickled down to you that's how the certainly how the the system is set up at five one three seven four nine seven thousand eight hundred big one and pounds of eighteen david columbus thanks for checking and brother what's up Dave, Dave Davey there they Dave. Dave. We're headed to how about John, Johnny there. Hey, what's up man? That conversation about the electric car you having earlier. Yeah. Hey, you know, I mean, a lot of people have families across the United States, and they can't afford to fly, you know, drive, and let's say you get that electric car. I mean, what's the range on me? You can get the extent of the one I drove. was i want to say what the extended batteries like three hundred seventy miles something like that tip of the day that's a lot of money that's a lot of miles no most people don't drive three miles a day no not in a day i may not your day to day commute your final down i'm talking about long term when they came when we go to florida every year you're talking half hour drive and that's his gasoline right and now you're saying your carcass three hundred seventy that's great but how long has it targeting time well here's what here's what's cool about this i mean you know i'm not schilling for tessler or anything like that and they're gonna hook me up but that that's a question in when they talk about the solvency of the company you got to remember that if i were to build let's say traditional gas car there's gas stations all over just talking to got from gas buddy right tesla had to go and put all these charging stations in all over the country and i think they said something like twelve of them open a day which is all on their dime so they have these superchargers okay and you go in and it's obviously more high voltage than you have in your house and you hook it up and you can get eighty to ninety eighty percent charge on your battery in less than i think it's like forty five minutes.

greg Good tesla Elizabeth Warren Dave Davey United States joe biden inglewood florida columbus ohio John
"greg good" Discussed on The Dan Patrick Show

The Dan Patrick Show

03:31 min | 2 years ago

"greg good" Discussed on The Dan Patrick Show

"Spurs warriors clippers at ten thirty on TNT Drake joins us now. Greg good morning. How are you? Mr. patchy good morning. How are you, sir? Jumper. It's a little off right now. I haven't had as much practice with it as I would like, how is your jumper. It sits wet as always. I mean, it's just don't the problem is Greg don't leave me open, but I can't get open. So that's the problem there. Who's got a better jumper, though. Wetter wetter say, you or your son who has a better jumper. That's a tough one. I'm going to give him the edge. Because I have the same problem. You have it's really difficult to get the jumper off in the at this point. I don't have the mobility that. I once had. So I I will give him the edge. But your son is one of the price recruits of this year's class. He's narrowed it down to what Georgetown, Oregon Notre Dame and North Carolina. He has. Yeah. And I saw he posted on Instagram last night at his decision is coming. So you don't know. I just hope it won't. Wow. It hasn't been determined completely. You know, it's good clothes getting down to the nitty gritty, so I'm anxiously awaiting that decision like like most. So are you pushing where what his decision will be over? Are you pushing in for Georgetown after you played with Patrick Ewing? Oh, I do think that your child would be a good fit for him potentially Patrick's that held a job as a coach there. And yeah, we do have a personal relationship. I have a personal relationship with some folks in North Carolina play where he Davis as well. Assistant coach there. I'm also very fond at the folks at Notre Dame. End of the day. If they're recruited me. That's a problem because I have deals. All right. The games last night that pacer's meltdown against Boston. I thought this might go seven games. But you know, you don't even get a shot off their how do you explain what happened in that? Boston pacer game. Well, I think that show you more the issue from the Pacers standpoint not having that one truly great player and their case would be able to depot, and I think that's the difference. You saw last night where you know. Kyrie's ability to score gets great defense. And it's the fame of the postseason and upset this all along, you know, systems are really wonderful in the regular season. When you don't have time to prepare. But when you get in the postseason, and we're focused on one team, and we're on the same schedule, and we can make adjustments for game to gain the one thing you struggle to adjust to his great players great players to make plays. And that's it. You know, we talk about the internet game, and obviously Indiana had their struggles. But they didn't have a great player when the intensity level picks up when it ramps up nobody that could force double teams or force you to commit help. And that's really what happened even in the gate down the stretch. You know, if you pick about the big three that jas. Tatum hit it was because they had to run extra bodies at. Cari, he swung it? And then they swung at weakside and Tatum gets that wide open three and that that's kind of the difference in this series..

Greg Notre Dame Wetter wetter North Carolina Tatum Georgetown Patrick Ewing Boston TNT Drake Mr. patchy Spurs Indiana Kyrie Cari Pacers Davis
"greg good" Discussed on The Dan Le Batard Show with Stugotz

The Dan Le Batard Show with Stugotz

03:57 min | 2 years ago

"greg good" Discussed on The Dan Le Batard Show with Stugotz

"It was intense. They obviously shared something together. And the are great couple a dreamy three me. Couple. Do have great chemistry, and they did Mike. You're right. They shared the obviously shared something together that was uncomfortable for her going into anything romantic, but it's a shared experience going through this entire store is born, but she helped him out as well. Right. Getting comfortable with singing and my right? Like, I was reading that. She got him to a place where he was comfortable singing doing confidently, and he helped her get to a point where she was confident act. I mean, that's romance wanna one it really healthy with your own vulnerabilities amazing. Yeah. But what's real and what's fake because actors are professional liars? Right. And that's the problem with the liar. You never know when they're telling the truth. So how much of this is true? And how much is acting? I don't know because they seem to constantly be lying or is. It all true. I'll never know. Do you know, there's I know this whole thing that they went through journey together. Please I come to work, and I work with suits every day. And we've never looked at each other that way not once. Who else did you want to stay together after the movie like Tom Cruise Kelly McGillis you wanted to stay together. Forever. Rocky and his wife. You wanted them to stay together. Forever right? Yeah. What was her name in the movie? Gloria what was it agency? Adrian. Adrian screaming Gloria. We did. Is there a funnier name Greg good of gone with Gloria rocky, Gloria? Gloria we'll winkle. Like, Mike you wanted Kiana Reeves, and I can't remember name Florida, Patty. You wanted them to stay together. Forever chemistry was fantastic. Yeah. But she also that thing with Bodey. So they got together on very weird terms. It's a good put the bony factor. So what do you guys say, I my my whole heartache is the true love relationship, the to relationship in movies between Bodine Johnny for you want them to stay together and the pool of the surf to Johnny but voting the Lori petty stories like third on that list. I guess you're right. About Pappas and Utah might be fourth might be. I mean Pappas made the ultimate sacrifice. Spoiler alert. I wanna get some consensus in this room. Though. Do we think that Bradley Cooper's girlfriend is jealous of his relationship with lady Gaga mantra percent? I mean, I was jealous. Can't not be. I mean, she is beautiful and she says actual girlfriend. You don't think she has the confidence of hey, Bradley's just doing this. You know, he's playing it up. It's the Oscars. And now it's over today. Like if you see him again after last night doing stuff in public acting like that then there's something to be concerned about, but it has the end, right? What he's saying? As a lack of saying? This off halfway. I know I'm on the same page. I felt like I didn't have to finish it because it made so much sense. They're seen out in public doing weird things today and moving forward then there's something to be concerned about last night was the final. I mean, everybody's talking. So even if she was cool with it. There's no way that she's cool it now because Stu gods on the Dan lebatardshow with Stu gods. And he's espousing. These these theories, that's certainly hitting home. Because now she's got the Scots of the world talking. I see a photo from last night of lady Gaga and his and his girlfriend hugging. So I think they're okay. Them sitting at the see. I'm not sure when time. Yeah. Big time is the time stamp now. I'm into it shopped because I would be interested in seeing the pictures after that performance right hundred percent..

Gloria rocky Mike Bradley Cooper Stu gods lady Gaga Patty Pappas Bodine Johnny Tom Cruise Kelly Bodey Adrian Greg good Kiana Reeves Utah Florida Lori Dan lebatardshow hundred percent
"greg good" Discussed on WGN Radio

