14 Burst results for "Greg Gonzales"

"greg gonzales" Discussed on The United States of Anxiety

The United States of Anxiety

07:49 min | 3 months ago

"greg gonzales" Discussed on The United States of Anxiety

"Welcome back. This is the united states anxiety and cairo this week. We are asking what we can learn from the nearly forty year old chinese pandemic as we approached one year living with covid nineteen and joined by greg. Gonzales who has co director of the global health justice partnership at yale university and has been in aids activists for three decades and greg. Let's get one more caller in here. Paul who's in the financial district paul. Welcome to the show. Hi how are you. I'm good you. You have a memory of that time of the early. Deputy that you wanna share. I was working in the film. I'm sorry i look in the film industry now. I was working in the restaurant industry in chelsea and living chelsea at the time and my mom worked at saint. Vincent's hospital And the parallel courses. Now that my daughter is a nurse in banco and the similarity of stories that i'm hearing and the terror and the fear that They're experiencing working in the health industry at the time. is kind of shocking And stories my mom would tell me about how people were afraid of putting bringing into rooms saint. Vincent's of the aids patients. And the the that. Same terror that my my daughter's experiencing Really sorta. I feel like it's it's it's strange Strange experience of going full circle but in a horrible way. Thank you for that paul greg. I want to ask you because one of the things that there's a lot of these very difficult memories of the epidemic. That are resident right now but part of why i wanted to talk to you is. There's also i find. There are a number of things that are quite inspiring about that period to me. And i wanna ask you about that because you were present at a time when a group of people in our community said you know we'll take care of ourselves and we will force a power that exists to value our lives and i just wonder about that. Now we're where do we see that connection with kovic now. Well actually in new york city. I think he d c. 'cause there's something called the coca nineteen working group and maybe not as visible as active new york. But it has a lot of alums from new york and some younger folks but also some of the researchers from the time the eighty nine hundred each iv. that are all working together to think about how to improve both Local policy in the city but also national policy on we switch treatment testing all the things you know like to focus on back in the eighty ninety three and hiv. And so you know it's an infectious disease all infectious disease docs from the eighties around doing this work around the front lines for kobe. But also the people who remember the epidemic activist groups like rise and resist new york and others have mobilized themselves in public nineteen It's not a surprise that it's the old actor beds. And the new generation sort of aligned with them better stepping up the city but also around the country well on that score thinking about all the treatment activism of both the past and present and hiv and then thinking about that period. We're now entering with vaccine rule out. What our lessons there. Because we've we've now got these very promising vaccines you've written you wrote in the nation that you don't expect them to be a big part of our rollout of are dealing with covid nineteen at least for much of twenty twenty one. Do you still think that's true. And if so why and how does it relate to what we've seen in the past dealing with pharmaceutical companies one is. I think i would revise my opinion. And they're going to be an important feature of the next year But it's the devil is not in in the vaccines themselves but the distribution And so the point is is that vaccines only as good as a shot in the arm to the people who need to get and You know one of the lessons of the the advent of conventional therapy is that When people get access to things about other people. I you know. Andrew sullivan wrote an article in new york times magazine in the mid nineteen ninety when plagues end Which meant age was over for him and for generating getting white men. They took their under drought pills. They took their health insurance more at home. And so are we going to see a similar sort of two-tiered retreat for covid nineteen in which certain segments for population get access to the vaccine. We let pockets of the virus. Persist into twenty twenty two twenty twenty three because the banks some different weeks there in time Or which is never penetration. What do you. What do you see now or look for in the biden administration to make sure that's not happening. I mean that that andrew sullivan nineteen ninety-six article really define much of my the next ten years of my life in trying to sort of respond to it in the black community. What do you see. What are you looking for to make sure we are not back in that place. Well one is. You know we're talking about should nursing home. Residents should healthcare workers get access to the vaccine. Should this group or that group but you know the point is is that Across the age demographics and the sort of setting like nursing homes We have to admit i. It's just a matter of fact that the virus covid different kinds of swath communities of color in the united states. And we're going to have to figure out a way to make sure that equity is part of what the biden administration doesn't it rolls back scenes. I'm happy that To my colleague. Here at gilmore silliman. Yes smith who's work on health equity over life is going to take up a post with new biden administration specifically i'm health equity and i'm i'm hoping that that that the administration's be Putting equity in access to vaccines any of those Sort of preventing put in place for covid nineteen front and center Which you know didn't necessarily see the in the nineteen ninety s in the united states. Run treatment what about the potential reluctance of people to take the vaccines survey data. That suggests americans. A particular might be reluctant. We spent a lot of years fighting this information in the black community about hiv. Where do you see that headed. Well i mean it's going to be an issue. It's not just people in the african american community. I think they pulled new york city. Police officers half of them said they would take it And so we we have a big job to do to get people to take vaccine and you know as we learned from. hiv pure basic. Education is the best way to go and so Yes the white house can use the bully pulpit of the presidency to make the case that we should take a job in the arm But we're going to have to build a ob-gyn of community health workers there in the communities that are part of the communities they come from to help vaccinate people to help educate people to help them through the next few months The point is is that it's going to have to be from the bottom up not necessarily just from the top down We could have all the sort of best laid plans to to to to get back things out the door but the rubber hits the road in in neighborhoods in new york city and then haven We're we're people struggled to get access to healthcare on an equal basis for many many years and so the vaccine coming along to actually be it's gonna get to them.

Vincent's hospital paul greg kovic greg infectious disease aids new york banco Gonzales yale university andrew sullivan cairo united states chelsea Vincent new york city hiv
"greg gonzales" Discussed on The Majority Report with Sam Seder

The Majority Report with Sam Seder

02:06 min | 10 months ago

"greg gonzales" Discussed on The Majority Report with Sam Seder

"Also an associate professor of law and research scholar at Yale Law We're going to talk to him about What we can expect this summer. What we should be doing and what what we could be doing. Be Right back after this. The town And we are back Sam Cedar on the majority report on the phone. It's a pleasure to welcome to the program Greg. Gonzales is an assistant professor and he'd be D- Miala G. at school of Public Health as well as a An associate professor of law and research scholar at Yale Law School And the Ad co-director of the Global Health Justice Partnership Welcome to the program Greg. Thanks for having me So let me. Let's just start You had written on. I think it was March thirteenth. Which you know for me or maybe it was the twelfth Was sort of because I I'm from New York. My kids didn't go back to school after that.

Yale Law School Greg associate professor Sam Cedar research scholar assistant professor school of Public Health Ad co-director Gonzales New York Miala G.
"greg gonzales" Discussed on The Majority Report with Sam Seder

The Majority Report with Sam Seder

02:17 min | 10 months ago

"greg gonzales" Discussed on The Majority Report with Sam Seder

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"greg gonzales" Discussed on Reliable Sources with Brian Stelter

Reliable Sources with Brian Stelter

08:37 min | 11 months ago

"greg gonzales" Discussed on Reliable Sources with Brian Stelter

"Diagnosed with over one thousand nine hundred now recovered. Sarah maslum coming up later. This hour the first leadership in crisis this week. President Trump was praised for his tone. He soberly told the country that the great down. Twenty twenty is necessary because cove in nineteen could claim the lives of two point two Americans otherwise. So let's say a quick look at what else he said and did this week as we consider his tone he celebrated the TV ratings for his briefings. He bragged about his popularity on facebook. He hooked up a drug despite concern about it. From the government's top doctors that was it. Saturday's briefing th. You know what's happened to the briefings here? They've been taking up more and more time and trump has been taking up more and more time than the taskforces medical experts have been and he is still getting lots of facts. Wrong at these briefings. One day said scarves work better then masks. One Day said airplane and train. Travelers are being given very strong task for the virus before departure and after a rival. That is not true. Maybe it should be true. But it's not. He also said that new small business loan program has been flawless. They've actually been many glitches and problems with the rollout but he said I don't even hear of any glitch. This all makes me wonder if his aides are hiding bad news from him. All right let me keep going to call governors president trump said. I haven't heard about testing in weeks. Even though testing remains a huge problem we falsely claimed the. Us is doing the most testing per capita when the US is actually way behind South Korea and Germany for example he repeatedly referred to the flu pandemic of nineteen seventy and even though it happened in nineteen eighteen. He blamed prior administrations for stockpile shortages. Even though he's been in office for more than three years he made a big show of unpacking. One of those really awesome new quick test kits but hold it upside down and put it on display the wrong way called into Fox and friends in griped about Nancy Pelosi and called the amazing city of San Francisco slum. You took a swipe at former president Barack Obama's emissions rules and decried the green new deal. He got angry while watching morning joe so he attacked the show's ratings. He got angry about CNN so he called this network joke he berated multiple reporters on multiple days on live television and he said keeping US coach. He's he's keeping covert nineteen deaths in the US to just one thousand would be a very good job a very good job. American healthcare workers in their patients deserve better than this and reporters can help. Reporters are helping right now by tracking. What's going on and holding institutions accountable local state and federal government institutions. There's a whole lot of revisionist history being pen right now. A lot of digging of the memory hole. The PRO trump media is trying to bury. The trump White House is failures to fully protect and prepare the from this pandemic in the immortal words of White House. Press Secretary Stephanie. Gresham there's no reason to go backwards and figure out tick talks of what happened when we've got a crisis on our hands right and the crisis is wide. We need to look backwards and learn from mistakes and make sure they are never made again looking this Associated Press headline from just today U S wasted months before preparing for the viral those virus pandemic. This was a nine eleven level failure of the federal government. It was it needs to be talked about and covered and scrutinized that way but let me out of here job number one and story number one right now is about the life saving efforts underway story. Number one is about the hospitals and all we can all do to help but I think story number two is about the government's delays and dysfunction both months ago and also right now that's true on the local level. There's a lot of states that I want to know more about it. But what went wrong at the state level but it's the federal level to ignore it or to cover it up or the memory hole. It does a disservice to the dead. Let's talk about that with staff writer for the New Yorker Susan Glasser. She is with me now. Greg Greg Greg Gonzales. Sorry I pronounce your name from. I don't WanNa get it wrong. Solve this I apologize. I got all this type Screw it up in my teleprompter Greg is with the Yale School of Medicine and we're also joined by radiologists and physician advocate. Nisha Meta. She's the founder of physician side gigs of facebook community of over fifty thousand five positions. And he show. We didn't get your last hour so I want to start with you I what WanNa ask you about is what you are hearing from the frontlines because we are getting some views once in a while into hospitals Into ERS and into these. These makeshift Moore's but we're not getting very many views. The press mostly unable to see what's happening. The public is most unable to see what's happening. So you've been getting feedback. You've been getting messages through your facebook group from hundreds of nurses and doctors. What are they telling you? I think the big thing is fear. I think there's a lot going on that you know everybody's trying to run. Obviously everybody's doing the best With three services that they have unfortunately as a lot of you have already heard in terms of personal protective equipment and other assurances. They're not necessarily up to speed with what we need. And so I think the biggest thing here is really. How do we emphasize that importance to the public? In terms of how an usher to our legislators to really make sure that we're protected to the degree that we need to do the job that we need to do and I think that that is the number one story and rightfully so you guys have been running for a really long time. Just because if we don't have the protection that we have been the frontlines will fall and honestly we'll also become vectors to spread it to our patients and so all in all that that has to be priority number one. I think other story. That's not really being told. As sort of the personal side of what physicians and other healthcare workers are facing in this situation. And that's a lot of what I hear when people reach out to me so this week alone. I've heard so many people calling me and sending me messages. You know crying and screaming about just their frustrations on the front lines right now. Because not only have to remember not only. Are we going in there and doing our job but also we thought families at home? We've got people to protect or scared for our own health. Were scared for the lights of families in. Who's going to protect them? And so there's there's all bad that goes behind every decision on our end. There's always a struggle between Position I or are your parents. I for example. I've got physicians calling me saying I don't know if I'll ever see my child began. I've separated from them for their safety. And now I seen my colleagues say. Some of them are intimated. We've actually had numerous deaths in the physician community over the past week including some that are really really gone residents. And so you know. We're very very hyper aware of the fact that a lot of us are going to be exposed to this and it's not a question of when or if it's really a question of when and what's going to happen what's transpiring those situations and was going to happen to our families. I think that that is just incredibly sad. Because you're seeing people were saying I'm stepping out to the front lines and and I go into a situation. That's urgent and I don't have the personal protective equipment and I know that I don't have a. I know that I'm GONNA walk into that scenario and I'm going to be exposed but yet I have this unique my patients to step in and I also have this duty to my other patients in the future to not get this and you know deteriorate from our ability to protect earth provide Karen Future and also What happens to to me and what happens my family in that situation so I think. Healthcare workers are facing a lot of challenges right now as they face I think it's really frustrating for us to not feel like the one thing that could be supplied to US could type. Everyone personnel protective. Equipments is not their right to still have shortages as applies to still have shorts event. Ventilators Greg I say. This is nine eleven level failure of the government. What is it called for a nine eleven style commission so first of all? It's not an nine eleven's level failure much greater than that is Andy. Slavic said Recently to greatest public health one hundred years so think of that and they give the death toll in Afghanistan and Iraq Vietnam if anything projections hold true Most of the wars that we've seen in our lifetime will be Core by the death toll of this pandemic now we need but we need is really a Marshall Plan or a new deal for public health..

