12 Burst results for "Greg Creech"

"greg creech" Discussed on Everyday Buddhism: Making Everyday Better

Everyday Buddhism: Making Everyday Better

05:50 min | Last month

"greg creech" Discussed on Everyday Buddhism: Making Everyday Better

"On the PELETON. And and in a performance metrics within within corporate organizations and. Is the goal you know. COMPA- compassion and Kindness, is wouldn't even enter into into the equation. Yeah Yeah exactly and that idea of it being ego centric, it's as if. We either are thinking. We're so great were so grandiose were so narcissistic. That's one way to. Just be. Caught up in self or were the worst were terrible. We need to get better I. You know I'm not fast enough smart enough rich enough, and that's it's just again of an other side of the coin in this. Right yeah. I in working with the great creature who I mentioned earlier Greg I'm sorry I keep digging you here today but and working with Greg Creech. I asked him about perfectionism because I have problems with perfectionism and he said. He said that's that's a subtle sign of egoism and you gotta get over yourself and it was such a slap in the face but it is it. It's just what you're talking about and boy you know this all I know we're kind of going around circles on this but one thing I want I sort of want to. Grab the tail of this in drag it somewhere else and say, okay, here we are in the middle of this pandemic and I I think many people have learned a lot of lessons in the last cheese how many months has been seven months seven hunts out yeah. Yeah. It's scary So and seven months you know one thing we certainly learned about is that we have we'll or maybe we've learned or were trying to learn. is getting comfortable making friends with uncertainty At that and like it's like what we're learning is three marks of existence, right? Not because we asked to learn because of being forced down our throat in these last seven months, right? So it's like we were learning in permanence, you know and we're learning interdependence, and we're learning that on nothing is as discreet and steady as we thought, it was or emptiness including ourselves..

Greg Creech
"greg creech" Discussed on Everyday Buddhism: Making Everyday Better

Everyday Buddhism: Making Everyday Better

05:06 min | 2 months ago

"greg creech" Discussed on Everyday Buddhism: Making Everyday Better

"It's matter of starting small and slowly building your balance so that you will eventually have something to fall back. Now, some of the actual practices are more sleep, better nutrition, more different exercise, more meditation self compassion, and I'm emphasizing that gratitude also emphasizing that and connection. And saying, no, we don't feel like we can do something. But. There's a big picture framework that holds the hold these practices, and it's like a framework of attitude adjustment. And they are they consist of a certain steps which I will. Share with you here, the first step is acceptance and I've talked about this a lot talked about a lot from the framework of Japanese psychology. I've talked about a lot from Greg creatures books and in Interviewing Greg Creech. Acceptance is a dynamic thing. It's not a giving up or. You know that that feeling of I guess I have to accept it I can't change it but Blah no acceptance can be a powerful force. It's a force of taking control of your own mind and looking into reality instead of pushing it away or escaping from it. Instead. Of like exaggerating it or avoiding it that's sort of the push pull phenomena of the second noble truth. Buddha talks about both of those things pushing and pulling are clinging. If you're pushing it away, you're actually clinging to it because you keep thinking about it if if your pulling. Putting the you wouldn't pull the actual pandemic towards you but you would pull your wishing for your old life back to you and that's all sore clinging clinging to something. That is no longer there. In acceptance we accept that life is different and when we stop fighting reality, we can apply our energy towards more constructive activities. The second attitude adjustment is expecting less from yourself, expecting less and replenishing more. It takes more if it takes more than a half a day to get focused and complete one task. Okay. That's okay I. It's totally out of what we normally except for ourselves totally out of what we think is right for ourselves as we push ourselves through our days. But everything about our daily rhythms and times are different now and we need to slowly build. Let's face it. We're building a new way to live. The other attitude adjustment is recognized the different aspects of grief. We are grieving actual lives, lost sicknesses the loss of being able to visit others we are grieving are lost way of life we are grieving. The fact that we have an uncertain future now, the stages of grief that they talk about are typically refer to as denial anger, bargaining, depression, and acceptance. Now, one thing about stages of grief is that they're not letting year. And they can surprise us when they arise..