WGN Radio

10:57 min | 2 years ago

"greg good" Discussed on WGN Radio

"Sixteen below at Chicago's lakefront, I'm Vic Vaughn in the WGN radio newsroom. And these are the stories that matter on seven twenty WGN. WGN radio's daily conversation about the life of business and the business of life. Oh, this is the Oakland bell with Steve on twenty WGN. Good morning again, everyone. Welcome back to the program as we continue with the opening bell for this Thursday edition yesterday. The Federal Reserve meeting wrapped up, and we had a news conference from the Federal Reserve chairman no interest rate hike, and it looks like we're going to stay put on future hikes. Let's bring in Greg McBride this morning chief financial analyst for bankratEcom. Greg. Good morning. So what was your takeaway after listening to the Federal Reserve chairman yesterday, it seems we're probably not going to see another interest rate hike for awhile. Yeah. Sure. Seems that way, you know, I'll tell you for a meeting where they did not change rates. I thought it was plenty eventful because his comments really represent a complete one eighty some where the fed chair was as recently as all tobe, you'd think back October, the fed chair said we were a long way from that neutral level of interest rates where they would stop. Then in December. They raised rates indicated they were going to raise rates twice this year that really came across it's pretty rigid on those those plans and now. We started the first of the year after the market at built over decide to change their tone and emphasized patience and flexibility. And then you know yesterday. Saying that the case for raising rates has weakened basically saying that they're on hold until conditions change. And specifically they mentioned that you know, it's inflation picks up then that would be the catalyst short of that. It sounds like they're on the sidelines for the foreseeable future. Again, a really sharp change in a very short period of time. The things he's talking at up to Brexit trade the even the recent government shutdown that's taking some momentum out of the economy. Should we be concerned that the fatty is reacting to the markets? They're not really supposed to be doing that. Are they? No, they're not know. It's. You know, investors really loved what they heard yesterday. They heard the operative word patient. You know, the fed said everything that the markets wanted to hear and you certainly saw that reaction in the markets. But the ultimately the markets are going to move based on the fundamental, and you know, it's the Senate ends up falling behind the curve at some point, you know, long term that's gonna come back to buy us. So generally, I would say no, it's not a good thing that the said is caving to the markets. But the perception in the markets is at the said was a little bit out of touch. Time will tell I mean, you know, the fed did say that they're the odds on favorite is that the economy is still in really good shape. And that they expect it, you know. You know, the conditions are going to continue to be such that they would raise wage, but they said the whole time talking about the, you know, sort of less likely scenario than staying on the sidelines for the foreseeable future. There's besides the market reaction to some of this. I mean, there are some things behind the markets data points that have been concerning over the last six five or six months. I'm talked to us a little bit about that. Well, I mean, we've seen certainly weaker global economic growth China being the biggest concern Europe not far behind. I mean, those are definitely considerations. If there's a hard landing in China, for example, that is going to impact growth here. The trade dispute is is something that is a, you know, a real impediment to the economy. I mean, certainly if those higher level of tariffs kick in that's just going to hurt everybody in borders, exporters, consumers retailers, you name it. So that's you know, there's a lot of hesitancy I think around that even the recent government shutdown. I mean, I don't want to minimize the fact that eight hundred thousand people had to go without two paychecks. You know, in terms of the broader economic impact it shaved about apple percentage point Doppler acknowledged crust. I think the bigger concern there is we don't know if we have to go to that song and dance again in another three weeks or not. So there's gonna be a lot of consumers and businesses that are going to act hesitancy just given that uncertainty. So you know, the. The final tally on what type of headwind that is to the economy is isn't something that we know yet housing market continues to just get weaker and weaker. I mean think about that as strong as Strong's belabor market is he continued to add jobs for seem wage growth. And yet, you know, the housing more selling fewer and fewer houses. So there are definitely some some concerns out there some headwinds to the economy. And you know, the fed doesn't even have complete economic data to deal with at this point because of the region government shutdown. So I mean, we're going to hike rates anyway. They really kind of need to wait for the dust to settle for them to just I think he he'll come out and just be as. Boldly stated as they can that, you know, they're not inclined to raise rates at the case relating rates has changed that to me is a real surprise. Given the fact that just six weeks ago, they seem inclined to raise rates twice this year. Is there? I'm sure people today will also say that the Federal Reserve chairman perhaps as being influenced by Donald Trump on this. The president has not had much good to say about the Federal Reserve chairman. Well, those people be right today. Will they be accurate? You don't it's hard to refute that I look I did people have the thing that for a couple of months now, and you know, up until two weeks ago. I said, no, no, they're not going to be influenced by the political pressure. Nets continues to be what they say even yesterday. That's what Powell was saying. But you know, you could certainly take a sceptical view and say, wow. This is a pretty sharp one eighty over the past couple of months. Did he economic fundamentals justify that sharp of a turn from the fed? And you know, you could question that and and begin to, you know, skeptically do this is bowing to pressure whether it's from the White House or financial markets. I mean, it's you know, it's pretty clear. The fed is data very sharp change in direction. So Greg moving forward here. What would we watch for the inflation part of this? If we see some data on the inflation that will push the Federal Reserve to get back on the horse get back in the saddle what kinds of data would they see that would make them do that. I, you know. Ellen say missing ingredient the connection that hasn't. We haven't seen yet is wage growth seating through to higher prices as the -flective inflation numbers. In you. They look at it cornflakes and in their view they stabilized at around two percent. Now you and everybody listening is kind of rolling is at that. Because you know, we we see completion of a lot more than two percent whenever you know, where we go into the store and buying things and just you know, in in day-to-day life. But that's what the fed is is those are the numbers that they're sticking to if those numbers start to move higher in you start to see that wage feeding through the prices that's the catalyst to catch the fed to act short of that. You know, I I'm not real sure what that's going to be. I mean, again, it is this is this is core prices. So it includes excludes food and energy, which tends to be pretty volatile. So you see oil prices should move back up in the past couple of weeks. That's not necessarily going to be the trigger. That would do it. So in the meantime with the fed the sidelines on interest rates. This is good news for people who have credit cards, right and other interest rate heavy aspects of the consumer life. We can all breathe a little sigh of relief here. We continue paying off our credit cards. It's definitely borrowers. But I would adopt a stance that you've got to expect that interest rates are eventually going to start moving higher resume moving higher. So continue to pay down that debt. Stick to the discipline of. Financing into fixed rates grabbing low rate ballots transfer offers to insulate yourself further rate hikes lily, accelerate the debt repayment because know one or two things either the economy continues to chug along does well in the fed does resume raising rates or. You know, we we fed stays on the sidelines for good. And we ended up going into an economic slowdown either way. You don't want to have that debt hanging over here. So I think there's a real incentive to pay down the debt, particularly variable rate debt and boost savings savers continue to be rewarded, you know, that's gonna take away some of the momentum upward momentum which team from. Savings accounts certificates of deposit of late. But you know, they're currently at levels above the rate of inflation. That's the first time in a decade. So sabres are being the boarded. So there's a real incentive. I think the pay down the debt use the savings put yourself in a better position. Because again, if the fed continues to raise rates, you wanna be a sabre, it'd be on the right side of that occasion. If the economy goes into a slowdown. You wanna have more savings and left? In the short term yesterday. We saw nice pop on the Dow up nearly four hundred thirty four points. The Dow SNP up more than a percent and a half, the NASDAQ up more than two nearly two and a quarter in going to see the markets. React, positively to this today and tomorrow. It's hard to say day to day. We've got the jobs report coming out tomorrow. And I think that the battle, you know, probably, you know, be a market mover. You know, one way or the other. There's still the big picture things out there. Yes. React, positively to what they heard from the sad. We've had a nice rally throughout the month of January dancing back in that awful December. I think in large part because of the feds started changing their tune pretty early in the month. So, but we've still got those big picture issues out there, certainly about the China trade dispute, there's the indisputable slowing close economically around the world specifically in China Europe. And then there's the unknown about you know, we're going to have another government shutdown and then just overall political dysfunction, those big picture items are still out there. Yeah. The fed might be on the sidelines. But they're still other things that the market is going to have to contend with. So we're in the middle of earning season. You know in the markets are going to be volatile. I would just expect that the truly par for the course at this juncture. All right, Greg great talking with you. Thanks for the analysis. Have a great day. Thank you very much. Steve stay warm, and you know, thinking about everybody out there. All right. Thank you very much. Greg McBride chief financial. Analysts bankrate dot com. It's five fifty one in the opening bell time do what pay traffic.

Federal Reserve Greg McBride China WGN radio WGN chairman Steve Chicago chief financial analyst Senate sabres Oakland Vic Vaughn Europe Brexit Donald Trump
"greg good" Discussed on News Radio 1190 KEX

News Radio 1190 KEX

14:25 min | 2 years ago

"greg good" Discussed on News Radio 1190 KEX

"Unexplained in hell, Greg good to have you with us pleasure to be here. George thanks for having us with our old colleague Dave Schrader a couple of years ago. Weren't you both of you? Yeah. He good guy, your friend. So let's talk about the paranormal, and I'll I'll talk to you individually for a while. Then just both of you jump in anytime you want, but Greg how did you get started in this? Well, Dana, and I quite literally grew up investigating the paranormal we've been doing it for twenty years. Driving around at night listening to coast to coast on our. Journeys into haunted houses as kids. And then we started to get more serious about it and about three years ago. We said, well, let's give this a crack. Let's see if we can do this full-time, and we launched the traveling museum of the paranormal and the occult and now we pretty much spend eight nine months out of the year on the road traveling from coast to coast presenting haunted objects collecting, haunted objects, helping people with any kind of paranormal problem vesting pretty much anything you name it. Do you go all over the country? It literally host coast California to main Florida all over now. What do you drive? I mean, traveling museum to me sounds like you pick up something in this huge trucker van what do you? What do you have believe it or not it is a Volkswagen minivan? No. We're very good at tetris. I love it. I love it and Dana. What is a hedge witch? Which is I mean, a lot of people kind of have different ideas about what it is. It really. It's usually someone who associates a lot with the natural world. So they work a lot with medicinal herbs. They work a lot with things that you can find in nature, and that kind of becomes one of the major aspects of their magical practice you sound like a good witch. Can there be bad witches? I think just like people there's good people. And I think that really it's all about the intention behind what you're doing. So. Yeah, I think there can be a bad bitches, Greg as you travel around the country with the museum. Do you find that more and more people are fascinated by all this? Well, I think that we're in a really good climate for people to be fascinated by I think we're seeing a resurgence in the last few years of people getting more in touch with spiritual nature of things, and they're more interested in that type of thing. And I think that more than ever they're less afraid of it. We're starting to see people who are becoming less. Scared of the idea of the unexplained in the paranormal is becoming more of a normal thing. That's one of the things that we're constantly. That's one of the biggest messages of of the museum that we run is that most of the time these things that people are afraid of they're just trying to get your attention. And so I think we're in a perfect place for the paranormal right now in the paranormal work that you've done, Greg. Have you ever come across anything that? Even scared you or something you didn't want to get involved with quite a few times. You know, there's things that I think you'll find with a lot of these things you don't really have much of a choice, but to get involved. Sometimes you're you're dragged into it. And that happens at least a few times a year. You know, we've got artifacts in the museum that have caused nothing but problems for people car accidents things that are believed to be cursed things that we've quite literally earlier this year, we had to actually take an artifact back to a cave in the catskill mountains that had been stolen from a floor because it kept it kept hurting people. Wow. And do you find that spirits and ghosts attach themselves to two items? I think you know, there's there's our opinion on this is a lot different than a lot of our colleagues. I think that what happens. A lotta times is there are intelligence is out there or their pieces of us that exists somewhere in some kind of a I guess for lack of a better word, cloud and times of high emotion times. Stress and trauma. They can almost make an upload into that cloud. And sometimes that attach to specific places and things I mean, a a building is the biggest haunted object of all. And so I think that times of intense emotion create this kind of attachment that when the time is right or or the date or the place of the person they can tap into that. And the experience that haunting and Dana. Of course, you and Greg have put together what is called Hellier a five part documentary series about the Appalachian mountains. How did you key in on the those mountains? Well, we were originally contacted back in two thousand twelve by a man who is experiencing strange activity on his property specifically around a mine shaft that was on his property, and after you know, years and years of kind of looking into this case and really digging into it. We started to notice that there were a lot of similar types of instances happening up and down the mammoth cave system in and around that area. Sometimes people would refer to them as goblins sometimes people will call them holler goblins. Sometimes they have completely different kind of local names for them. But a majority of time the the things that were happening were all the same. So we were able to kind of put together this map. I guess you would say of where exactly this chain of events was happening. Greg was there a specific case that led you to to the Appalachian mountains. Or was it just in general? Well, we're we were researching actually the name of of the documentary is the name of the town where this case took place Hellier Kentucky, they have account called Hellier Kentucky. It is a town called Hellier quite the name. Really interesting because one of the things that we had just found out is that the name Hellier actually means to obscure to cover up, which is what we think was happening in this town. There was a guy who like they was saying there's a guy named David who sent us photographs of three toed footprints that were coming out of a mine shaft, these these things that he saw his children they were tapping on his windows at night, and they described them as little naked children that were bald like grandpa, and they sounded quite a bit like the the Sutton farmhouse attack that happened in Hopkins hopkinsville Kentucky back in the fifties. And so everything seems so similar to that case that we started looking at it the same way, and you know, this guy David was convinced that these these creatures that were assaulting his family at night or extraterrestrial and he desperately wanted us to come and documentary. This. He wanted us to help him a blow up the mine that was on the edge of his property. And he said he was trying to talk to the police, and they weren't taking him. Seriously. I thought the locals were hazing him. And then it just got so bad. He and his family fled their home. He went back with his brother in law to take some photographs and pick up the rest of their stuff. And that was the last we heard of him he disappeared. And that's kind of where Hellier picks up us tracking down this case as we were doing that. And we were finding all of these different similar similar sightings going hundreds of years back all along the Appalachia's and people were just giving them different names. They were all seeing the same thing, we think they just were calling them different things. And no one really put two and two together. How do you know that this is the real deal as opposed to some trickery or they're trying to pull the wool over your eyes? I think I mean we. We initially were very skeptical of what was happening to this day. There's still a healthy level of skepticism. We were constantly trying to really keep ourselves grounded throat this investigation because it does take some pretty crazy turn. So I think that's something that no matter what is always in the back of our minds at just as far as the investigation goes. We try to remain to skeptical as possible because there is a lot of people out there who is a potentially be putting us on when you were on the scene. Could you feel anything strange was there any kind of energy pattern out there? Absolutely. I mean that was the first thing that we noticed when we got to hell, you're I've kind of all described it as a feeling of having your brain sort of re-tuned to a location it. It was the first thing that we noticed it felt strange. They're very dreamy like you had sort of stepped into a different feeling sort of a place was really interesting. Now, you you broke it down to. The five parts the documentary. Right. Yes. There are they're five different parts. The first part of the documentary is basically just a recap of the investigation that we had done so far. This is something that's been seven years in the making. And and it's just kind of something we've been slowly chipping away at because there's there's so many mysteries unravel. So the first part is just kinda catching up, and then everything from the second episode on is the actual investigation itself. Were you happy with the way it ended up? Well, I think that's that's a really interesting question because I think that. Any kind of paranormal media and even in paranormal investigation itself. It's it never goes where you think it's going to go very always takes you someplace else. Exactly, exactly. And that is is really what happened. You know? This thing started out as what we thought was going to be very simple investigation. We were going to go to Hellier we were going to find David we were going to go to his property, and we were going to see what was going on there. But as we started to peel back layers of that onion, we noticed that this was a bigger phenomena. This was stranger than just goblins. It had part of the reason the case even even got picked up again was because our friend Karl Pfeiffer who was the director. He experienced a synchronicity that were just absolutely impossible that we're leading him to do this case. It was like the phenomenon itself was telling us you need to document this you need to show it to people and now. Now that we've done that. It's it's in the world. And we're noticing other people are starting to feel themselves being sucked into this as well. What's the link with Mothman? So the second episode is where this pops up one of the things that happened a year after we got the initial emails was we got two very strange pointed emails from a man who went by the pseudonym, Terry wrist. I mean, we're pretty sure that's not his real name. He sent very strange emails that said the first ones that I have something for you one week. And then a week later to the date. We got another E mail that said, why did you stop when you were so close, right? Well, that's an interesting thing. We he sent us a photograph of GPS coordinates and those GPS coordinates went to Brown mountain. Which was a place. We had been just months before person whoever. This is new where we were what we were looking into. Because we were there initially. We were there to try and find this entrance to a cave aren't there? Strange lights on Brown mountain. Of the Brown mountain lights. They still don't quite exactly know how they've happened. But there these weird wispy little little green lights that come up out of the mountains and float around. They're not plasma balls. Are they they aren't sure they're not quite sure the one interesting thing is the mountains made out, of course. So they think maybe it could be some expanding and contrasting that's making things light up and shoot sparks, okay? Now back to Mothman. So this guy who went by Terry risk. The first thing I did was I start to look around and see who is this person who's who uses the student him. And the only reference that I could find to this. This name was in a very obscure book that came out in the nineties called secret cipher of the youth enough was by Alan greenfield. And it's a book about using magic rituals to contact extraterrestrials. Very fringe stuff. Nothing that I was really into at the time and in the very back there. There's an interview between Allen and this man using the pseudonym carry wrist in it this man talks about using the secret cipher in order to figure out where injured cold lived and in this. He actually uses a secret cipher to to use the words, ink and black which actually meant injured cold. And in the second Email that we got from this guy who called himself, Terry wrist, possibly the same guy. He said that the ink and black is still isolated. Well, one of the things that Terry talks about in this this interview with Alan is that injured cold had been on the run and with hiding and that the whole Mothman flap was really a distress signal very weird stuff. But in an immediate tangible link to the mafia in case and injured cold, that's dramatic. It really is and Dana in terms of your. Or role here as a witch? Do you use that in the investigation? Absolutely. For me. I've always taken magic and utilized it with paranormal investigation. So I'm constantly, you know, utilize tarot or creating a communication alters. And it kind of just another layer that we can tap into when we're investigating. So it's always been a really positive thing for me and really kind of been what drives my style of investigating. I guess that you were investigating this particular case, did you know, what you were going after or did it just happen..