Us facebook President Trump Greg Greg Greg Gonzales president White House Twenty twenty Sarah maslum Associated Press CNN Greg I San Francisco Barack Obama Nancy Pelosi Yale School of Medicine Press Secretary Karen Future
"greg gonzales" Discussed on Slate's Political Gabfest

Slate's Political Gabfest

13:57 min | 1 year ago

"greg gonzales" Discussed on Slate's Political Gabfest

"From new haven. Hello Emily Hello Nice to see you on zoom and John dickerson of CBS's sixty minutes and his bookshelf. Hello John and you have of your book to. I do and I would show people. But this is not a visual medium. As I've been led to believe and I just enlarge the screen and looking at all I can say. Is I apologize? You Look Great. What do you mean what? Could you leave me so nice to see you guys? It's just nice to see you guys and to see Jospin Bridget. So it's great to see you again regardless of how how unshaven dirty. Any of US looks on today's Gab. Fest the tug of war over how long the shutdown should last. And why will the president a bet a public health catastrophe by encouraging? Americans to get back to normal life too soon and do we have even the remotest sense that this pandemic is beginning to change that we are beginning to get any of it under control even as New York sinks into what appears to be an absolutely disastrous situation. We will talk to an epidemiologist Greg Gonzales. About all of that then. The largest stimulus bill in world history attempts to forestall economic collapse here in the US but is two trillion dollars enough. We'll talk about that and then we will hear from civil war historian. David Blight about what history can teach us about living through catastrophe. David is one of my favorite people. Talk about anything and I can't wait to hear his historical perspective. On this plus of course we will have cocktail chatter. There is a raging debate going on in this country stoked by president trump over how long the corona freeze should last. The president said this week. Idiotically that he wants people in Stores Churches by Easter which is just a couple of weeks away. Meanwhile there are a couple of other people. There's a group of other people who are arguing in a in a similar vein that social distancing be damned. Let's let the disease run. Its course through the young and healthy. Keep the economy humming. Tried to protect the old during that. Greg Gonzalez is an assistant professor at Yale University School of Public Health epidemiologist. He has a somewhat different perspective. On this so greg can you start with the what do you think are the major fallacies of the let's get back to business? We've done enough already proposals. That were hearing from the president and others so first of all. Start off with where we are. We're in the midst of a raging pandemic and ET National Public Health. Response that nobody thought could be and so we're in a situation where I see us all over the country particularly New York in northeast but slowly across the country or are going to be full capacity in people making choices about who lives in does so the projections are maybe between one in two million deaths. If we relax social distancing in the absence of a vaccine Retreatment for for Kobe. Nineteen we are stuck with. Social distancing is the main way of protecting herself now public health experts and epidemiologists all realize the ask is a big one. And we're all doing the same thing as as people are doing all over the world following these guidelines. We also realize we have to think of a way out on. This can't go on forever. The more weeks we accumulated of this sort of social isolation people be chomping to to get out of their houses. Meet their friends and family on the Jim normalize so these discussions are happening in the world of public health. Not just sort of in the in the greater sort of public discourse what. We don't need her for false choices. The idea that we have to pick the economy versus protecting the public health. I've been speaking to both my public health colleagues colleagues in economics people exact cooper-hewitt gale and others. Who Don't see a conflict in this at all the way to save the economy the way to save our friends and families lives is to beat this virus Greg. One way you came to our attention was a twitter thread. That was in particular response to a piece in the New York. Times by David Katz. I think his name is which argued we can let the Let the young get this disease. Protect the olds. And that'll be fine. Talk about why it is why. It's not possible for that model to work. Which I think. Emily and I both played with and we're tempted by and wanted to believe in and emily. I shouldn't speak at least just wanted to explain to our audience why that's a fallacy out. It's interesting too because it was very appealing to Jim. Dow In and Kim spent at the New York Times. There is an easy out. There's witty get through this without the pain that I think. Many are contemplating overlong creator social isolation we are dean of our school of Public Health. Stand remind myself started homer who runs the global health and Becca Levy. Another professor here at at Yale wrote a piece in the time too short letter saying why this is in part why. This is not a credible plan for addressing the epidemic. One is the idea that we can sort of sequester all the elderly in the United States and their caregivers Safety over the course of months while life goes on outside outside of sequestered existence. It's not credible. We don't have a safety net. That's going to be able to sort of sustain this for the elderly in isolation over time the other pieces of don't know you know many of you probably know a people in your social circles or one or two degrees of separation who were in the ICU or been sick who are not seventy five. Eighty five years old so as many of us know David Latte above the law a lawyer in New York City who is his been been in the ICU. Marathon runner physically fit. I all other standards. Who has the disease if you let younger people out to go to work with the idea that let them diskette exposed and they'll get a mile illness or they won't get anything all Discounts the fact that a certain percentage of killing people will get serious disease and die. And you just have to the mass right. If there's a big difference between a one let's say one percent chance of serious illness when you have one hundred people one person out of a hundred will get it. But if they're ten thousand people a million people. Ten million people any multiplies by when percents Huge absolute number of young people ending up in the ICU. The other thing is that This could be a seasonal coronavirus infection. Snow seating at across the American landscape by letting everybody get it except a small group of people doesn't bode well for trying to radically this this sort of a recurring infection. That comes up with some have flu. End Corona virus season which means you know hundreds and hundreds of thousands of debts on annual basis. Those are the main meets the cats editorial with wishful thinking so wrapped in insignificant near of Science I just want to say you were brought up my friend. David Latte who I'm really worried about. He is on a ventilator. And I think sedated according to the latest news that I heard and just been thinking about him a lot and there are other people like that as well so I think the way in which this viruses starting to touch us especially in the northeast or I don't know maybe that's not even true. Start starting to feel very real at least to me if we're looking for an evidence based approach to this. What are the next things we should be watching for? And what are some of the time horizons that we can be paying attention to as we determine how to go forward markers. Maybe there's a rational case being made for going forward and it's coming from both public health and economists people at Gabriel's within a manual says from Berkeley Hall Romer Economists Bunch people are saying we can stem the economic damage that this this crisis caused by under girding economy from the bottom up to eighty eight hundred fifty billion dollars worth of corporate subsidies but really figuring out how to support new all the four of us to five of us in our daily lives in terms of social visiting income support. All the social services. We need to make sure that people who are less fortunate than us able to do this. And then we watch and we continue. The social distancing end will see the peak of cases starts to lessen hopefully we'll have millions and millions of tests in a few months so that we can understand the sentence a the epidemic that still lingers in the United States in have antibody test. We can understand who's been exposed and WHO's not been exposed. If one of US has antibodies to the virus never had symptoms. Maybe we can go back to work or be part of the volunteer effort In so this is going to be a very step by step process to get people back to work. It's not like one day we're gonNA flip a switch and it's all going to be over to be a gradual gradual scaled-down of social distancing interventions over the course of months and it's GonNa take a massive investment of public health resources in order to do it. We're not prepared to based on the status quo as it exists today Natural the scary thing is because there's an absolute failure leadership from the top which is interested in denial and and and sort of misinformation. So we have people up and down the chain of Management. Not really willing to do the wrong thing. Doing the wrong thing needs telling your boss doesn't WanNa hear Greg. I wonder if you have any sense about whether New York is which is now the epicenter of the pandemic in the world whether it is a harbinger for the United States uniquely bad place and and death that question a different way one of the things. I've been wondering about and I'm interested in your professional take on is for the most part. Americans live pretty far apart from each other. We're big country. We're not that densely populated and except for a few cities we are. We don't have places where people really live cheek by jowl. New York is one of them and are we likely to have some protection from the fact that that many Americans actually are socially distant how they live to begin with so new. York is not a bad place. I think as a New Yorker. I think it's a fine place to live. I think the population density is one reason why we might be seeing more severe epidemic there but it's also just luck of the draw right. It's a major transportation hub the future for the country If you start to look at the map say the New York Times. You'RE GONNA see this sort of start to rise up think of Miami Rhonda Santa's. The governor said are not ready to sort of tell people to stay home from work. he he dilly-dallied in terms of closing the beaches. So you're GONNA see other cities around the. Us start to have their cases mount particularly in in states where governor to. It's basically all delete of the White House in downplaying the risk for their community but also think of it not a function density but a social network think of communities that are tightly unwilling together the Amish Mennonites in in rural Pennsylvania and others who depend on a lot of social contacts of May not be about density could be about density social network. One thing. I've been wondering about is how heartened to be by the drop in rising cases in Italy. So I've been hearing for weeks. That Italy was like a couple of weeks ahead of us and they seem like us to you. Know initially resisted or struggled with social distancing but then really gone on much more of a national shutdown and now it seems like a couple of weeks after that. There is starting to be a fallen. The rising case rate. There is that something that suggests that if we can really do the social distancing for two or three weeks. We can expect a similar achievement. Or Am I kind of exaggerating here in grasping at straws? So look I mean. I think what happened? In Italy's that once they saw the rising death tolls age. They sort of went into lockdown And if we look at what happened on in other places South Korea a mixture of testing social distancing. There's been a way to sort of Flattened occur but also to sort of start to control the epidemic. We have not taken the route that Spain or Italy or other countries that have been hard hitting Europe done. We don't have a national lockdown. We have a lock down in New York State. We have our orders in Connecticut and other states around the country like California to institute strong social distancing measures. But it's not all fifty states and it's not even across the country. The stag thing is we. We sink or swim together and you know viruses. Don't understand the borders between New York and New Jersey or Mississippi Mississippi sneakers and so unless we figure out a way to do more rigor social distancing across the country for sustained period of time. We're just piling infections. Acquired infections were building new chains of infection across the United States. And it's not going to be two or three weeks are we can be two or three months of hardship and didn't have to wait through this You know staying in our own houses. Not Seeing you know for a long time. It's not hard to do. We're going to have to think of ways to build. Social connections may be ourselves for a couple of weeks alone and then maybe try to trigger waste. We can combine our social circles over. Not At that point at it all greg to endure that couple of months process..