Greg Creech Buddha
"greg creech" Discussed on Everyday Buddhism: Making Everyday Better

Everyday Buddhism: Making Everyday Better

04:42 min | 3 months ago

"greg creech" Discussed on Everyday Buddhism: Making Everyday Better

"Another minute as the months of the pandemic drone on and on and with it the continuing uncertainty finding places of pieces becoming all important focus of life for many of us I. . Think. . In I shared with you in the previous episode that I've committed to a more consistent daily meditation practice as a way to take positive action rather than focus on all that is wrong in our country in the world. . And the other thing I did was to reach out to my teacher and friend Greg Creech. One . of the leading authorities on Japanese psychology to talk with me on this podcast episode about uncertainty and transitions. . When we talked on the phone about what advice sir practice he could offer to podcast listeners as we whether this time of great uncertainty he said something that really struck me. . He said it's not a mass issue. . It's your personal situation and attachment, , and then he went on to say that everyone is dealing with losses but ultimately, , it's an individual thing. . and. . So with that brief lead in I want to welcome greg to this podcast once again. . Hi, Greg , thanks so much for joining me. . Are Wendy thank you for having me. . It's nice to talk to you again. . Okay. . So Great <hes> I would like us to focus <hes> much of the conversation today and I think I mentioned this when we talked on one of your recent articles coping in the garden of uncertainty. . And also, , if we have any time left, , maybe you could talk about your recent series focused on the challenges post posed by this a pandemic, , which was <hes> life not on hold right is that correct? ? That's correct. . I though, , if you could unpack what I just shared from our recent conversation which I hope I quoted you correctly even if you remember what you said <hes> it's not a massive issue at your personal situation, an , attachment and then everyone is dealing with losses but ultimately, , it's an individual thing. So . can you talk more about those concepts Greg? ? First of I do think that it's an unusual situation because in terms of the pandemic <hes> that <hes> the whole world. . Is <hes> suffering from this <hes> and obviously Some people are suffering in different ways or more or less but but <hes> we out all are exposed to the situation and. . and. . So I'm not trying to suggest that that there. . Is Anything but a global. . Threat to our lives into our health and <hes> but I think in terms of how we cope with it. . It it really is very much an individual issue has to do with our own practice. . It has do with what presses are buttons <hes>. . It has to do with what <hes>. . <hes>. . We. . Miss that gives us a sense of impatience and agitation because we have such a strong desire to have X. and we can't have it right now because the conditions of of our lives in the world. . So in that sense, , our ability to work with the situation to cope with it. . To find a way to accept what we can't change for example. . Though those kinds of things that are coming up our individual issues and the kinds of things that will which your buttons or agitate you or. . Frustrate you. . At an extreme are probably not necessarily the things that are going to have that effect on me but I have my own things <hes> and so to that extent, , the the. . Solutions that were looking for while we can talk about vaccine as a solution to medical problem but the solution to our practical and spiritual issues that we're facing in our own minds really is a question of of coping with that as an individual and I think of it similarly when I think of coping with the issue of death. . All right. . Right. . That <hes>. . We we all will die <hes>. . It's a given but <hes>. . But how we die in how we face in cope with our own individual death is something that we can't share with anybody else right it's something that we have to work with. . As individual. . And I think net sense the situation we find ourselves in now. . Is is somewhat parallel to that. . Yeah that is that's really

Total Institute Tricycle Self utne Editor of The quarterly journa Greg editor Nikon sun magazine Health magazine Grayson Linda Vermont
6 Steps for Coping with Uncertainty with Gregg Krech