Greg Dana Hellier Terry wrist David Brown mountain coast California Volkswagen Kentucky George Dave Schrader Florida Alan greenfield Allen Appalachia Sutton farmhouse Karl Pfeiffer Hopkins hopkinsville Kentucky
"greg good" Discussed on KTOK

KTOK

14:25 min | 2 years ago

"greg good" Discussed on KTOK

"Unexplained in hell, Greg good to have you with us pleasure to be here. George thanks for having us with our old colleague Dave Schrader a couple of years ago. What you both of you. Yeah. You good guy, your friend. So let's talk about the paranormal, and I'll I'll talk to you individually for a while. Then just both of you jump in anytime you want, but Greg how did you get started in this? Well, Dana, and I quite literally grew up investigating the paranormal we've been doing it for twenty years driving around at night listening to coast to coast on our journeys into haunted houses as kids. And then we started to get more serious about it and about three years ago. We said, well, let's give this a crack. Let's see if we can do this full-time, and we launched the traveling museum of the paranormal and the occult and now we pretty much spend eight nine months out of the year on the road traveling. From coast to coast presenting haunted, objects collecting, haunted objects, helping people with any kind of paranormal problems investigating pretty much anything you name it. Do you go all over the country? Okay. Get literally host coast, California to main Florida all over. Now. What do you drive traveling museum to me? Sounds like you pick up something in this huge truck or van what do you what do you have believe it or not it is a Volkswagen minivan? No. We're very good at tetris. I love it. I love it and Dana. What is a hedge witch? Which is I mean, a lot of people kind of have different ideas about what it is. Really? It's usually someone who associates lot with the natural world. So they work a lot with medicinal herbs. They work a lot with things that you can find in nature, and that kind of becomes one of the major aspects of their magical practice you sound like a good witch. Can there be bad witches? I think just like people there's good people. And I think that really it's all about the intention behind what you're doing. So. Yeah, I think there can be a bad bitches, Greg as you travel around the country with the museum. Do you find that more and more people are fascinated by all this? Well, I think that we're in a really good climate for people to be fascinated by I think we're seeing a resurgence in the last few years of people getting more in touch with the spiritual nature of things, and they're more interested in in that type of thing. And I think that more than ever they're less afraid of it. We're starting to see people who are becoming less. Scared of the idea of the explained in the paranormal is becoming more of a normal thing. That's one of the things that we're constantly. That's one of the biggest messages of of the museum that we run is that most of the time these things that people are afraid of they're just trying to get your attention. And so I think we're in a perfect place for the paranormal right now in the paranormal work that you've done, Greg. Have you ever come across anything that? Even scared you or something you didn't want to get involved with quite a few times. You know, there's things that I think you'll find with a lot of these things you don't really have much of a choice, but to get involved. Sometimes you're you're dragging into it. And that happens at least a few times a year. You know, we've got artifacts in the museum that have caused nothing but problems for people car accidents things that are believed to be cursed things that we've quite literally earlier this year, we had to actually take an artifact back to a cave in the catskill mountains that had been stolen from a few years before because it kept it kept hurting people. Wow. And do you find that spirits and ghosts attach themselves to items? I think you know, there's there's our opinion on this is a lot different than a lot of our colleagues. I think that what happens a lot of times there are intelligence is out there or their pieces of us that exist somewhere in some kind of a I guess for lack of a better word, a cloud and times of high emotion times of. Stress and trauma. They can almost make an upload to that cloud. And sometimes that attach to specific places and things I mean, a building is the biggest hotted object of all. And so I think that times of intense emotion create this kind of attachment that when the time is right or or the date or the place of the person they can tap into that. And the experience that haunting and Dana. Of course, you and Greg have put together what is called Hellier a five part documentary series about the Appalachian mountains. How did you key in on the those mountains? Well, we were originally contacted back in two thousand twelve by a man who experiencing some strange activity on his property specifically around a mine shaft that was on his property, and after you know, years and years of kind of looking into this case and really digging into it. We started to notice that there were a lot of similar types of instances happening up and down the mammoth cave system in and around that area. Sometimes people would refer to them as goblins sometimes people will call them holler goblins. Sometimes they would have completely different kind of local names for them. But a majority of time the the things that were happening were all the same. So we were able to kind of put together this map. I guess you would say of where exactly this chain of events was happening. Greg was there a specific case that led you to to the Appalachian mountains. Or was it just in general? Well, we're we were researching actually the name of of the documentary is the name of the town where this case took place Hellier Kentucky, they have account called Hellier Kentucky. It is a town called Hellier quite the name, really interesting. Because one of the things that we had just found out is that the name Hellier actually means to obscure to cover up, which is what we think was was happening in this town. There was a guy who was saying there's a guy named David who sent us photographs of three toed footprints that were coming out of a mine shaft at these these things that he saw his children they were tapping on his windows at night, and they described them as little naked children that were bald like grandpa, and they sounded quite a bit like the the Sutton farmhouse attack that happened in Hopkins hopkinsville Kentucky back in the fifties. And so everything seems so similar to that case that we started look. Looking at it the same way. And you know, this guy David was convinced that these these creatures that were assaulting his family at night or extraterrestrial, and he desperately wanted us to come and document this. He wanted us to help him a blow up the mine that was on the edge of his property. And he said he was trying to talk to the police, and they weren't taking him. Seriously. I thought the locals were hazing him. And then it just got so bad. He and his family fled their home. He went back with his brother in law to take some photographs and pick up the rest of their stuff. And that was the last we heard him he disappeared. And that's kind of where Hellier picks up is us tracking down this case as we were doing that. We were finding all of these different similar similar sightings going hundreds of years back all along the Appalachia's and people were just giving them different names. They were all seeing the same thing, we think. They just we're calling them different things. So no one really put two and two together. How do you know that this is the real deal as opposed to some trickery or they're trying to pull the wool over your eyes? I think I mean, we initially were very skeptical of what was happening and even to this day. There's still a healthy level of skepticism. We were constantly trying to really keep ourselves grounded throat this investigation because it does take some pretty crazy turn. So I think that's something that no matter what is always in the back of our minds in at just as far as the investigation goes, we try to remain discuss possible. Because there is a lot of people out there who substantially be putting us on when you were on the scene. Could you feel anything strange was there any kind of energy pattern out there? Absolutely. I mean that was the first thing that we noticed when we got to hell, you're I've kind of all described it as a feeling of having your brain sort of re-tuned to. Location. It. It was the first thing that we noticed it felt strange there. It felt very dreamy like you had sort of stepped into a different feeling sort of a place was really interesting. Now, you you broke it down to the five parts the documentary, right? Yes. Yeah. There are they're five different parts of the first part of the documentaries. Basically just a recap of the investigation that we had done so far. This is something that's been seven years in the making, and and it just kind of something we've been slowly chipping away at because there's there's so many mysteries to unravel. So the first part is just kinda catching up, and then everything from the second episode on is the actual investigation itself. Were you happy with the way it ended up? Well, I think that's that's a really interesting question because I think that. Any kind of paranormal media and even in paranormal investigation itself. It's it never goes where you think it's going to go very always takes you someplace else. Exactly, exactly. And that is is really what happened. You know? This thing started out as what we thought was going to be a very simple investigation. We were going to go to hell earlier, we were going to find David we were going to go to his property, and we were going to see what was going on there as we started to kill back layers of that onion, we noticed that. This was a bigger phenomenon. This was stranger than just goblins. It had part of the reason the case even even got picked up again was because our friend Karl Pfeiffer who was the director. He experienced a synchronicity that were just absolutely impossible that we're leading him to to do this case. It was like the phenomenon it self was telling us, you need to document this you need to show it to people and now. Now that we've done that. It's it's in the world. And we're noticing other people are starting to feel themselves being sucked into this as well. What's the link with Mothman? So the second episode is where this pops up one of the things that happened a year after we got the initial emails was we got two very strange pointed emails from a man who went by the pseudonym, Kerry, wrist. I mean, we're pretty sure that's not his real name. He's very strange emails. That said the first ones that I have something for you one week. And then a week later to the date. We got another Email that said, why did you stop when you were so close was he right? Well, that's an interesting thing. We he sent us a photograph of GPS coordinates and those GPS coordinates went to Brown mountain. Which was a place. We had been just months before person whoever. This is new where we were what we were looking into. Because we were there initially. We were there to try and find this entrance to a cave aren't there? Strange lights on Brown mountain, zephyr. Yeah. The the Brown mountain lights, they still don't quite exactly know how they've happened. But there are these weird wispy little little green lights that come up out of the mountains and float around and they're not plasma balls. Are they they aren't sure they're not quite sure the one interesting thing is the mountains made out, of course. So they think maybe it could be some expanding and contrasting that's making things light up and shoot sparks. Okay. Back to Mothman. So this guy who went by Terry risk. The first thing I did was I start to look around and see who is person who's who uses the student him. And the only reference that I could find to this. This name was in a very obscure book that came out in the nineties called secret cipher of the youth was by Alan greenfield. And it's a book about using magic rituals to contact extraterrestrials. Very fringe stuff. Nothing that I was really into at the time. And in the very back. There is an inter. View between Allen. And this man using the pseudonym Terry wrist in in it this man talks about using the secret cipher in order to figure out where injured cold lift and in this. He actually uses a secret cipher to to use the words, ink and black which actually meant injured cold. And in the second Email that we got from this guy who called himself, Terry wrist, possibly the same guy. He said that the ink and black feel isolated. Well, one of the things that Terry talks about in this this interview with Alan is that injured cold had been on the run and with hiding and that the whole Mothman flap was really a distress signal. Very weird stuff, but in an immediate tangible link to the Mothman case and injured cold dramatic. It really is and Dana in terms of your role. Here as a witch. Do you use that in the investigation? Absolutely. For me. I've always taken magic and utilized it with paranormal investigation. So I'm constantly, you know, utilize them like tarot or creating a communication alters. And it kind of is just another layer that we can tap into when we're investigating. So it's always been a really positive thing for me and really kind of been what drives my style of investigating. I guess that you were investigating this particular case, did you know, what you were going after or did it just happen..