New York City US greg president social isolation New York Times Emily Italy David Latte Jim John dickerson David Blight school of Public Health Jospin Bridget CBS Greg Gonzales New York State Yale University School of Publ
"greg gonzales" Discussed on All In with Chris Hayes

All In with Chris Hayes

11:20 min | 1 year ago

"greg gonzales" Discussed on All In with Chris Hayes

"Earlier today. The president was on a teleconference with the nation's governors telling them when it comes to ventilators quote. Try Getting it yourselves. He then took a shot at New York governor. Andrew Cuomo the guy who's just announced a plan with New Jersey and Connecticut to begin. Take control this thing. The president tweeted. He has more to do to which correspondent quote. I've do more no. You had to do something you are supposed to be the president throat this crisis which has been building now for months the response. The president has ranged from absentee to negligent to actively harmful at almost every turn president trump either publicly downplayed the risk or failed to act proactively such that. We are now very very far behind on Friday. The president is able to pull a stunt with thirty minutes until the markets closed rally the stocks. Today he came out again finally finally appearing to grasp and communicate the seriousness and duration of the pandemic market has been there for a while however they've seen what's coming today. The Dow closed down three thousand points the biggest single day point loss of all time the second largest percent loss. It is very hard for all of us to get our heads around this moment. Because there's no obvious precedent for what we are currently facing and will continue to face for weeks and months. I mean I say this is the father of kids. We're not in school for at least the next six weeks or so. The closest parallels we have at hander disaster preparedness and recovery. We saw New Orleans and the Gulf coast after Hurricane Katrina War war mobilization were to to an extent. We have not seen in over half a century but the one advantage that we have here. We think on that scale that scale of the challenge is we have something to collectively combat society helpless mobilized towards that aim. And if we get it right. We will not be dealing with the level of sheer physical destruction. Our grandparents had do during the war or the people of New Orleans had to deal with after the hurricane. If we can get this right we can rebuild very quickly but we have to get it right joining me now from on how we accomplish that Greg Gonzalvo his assistant professor at the Yale School Medicine and Dr Gary Procup Vice Chair of Pathology Laboratory medicine at the Cleveland Clinic. Dr Gonzales says let me start with you on this. Where do you see us right now? Are you encouraged by the dramatic steps? We've seen the last seventy two hours in terms of shutting things down to try to maximize social distance and slow the spread of the virus. Look we have no choice? We have to institute social distancing measures. Some of which the President Dan his team outlined today. But there's no virtue in late adoption. We lost three months in trying to combat this new virus by delays and equivocations and disavowals about the importance of this epidemic. And so we're doing what we should do right now. But there's a big question about it. It was too little too late. Dr procup from the testing and surveillance standpoint. Where do you see us right now? In terms of our ability to get is on the virus and have a sense of its actual scale and the ramping up of testing which has been increasing daily. But he's still not there yet. That's exactly right Chris. We are ramping up. If we had been allowed to test earlier we would be where we needed to be. And knowing which patients have this virus in which do not so they could go into self quarantine. But we're we are catching up and ramping up. But tell me more about what that means. I mean I know there's been. Some regulatory hurdles have been done away with for the FDA. There's both private labs their common platforms being used. It strikes me though is still hard. Even in the epicenter of outbreaks to get easy and reliable point of care testing. Is that fair? That's absolutely fair so I will say once. The regulatory burdens were lowered van laboratories that were really highly skilled laboratories. Were able to bring up this test. I will say though. There are delays from most of the commercial manufacturers for the instruments there are delays in reagents. So many of these things are hamstringing many of the common laboratories and we're nowhere near point of CARE Testing Greg Lie. We're now in a situation. We're undertaking mass essentially forced quarantine. Right I mean the thing you've seen in San Francisco what we've seen in Italy and in France and in Spain and Greece. I saw this tweet. Today was fascinating and I wanted to get your on it in terms of how testing inter-plays with the policy. We need this is blue bottle. Blue bottle is closing stores but staying open in Japan and South Korea where the virus has also spread because they have quote extensive testing and medical support. Clearly in place. There is a cost. We're paying in not being able to know where the virus is we cannot. We cannot precisely targeted our efforts for prevention or to mobilize resources for care in the coming healthcare surge because we don't know where Infections are and what extent they exist across the country and so we're doing brute force measures right now because we don't have any testing capacity to give us a clear picture of what's going on across the United States. You'RE A deputy biologist you've dealt with other infectious diseases and outbreaks. Before a bunch of health experts issued a letter. I think about two weeks ago about best practices how to how to attack this. How are we doing on that We're doing slightly better but we are still failing on most of the points. We outlined the letter for instance as you started a restaurant in bars or closing across many cities and states across the United States. Where are these people going to find their livelihoods over the next two months there needs to be an immediate a provision of some sort of economic relief to many people who are? GonNA LOSE THEIR JOBS. Have NO SICK PAY. Who HAVE NO VACATION PAY? Do not have the option of working from home over the next six to eight months. Mitt Romney today said we should give every American thousand dollars a month for the next few months that distort and both parties should agree to it and get it going now. Dr procup. I talked to a bunch of doctors over the weekend. Some here in New York City Emergency Room. Doctors were very concerned. In fact one today told me that today you could see it in the Er that it was. It was really palpable today. How much coordination is happening? We have a very fragmented. Healthcare System in America unlike a place like Italy between hospitals between doctors and between regions or anyone who is coordinating folks like yourself and others to sort of be together planning so that places can prepare. That don't have a huge outbreak. Now for what's coming I would say there's non great coordination overall it takes individual groups to coordinate. I will say within our city within Cleveland. The leaders of the medical institutions have gotten together and talked how they can coordinate for example. You know we. We've coordinated the drive through swabbing area with university hospitals so it takes individuals to take the initiative to coordinate. There's not great coordination above that. But there really should be all right. Greg Gonzales Dr procup. Thank you both for sharing tease for important. I WanNA bring it now. Connecticut Governor Ned Lamont today announced his State is Coordinating Corona virus response efforts with New York and New Jersey Governor. Tell me how you and those other governors came to make the decision issue the announcement today about Jim's and bars and restaurants and like Chris. You summarized it very well In your introduction. You can't wait for the feds to take the lead so is a small state of Connecticut. Doesn't work for me just to do Restaurants and bars alone so do it in coordination with Andrew. Cuomo New York and Murphy. Down in New Jersey makes a lot of sense. I was on the phone with Rhode Island today. So we're taking the lead where the feds have fallen off. We've got lead but I'm GonNa tell you what really brings it home was luck last night The bars are pretty crowded in this city and people were taking this to heart now. They're closed people. Know this is real. It's notable I think I've looked at some metric today about traffic and things like that. Clearly this this is having effect. What are you doing at the state level? What are your Public Health? Experts telling you about how to understand what's coming your way. I was on the phone with all the hospital system today. And we've got to do a lot more now. We're GONNA have a hit on our ICU. Intensive Care Unit so we have no idea what's coming and that's going to mean more people. More nurses more beds more equipment more ventilators. We're not getting much help from the feds. That has the president said Go. Get Your own ventilators. But you don't get that at Amazon Dot Com. We're working this hard to do what we can to prepare for. That wave is just a week or two away are there. Are there simple. Clear things In terms of say Medicaid reimbursement the federal government could be doing could be stepping in to aid your efforts right now that you're not getting well you've described the testing in some detail right now. I've got to do a better job of convincing folks. If they're ill they're not feeling right. They may have some early case of the flu. Stay home take care of you in terms of getting paid. Take Care of you in terms of health care but you gotta have the get up and go to stay home. Stay home going to the office going to work going to school. That's a dangerous place to be these days. If you're not feel right I get that message. We've been communicating avenue. Reviewers that that basically at this point we need to keep ers clear for the most at risk but as you think about your ICU's reaching a capacity potentially as the pandemic grows like what do you need. What resources do you need? And where can you get them in? Can you get them from federal government? Are there easy things a federal government can do for you? Well I can tell you. Danbury hospital is already at capacity and they have two hundred. Nurses are on furlough because they were in contact. If I could test those nurses I could potentially get them back into the game suitor. You've got you've got two hundred nurses sitting on the sidelines right now. Who can't get back to work because they can't be tested to confirm whether or not they have the virus exactly we got a surge in us. Demand is going up and I'm losing nurses by the day we'll have to furlough themselves for a period of time. That's a priority for testing for me. Where are testing capacities going up? But it's going up very incrementally and that's dangerous on the economic front. You heard what Greg said. Obviously this is enormous social disruption enormous economic disruption and hardship. What can the state do? And what are things that only the federal government can do? What are you planning? We are working with our small businesses right now. We have a lot of folks in the service sector you know. They're stored their business their restaurant there. Are that stopped. And what can we do to help them get through? How can we provide You know unemployment compensation to their folks are covered for a period of time. I'm providing small business loans right now to help them cover this bridge..