Greg Dana Terry wrist Brown mountain David Hellier Volkswagen Alan greenfield Kentucky George Dave Schrader California Allen Appalachia Florida Sutton farmhouse Karl Pfeiffer Hopkins hopkinsville Kentucky
"greg good" Discussed on Newsradio 1200 WOAI

Newsradio 1200 WOAI

13:23 min | 2 years ago

"greg good" Discussed on Newsradio 1200 WOAI

"Of the explained in hell, Greg good to have you with us pleasure to be here. George thanks for having. If you will with our old colleague Dave Schrader a couple of years ago. Weren't you? Both of you just. Yeah. Good guy, dear friend, so let's talk about the paranormal, and I I'll I'll talk to you individually for wild. And just both of you jump in anytime you want, but Greg how did you get started in this? Well, Dana, and I quite literally grew up investigating the paranormal we've been doing it for twenty years driving around at night listening to coast to coast on our journeys into haunted houses kids, and then we started to get more serious about it and about three years ago. We said, well, let's give this a crack. Let's see if we can do this full-time, and we launched the traveling museum of the paranormal and the occult and now we pretty much spend eight nine months out of the year on the road. Traveling. From those two coasts presenting haunted. Objects collecting, haunted objects, helping people with any kind of paranormal problem investigating pretty much anything you. Do you go all over the country? Okay. Literally coast to coast, California to main Florida all over what? Now, what do you drive mean? Traveling museum to me sounds like you pick up something in this huge trucker van what do you? What do you have believe it or not it is a Volkswagen minivan? No. We're very good at tetris. I love it. I love it and Dana. What is a hedge witch? I which is I mean, a lot of people kind of have different ideas about what it is. But really, it's usually someone who associates a lot with the natural world. So they work a lot with medicinal herbs. They work a lot with things that you can find a nature, and that kind of becomes one of the major aspects of their magical practice you sound like a good witch. Can there be bad witches? I think it's like people there's good people. And I think that really it's all about the intention behind what you're doing. So. Yeah. Absolutely. There can be a bad bitches, Greg as you travel around the country with the museum. Do you find that more and more people? Fascinated by all this. Well, I think that we're in a really good climate for people to be fascinated by I think we're seeing a resurgence in the last few years of people getting more in touch with the spiritual nature of things, and they're more interested in that type of thing. And I think that more than ever they're less afraid of it. We're starting to see people who are becoming less scared of the idea of the unexplained in the paranormal is becoming more of a normal thing. That's one of the things that we're constantly. That's one of the biggest messages of of the museum that we run is that most of the time these things that people are afraid of they're just trying to get your attention. And so I think we're in a perfect place for the paranormal right now in the paranormal work that you've done, Greg. Have you ever come across anything that? Even scared you or something you didn't want to get involved with. Quite a few times. There's things that I think you find with a lot of these things you don't really have much of a choice, but to get involved. Sometimes you're you're dragged into it. And that happens, I at least a few times a year, we've got artifacts in the museum that have caused nothing but problems for people car accidents things that are believed to be cursed things that we've quite literally earlier this year, we had to actually take an artifact back to a cave in the catskill mountains that had been stolen from a floor because it kept it kept hurting people. Wow. Do you find that spirits and ghosts attach themselves to items? I think you know, there's there's our opinion on this is a lot different than a lot of our colleagues. I think that what happens a lot times there are intelligence is out there or their pieces of us that exist somewhere in some kind of I guess for lack of a better word, cloud and times of high emotion times of stress and trauma. They can almost make an upload to that cloud. And sometimes that attach to specific places and things I mean, a building is the biggest haunted object of all. And so I think that times of intense emotion create this kind of attachment that when the time is right or or the date or the place of the person they can tap into that. And the experience that haunting and Dana. Of course, you and Greg have put together what is called healthier a five part documentary series about the Appalachian mountains. How did you key in on the those mountains? Well, we were originally contacted back in two thousand twelve by a man who was experiencing some strange activity on his property, specifically around mine shaft that was on his property, and after you know, years and years of kind of looking into this case and really digging into it. We started to notice that there were a lot of similar types of instances happening up and down the mammoth cave system and in and around that area. Sometimes people would refer to them as goblins sometimes people will call them holler goblins. Sometimes they would have completely different kind of local names for them. But a majority of time the the things that were happening. We're all the same. So we were able to kind of put together this map. I guess you would say of where exactly this chain of events was happening. Greg was there a specific case that leads you to to the Appalachian mountains. Or was it just in general? Well, we're we were researching actually the name of of the documentaries. The name of the town where this. Case took place Hellier Kentucky. They have account called Hellier Kentucky is a town called Hellier quite the name, really interesting. Because one of the things that we had just now doubt is that the name Hellier actually means to obscure to cover up, which is what we think was was happening in this town. There was a guy who like they were saying there's a guy named David who sent us photographs of three toed footprints that were coming out of a mine shaft of these these things that he saw his children they were tapping on his windows at night, and they described them as little naked children that were bald like grandpa, and they sounded quite a bit like the the Sutton farmhouse attack that happened in Hopkins hopkinsville Kentucky back in the fifties. And so everything seems so similar to that case that we started looking at it the same way, and you know, this guy David was convinced that these these creatures that were assaulting his family at night or extraterrestrial and he desperately. Wanted us to come and document this. He wanted us to help him a blow up the mine that was on the edge of his property. And he said he was trying to talk to the police, and they weren't taking him. Seriously. I thought the locals were hazing him. And then it just got so bad. He and his family fled their home. He went back with his brother in law to take some photographs and pick up the rest of their stuff. And that was the last we heard him and he disappeared. And that's kind of where Hellier picks up is us tracking down this case as we were doing that. We were finding all of these different similar similar sightings going hundreds of years back all along the Appalachia's and people were just giving them different names. They were all seeing the same thing, we think they just were calling them different things. So no one really put two and two together. How do you know that this is the real deal as opposed to some trickery or they're trying to pull the wool over your eyes? I think I mean, we initially were very skeptical of what was hap-. Opening into the state. There's still a healthy level of skepticism. We were constantly trying to really keep ourselves grounded throat this investigation because it does take some pretty crazy turn. So I think that's something that no matter what is always in the back of our minds in at just as far as the investigation goes, we try to remain as possible because there is a lot of people out there who potentially be putting us on when you were on the scene. Could you feel anything strange was there any kind of energy pattern out there? Absolutely. I mean that was the first thing that we noticed when we got to hell you're kind of all described it as a feeling of having your brain sort of re-tuned to a location it. It was the first thing that we noticed it felt strange there. Dreamy like you had sort of stepped into a different feeling sort of a place. It was really interesting. Now, you you broke it down to the five parts the documentary. Right. Yes. Yeah. There are there. Five different parts of the first part of the documentary is basically just a recap of the investigation that we had done so far. This is something that's been seven years in the making. And and it just kind of something we've been slowly chipping away at because there's there's so many mysteries to unravel. So the first part is just kinda catching up, and then everything from the second episode on is the actual investigation itself. More you happy with the way it ended up. Well, I think that's that's a really interesting question because I think that. Any kind of paranormal media and even in paranormal investigation itself. It's it never goes where you think it's going to go very always takes you someplace else. Exactly, exactly. And that is is really what happened. You know? This thing started out as what we thought was going to be a very simple investigation. We were going to go to Hellier we were going to find David we were going to go to his property, and we were going to see what was going on there. But as we started to kill back layers of that onion, we noticed that this was a bigger phenomenon. This was stranger than just goblins. It had part of the reason the case even even got picked up again is because our friend Karl Pfeiffer who was the director. He experienced a synchronicity that were just absolutely impossible that we're leading him to to do this case. It was like the phenomenon itself was telling us you need to document this you need to show it to people. And now that we've done that. It's it's in the world. And we're noticing other people. Are starting to feel themselves being sucked into this as well. What's the link with Mothman? So the second episode is where this pops up one of the things that happened a year after we got the initial emails was we got two very strange pointed emails from a man who went by the pseudonym, Kerry, wrist. I mean, we're pretty sure that's not his real name. He sent very strange emails that said the first ones that I have something for you one week. And then a week later today, we got another E mail that said, why did you stop when you're so close? Was he right? Well, that's an interesting thing. We he sent us a photograph of GPS coordinates, and those GPS coordinates went to Brown mountain, which was the place. We had been just months before person whoever. This is new where we were what we were looking into. Because we were there initially. We were there to try and find this entrance to a cave. Arthur strange lights on Brown mountain Zeph samples. The Brown mountain lights. They still don't quite exactly know how they've happened. But there are these weird wispy little little green lights that come up out of the mountains and float around and they're not plasma balls. Are they they aren't sure they're not quite sure the one interesting thing is the mountains of courts. So they think maybe it could be some expanding and contrasting that's making things light up and shoot sparks, okay? Now back to Mothman. So this guy who went by Terry risk. The first thing I did was I started to look around and see who is this person who's who uses the student and the only reference that I could find to this. This name was in a very obscure book that came out in the nineties called secret cipher of the finance was by Alan greenfield. And it's a book about using magic rituals to contact extraterrestrials. Very fringe stuff. Nothing that I was really into at the time. And in the very back. There is an interview between Allen in this man using the pseudonym carry wrist in it. This man talks about using the secret cipher in order to figure out where injured cold lift and in this. He actually uses the secret cipher to to use the words, ink and black which actually meant injured cold. And in the second Email that we got from this guy who called himself, Terry wrist, possibly the same guy. He said that the ink and black is still isolated. Well, one of the things that Terry talks about in this this interview with Alan is that injured cold had been on the run and with hiding and that the whole Mothman flap was really a distress signal very weird stuff. But in an immediate tangible link to the Mothman case and injured cold, it's dramatic. I it really is and Dana in terms of your role here as a witch. Do you use that in the investigation? Absolutely. For me. I've always taking. Magic and utilized it with paranormal investigation. So I'm constantly, you know, you tarot or creating a communication alters. And it kind of just another layer that we can tap into when we're investigating. So it's always been a really positive thing for me and really kind of been what drives my style investigating. I guess as you were investigating this particular case, did you know, what you were going after or did it just happen..