president Dr procup federal government Andrew Cuomo New Jersey Connecticut New York New Orleans Chris Italy United States New York City Dr Gonzales Mitt Romney Rhode Island Amazon Cleveland Greg Gonzalvo Hurricane Katrina
"greg gonzales" Discussed on The Situation Room with Wolf Blitzer

The Situation Room with Wolf Blitzer

10:12 min | 1 year ago

"greg gonzales" Discussed on The Situation Room with Wolf Blitzer

"Mike Pence today exuding confidence as the newly appointed head of the White House's Corona Virus Response Team we're ready for anything and president trump touted his second in command as being uniquely qualified for the job is really very expert at the field but the vice president's appointment doesn't inspire confidence among those who've investigated his management of medical crises by prison. Pence doesn't have a great track record when it comes to public health and his own state. Epidemiologist Greg Gonzales led a Yale University. Study of how pence managed two thousand fifteen outbreak of HIV in Indiana when he was governor the HIV virus had spread quickly in rural areas of Indiana among people. Who were reusing. Needles to inject opioids medical experts and law enforcement. Officials pleaded for pence to immediately. Start a program of Needle. Exchanges arguing that if people used new sterile needles. The state could head off the outbreak. But Gonzales says pence waited at least two months to even declare a public health emergency pattern of delay of Equivocation on what to do pence told the Indianapolis Star quote. I don't believe effective anti-drug policy involves handing out drug paraphernalia. The pressure mounted pence prayed on it. According to The New York Times then reluctantly agreed to the needle exchange program it worked the number of HIV infections decreased. But Gonzales says the damage had been done over two hundred people became needlessly infected with HIV. The needle exchange came too little too late but Indiana's HIV outbreak isn't the only instance where pence's judgment on medical issues comes into questions. In two thousand he wrote in an op. Ed quote despite the hysteria from the political class in the media. Smoking doesn't kill. He can be captured by his own interests or by political interests or as was the case with him by the money that came from individuals and corporations that don't want us to know that certain products kill Michael de Antonio Co author of a book on Pence says Pence's motivation to write that op. Ed could have been connected to his family's one time. Ownership stake in a chain of convenience stores called Tobacco Road which sold cigarettes when it comes to the corona virus. We're going to have to watch him carefully to see. If for some reason be it political or economic. He's going to go short on science and long on science denial. We contacted Mike. Pence's office to respond to the criticism of how he handled the HIV crisis in Indiana. They referred us to the office of surgeon. General Jerome Atoms. Who said he worked closely with pants in Indiana during that crisis Adams Sinn? Cnn a statement saying their efforts became a model for how other states responded to similar crises. And another former top Indiana health official referred to us by the White House called Pence's efforts in that crisis heroic and credited him with getting laws quickly changed to allow that Needle Exchange Program Wolf. Brian Todd reporting for US Brian. Thank you very much coming up doing enough to solve the mysterious disappearances of more than two dozen native American women and Girls Tony Shivani and I'm Aubrey Edwards and John Moxley joins us on E. W. unrestricted. It sounded like someone shooting guns. That sounds exactly like before you've ever like shooting range New Year like a pop-up Powell Powell so loud and it was like reverberating off the garage door. What the Hell is going on in that? It was just people. Taking bumps rate involves AWA unrestricted listening. Subscribe for Free. Wherever you get your podcasts. We're following urgent demands for action from families to say Thirties in Montana. Aren't doing enough to solve the mysterious disappearances of more than two dozen native American women and girls are national correspondent. Sara side has been looking into this for us tell us more Sara Wolfe native American family. Say they're women and girls are going missing and turning up dead far more often than anyone has cared to notice until now. We visited Montana where the issue is particularly acute. Pollock housetops just found the exact spot where her daughter's body was discovered on this Cheyenne reservation. And I remember seeing Pitcher. All the sorrow and questions fled her mind. Why did her daughter walk away from a Remote House party in the dead of winter? Wearing no jacket. Why did it take so long to find her body which was discovered just a couple hundred meters from that same home? You do not believe this. Was Sheer Accident Gold. When she reported her daughter missing there was no amber alert and no immediate official search in the end it was community members not reservation police or FBI who found Henny Scott weeks later. The medical examiner determined she had died of exposure. Aided by alcohol found in her body was only fourteen because she was young and they didn't make it a priority eight months later another teenager from the same reservation disappeared. Eighteen year old K. Sarah stops pretty places. Went Missing in August. Two Thousand Nineteen. Her family says the Big Horn County. Sheriff's office made things worse not better. How hard was it to get them to act? The really didn't act on it. They said she's probably just out with her. Friends are case. Sarah had gone missing more than a half dozen times before trying to cope with a broken family and a difficult life on the reservation as her grandmother and legal guardian. Yolanda Frazier wants answers. What disturbs you about the investigation into cases Really lack of investigation. The sheriff's office did not return multiple emails and calls for comet. Unbeknownst to the family. Her body was found just days later. Still six months on K. Sarah's cause of death is listed as undetermined but suspicious. Sarah was one of twenty eight indigenous women or girls to go missing or be murdered in Big Horn County in recent years. Montana has the highest number of MMA w cases by state nationally Based on our data researcher Anita Luke Casey says the best numbers. She has show a terrible trend. The government doesn't even have a proper count of all of their cases. There's a lot of coverage of this issue that describes it as a mystery like we don't know what's happening. We don't know what's going on as if native women they're kind of like a rabbit in a magic act like we just mysteriously disappear and that's not real native. Americans make up six point seven percent of Montana's population but according to State Data Between Twenty Sixteen and twenty eighteen. They accounted for more than a quarter of the missing person reports. Montana's US attorney. Kirk Army was the only government official involved in some of these cases who spoke with us on the record. There is a serious problem with missing native Americans particularly native American women now. The families working together with activists maybe having an impact three task forces are now being set up a county state and the latest a federal task force ordered by President Trump. I think one of the real positive things being done by the White House Task Force is going to be. Try to provide some standardization like the rapid deployment teams. That can be brought anywhere quickly. Six months after K. Sarah stops pretty places was found dead a sixteen year old native. American girl was reported missing a van. She was riding in left her behind after breaking down authorities say Selena. Not Afraid was last seen alive here at this restaurant on January first. It took nearly three weeks to find her body. Which was three quarters of a mile to a mile away from here in a place like this authorities. Say One of their biggest issues and trying to find. Missing Indigenous People is the sheer fastness of the place and the limited manpower but in Celinas case. The initial response was totally. He alum flew their big high-powered drone. Over here we had a helicopter fly over. We had people walk in. This is all day one. The Corner Determined Selena died of hypothermia and sheriff's officials intimated the case was over but then the county attorney sent out a scathing rebuke saying. The investigation was open and active. Selena's family found themselves like the others mired in confusion created by officials in all these cases. The families have taken to the streets to express their frustration with local. Authorities Horn. Says she's hoping President Trump's task force will finally simplify all that I would say you're on the right track sir. You're on the right chop Selena's family happy about what president trump has done and those task forces we mentioned are only place though for a limited time and the families wonder if enough can be accomplished to save their girls before they are found dead while so said Sarah so glad. You did that report for us. Appreciate it very much Sarah cider reporting. There's breaking news just ahead. Stocks tumbled again is more economists. Say the corona virus outbreak could trigger a recession great here in the United States and a very disturbing new whistleblower complaint tonight alleges that. Us workers helped American corona virus evacuees without protective gear..

Mike Pence K. Sarah Indiana Montana President Trump Selena Greg Gonzales official president HIV Yale University United States Cnn White House vice president Sarah cider Indianapolis Star
"greg gonzales" Discussed on The Situation Room with Wolf Blitzer

The Situation Room with Wolf Blitzer

11:02 min | 1 year ago

"greg gonzales" Discussed on The Situation Room with Wolf Blitzer

"Mike Pence today exuding confidence as the newly appointed head of the White House's Corona virus. Response Team we're ready for anything. And President. Trump touted his second in command as being uniquely qualified for the jobs is really very expert at the field but the vice president's appointment doesn't inspire confidence among those who've investigated his management of medical crises by prison. Pence doesn't have a great track record when it comes to public health and his own state. Epidemiologist Greg Gonzales led a Yale University. Study of how pence managed two thousand fifteen outbreak of HIV in Indiana when he was governor the HIV virus had spread quickly in rural areas of Indiana among people. Who were reusing. Needles to inject opioids medical experts and law enforcement. Officials pleaded for pants to immediately. Start a program of Needle. Exchanges arguing that if people used new sterile needles. The state could head off the outbreak. But Gonzales says pence waited at least two months to even declare a public health. Emergency here is a pattern of delay of Equivocation on what to do pence told the Indianapolis Star quote. I don't believe effective anti-drug policy involves handing out drug paraphernalia. The pressure mounted pence prayed on it. According to The New York Times then reluctantly agreed to the needle exchange program. It worked the number of HIV infections. Decreased but Gonzales says the damage had been done over two hundred people became needlessly infected with HIV. The needle exchange came too little too late but Indiana's HIV outbreak isn't the only instance where pence's judgment on medical issues into questions. In two thousand he wrote in an op. Ed quote despite the hysteria from the political class and the media. Smoking doesn't kill. He can be captured by his own interests or by political interests or as was the case with him by the money that came from individuals and corporations that don't want us to know that certain products kill Michael. Dantonio CO author of a book on Pence. Says Pence's motivation to write that op? Ed could have been connected to his family's one time. Ownership stake in chain of convenience stores called Tobacco Road which sold cigarettes when it comes to the corona virus. We're going to have to watch him carefully to see. If for some reason be it political or economic. He's to go short on science and long on science denial. We contacted Mike. Pence's office to respond to the criticism of how he handled the HIV crisis in Indiana. They referred us to the office of surgeon. General Jerome Adams who said he worked closely with pants in Indiana during that crisis Adams Sinn. Cnn a statement saying their efforts became a model for how other states responded to similar crises. And another former top Indian health official referred to us by the White House called Pence's efforts in that crisis heroic and he credited him with getting laws quickly changed to allow that needle exchange programs Wolf. Brian Todd reporting for us. Brian thank you very much coming up our authorities doing enough to solve the mysterious disappearances of more than two dozen native American women and girls. Hey Taylor rooks take it. There is back with more access more athletes and more conversations featuring the most high profile players including Kevin Durant Chris Paul Jalen Brown and more watch season two on the Eighth Riffa the South Carolina primary now just two days away. Joe Biden is laser focusing in on the state while many of his rivals are actually looking ahead to Super Tuesday contests next week. Let's get some insight from our political experts. David axelrod. You'RE ONE OF OUR POLITICAL EXPERTS. Are What are you looking for first of all in South Carolina but also on Super Tuesday? Joe Biden needs his firewall. To hold because Iowa New Hampshire did not and he did very poorly in both those states. He rehabilitated himself somewhat in Nevada With a second place but he has to win in South Carolina State that he's always suggested he would has a large African American population as much as sixty percent of the vote could be African American. Maybe a little less than that. I'm going to be looking for weather. He can Get forty forty plus percent of that vote and do well enough among white voters. Twenty plus If he does those two things he ought to have a good win in South Carolina and he needs to wolf to have some propulsion into Super Tuesday. Right now his campaign is broke. They've got half a million dollars on television in the fourteen Super Tuesday states. Mike Bloomberg is I think. Run One hundred and seventy one million just to give you a point of comparison and he needs the momentum from Saturday to Tuesday. If he if he gets that he could still be in this race and still be nipping at At Bernie Sanders Heels here if he doesn't he's he. He may have to reconsider his ray trouble if he does it then. And and I think David Axelrod makes an important point crystal is that it's not just enough for Biden to win. In South Carolina the margin of victory could be critical. Yeah I think that's the central point by pass to win if he loses he's out but I think at this point given what David I think. Really importantly identifies Joe Biden's fundraising has been somewhere between not good and really bad throughout the campaign. It's really hard to raise money when you come in fourth in Iowa and fifth in New Hampshire and you're the ostensible front runner going into those things he needs to win this. I think by double digits because all he has momentum from south personably from South Carolina to Super Tuesday. He's not going to have TV. He has his name. People know his name. And if it looks like he might be a winner. His name might be enough to get him second in that delegate count behind Bernie Sanders after Super Tuesday. If not people don't like the vote for some they don't think has a chance even if they liked him and it would really help you. I think for the Democratic Party at this juncture especially when Elizabeth Warren Says Look. It's the progressive ideas that are really popular with the Democratic voters to be able to say. Hey we OUGHTA have to. We ought to have someone in this moderate lane and someone in the Progressive Lane and the audit really be able to fight it out but I was just in California the last couple of days and you know you go to the first commercial break of it. And it's a Mike Bloomberg unbelievable so so it's GonNa be tough unless he's got the money to compete with someone who's got unlimited money and the real danger for Biden as he can do well and he could still be splintering that vote with Mike Bloomberg against the Progressive. Way And I was talking to somebody who's very close to the to the Biden campaign. Who said to me? Look what we're going to look for in Super Tuesday assuming they survive over the weekend. What we're going to look for is the difference between how we do. And how Bloomberg does now. We don't expect maybe they can win a couple of contests but when you look at the overall delegate count if they're sort of in Bloomberg range and I don't know what that means. I pressed on that but I didn't get an answer if they're within Bloomberg range than they think they can. They can live to to compete another day. So they're they're looking at Super Tuesday sort of as a as a whole and just as you know how many delegates they can. They can rack up and see if it's realistic to compete with with longer and difficult just very quickly to Gloria's point I think one thing that you have to think about David mentioned David Gregory mentioned Bloomberg's money and how it's so pervasive we overlook Bernie's money now it's not he's not worth sixty billion dollars but Bernie Sanders basically goes and ten million dollars. Come pouring out from his small dollar grassroots base and so you're now dealing with two people who have effectively close to unlimited ability to raise money raise two hundred fifty million dollars from two thousand sixteen kept. No one thought he could win. So can you. If you're Joe Biden footage it's Elizabeth. Warren Amy Klobuchar. Can you compete? Because it's not going to be over after super important point. Go ahead. Dave Lemme say if Joe Biden has a great night. On Saturday night Mike Bloomberg will have had a very bad night. His whole theory was based on Biden collapsing in this first four contests so that he could coalesce that center left lane. If Biden is resurgent for coming out of South Carolina it could make the Bloomberg Campaign very very speculative. But my question. Act's I mean maybe you can address. This is Bloomberg you obviously have the ability to go the distance and all of them even kind of living. How hand to mouth could try to push this to the convention what prevailing wisdom causes someone to say. No we've got a narrow this down for the good of the party to at least fight out. The Progressive Wing wasn't going in if if it was and he was a loser. If I'm looks like a winner maybe that would be something he would consider. I think he's going to come under enormous pressure if Biden looks like he can be competitive To reconsider what he's doing. Because that was the predicate of his campaign was there needed to be an alternative to Bernie Sanders if he doesn't appear to be the alternative than What is his purpose in this way? Do you think he waits at least. I mean isn't his gambit to see how he does on super badly and you've got two days to wait right in South Carolina. I think all of them are going to wait until Super Tuesday. I mean honestly if you are anyone not name Bernie Sanders the news from Elizabeth Warren last night that she plans to go all the way through this thing which plans change. But that's the greatest news that you've heard because what you need is some way to keep. Bernie's delegate count the more that Bernie can totally consolidate liberals and wind up delegates. Thirty plus percent the worship. Because let's say you need one thousand nine hundred delegates win it pretty is at eighteen hundred. It's going to be horror to keep it from him. So they want Elizabeth Warren Communist China dates. We can draft. Kratz will start talking about Obama's phone starts everybody everybody Standby we got more news. We're following the vice president. Mike Pence appointment as the head of the corona virus. Taskforce is raising some questions right now about how we handle the issue outbreak in Indiana when he was governor Brian. Todd is working this story for US Brian. Some criticism of the vice president's record on on that health crisis and others right wolf. We've been digging on Mike. Pence's handling of that crisis and we interviewed a medical expert who investigated pence's response to that HIV outbreak. He's among several medical professionals. Who'RE SHUDDERING TONIGHT OVER PENCILS APPOINTMENT TO.

Mike Pence Joe Biden Bernie Sanders South Carolina Mike Bloomberg Indiana Bloomberg vice president Greg Gonzales Elizabeth Warren Brian Todd Mike David axelrod Ed HIV President Yale University New Hampshire
"greg gonzales" Discussed on Amanpour