Greg Dana Terry wrist Hellier David Alan greenfield Dave Schrader Brown mountain George Volkswagen Kentucky Hellier Kentucky California Allen Appalachia Florida Sutton farmhouse Karl Pfeiffer Hopkins hopkinsville Kentucky
"greg good" Discussed on 600 WREC

600 WREC

14:25 min | 2 years ago

"greg good" Discussed on 600 WREC

"Unexplained in hell, Greg good to have you with us pleasure to be here. George thanks for having with our old colleague Dave Schrader a couple of years ago. Weren't you? Both of you or just. Yeah. You good guy, your friend. So let's talk about the paranormal, and I'll talk to you individually for a while. And just both of you jump in anytime you want, but Greg how did you get started in this? Well, Dana, and I quite literally grew up investigating the paranormal we've been doing it for twenty years. Driving around at night listening to coast to coast on our. Journeys into haunted houses as kids. And then we started to get more serious about it and about three years ago. We said, well, let's give this a crack. Let's see if we can do this full-time, and we launched the traveling museum of the paranormal and the occult and now we pretty much spend eight nine months out of the year on the road traveling from coast to coast presenting haunted objects collecting, haunted objects, helping people with any kind of paranormal problem designating pretty much anything you name it. Do you go all over the country? Hope it literally host the coast of California to main Florida all over now. What do you drive? I mean, traveling museum to me sounds like you pick up something in this huge trucker van what do you what do you have believe it or not it is a Volkswagen minivan? No. We're very good at tetris. I love it. I love it and Dana. What is a hedge witch? Which is I mean, a lot of people kind of have different ideas about what it is. It really. It's usually someone who associates a lot with the natural world. So they work a lot with medicinal herbs. They work a lot with things that you can find in nature, and that kind of becomes one of the major aspects of their magical practice you sound like a good witch. Can there be bad witches? I think just like people there's good pedia people. And I think that really it's all about the intention behind what you're doing. So. Yeah, I think there can be a bad bitches, Greg as you travel around the country with the museum. Do you find that more and more people are fascinated by all this? Well, I think that we're in a really good climate for people to be fascinated by I think we're seeing a resurgence in the last few years of people getting more in touch with the spiritual nature of things, and they're more interested in in that type of thing. And I think that more than ever they're less afraid of it. We're starting to see people who are becoming less. Scared of the idea of the the unexplained in the paranormal is becoming more of a normal thing. That's one of the things that we're constantly. That's one of the biggest messages of of the museum that we run is that most of the time these things that people are afraid of they're just trying to get your attention. And so I think we're a perfect place for the paranormal right now in the paranormal work that you've done, Greg. Have you ever come across anything that? Even scared you or something you didn't want to get involved with quite a few times. You know, there's things that I think you'll find with a lot of these things you don't really have much of a choice, but to get involved. Sometimes you're you're dragged into it. And that happens I at least a few times a year. You know, we've got artifacts in the museum that have caused nothing but problems for people car accidents things that are believed to be cursed things that we've quite literally earlier this year, we had actually take an artifact back to a cave in the catskill mountains that had been stolen from us four because it kept it kept hurting people. Wow. And do you find the spirits and ghosts attach themselves to items? I think you know, there's there's our opinion on this is a lot different than a lot of our colleagues. I think that what happens. A lotta time. Does there are intelligence is out there or their pieces of us that exists somewhere in some kind of a I guess for lack of a better word, a cloud and times of high emotion times. Stress and trauma. They can almost make a an upload into that cloud. And sometimes that attach to specific places and things I mean, a building is the biggest haunted object of all. And so I think that times of intense emotion create this kind of attachment that when the time is right or or the date or the place of the person they can tap into that. And the experience that haunting and Dana. Of course, you and Greg have put together what is called Hellier a five part documentary series about the Appalachian mountains. How did you key in on the those mountains? Well, we were originally contacted back in two thousand twelve by a man who is experiencing some strange activity on his property specifically around a mine shaft that was on his property, and after you know, years and years of kind of looking into this case and really digging into it. We started to notice that there were a lot of similar types of instances happening up and down the mammoth cave system in and around that area. Sometimes people would refer to them as goblins sometimes people. Call them holler goblins sometimes they would have completely different kind of local names for them. But a majority of time the the things that were happening were all the same. So we were able to kind of put together this map. I guess you would say of where exactly this chain of events was happening. Greg was there a specific case that led you to to the Appalachian mountains. Or was it just in general? Well, we're we were researching actually the name of of the documentary is the name of the town where this tastes took place. Hellier kentucky. They have account called Hellier Kentucky. It is a town called Hellier quite the name. Really interesting because one of the things that we had just found out is that the name Hellier actually means to obscure to cover up, which is what we think was was happening in this town. There was a guy who was saying there's a guy named David who sent us photographs of three toed footprints that were coming out of a mine shaft, these these things that he saw his children they were tapping on his windows at night, and they described them as little naked children that were bald like grandpa, and they sounded quite a bit like the Sutton farmhouse attack that happened in Hopkins hopkinsville Kentucky back in the fifties. And so everything seems so similar to that case that we started looking at it the same way, and you know, this guy David was convinced that these these creatures that were assaulting his family at night, we're extraterrestrial and he desperately wanted us to come and documentary. This. He wanted us to help him a blow up the mine that was on the edge of his property. And he said he was trying to talk to the police, and they weren't taking him. Seriously. I thought the locals were hazing him. And then it just got so bad. He and his family fled their home. He went back with his brother in law to take some photographs and pick up the rest of their stuff. And that was the last we heard of him he disappeared. And that's kind of where Hellier picks up us tracking down this case as we were doing that. We were finding all of these different similar similar sightings going hundreds of years back all along the Appalachia's and people were just giving them different names. They were all seeing the same thing. We think they just were calling them different things. No one really put two and two together. How do you know that this is the real deal as opposed to some trickery or they're trying to pull the wool over your eyes? I think I mean. We initially were very skeptical of what was happening and even to this day. There's still a healthy level of skepticism. We were constantly trying to really keep ourselves grounded throat this investigation because it does take some pretty crazy turn. So I think that's something that no matter what is always in the back of our minds and just as far as the investigation goes, we try to remain discoverable as possible because there is a lot of people out there who substantially be putting us on when you were on the scene. Could you feel anything strange was there any kind of energy pattern out there? Absolutely. I mean that was the first thing that we noticed when we got to hell, you're I've kind of all described it as a feeling of having your brain sort of retuned to a location it. It was the first thing that we noticed it felt strange. They're very dreamy like you had sort of stepped into a different feeling sort of a place was really interesting. Now, you you broke it down. The five parts the documentary. Right. Yes. Yeah. There are they're five different parts. The first part of the documentary is basically just a recap of the investigation that we had done so far. This is something that's been seven years in the making, and and it just kind of something we've been slowly chipping away at because there's there's so many mysteries to unravel. So the first part is just kinda catching up, and then everything from the second episode on is the actual investigation itself. Were you happy with the way it ended up? Well, I think that's that's a really interesting question because I think that. Any kind of paranormal media and even in paranormal investigation itself. It's it never goes where you think it's going to go very always takes you someplace else. Exactly, exactly. And that is is really what happened. You know? This thing started out as what we thought was going to be a very simple investigation. We were going to go to Hellier we were going to find David we were going to go to his property, and we were going to see what was going on there. But as we started to kill back layers of that onion, we noticed that this was a bigger phenomena. This was stranger than just goblins. It had part of the reason the case even even got picked up again was because our friend Karl Pfeiffer who was the director. He experienced a synchronicity that were just absolutely impossible that we're leading him to to do this case. It was like the phenomenon self was telling us you need to document this you need to show it to people and now. Now that we've done that. It's it's in the world. And we're noticing other people are starting to feel themselves being sucked into this as well. What's the link with Mothman? So the second episode is where this pops up one of the things that happened a year after we got the initial emails was we got two very strange pointed emails from a man who went by the pseudonym, Terry wrist. I mean, we're pretty sure that's not his real name. He's very strange emails. That said the first ones that I have something for you one week. And then a week later to the day, we got another E mail that said, why did you stop when you were so close was he right? Well, that's an interesting thing. We he sent us a photograph of GPS coordinates and those GPS coordinates went to Brown mountain. Which was a place. We had been just months before person whoever. This is new where we were what we were looking into. Because we were there initially. We were there to try and find this entrance to a cave aren't there? Strange lights on Brown mountain. The Brown mountain lights. They still don't quite exactly know how they've happened. But there are these weird wispy little little green lights that come up out of the mountains and float around. They're not plasma balls. Are they they aren't sure they're not quite sure the one interesting thing is the mountains made out, of course. So they think maybe it could be some expanding and contrasting that's making things light up and shoot sparks, okay? Now back to Mothman. So this guy who went by Terry risk. The first thing I did was I started to look around and see who is person who's who uses the student and the only reference that I could find to this. This name was in a very obscure book that came out in the nineties called secret cipher of the EUFOR knocks was by Alan greenfield. And it's a book about using magic rituals to contact extraterrestrials. Very fringe stuff. Nothing that I was really into at the time and in the very back there. There's an interview between Allen and this man using the pseudonym carry wrist. In in it this man talks about using the secret cipher in order to figure out where injured cold lift and in this. He actually uses a secret cipher to to use the words, ink and black which actually meant injured cold in in the second Email that we got from this guy who called himself, Terry wrist, possibly the same guy. He said that the ink and black is still isolated. Well, one of the things that Terry talks about in this this interview with Allen is that injured cold had been on the run and with hiding and that the whole Mothman flap was really a distress signal very weird stuff. But in an immediate tangible link to the Mothman case and injured cold, that's dramatic. It really is and Dana in terms of your role here as a witch. Do you use that in the investigation? Absolutely. For me. I've always taken magic and utilize it with paranormal investigation. So I'm constantly, you know, utilize tarot or creating a communication alters. And it kind of is just another layer that we can tap into when we're investigating. So it's always been a really positive thing for me and really kind of been what drives my style of investigating. I guess that you were investigating this particular case, did you know, what you're going after or did it just happen..

Greg Dana Hellier Terry wrist David Brown mountain kentucky Volkswagen George Dave Schrader Allen California EUFOR Appalachia Florida Sutton farmhouse Karl Pfeiffer Hopkins hopkinsville Kentucky
"greg good" Discussed on News Radio 1190 KEX

News Radio 1190 KEX

14:25 min | 2 years ago

"greg good" Discussed on News Radio 1190 KEX

"The unexplained in hell, Greg good to have you with us pleasure to be here. George thanks for having us with our old colleague Dave Schrader a couple years ago. Weren't you? Both of you are just yeah. He good guy, your friend. So let's talk about the paranormal, and I'll I'll talk to you individually for a than just both of you jump in anytime you want, but Greg how did you get started in this? Well, Dana, and I quite literally grew up investigating the paranormal we've been doing it for twenty years. Driving around at night listening to coast to coast on our. Journeys into haunted houses as kids. And then we started to get more serious about it and about three years ago. We said, well, let's give this a crack. Let's see if we can do this full-time, and we launched the traveling museum of the paranormal the occult, and now we pretty much spend eight nine months out of the year on the road traveling from coast to coast presenting haunted objects collecting, haunted objects, helping people with any kind of paranormal problem investigating pretty much anything you name it. Do you go all over the country? Help get literally coast to coast California to main Florida all over now. What do you drive? I mean, traveling museum to me sounds like you pick up something in this huge trucker van what do you what do you have? Believe it or not it is a Volkswagen minivan. No. We're very good at tetris. I love it. I love it and Dana. What is a hedge witch? Is. I mean, a lot of people kind of have different ideas about what it is. Really? It's usually someone who associates a lot with the natural world. So they work a lot with medicinal herbs. They work a lot with things that you can find in nature, and that kind of becomes one of the major aspects of their magical practice you sound like a good witch. Can there be bad witches? I think just like people there's good pedia people. And I think that really it's all about the intention behind what you're doing. So. Yeah. Absolutely. There can be a bad bitches, Greg as you travel around the country with the museum. Do you find that more and more people are fascinated by all this? Well, I think that we're in a really good climate for people to be fascinated by I think we're seeing a resurgence in the last few years of people getting more in touch with the spiritual nature things, and they're more interested in that type of thing. And I think that more than ever they're less afraid of it. We're starting to see people who are becoming less. Scared of the idea of the unexplained in the paranormal is becoming more of a normal thing. That's one of the things that we're constantly. That's one of the biggest messages of of the museum that we run is that most of the time these things that people are afraid of they're just trying to get your attention. And so I think we're in a perfect place for the paranormal right now in the paranormal work that you've done, Greg. Have you ever come across anything that? Even scared you or something you didn't want to get involved with quite a few times. You know, there's things that I think you'll find with a lot of these things you don't really have much of a choice, but to get involved. Sometimes you're you're dragged into it. And that happens I at least a few times a year. You know, we've got artifacts in the museum that have caused nothing but problems for people car accidents things that are believed to be cursed things that we've quite literally earlier this year, we had to actually take an artifact back to a cave in the catskill mountains that had been stolen from years before. Because it kept it kept hurting people. Wow. And do you find that spirits and ghosts attach themselves to two items? I think you know, there's there's our opinion on this is a lot different than a lot of our colleagues. I think that what happens a lot of times there are intelligence is out there or their pieces of us that exists somewhere in some kind of a I guess for lack of a better word, a cloud and times of high emotion times of. Stress and trauma. They can almost make an upload to that cloud. And sometimes that attach to specific places and things I mean, a building is the biggest hotted object of all. And so I think that times of intense emotion create this kind of attachment that when the time is right or or the date or the place of the person they can tap into that. And the experience that haunting and Dana. Of course, you and Greg have put together what is called Hellier a five part documentary series about the Appalachian mountains. How did you key in on the those mountains? Well, we were originally contacted back in two thousand twelve by a man who is experiencing some strange activity on his property specifically around a mine shaft that was on his property, and after you know, years and years of kind of looking into this case and really digging into it. We started to notice that there were a lot of similar types of instances happening up and down the mammoth cave system in in and around that area. Sometimes people would refer to them as goblins sometimes people will call them holler goblins. Sometimes they would have completely different kind of local names for them. But majority of time the the things that were happening. We're all the same. So we were able to kind of put together this math. I guess you would say of where exactly this chain of events was happening. Greg was there a specific case that leads you to to the Appalachian mountains. Or was it just in general? Well, where we were researching actually the name of the documentary is the name of the town where this case took place Hellier Kentucky, they have account called Hellier Kentucky. It is a town called Hellier quite the name. It's really interesting because one of the things that we just found out is that the name Hellier actually means to obscure to cover up, which is what we think was was happening in this town. There was a guy who like they know was saying there's a guy named David who sent us photographs of three toed footprints that were coming out of a mine shaft, these these things that he saw his children they were tapping on his windows at night, and they described them as little naked children that were bald like grandpa, and they sounded quite a bit like the the Sutton farmhouse attack that happened in Hopkins hopkinsville Kentucky back in the fifties. And so everything seems so similar to that case that we started look. Looking at it the same way. And you know, this guy David was convinced that these these creatures that were assaulting his family at night or extraterrestrial, and he desperately wanted us to come and document this. He wanted us to help him a blow up the mine that was on the edge of his property. And he said he was trying to talk to the police, and they weren't taking him. Seriously. I thought the locals were hazing him. And then it just got so bad. He and his family fled their home. He went back with his brother in law to take some photographs and pick up the rest of their stuff. And that was the last we heard of him he disappeared. And that's kind of where Hellier picks up is us tracking down this case as we were doing that. We were finding all of these different similar similar sightings going hundreds of years back all along the Appalachia's and people were just giving them different names. They were all seeing the same thing, we think. They just were calling them different things. So no one really put two and two together. How do you know that this is the real deal as opposed to some trickery or they're trying to pull the wool over your eyes? I think I mean, we initially were very skeptical of what was happening to this day. There's still a healthy level of skepticism. We were constantly trying to really keep ourselves grounded throat this investigation because it does take some pretty crazy turn. So I think that's something that no matter what is always in the back of our minds in at just as far as the investigation goes. We try to remain skeptical as possible because there is a lot of people out. There has potentially be putting us on when you were on the scene. Could you feel anything strange was there any kind of energy pattern out there? Absolutely. I mean that was the first thing that we noticed when we got to hell, you're I've kind of all described it as a feeling of having your brain sort of retuned to allow. Location. It. It was the first thing that we noticed it felt strange. They're very dreamy like you had sort of stepped into a different feeling sort of a place was really interesting. Now, you you broke it down to the five parts the documentary. Right. Yes. There are they're five different parts of the first part of the documentary is basically just a recap of the investigation that we had done so far. This is something that's been seven years in the making, and and it just kind of something we've been slowly chipping away at because there's there's so many mysteries to unravel. So the first part is just kinda catching up, and then everything from the second episode on is the actual investigation itself. Were you happy with the way it ended up? Well, I think that's that's a really interesting question because I think that. Any kind of paranormal media and even in paranormal investigation itself. It's it never goes where you think it's going to go very always takes you someplace else. Exactly, exactly. And that is is really what happened. You know? This thing started out as what we thought was going to be very simple investigation. We were going to go to hell earlier we were going to find David we were going to go to his property. We were going to see what was going on there. But as we started to keel back layers of that onion, we noticed that this was a bigger phenomenon. This was stranger than just goblins. It had part of the reason the case even even got picked up again was because our friend Karl Pfeiffer who was the director. He experienced a synchronous cities that were just absolutely impossible that we're leading him to do this case. It was like the phenomenon self was telling us, you need to document this you need to show it to people. And now that we've done. Done that. It's it's in the world. And we're noticing other people are starting to feel themselves being sucked into this as well. What's the link with Mothman? So the second episode is where this pops up one of the things that happened a year after we got the initial emails was we got two very strange pointed emails from a man who went by the pseudonym, Terry wrist. I mean, we're pretty sure that's not his real name. He sent very strange emails that said the first ones that I have something for you one week. And then a week later to the day, we got another E mail that said, why did you stop when you were so close was he right? Well, that's an interesting thing. We he sent us a photograph of GPS coordinates and those GPS coordinates went to Brown mountain. Which was a place. We had been just months before person whoever. This is new where we were what we were looking into. Because we were there initially. We were there to try and find this entrance to a cave aren't there? Strange lights on Brown mountain. The Brown mountain lights. They still don't quite exactly know how they've happened. But there are these weird wispy little little green lights that come up out of the mountains and float around and they're not plasma balls. Are they they aren't sure they're not quite sure the one interesting thing is the mountains made out, of course. So they think maybe it could be some expanding and contrasting that's making things light up and shoot sparks. Okay. Now back to Mark, man. So this guy who went by Terry risk. The first thing I did was I start to look around and see who is this person who's who uses the pseudonym and the only reference that I could find to this. This name was in a very obscure book that came out in the nineties called secret cipher of the EUFOR knots was by Alan greenfield. And it's a book about using magic rituals to contact extraterrestrials. Very fringe stuff. Nothing that I was really into at the time and in the very back there. In an interview between Allen, and this man using the suit him carry risks in it this man, talks about using the secret cipher in order to figure out where injured cold lived and in this. He actually uses the secret cipher to to use the words, ink and black which actually meant injured cold in in the second Email that we got from this guy who called himself, Terry wrist, possibly the same guy. He said that the ink and black is feel isolated. Well, one of the things that Terry talks about in this this interview with Alan is that injured cold had been on the run and with hiding and that the whole Mothman flap was really a distress signal very weird stuff. But in an immediate tangible link to the Mothman case and injured cold, that's dramatic. It really is and Dana in terms of your. Or role here as a witch? Do you use that in the investigation? Absolutely. For me. I've always taken magic and utilized it with paranormal investigation. So I'm constantly, you know, utilize like tarot or creating a communication alters. Any kind of is just another layer that we can tap into when we're investigating. So it's always been a really positive thing for me and really kind of been what drives my style of investigating. I guess as you were investigating this particular case, did you know, what you're going after or did it just happen?.

Greg Dana Terry wrist Hellier David Brown mountain Volkswagen Alan greenfield Kentucky George Dave Schrader California Allen Appalachia Florida Sutton farmhouse Karl Pfeiffer Hopkins hopkinsville Kentucky
"greg good" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