Amanpour

10:59 min | 1 year ago

"greg gonzales" Discussed on Amanpour

"He says that while new HIV infection rates dropping in cities around the US the viruses actually on the rise in rural America. And he tells Hari Sreenivasan why the United States is not prepared to deal with this crisis. So Stephen says there are one point one million people in the US living with HIV today. And you had a recent article in the Times. How is that cities like New York San Francisco Chicago? HIV rates are declining but in rural areas. They're climbing and you're saying it's GONNA get worse. It probably is going to get worse in rural areas. Cities have been very proactive about addressing the crisis trying to do things about it that are effective and this has it happened at all kinds of levels so one level they just have better public infrastructure in the first place in terms of dealing with health and even those cities are places where HIV rates have been very dense They've had decades of working on ways to address it and very directly trying to address the populations that are at risk The biggest population at risk scar young men who have sex with men particularly of color and so cities are very aggressively trying to create interventions around those people getting drugs to them the the drugs that we can get to people once they have become. HIV positive not only help their health but it prevents onward transmission to other people so getting those drugs them also getting them prevented to Travolta is brand name for this drug problem that people can take as a preventive measure. Yeah and then also just having ways to get people tested in the first place and CDs particularly Shakerley New York. They're very aggressive about trying to get people tested all kinds of levels and that That just simply doesn't exist. In rural parts of the country the infrastructure infrastructure doesn't exist the culture of getting people tested I've talked to sources in West Virginia Rural America. Where they'll say that they know doctors who've never done in HIV test career and cities are much more aggressive about doing those things and also they've been really good about Addressing the specific health challenges of these populations relations having queer specific sex education having transpacific sex education and then the epidemic. That's really taking the country right now. They're also going after the Drug crisis and having safe needle exchanges in some cities or even having safe injection sites and very little of that exists in rural America so really the opioid crisis is having having an impact on HIV rates. Very much so around the country. I tried to think as a as an aide store and it's scholar. I try to think about how the story of AIDS is a story of industrialization. Leterrier for Ruby Frazier talks about how industrialization uses workers bodies up and when their bodies have been and used up what has been left behind. And so when you look at places where where the millis closed or or coal mines have closed. People's bodies have been had a huge toll taking get on them. They've had lots of injuries. They've had lots of pain. And that's happening. Purdue Pharma is sending in all of these drugs you can see towns where one hundred pills per person have been sent into these towns and this is happening as people are losing their jobs and they're losing their health insurance and when they lose their health insurance and their bodies are in pain and they can't get that prescription high anymore more. They often turn to injection drug use. And so this happened kind of most silently we saw this happened in Scott County Indiana in two thousand fourteen in two thousand fifteen eighteen in southern Indiana. Mike Pence the now vice president was the governor at the time and infamously. His health. People came to him when they started to see that there was is a crisis happening and said we need to do some kind of needle program and he infamously infamously said that he needed to pray about it and took some time to pray about it before he had an answer. And two of my colleagues at the L School of Public Health for Crawford and Greg. Gonzales did research looking at that years before they had really cut all the surveillance mechanisms even looking at HIV in the first place and so at that time the Centers for Disease Control outlined that there were two hundred and twenty such counties is throughout the United States that Scott County. They're sort of sitting ducks waiting for the potential hepatitis or ID outbreak to occur because they didn't have prevention measures they didn't have proper harm reduction programs. They didn't have education around these things so there are just sort of waiting for an outbreak that could occur in those places. Because there's not really counting happen happening until you know that there's something bad is going on. And that's what's now happening in West Virginia. So you're saying essentially that the culture clash and the conservatism ends up fueling policies that actually endanger communities. Yes that's very much true and it happens at various levels at the emergency level. The thing that needs to happen quickly when we understand something like this happens is getting clean needles into the people's hands Particularly because injected injection drug uses one of the fastest ways that HIV and also. Hepatitis can move between people. And there's a lot of conservative misinformation. About what these programs do. They'll say they make people more likely to use drugs. They'll say that it makes unclean needles. It's more likely to be left out in public and that it's going to bring crime and we actually know all of these things are not true. Research has been pretty consistent for decades that these kinds of mechanisms get people into care. Make them less likely to have needles out in the open and they don't increase crime or anything like that so that sort of at the emergency agency level and then at the bigger cultural level there are these things that are really putting people at harm One is that many of these states. And I see this in my own research in Missouri where I've in studying the criminalization of HIV for about five six years now. I've seen this in Missouri as well as that when you have states and localities have absence only education STI STI STI rates are going to go up. HIV rates are going to go up and so there are huge parts of the country particularly where these two hundred and twenty counties are that have either absence only education occasion or they have pregnancy only education. And we're not teaching the young people what they need to know it to be able to protect their bodies as they become sexual beings. There seems to be kind of a geographic cross section. Here I mean on the one hand. Georgia has the highest rates of new HIV infections in the country. The South is only responsible for little more than a third of the population but more than half of the new HIV diagnoses are happening in the South Y. Yeah that's a really interesting and sad story. So cities have some infrastructure and these rural parts of the country. Really don't and the South has has had some of the worst rates have HIV that have to be read in the context of a bigger health crisis in the country which is access to medication access to healthcare so in the south. We have some of the lowest rates of access to medication at all or healthcare. All you have the cases not just going not just beaten being a matter of HIV exposure if someone what is exposed to HIV and we find out about it and they had an HIV test at their annual physical and we got the medication they were on. Live the rest of their life. Normally way it's actually easier to deal with diabetes or any other number of chronic conditions. But when somebody doesn't get access to the medication can progress onto aids and during during that time they're also trans. Transmission can happen through them because we're not able to suppress the viral load so the south is real is a real vector of places is where people don't have access to the medication they don't have access to regular health insurance and so the rates are going up and up and there's such stigma and shame that even the people who probably know what's going on the symptoms have gotten so bad they're just so frightened to get care that they don't until it until it gets too bad and then the virus keeps moving and getting any more prevalent within their communities. Let's talk a little bit about the medication that is available houses rolling out a row across the United States. So since Nineteen ninety-six we we have had a drug called their most often called antiretrovirals. ARV's and these very effectively not only save people's lives but they make transmission not dot happened through sex once people are on them and nineteen ninety-six is the banner here that we have to look at the AIDS. Are the AIDS deaths rates. Dropped precipitously that year but they moved out and they got rolled out very unequally racially and geographically. And that's why we're seeing very different stories in cities in the rural south south so for people who got the medication. The virus started the cycle out of the population and the rate went down and for people who didn't go didn't get the medication groups that didn't get it the Vira a- actually got dense around them and went up and from the CDC's down that you can look at the rate of AIDS in the population amongst white people and black people in Nineteen ninety-five before there were drugs and two thousand fifteen almost ten years after their drugs the rate for black American two thousand fifteen was actually slightly lately higher than it was for white people when there were no drugs. Wow and that's not because black people have more sex or unprotected sex or use Ivy evy drugs more they actually engage in those activities left's but because black people and maths did not get the drugs. The rate has actually gone up in Black America. So so we have these drugs that are available and they're extraordinarily and unconscionably expensive. The drug is up to two thousand dollars a month for people to get started. Assorted emergency level. We need to get into these places where these outbreaks are happening but also very proactively we need to get it in two young men who have sex with men and people love color who and communities where the rate is very high because if we can just start if we can just start addressing at the rate of HIV will start cycling down in this population so some of your reporting lays lays out this racial dimension to this. If I was a straight white man I have a one in twenty five hundred chance of getting HIV but one in every two who black gay and bisexual men in the US or projected to become HIV positive in their lifetimes. That's correct it's really It's extraordinary and so who has power in this country and who's affected by this are very different populations my colleague Linda Virunga who I believe has been on the show wrote. Wrote The New York Times cover story about black men in the south and she phrases it very poetically pointing out that Swaziland. The tiny country in southern Africa which has about a million and people as the highest rate of HIV on earth. It's about twenty eight twenty nine percent of the population but black gay man. You know we're on record to fifty percent black gay men and men have sex. With man. Bisexual men were country. We would have the highest rate of HIV on the earth. And it's not because before it's not because we engage in riskier sex sex or drug use..

HIV United States AIDS the Times West Virginia Hari Sreenivasan Hepatitis Stephen Purdue Pharma New York San Francisco America Mike Pence Chicago New York Travolta Ruby Frazier Indiana L School of Public Health Black America
"greg gonzales" Discussed on Reset with Jenn White