WIBC 93.1FM

14:11 min | 2 years ago

"greg good" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

"Unexplained in Hello. Greg. Good to have you with us pledge of your George. Thanks for having. If you will with our old colleague Dave Schrader a couple of years ago. Weren't you both of you? Yeah. You're good guy, your friend. So let's talk about the paranormal, and I'll I'll talk to you individually for a wild. And just both of you jump in anytime you want, but Greg how did you get started in this? Well, Dana, and I quite literally grew up investigating the paranormal we've been doing it for twenty years. Driving around at night listening to coast to coast on our. Journeys into haunted houses as kids. And then we started to get more serious about it and about three years ago. We said, well, let's give this a crack. Let's see if we can do this full-time, and we launched the traveling museum of the paranormal the occult, and now we pretty much spend eight nine months out of the year on the road traveling from coast to coast presenting haunted objects collecting, haunted objects, helping people with any kind of paranormal problem domesticating pretty much anything you name it. Do you go all over the country? Help get literally hosts coast, California to main Florida all over. Now. What do you drive? I mean, a traveling museum to me sounds like you pick up something in this huge trucker van what do you? What do you have believe it or not it is a Volkswagen van? No. We're very good at tetris. I love it. I love it and Dana. What is a hedge witch? I wish is I mean, a lot of people kind of have different ideas about what it is. It really. It's usually someone who associates a lot with the natural world. So they work a lot with medicinal herbs. They work a lot with things that you can find in nature, and that kind of becomes one of the major aspects of their magical practice you sound like a good witch. Can there be bad witches? I think just like people there's good people. And I think that really it's all about the intention behind what you're doing. So. Yeah, I think there can be a bad bitches, Greg as you travel around the country with the museum. Do you find that more and more people are fascinated by all this? Well, I think that we're in a really good climate for people to be fascinated by I think we're seeing a resurgence in the last few years of people getting more in touch with the spiritual nature of things, and they're more interested in in that type of thing. And I think that more than ever they're less afraid of it. We're starting to see people who are becoming less. Scared of the idea of the unexplained in the paranormal is becoming more of a normal thing. That's one of the things that we're constantly. That's one of the biggest messages of of the museum that we run is that most of the time these things that people are afraid of they're just trying to get your attention. And so I think we're in a perfect place for the paranormal right now in the paranormal work that you've done, Greg. Have you ever come across anything that? Even scared you or something you didn't want to get involved with quite a few times. You know, there's things that I think you'll find with a lot of these things you don't really have much of a choice, but to get involved. Sometimes you're you're dragged into it. And that happens at least a few times a year. You know, we've got artifacts in the museum that have caused nothing but problems for people car accidents says things that are believed to be things that we've quite literally earlier this year, we had actually take an artifact back to a cave in the catskill mountains that had been stolen from a floor because it kept it kept hurting people. Wow. And do you find the spirits and ghosts attach themselves to items? I think you know, there's there's our opinion on this is a lot different than a lot of our colleagues. I think that what happens a lotta times there are intelligence is out there or their pieces of us that exist somewhere in some kind of a I guess for lack of a better word, a cloud and times of high emotion times of. Stress and trauma. They can almost make an upload to that cloud. And sometimes that attach to specific places and things I mean, a building is the biggest hotted object of all. And so I think that times of intense emotion create this kind of attachment that when the time is right or or the date or the place of the person they can tap into that. And the experience that haunting and data. Of course, you and Greg have put together what is called healthier a five part documentary series about the Appalachian mountains. How did you key in on the those mountains? Well, we were originally contacted back in two thousand twelve by man, who is experiencing some strange activity on his property specifically around a mine shaft that was on his property, and after you know, years and years of kind of looking into this case and really digging into it. We started to notice that there were a lot of similar types of instances happening up and down the mammoth cave system in and around that area. Sometimes people would refer to them as Bob Dobelin. Sometimes people call them, holler goblins. Sometimes they would have completely different kind of local names for them. But a majority of time the the things that were happening were all the same. So we were able to kind of put together this map. I guess you would say of where exactly this chain of events was happening. Greg was there a specific case that led you to to the Appalachian mountains. Or was it just in general? Well, we're we were researching actually the name of of the documentary is the name of the town where this case took place Hellier Kentucky, they have account called Hellier Kentucky. It is a town called Hellier quite the name. Really interesting because one of the things that we have just found out is that the name Hellier actually means to obscure to cover up, which is what we think was was happening in this town. There was a guy who like they knew was saying there's a guy named David who sent us photographs of three toed footprints that were coming out of a mine shaft at these these things that he saw his children they were tapping on his windows at night, and they described them as little naked children that were bald like grandpa, and they sounded quite a bit like the the Sutton farmhouse attack that happened in Hopkins hopkinsville Kentucky back in the fifties. And so everything seems so similar to that case that we started looking at it the same way, and you know, this guy David was convinced that these these creatures that were assaulting his family at night, we're extraterrestrial and he desperately wanted us to come and documentary. This. He wanted us to help him a blow up the mine that was on the edge of his property. And he said he was trying to talk to the police, and they weren't taking him. Seriously. I thought the locals were hazing him. And then it just got so bad. He and his family fled their home. He went back with his brother in law to take some photographs and pick up the rest of their stuff. And that was the last we heard him he disappeared. And that's kind of where Hellier picks up is us tracking down this case as we were doing that. We were finding all of these different similar the similar sightings going hundreds of years back all along the Appalachia's and people were just giving them different names. They were all seeing the same thing, we think they just were calling them different things. So no one really put two and two together. How do you know that this is the real deal as opposed to some trickery or they're trying to pull the wool over your eyes? I think I mean we. Initially were very skeptical of what was happening even to this day. There's still a healthy level of skepticism. We were constantly trying to really keep ourselves grounded throat this investigation because it does take some pretty crazy turn. So I think that's something that no matter what is always in the back of our minds in at just as far as the investigation goes. We try to remain skeptical as possible because there is a lot of people out there who potentially be putting us on when you were on the scene. Could you feel anything strange was there any kind of energy pattern out there? Absolutely. I mean that was the first thing that we noticed when we got to hell, you're I've kind of all described it as a feeling of having your brain sort of re-tuned to a location it. It was the first thing that we noticed it felt strange. They're very dreamy like you had sort of stepped into a different feeling sort of a place was really interesting. Now, you you broke it down. The five parts the documentary. Right. Yes. Yeah. There are they're five different parts of the first part of the documentary is basically just a recap of the investigation that we had done so far. This is something that's been seven years in the making, and and it just kind of something we've been slowly chipping away at because there's there's so many mysteries to unravel. So the first part is just kinda catching up, and then everything from the second episode on is the actual investigation itself. Were you happy with the way it ended up? Well, I think that's that's a really interesting question because I think that. Any kind of paranormal media and even in paranormal investigation itself. It's it never goes where you think it's going to go very always takes you someplace else. Exactly, exactly. And that is is really what happened. You know? This thing started out as what we thought was going to be a very simple investigation. We were going to go to hell earlier, we were going to find David we were going to go to his property, and we were going to see what was going on there. But as we started to keel back layers of that onion, we noticed that this was a bigger phenomenon. This was stranger than just goblins. It had part of the reason the case even even got picked up again was because our friend Karl Pfeiffer who was director. He experienced a synchronicity that were just absolutely impossible that we're leading him to to do this case. It was like the phenomenon itself was telling us you need to document this you need to show it to people and now. Now that we've done that. It's it's in the world. And we're noticing other people are starting to feel themselves being sucked into this as well. What's the link with Mothman? So the second episode is where this pops up one of the things that happened a year after we got the initial emails was we got two very strange pointed emails from a man who went by the pseudonym, Terry wrist. I mean, we're pretty sure that's not his real name. He sent very strange emails that said the first ones that I have something for you one week. And then a week later to the date. We got another E mail that said, why did you stop when you were so close was he right? Well, that's an interesting thing. We he sent us a photograph of GPS coordinates, and those GPS coordinates went to Brown mountain, which was a place. We had been just months before person whoever. This is new where we were what we were looking into. Because we were there initially. We were there to try and find this entrance to a cave during lights on Brown mountain. Yeah. Brown mountain lights. They still don't quite exactly know how they've happened. But there are these weird wispy little little green lights that come up out of the mountains and float around and they're not plasma balls. Are they they aren't sure they're not quite sure the one interesting thing is the mountains made out, of course. So they think maybe it could be some expanding and contrasting that's making things light up and shoot sparks. Okay. Back to Mothman. So this guy who went by Terry risk. The first thing I did was I start to look around and see who is this person who's who uses the pseudonym and the only reference that I could find to this. This name was in a very obscure book that came out in the nineties called secret cipher of the finance was by Alan greenfield. And it's a book about using magic rituals to contact extraterrestrials. Very fringe stuff. Nothing that I was really into at the time. And in the very back. There is an interview between Allen. And this man using the pseudonym carry wrist in it this man talks about using the secret cipher in order to figure out where injured cold lift and in this. He actually uses the secret cipher to to use the words, ink and black which actually meant injured cold. And in the second Email that we got from this guy who called himself, Terry wrist, possibly the same guy. He said that the ink and black is feel isolated. Well, one of the things that Terry talks about in this this interview with Allen is that injured cold had been on the run and was hiding, and that's the whole Mothman flap was really a distress signal very weird stuff. But in an immediate tangible link to the Mothman case and injured cold, let's dramatic. It really is and Dana in terms of your role here as a witch. Do you use that in the investigation? Absolutely. For me. I've always taken magic and utilized it with paranormal investigation. So I'm constantly, you know, you like them like tarot or creating a communication alters. And it kind of just another layer that we can tap into when we're investigating..

Greg Dana Terry wrist David Hellier Brown mountain Volkswagen Dave Schrader Kentucky Allen Bob Dobelin Appalachia California Sutton farmhouse Karl Pfeiffer Hopkins hopkinsville Kentucky Alan greenfield director
"greg good" Discussed on Reality TV RHAP-ups: Reality TV Podcasts

Reality TV RHAP-ups: Reality TV Podcasts

03:23 min | 3 years ago

"greg good" Discussed on Reality TV RHAP-ups: Reality TV Podcasts

"This is why we're in the scrubs tribe because like. She plays NFL AFL. These people are really impressive. Anyway, she's as motivating wake boarding. She'd very impressive job daughter. So I feel like again, she's very some on these champions if you could get to emerge as you might fit in with some of these guys because he's going to be really, really strong. It just depends on I three six days. How else Bokan she? How much is she getting on people's nerves? How much she annoying people pissing people off as you can get through that, then I might change my mind. I might make her dateable. I think she's going to be a huge character. I think she is going to have a massive effect on the game. Personality was strategy wise. I think that we are looking at our first big female villain. Now, when I looked at the, I know we've had Fabi and you could argue that Sarah was a villain because she was good at the game, but we've never had a female who has outwardly luxury added in being outspoken and. Strategizing and half. Because they voted out, I've -solutely absolutely. And that's one of the shames of survivor. But I actually think that Jenner is going to fill that void. She's going to make it somewhat far, and I think that she will find a safe place to land with those other big males that she will gravitate towards. She says that in video she seems like someone who people will be a little bit scared of. I don't know. I just have this. I think that we are looking at someone who's going to be a massive part of the season. You convince me you can be like Jenna hype, man, I feel like she will make the merge expense vanilla yet, and that's genuinely what I think is going to happen. I have again, no information other than the fact that she seems like someone who if you put Jenner and Fennell in a room. You could. You would bet money that they are not going to walk out wearing friendship bracelets. Yes. Well, they might not have the materials to make the friendship braces. Yes. No, that, but just in general, I feel like they weren't like jello, Fennell, interior decorative. She can find something to my tell general what to do in order to make it. And that'll piss general also much. She says that she's going to be heroic villain. Now I hate that lawn because that's what ties and Enda joins said lost year, and neither of them actually had any I chance had any villain. Qualities and Tarzan made himself seem very heroic seem to know what actually happened. We wasn't long enough, but I can actually see her being a villain, and but she's heroin in her own is is what I think. Because she says that are not afraid to stand up for myself. If I'm belittled or disrespected, I'm happy to kind of put people in that. Lice. She seems like someone that she thinks that what she's going to be doing is because it's for the greater good. But really, it's Genesis, Greg good? Yes. You might be the hero and villain because she'll. Villain, but I'm rooting for her because at the kind of game I want to see. So I'll definitely be all onboard on definitely rooting for your hot man. How can how can refer. She says that she's happy to law. She has absolutely want to tell them what they want. He yes, and she's such. She doesn't smile in video either. And in love when women don't smile..

heroin Jenner NFL Tarzan Jenna hype Greg good Fabi Enda Fennell Sarah three six days
"greg good" Discussed on Be Your Change

Be Your Change

03:42 min | 3 years ago

"greg good" Discussed on Be Your Change

"I feel that smart money, it's not just flowing money, but opening doors and helping mentorship as well. And that the relationship that more and more people are drawn to his days. As we noted in one. Of his series impact investment is party early rising amongst millennials with one survey, showing Seventy-nine percent of millennials wanted to invest in book, social and financial impact for ways. People want to be part of a movement that east creating more conscious society. Many of them come to us and thank you. This is made my life so much more worthwhile. I'm working Bank making lots of money, but I'm running this company made lots of money, but now I feel fulfilled because I can actually see people being lifted out of poverty, and it makes so much meaning for that. So those are the kind of people we look for with one have meaning in their lives, ends of impact also brings meaning into leaners online in a lot of ways. Lena's he's herself in the woman. She makes investments in Lena's. Own family was poor. Her grandmother was a rice farmer in Singapore and her family work. They were. So that's why angels of impact. We don't just what women prices. We support those are helping alleviate poverty. Lena's on background is in technology. She was a CEO of one of the first tech startups in Singapore. In the early ninety s she's working forty, seven different countries including Switzerland. The US in Indonesia, Lena says as a woman, she had to work twice as hard to break the glass ceiling because there was always an unconscious bias. So I was in the tech field for many, many as twenty five years. And in tech field, you know is very male dominated, right? So I very much empathized how difficult it was to be a woman in tech feel and to be literally invisible and trying to make yourself visible. I went onto run my own company. I rent an Illinois company out of Singapore, which provided services all around the region, including straying China, Vietnam. And in that process, I found enterpreneurship to be very empowering because I didn't have to go back for job. I. Create opportunities, and I was creating opportunities for other people as well as creating teams. And I was creating value. Lena was creating opportunities, but she fit like something was missing. She wanted to do more to help others because even though our family was able to leave themselves out of poverty, not old families are so lucky when I was very young. I watched rich and Ediborah's movie on Mahatma Gandhi and also other trees was one of my real role models for me in terms. So there's I was always actually conflicted with business and then, oh, by the way, I want to do some good and then business and honored to some good. So when I first thought hearing about social entrepreneurship, brilliant idea, you know that you could use business fundamentals and do good and one of the books that really changed. My mindset was professor mom at Unisys book co, creating a world without poverty way, challenges economic series. And he challenges the fact that we need to restore dignity for the poor. They can help themselves. They are innovators. They're not passive recipients. What lean is saying is that donating money. Is not that empowering, but when invest money into person or company align with Greg good, that is empowering both of the interpreter and for the investor and then made so much sense to me, you know. And so that's when I said, okay, how can I apply this network that I've already built up both in the business Willis? Well, as sort of the nonprofit well to be able to help others to do it United sided. The best way to help authors was to her business know how to enable women around the world to leave themselves out of poverty. She would help small women run businesses, find.

Lena Singapore Greg good Mahatma Gandhi Illinois Switzerland US professor Indonesia Ediborah China Vietnam Seventy-nine percent twenty five years
Red Dead Redemption 2 Release Date / Pre-Order Guide

Kinda Funny Games Daily

02:04 min | 3 years ago

Red Dead Redemption 2 Release Date / Pre-Order Guide

"Oh no no we we've we've reached out we're we're in talks confirm our boy who you saw is yet you know the gigs over there left left their here these other people now what's good game saints so it's totally yeah garrick i've been you're right there i why i read this after talking about artie that's an interesting wrinkle that is bethesda as well but the timing doesn't share i hear i feel like that's unrelated am and six pm feather in the cap putting putting an letting you know that's something that's how i'm on the beat saber trading greg good i'm glad i got you there be saber it looks amazing if you haven't seen beat sabre ladies and gentlemen you officially have my permission to pause the show and go watch anything for beat sabre is dvr in vr with light sabers see i yeah i would go away from the ddr train and just it's more like a it's a rhythm game it's like tar hero with light sabers where the notes are coming on the highway and you slash him with light sabers rather than but either anyway either anyway you slice it big fan number four readend redemption to have exclusive content that's playstation this is from jason schreier over kentucky i feel like when they announced red dead the playstation blog had something up about like this but there's a little bit little wrinkle here jason writes today developer rockstar announced a bunch of bundles and preorder bonuses for the much anticipated western game in barrie buried amongst all the stuff about fits gt online cash playstation store is this line playstation exclusive place elect content i play station for details to follow we don't know the scale of select content could be hats could be a full expansion but if it's anything like sony's arrangement with destiny it will be a pain for xbox players the company behind the playstation four paid activision to keep guns maps and even full strikes from xbox players for years then to the same with destiny to and several call of duty games microsoft pulled its own time this lucidly nonsense with dragon agent position as well as other big multi platform games including call duty over the past decade so they only buy it make sense yeah that that's there and then also.

Garrick Artie Bethesda Jason Schreier Rockstar Barrie Sony Activision Kentucky Developer Microsoft
French Open organizers won't give Serena Williams a seeding

Mason & Ireland

01:54 min | 3 years ago

French Open organizers won't give Serena Williams a seeding

"I five week court trial my fighting weight is one ninety five got myself back to one ninety eight but my weight bounces around a lot while i finish twenty eighteen weighing more or less than one ninety seven over under one ninety seven you gonna go under man you look in lean it on your other habits yeah you're gonna be working a lot it's going to be celebrating a lot yet your trump that he's not out of the woods yet in that trial there's still some things should be decided i think he's going to smoke a lot of weed which will make them eat i'm gonna say you're you're going to be right there it's going to be right at the number over one ninety seven hundred one in because i want to be supportive i'm going to say barely under greg good for you for being supportive i think something's going to happen you're not gonna working too much you're going to go over jerry now i think he's got it in his head not to go over it so he'll be under i'm tell you i'm going well i'm not winning that michael all right no it's me okay serena williams is the greatest female tennis player of all time in it's not close three of williams's twenty three grand slam titles came at the french open which he's playing in this coming week oh mason caesarian blah blah blah you can put anything you can put remarkably the french open has serena unseeded because she took over a year off to have a baby the tournament says because her ranking is dropped out of the four hundred top four hundred they didn't cedar she was ranked number one when she went on maternity leave having just won the australian open nancy armor from usa today wrote this about serena's maternity leave quote to not recognize that should warn exception be it for serena or any new mother is both out dated in meanspirited not to mention shortsighted on.

Greg Jerry Michael Serena Williams USA Meanspirited Five Week
"greg good" Discussed on Mason & Ireland

Mason & Ireland

01:41 min | 3 years ago

"greg good" Discussed on Mason & Ireland

"Has said specifically there will never be electoral but you can't call a non mascot oh she's an earlier she's a mascot chester chuck the condos sister gene is a good luck charm ninety ninety eight year old sister gene in a way wheelchair is their mascot until she shoots a t shirt cannon somewhere from half court options not a mascot mascot greg good or bad that we've got so many so many of the little guys so many david sly slaying goliaths i think starting dining table where i'm with brian very highly on this it's just not it's not interest brian what's right i don't agree with brian i it just doesn't make fun it's not funny i love the love that you lost one duke duke duke a loved it kobe was go to duke and winning and you were like no no should be at howard mad howard show the mac over in butler right and now brad stevens is is a beast over there in the south right i love that team because of its grit because they were always the underdogs that's why i'm more excited about this loyola nevada game because nevada has all the games that they've won was after the first time they lent so lazy but nevada excuse me nevada you're right vata is is not the kind of texas is not the kind of high seed that helps the ncaa when they get through you know why people have heard of text another where you get the ncaa tournament and by the way i'm predicting this now okay no matter what it'll be the lowest rate and aa turn champion history.

kobe butler nevada texas ncaa greg good david sly brian howard brad stevens ninety ninety eight year
Russian businessman's death being treated as a homicide

All Things Considered

02:21 min | 3 years ago

Russian businessman's death being treated as a homicide

"Russian president vladimir putin is expected to win sunday's election in a landslide but not everyone supports them i'm voting for greg good evening ski because i think he's smart i trust him we'll hear more from russians on the ground in moscow also this hour the white house says there are no immediate personnel changes looming despite rampant rumors of more staff shakeups and here in new york three whistle blowers are suing the most popular health insurance for city workers will get the details from wnyc's own rigid bergen all that more this hour right after news headlines live from npr news in washington i'm jack speer even as a thorn in south florida tried to determine what caused a newly installed pedestrian bridge to come down on a highway yesterday killing at least six people they say they believe no one is alive beneath tons of concrete and twisted metal now one presents director the miami dade police department late last night it was approximately ten o'clock when the determination was made that this no longer was going to be a certain rescue mission and nowadays a recovery and investigatory mission same federal investigators say to piers cable suspending the bridge were being tightened after a stress test when the nine hundred fifty tonnes span collapsed scheduled to open next year the bridge was built to link florida international university with the nearby town of sweetwater at least one student was among the victims the fourteen point two million dollar bridge was designed to make it safer for students across the busy highway british police say they're investigating the recent death of a russian businessman in london is murdered npr's joanna kakissis reports from london the investigation comes as british russian relations of soured on the suspicious poisoning ex russian spine has daughter police say nikolai glushkov was strangled to death his family found his body in his london home late on march twelfth his death is not appear to be related to the nerve gas poisoning of sergei julius cre paul glushkov used to be an executive at aeroflot the russian state airline until he was jailed in nineteen ninety nine for fraud and money laundering he fled to britain after his release he was close to a critic of ladimir putin exiled oligarch boris ber zoff ski was found hanged in his london home.

Joanna Kakissis Britain Sergei Julius Cre Florida International Universi NPR Greg President Trump Fraud Executive Paul Glushkov Nikolai Glushkov London Vladimir Putin Sweetwater Miami Dade Police Department Director South Florida Jack Speer Washington
"greg good" Discussed on Reliable Sources with Brian Stelter

Reliable Sources with Brian Stelter

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"greg good" Discussed on Reliable Sources with Brian Stelter

"Dirt on hillary clinton and whether or not that famous lines and donald trump during that press conference russia if you're listening find those 30000 missing emails actually was tied back to his knowledge or not so when you see someone like greg good velde saying it's a paperthin case how do you react it's astonishing that that they're still saying that even after nineteen people have been charged with crimes after five of them have pleaded guilty i mean it's just it's very clear as of right now any way that this is not just a witchhunt and actually robert muller made that clear a few weeks ago when he indicted thirteen russian nationals four their role in interfering in in the election that made it clear to everyone around rubber muller even his critics that he was not just going after the president he was actually actively investigating russia's election interference where do the leaks come from because all those headlines i wish showing their based on leaks is it muller's team do really reasonably of his office is leaking there's no reason to believe that it's muller's office if moller's office was leaking then we would not be completely surprised and shocked every time he dropped an indictment meant exactly we would have known beforehand for example that he was going to charge michael flynn with pleading guilty we would have n with with with lying to the fbi which she then pled guilty for we would have known that george puppet up lists this virtually unknown campaign aide had pleaded guilty to lying to the fbi was now cooperating witness so the leaks are primarily coming from people who have already been interviewed by robert muller and who are telling the press what questions were asked to that we can all get a better idea of what the scope of his investigation is so i'm reminded again steve how little we actually know about moller's probe of were only finding out what questions are being asked inside these meetings we don't know the answers and and we don't know what mother audience that's the problem of the prison trump's defenders in the media of which is the key it's not a twosided debate because unlike the ken star investigation of of putting a prison clinton where he was holding press conferences constantly leaking if he literally held prescott.

hillary clinton russia robert muller president moller michael flynn fbi george prescott donald trump greg good velde steve
"greg good" Discussed on Around the NFL

Around the NFL

01:38 min | 3 years ago

"greg good" Discussed on Around the NFL

"Again the one thing that eagles failed on offense uh in this game was twopoint conversions they film unwise in addition to missing an extra point and now and i and i call the missed extrapoint and aid said that that was going to be the difference in a one point the patriots win and at one point it was thirty three to thirty two in the fourth quarter with a mixed extra point on the board so far so far would you say greg good i am being a class act so far like some people that they got commodity gloating so far total perot very classy i have been a fine day for all of that yes euroclassica uh so 15 six backslapping on this up in it and you're thinking yourself a boy of the patriots about to fall into a deep hole but it never really happened that way fifteen six after this point it's kind of a back and forth affair james wide scores a rushing touchdown uh and then the eagles the eagles score again they can't get a stop and it happens in a very interesting way let me go back first and say this there is a huge play and we represent twice with tom brady with the patriots and josh mcdaniel's and maybe maybe as last game navy will see there's report out there that mcdaniel's might not be ready to move on and which would leave the cult's in a very bad way but a huge play in which tom brady was the intended receiver and we have not heard from our boys scott zolak yet of the let's listen to the play in the second quarter in which tom brady had a chance to score a touchdown with his legs in his hands.

patriots eagles tom brady josh mcdaniel greg scott zolak
"greg good" Discussed on Skip and Shannon: Undisputed

Skip and Shannon: Undisputed

01:34 min | 4 years ago

"greg good" Discussed on Skip and Shannon: Undisputed

"Now that we're got we'll how's it going to work out shots are out there on that call i know abroad dave iraq now leslie i've been if they do the mvp right now bit lebrun in the front bought big bit day there i don't know about money might be lucky i can't control what the media thinks the media's to you the their blind witness you will agree more i'm not i don't have to bolt we go to laugh by game they played 30 game already naylor abroad jane is second in the nba him by the way did you see what kevin durant did with the stars out at staples last night on kobe night in overtime he goes 4 of 4 two of two from three 2 of two from the free throw line argue the lakers well point against apl thug if the lakers apec migrant now it is back with the cowboys following his sixgame suspension zeke spent six weeks in kabul and looks to be in pretty good shape based on these photos in the fall network reported zeke also put together documentary during his suspension telling his side of the story after domestic violence accusations dramatic fox nfl analyst greg jennings looking greg good morning good morning morning grigor you buying this is a news the are you barn this is a news ecosystem have any anything else to buy uh but you know what i mean or your gortat anyway logo at what i do love about what i see in what i have not heard is that i haven't heard anything when when everything went down and he got suspended and he went to this undisclosed place that we now know as kabul.

mvp lebrun nba kevin durant lakers cowboys kabul zeke greg jennings gortat dave iraq leslie kobe domestic violence nfl analyst six weeks