Reset with Jenn White

13:58 min | 1 year ago

"greg gonzales" Discussed on Reset with Jenn White

"Hi I'm Jen. White and this is reset on. Today's show we WANNA know. What does Chicago goes sound like it just a bit? We'll talk with Jill Hopkins. She's the host of the morning amp on. WBZ's sister station vocal. She'll introduce us to some of the talented people around the city. Who are being highlighted invoke h-a-l-o series? This is what Chicago sounds like. We shine a spotlight on and pass the microphone to people who do do things not just for Chicago but because of Chicago but first rates of HIV diagnoses are falling in cities across the country. Cities like New York Philadelphia and right here in Chicago. That's the good news. The bad news cases of the virus are cropping up more and more in rural areas like West Virginia and other parts parts of Appalachia. Joining me to talk about this trend is Steven thrasher. He's an assistant professor at Northwestern University's School of Journalism. He has an op-ed in the New York Times this week on the topic to mark World Aids Day it's called. HIV is coming to rural America and Thrasher says rural. America isn't ready Steven Thrasher. Sure welcome to reset. Thank you so much for having me. Why are cases of HIV falling in cities? Cities are being very proactive about the root causes houses of the virus. So they're they're addressing the virus and AIDS as well very directly with public health campaigns but there are also some cities are decriminalizing sex work. Many of them aren't doing things around harm reduction and making healthcare available for people who inject Intravenous drugs and they're also being very proactive with a drug called prep It's a drug drugs. You can take that people who are at risk for HIV can take all the time To prevent onward transmission. So cities are being very proactive about those things and they have general infrastructures for health care. that have been existing for some time so they're able to deal with these things in ways that rural America is not. Where are the country? Are we seeing An increase in new HIV diagnoses. Yes our cities rates are falling and lots of big cities and there are these spikes that are happening in pockets of the country For a long long for the past few years. We've had some sense that the Mississippi Delta was a place where there was high prevalence and there's been active work about that but in rural counties all around the country there are these outbreaks that are happening. The first one that we saw quite extensively was in Scott County Indiana in two thousand fourteen in two thousand fifteen and that was when now vice president Mike Pence was then the governor and it was really newsworthy at the time because his public health people came to him. And said we need to do something about a needle exchange the way that these These outbreaks are happening in deindustrialized places when economic hard times hit The the unemployment and the issues around that really deft Jeff to help with the opioid crisis and many of these communities legally the drugs have been pumped end by corporations There's one town in West. Virginia that has a population of about twenty nine hundred people were twenty million. Drugs have been sent over just a few years. So when deindustrialization happens and people lose their jobs. They're addicted to they. Become addicted acted to legal Prescription drugs and they can't get those. They often turn to using syringes with Paul and with heroin and so in places like Scott. Not County The Public Health People Indiana saw what was happening and knew something to be done about. Pence famously said he needed to pray about it and took some weeks before that came to be but the real issue which my colleague Greg Gonzales does research about this at Yale is that the issue wasn't just that pence took time to pray about it was also the Indiana had gotten rid of a lot of the testing mechanisms in the first place and when that happened when Scott County happened. The Centers for Disease Control Found Two hundred twenty counties throughout the United States where there were similar. Similar things ready to happen that these counties where there wasn't much infrastructure and the elements were at play for another outbreak to happen and now that's happening in rural West Virginia. So when you talk about testing are you talking about community. Health facilities are what falls under that umbrella. Their various ways that testing happen so so there are testing clinics directly for HIV. But also at the level when I was reporting the story for the New York Times I found out that and it was ah news to me because I lived in New York and our live here in Chicago and as a gay man my doctors in various capacities will ask me to get tested or I'll proactively get tested But in many of these places the the family doctor community doctors never asked for people to be tested. They might not even know how to test or just might not be part of their practice and so Testing is not happening at the level of the family doctor. There aren't campaigns to get people tested. There's not sort of public. Health drives to get tested in these places and then when people become increasingly at risk because they might be using intravenous drugs or that they're having intimate relations with somebody. Who is using intravenous drugs? Their doctor might not think to get them tested at at that point another thing. That's really difficult as even in these places where there might be some kind of testing or testing ability people in rural America. I've found for my conversations with people might feel stigma. Might keep them from getting tested and so here in a city like Chicago or New York or San Francisco. People might feel like they could go to a clinic. Run by AIDS service organization and feel relatively anonymous and whereas in rural America the country. Doctor that you know that you I know knows everyone even if they're not gonna tell anyone else's doctors of course they're not allowed to by law but the stigma of it might keep them from doing it. They don't they don't WanNa think that that person might know and so that's another way. That testing is lower in rural America than cities Chicago is seeing its HIV rates fall. Do we know how things are looking in the rest of the state kind of what I've been seeing being in my own research is that we just don't even have a handle on rural places so the city of Chicago will the the people who do the work here around. HIV and AIDS. We'll have a pretty good handle handle on knowing what's happening here and in rural parts of this stay around the country there aren't the infrastructure snow about that my my understanding having just land in in Illinois a few months ago and starting to get a sense of things here is that we have decent infrastructure through our state for doing this but what I was just looking at in West West Virginia and other parts of the country. There just isn't account so you don't even know what's happening until there's already a problem developing in Chicago if we found out that there what the cases were rising in some way there lots of mechanisms to kind of deal with that and try to bring help and protection to communities around safe sex use around injection drug use or a number of things like that around which has been a really big thing in the past few years. You just don't have that in other parts of the country. We'll even you said we are seeing a criminalization of HIV infection in many states as they're seeing a rise in transmissions they're taking a punitive approach rather than public health oriented approach talk about how that affects the epidemic. Sure so I got interested in the story that I was writing for the Times about from a tip from an activist who is is really concerned in her state about what was happening there and one of the really disturbing things that that she identified for me that I saw her name is Aton Young was that there. I think fifty five counties in West Virginia and there were needle syringe exchange programs in fifteen of them but one of them has been closed in the past astier and another one was severely was severely downsized because of stigma and fear around. And that's exactly the wrong thing that should be happening. There needs to not only be these kinds of programs throughout the state particularly when you see that this is how the virus is moving and the criminalization of having syringes itself keeps people from getting clean syringes syringes and not only as a harm to them but his harm to their sexual partners everyone in their networks. So that's one way. The criminalization affects things. And it's going in the wrong direction there and my own research. I've been studying for the past six years now. prosecution in Missouri young man named Michael Johnson. It was known as the Tiger Mandingo case and he was prosecuted for exposing a transmitting. HIV to other people initially sentenced to thirty years in prison Part because of our reporting he he was able to have his sentence overturned because of prosecutorial misconduct and he got out of prison in July and I was there to meet him. But everything about that case since I've been reporting at Criminalization Association doesn't help it increases stigma. It doesn't decrease It doesn't decrease transmission. Most people who are living with the virus and its transmitting transmitting through them. Don't even know their status and so- criminalization doesn't help in any way at the same time what I've felt really disturbed about. Is that the county that I study. Study Saint Charles County spent. I don't know spend a huge amount of money and time trying to prosecute this young man ostensibly. I think their reasoning was that they thought thought that would help. Lower rates of each of the prosecutor is now actually calling for the repeal of these laws But at the time I think they thought that this would help lower transmission and at the same time they just closed two years ago. They're only sti clinic in the county They were seeing about a thousand patients a year and they closed it down and so that's is also a really good. Wait understand that criminalizing. Something doesn't help that the the money that that county was putting into criminalising. It wasn't helping it at the same sometimes. Losing their STI clinic so now if there is an outbreak in a place like that It's more likely to happen because people aren't getting tested. Were not going to know about it until it's moved quite a bit this even historically when we look at who was most affected by HIV Queer. Black men And and I'm curious. What role do you think that played in determining the initial public health response to the disease and how that's playing out today? All all of this has something a huge amount to deal with race and even from the beginning of the time. The epidemic was being counted. It was disproportionately a black disease or black people were disproportionately affected that disparity has grown actually even after nineteen ninety six. This is kind of where I think the change happens. Ninety six six medication becomes available called. Irvy's that are highly effective and for the people who get them. It's life saving for the people around them who have sex with them who who are intimately involved with them. It is a game changer. And so the prevalence goes way down amongst white Americans. The real problem is that White Gay Americans ends even White Gay Americans living with HIV. After they get the drugs become very disinvested in AIDS politics. And so there's all this frenetic activity before ninety six my research actually the rate of if you look at it by race and not bisexuality. The rate of AIDS before ninety six is lower then is for African Americans today when there was no medication it was it was lower and all the split activity this for African Americans how does not because african-americans Working Americans engaged in quote unquote riskier behavior. It's just that because we largely didn't get the drugs the prevalence has actually gone up in our community and so so racist had a lot to do with the and it's been interesting. My story for the Times was the most read time story yesterday and which is not been the case about other. It's things that I've written before but it is really about the the crisis coming to rural white in America and I think that may actually Engender much more the political will to to deal with the crisis. What do you think lawmakers can do to help counter rising HIV infection rates or to continue the work that we see in places like Chicago where we're seeing those rates fall? policy-makers need to a one embrace a sex positive education including reading queer and Trans Specific Education. Very excited here in Illinois when I when I knew I was going to be moving here that we are going to be having. LGBTQ education in public schools. And that's really important to understand to decrease stigma and to help young people not feel about their bodies and become Sexually active to know how to protect themselves himself. So that's one thing they can do at an emergency level municipalities and states and the federal government needs to decriminalize drug use and the use of syringes. Because because even if a locality create some kind of a SYRINGE EXP- program in Indiana was A. It was a felony to have a syringe and many places in the country. It's a felony. It's illegal under federal. I believe So undoing that and then also decriminalizing sex work a drug. Use these things that make it really hard for people. When times are tough de-industrializing places? People often are using injection drugs and they may often be engaging in sex work to survive and when the the means of life life particularly kind of the the hardest means of life or criminalize. It makes it hard for people to get the care they have cities are really at the forefront of having comprehensive health approaches which is around this and it's been great New York and Philly just released their numbers in the past few weeks and have a huge strides through the use of the Structure Vodka But but also of course cities are. We're not counting. Everybody in homelessness is a major factor in how people say oh convert So dealing with policies that keep people housed housed and one of the reasons I study. HIV and AIDS is because it's just a price For understanding all the things that are going wrong in the society so lawmakers lawmakers and policy people can address things that make life better for people in general and that's going to decrease rates of HIV when people are healthy and able to have access to housing medicine that Steven thrasher assistant professor at northwestern. University's Medical School of Journalism Media and Communications Steven. Thanks for joining us..

Chicago the Times HIV infection AIDS America New York West Virginia United States Steven thrasher New York Times Indiana Mike Pence Illinois WBZ assistant professor White Jill Hopkins Virginia Centers for Disease Control
"greg gonzales" Discussed on KMOX News Radio 1120

KMOX News Radio 1120

08:51 min | 1 year ago

"greg gonzales" Discussed on KMOX News Radio 1120

"And we return to the story of detective Mike dodi's final night of duty of his life. When we last left off the tactical officers were approaching a mysterious vote with an unknown heat signature beneath your, the men, who were on the front lines. It was possibility. It was going to be dangerous, but, you know, you couldn't let that guy around loose. Nobody thought twice about it. Just this job. We got protect people. We got get this guy. Mike Doty was already taken off around the corner of the house. There was a deck kinda over here to the left, and it's like flat level, with the ground. Well, I've noticed that it was the ground was dropping off, and it was big enough, where somebody could get under there. And as we were coming, I remember, I took my hand off, I rifle and told Mike, let's check under that dick, and I and I did that. And when I pointed. He started shooting. I heard the first shot go out, and it wasn't a pause, but it was just that trying to come from. We had no idea that he was underneath deport prior to that he was up next to a hot tub. The flare can't see through. Stuff fit this picks up surfaces. So it can't see through windows, it can't see, through would it can't see through walls, nothing like that. No technology that I'm aware of could've told us that before it went around that corner. And then there was that first burst gun fire, and then a brief Paul's, and then there was a second Bursik gun fire, and then I knew that something wasn't right. Because when you hear I burst, you think, okay. You know, good guys are firing rounds everybody's. Okay. And then when you hear a pause, and then the second set of gunfire, you realize that as a as a gun fight, I knew immediately what had happened. There was no doubt what had happened? I didn't see Mike in that initial in the initial blast where shots. When I was returning fire in all that stuff was going on a kinda saw. What I thought was a poly close. Kind of over here and it was it was where my could go. This is all happening, so quick. It seemed like it was in slow motion, but it was all happening real quick. So. As soon as I turn the light on my whip and I get Mosel flash. Well, I engage muzzle flash and it was coming from the dick area. I engage the muzzle flash everything goes silent. You know, it's not a natural thing to put yourself in a lot of our. You see it on TV, if you watch football when they say that quarterback sent in the pocket and his getting rid of the stack. But yeah, he's still those football and makes a completion of that's cute. You know, standing in the pocket, no one you're about to get shot and still fight back. We didn't know where he was pushed up. Hit my light. So. I saw Doty laying there. Start moving cut. My light on when a scan the dick see the bad guy under the deck. A hollered out at that point time Lieutenant cliff during Greg Gonzales go, and they covered down him. I looked to my left and we've got somebody down, couldn't tell him. I just want to ours from uniform and immediately started using my weapon light. Looking in over to the right picked up the suspect eight to house push down got to them. And I'm scanning I can't find I'm just looking constantly trying to Mike respond a rolling. Life gone. His is no. These is there. He's not. Go ahead. We hear you. When they. How right now that we got dude, I out. Yup. Just the guy frozen time just. He didn't wanna die that. I guess we're really one in emergency medical director truck, anes share. Kevin Poulsen officer Trent ferris. We pull my out of he was almost in line with where bag. And we pull him back. Start checking Mike. There's no holes anymore thing. He's unresponsive. Or he stores breathing. A notice blood on my hands head tilt on him and. Realize that he'd been shot in the. A heard the call on the radio that I never wanted to hear offers. Oh. When he medics? So maybe jumped out of the very care. From safe area and started running towards or the gunfire was the other side of the house first patient, on counter was Mike Doty. He was brought out and. Put on the stretcher, and it was. Knows mike. Mike on the stretcher in sheriff he yells at in heels. Mike, mike. Shook his chest a little bit might might might just you know, I don't know why did that? Maybe I thought I could wake in, or I wanted to see how bad maybe I don't know why. Now for Chris Doty. Mike's brother. In a moment. He found out. It took somebody. Multiple people. Call my wife. Until she finally woke up. And she came in. I'll never forget that, that look on her face. When she just looked at me and said, Mike spit hurt. Your mind goes one in. And you and you don't know. So. By the time I got up dressed, then, of course, my six year old, and she she's smart enough to see that was. Emotion. By the time we got there. He just walk in. And it's just I was focused on one thing. And that was regardless of. His it was. I wanted to see you knew from the very beginning. First time. Nothing. Nothing is going to change when we went in. An operating room downstairs. And. Does help us. Any past. You come out at it's. He would have a statement. That he'd finally passed but at the same time. There was a little bit of relief. That, that wasn't suffering anymore. Didn't matter who you are. Or who you were if he was if it was your friend, or family member? It was just as his pure love is passion. And as love. For his friends and family. That that is what will be missed. To me. What anything else?.

Mike dodi Mike Doty Mike Mike spit Chris Doty dick football Kevin Poulsen Paul Lieutenant cliff medical director Trent ferris officer Greg Gonzales six year
"greg gonzales" Discussed on KMOX News Radio 1120

KMOX News Radio 1120

10:26 min | 1 year ago

"greg gonzales" Discussed on KMOX News Radio 1120

"And we return to the story of detective Mike dodi's final night of duty of his life. We last left off the tactical officers were approaching a mysterious boat with an unknown heat signature beneath your, the men, who were on the front lines. It was possibility was going to be dangerous, but, you know, you couldn't let run loose. Nobody thought about it just job. We gotta protect people. We gotta get this, Mike Doty was already taken off around the corner of the house. There was a deck kind over here to the left, and it's like flat level with the ground. Well, I've noticed that it was the ground was dropping off, and it was big enough, where somebody could get under there. And as we were coming, I remember, I took my hand off my rifle and told Mike, let's check under that dick, and I and I did that. And when I pointed, he started shooting I heard the. I shot go out, and it wasn't a pause. But it was just that trying to come from. We had no idea that he was underneath deport prior to that he was up next to a hot tub. The flare can't see through. The fit this picks up surfaces so can't see through windows, it can't see, through would it can't say through walls, nothing like that. No technology that I'm aware of could've told us that before we went around that corner. And then there was that first person gun fire, and then a brief Paul's, and then there was a second Bursik gun fire, and then I knew that something wasn't right. Because when you hear first burst, you think okay. You know good. Guys are firing rounds everybody's. Okay. And then when you hear a pause, and then the second set of gunfire you realize that is a is a gun fight. I knew immediately what had happened. There was no doubt. What had happened? I didn't see Mike in that initial in the initial blast where shots. When I was returning fire in all that stuff was going on a kind of saw. What I thought was a Pollock lows. Kinda over here and it was it was where my could go. This is all happening, so quick. It seemed like it was in slow motion, but it was all happening real quick. So. As soon as I turn the light on them with, and I get muzzle. Flash. Well, I engage muzzle flash and it was coming from the dick area. I engage the muzzle flash everything goes silent. You know, it's not a natural thing to put yourself in a lot of our. See it on TV, if you watch football when they say that quarterback ended in the pocket and his getting rid of the sacked. But yeah, he's those football and makes a completion. That's key. When you stand in the pocket knowing you're about to get shot and still fight back. We didn't know where he was pushed up. Hit my life. So. I saw Doty laying there. I start moving a Cup. A light on when I scan the debt. I see the bad owner the deck a hollered out at that point time, Lieutenant cliff, injuring Greg Gonzales go, and they cover down him. I looked in my left, and we've got somebody down, getting tell him, I just want to ours from uniform and immediately started using my weapon light. Looking in over to the right picked up the suspect eight the house. The push man down got to them. And I'm scanning I can't find I'm just looking constantly trying to Mike respond a rolling. Life gone. His is, is there is not. Go ahead. We hear you. When they do that. How right now that we got dude, I out. Point. The guy frozen time managers. Didn't he didn't wanna die? I guess we're really want them. Emergency medical director Chuck Haines sheriff, Kevin Tolson officer Trent ferris. We pull my out of he was almost in line with where bag. Louis and we pull him back. Start checking Mike. There's no holes. Any Marie thing. He's responsive. Gmc or he stores breathing. Look, I noticed blood on my hands done head tilt on him and. Realize that he'd been shot in the head. I heard the call on the radio that I never wanted to hear offers down. When he'd medics? Maybe jumped out of the Barakat. Area and started running towards or the gunfire was the other side of the house first patient on encounter was might Doty. He was brought out and. Put on the stretcher, and it was. Knows mike. Mike on the stretcher in sheriff, he yells and heels Mike, Mike. Shook his chest a little bit. Might might might just, you know. I don't know. Why did that? Maybe I thought I could wake him hopper. I wanted to see how bad maybe I don't know why. Now for Chris Doty. Mike's brother. In the moment, he found out. It took somebody. Multiple people. Call my wife. Until she finally woke up and she came in. I'll never forget that, that look on her face. When she looked at me and said, Mike Spann hurt. Your mind goes from one in there. And you know. And you don't know. So. By the time I got up dressed, then, of course, my six year old was she. She smart enough to see that was. Emotion. And it was by the time we got there. He just walk in. And it's just I was focused on one thing. And that was regardless of. His it was. I wanted to see him. He knew from the very beginning. Talk of time. Nothing. Nothing is going to change win. An operating room downstairs. And. Just help us. At any pest. You come out at its. He would have tickets. That he'd finally passed but at the same time. There was a little bit of relief. That, that wasn't suffering anymore. Didn't matter who you are. Or who you were if he was if it was your friend, or family member? It was just as his pure love is passion. And as love. For his friends and family. That that is what will be missed. To me more than anything else. And my goodness, if you're not shedding tears right now. There's something wrong with you. In hearing, a grown man holding back tears, talking about a pal. Who as he put it? Well, it's not a natural thing to put yourself in the line of fire. It's not. And by the way, this was a domestic dispute turned into a straight out old-fashioned western gunfight, but it was real. It was real. Pure love and passion for his family and friends. Those are the last words, we heard, and that's all I'm sure this detective detective Mike Doty wanna be remembered responding to the call of duty, trying to protect a woman from a man who'd been beaten her up, and who else is going to come in who else was going to come in. But the minimum celebrating detective Mike Doty's life. It's police week. All week long here. Our American stories. What.

Mike dodi Mike Doty Mike Mike Spann Chris Doty football dick Cup Gmc Barakat Paul Marie Lieutenant cliff Louis medical director Trent ferris Greg Gonzales
"greg gonzales" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

04:24 min | 2 years ago

"greg gonzales" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"The Brian Lehrer on WNYC produced by Alison Mary croak. So he is delay Amina Cerna and Jeremy house with the head of live radio. Megan Ryan, and that's Matt Mirando at the audio controls. Good morning, again, everyone it's been a big euro ready for HIV and aids developments the big news. You have already heard a second HIV positive patient went into remission following a rare treatment, and there's news of a possible third. But that's unconfirmed another sign of progress. Use of the HIV prevention medication prep has skyrocketed now thirty five percent of gay and bisexual men have high risk are using the drug. We're told all the news hasn't been good. However, though, President Trump announced a goal to end HIV in the US. A recent CDC report centers for disease control report says that declining HIV infection rates have now plateau that is the decline for the moment has stopped. So here to help. Make sense of these developments and more is oil Gutierrez editor in chief of pause. The Maxine the covers people affected by HIV aids enable the publication will Mark its twenty fifth anniversary oil, welcome to WNYC. Thanks for having me. Let me start with the what seems like miracle cure. You might have seen the New York Times op Ed by Greg Gonzales expert in activists yesterday, the cautioned against focusing on these two rare cases of cured patients writing that HIV is not going away anytime soon, you agree that these miracle stories distract from broader-based public health work. The short answer is yes. But there's much more longer answer to that. Look, I mean, when it comes to HIV, what most people think is something scary and something to be afraid of and and and not really think about so when it does kind of burst out into the media and into kind of a general focus. I mean, the thing that people are most interested in his is it over. You know? And so I certainly get the fascination about cure and about the potential for cure as a person living with the virus since nineteen Ninety-two. I really wanna cure. So I get it that said there definitely is an unfortunate tendency in the media to over blow these stories and simplify them to the point where they give I think perhaps some false hope like let's just send everybody who's HIV positive into surgery for a bone marrow transplant. Yes. Especially one that will probably kill you in the process, and this if I understand correctly has been used only a few times in ten years because it is so risky, and was in particular cases of people who had both cancer, the kind of blood cancer that a bone marrow might treat and HIV. Yes. Yes. So Timothy three Brown. Is the first person cured, and and we can use that word with him. Because you know, the science has borne that out even though again, technically, what it what he's really in is is vital remission, which is a term similar to to cancer, the idea that well, it's gone, and it's probably gone, and it's most likely gone, and you know, the longer that's gone. You're probably cure. So, you know, we're we're trying to get that familiarity with with this process, but but scientists seem pretty confident that we can use the word cured for him for the London patient. You know, the the idea is that he he may be cured. And we hope he is it's been eighteen months since he's not been on medication. That's amazing. That's why this is such great news. But you know, it's going to take several more years before we can feel confident to use the the seaward. Before we go on to prep and other developments regarding HIV listeners. I do want to open up the phones. We're talking to oil Gutierrez editor in chief of pause. Many of you know, it the magazine that's covered people affected by HIV aids. For twenty five years as of next month and anything you want to call in and say or ask is fair game..

HIV editor in chief Gutierrez Alison Mary croak Brian Lehrer Megan Ryan cancer CDC Matt Mirando New York Times US President Trump Maxine Jeremy house Greg Gonzales Timothy London thirty five percent
"greg gonzales" Discussed on WiLD 94.9

WiLD 94.9

02:14 min | 3 years ago

"greg gonzales" Discussed on WiLD 94.9

"Miller it's hot i wanna know do you know the wild ninety four nine phrase that pays two kboi package coned cleave record your message when you have finished recording you may hang up or press one for more options freemont i was helping you're gonna answer i'm greg gonzales from albany for nine and we're on the cpr phrase that pays it's wild ninety four nine the base never one music station known in case we call you back blows memorial day savings for all the projects popping up on your to do list at a pop of color to your porch or patio with your choice select hanging baskets or planners to for ten dollars and freshen up your landscape with new mulch and say because now you can get five bags of premium mulch for just ten dollars all projects have starting point start with lowe's offers valid five twenty three through five thirty while supplies last color selection vary by location us only excludes alaskan hawaii macy's memorial day furniture mattress and rug sale has it all incredible supervise and big savings like the astra sofa just five hundred ninety nine dollars get the tribeca grey to drawer queen storage bad for four hundred ninety nine dollars save five hundred to twelve hundred dollars on all sealy posture pedic mattresses and with any outdoor furniture purchase of nine hundred ninety nine dollars or more get free white glove delivery right now at macy's memorial day furniture mattress and rupp sale savings off regular prices exclusions apply welcome to total wine and more boy gets all of this beer out of the way how about if i find a beer you like you'll take it home show me your best this is a really delicious pale ale from sierra nevada give it a try you can't best my lot of your masterpiece a six pack right away sir and you'll always get it at the lowest price well let's have another why all these americans grilling all of a sudden explore eight thousand wines and twenty five hundred beers at total wine and more the selection is ridiculous hi this is iheartradio's maria melito my podcast marinas matzen stuff is all about animals from animal welfare to animal rescue wanna to know what to.

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