Everyday Buddhism: Making Everyday Better

04:42 min | 3 months ago

6 Steps for Coping with Uncertainty with Gregg Krech

"Another minute as the months of the pandemic drone on and on and with it the continuing uncertainty finding places of pieces becoming all important focus of life for many of us I. Think. In I shared with you in the previous episode that I've committed to a more consistent daily meditation practice as a way to take positive action rather than focus on all that is wrong in our country in the world. And the other thing I did was to reach out to my teacher and friend Greg Creech. One of the leading authorities on Japanese psychology to talk with me on this podcast episode about uncertainty and transitions. When we talked on the phone about what advice sir practice he could offer to podcast listeners as we whether this time of great uncertainty he said something that really struck me. He said it's not a mass issue. It's your personal situation and attachment, and then he went on to say that everyone is dealing with losses but ultimately, it's an individual thing. and. So with that brief lead in I want to welcome greg to this podcast once again. Hi, Greg thanks so much for joining me. Are Wendy thank you for having me. It's nice to talk to you again. Okay. So Great I would like us to focus much of the conversation today and I think I mentioned this when we talked on one of your recent articles coping in the garden of uncertainty. And also, if we have any time left, maybe you could talk about your recent series focused on the challenges post posed by this a pandemic, which was life not on hold right is that correct? That's correct. I though, if you could unpack what I just shared from our recent conversation which I hope I quoted you correctly even if you remember what you said it's not a massive issue at your personal situation, an attachment and then everyone is dealing with losses but ultimately, it's an individual thing. So can you talk more about those concepts Greg? First of I do think that it's an unusual situation because in terms of the pandemic that the whole world. Is suffering from this and obviously Some people are suffering in different ways or more or less but but we out all are exposed to the situation and. and. So I'm not trying to suggest that that there. Is Anything but a global. Threat to our lives into our health and but I think in terms of how we cope with it. It it really is very much an individual issue has to do with our own practice. It has do with what presses are buttons It has to do with what We. Miss that gives us a sense of impatience and agitation because we have such a strong desire to have X. and we can't have it right now because the conditions of of our lives in the world. So in that sense, our ability to work with the situation to cope with it. To find a way to accept what we can't change for example. Though those kinds of things that are coming up our individual issues and the kinds of things that will which your buttons or agitate you or. Frustrate you. At an extreme are probably not necessarily the things that are going to have that effect on me but I have my own things and so to that extent, the the. Solutions that were looking for while we can talk about vaccine as a solution to medical problem but the solution to our practical and spiritual issues that we're facing in our own minds really is a question of of coping with that as an individual and I think of it similarly when I think of coping with the issue of death. All right. Right. That We we all will die It's a given but But how we die in how we face in cope with our own individual death is something that we can't share with anybody else right it's something that we have to work with. As individual. And I think net sense the situation we find ourselves in now. Is is somewhat parallel to that. Yeah that is that's really

Greg Creech Wendy
"greg creech" Discussed on Everyday Buddhism: Making Everyday Better

Everyday Buddhism: Making Everyday Better

04:40 min | 3 months ago

"greg creech" Discussed on Everyday Buddhism: Making Everyday Better

"Drone on and on and with it the continuing uncertainty finding places of pieces becoming all important focus of life for many of us I. . Think. . In I shared with you in the previous episode that I've committed to a more consistent daily meditation practice as a way to take positive action rather than focus on all that is wrong in our country in the world. . And the other thing I did was to reach out to my teacher and friend Greg Creech. One . of the leading authorities on Japanese psychology to talk with me on this podcast episode about uncertainty and transitions. . When we talked on the phone about what advice sir practice he could offer to podcast listeners as we whether this time of great uncertainty he said something that really struck me. . He said it's not a mass issue. . It's your personal situation and attachment, , and then he went on to say that everyone is dealing with losses but ultimately, , it's an individual thing. . and. . So with that brief lead in I want to welcome greg to this podcast once again. . Hi, Greg , thanks so much for joining me. . Are Wendy thank you for having me. . It's nice to talk to you again. . Okay. . So Great <hes> I would like us to focus <hes> much of the conversation today and I think I mentioned this when we talked on one of your recent articles coping in the garden of uncertainty. . And also, , if we have any time left, , maybe you could talk about your recent series focused on the challenges post posed by this a pandemic, , which was <hes> life not on hold right is that correct? ? That's correct. . I though, , if you could unpack what I just shared from our recent conversation which I hope I quoted you correctly even if you remember what you said <hes> it's not a massive issue at your personal situation, an , attachment and then everyone is dealing with losses but ultimately, , it's an individual thing. So . can you talk more about those concepts Greg? ? First of I do think that it's an unusual situation because in terms of the pandemic <hes> that <hes> the whole world. . Is <hes> suffering from this <hes> and obviously Some people are suffering in different ways or more or less but but <hes> we out all are exposed to the situation and. . and. . So I'm not trying to suggest that that there. . Is Anything but a global. . Threat to our lives into our health and <hes> but I think in terms of how we cope with it. . It it really is very much an individual issue has to do with our own practice. . It has do with what presses are buttons <hes>. . It has to do with what <hes>. . <hes>. . We. . Miss that gives us a sense of impatience and agitation because we have such a strong desire to have X. and we can't have it right now because the conditions of of our lives in the world. . So in that sense, , our ability to work with the situation to cope with it. . To find a way to accept what we can't change for example. . Though those kinds of things that are coming up our individual issues and the kinds of things that will which your buttons or agitate you or. . Frustrate you. . At an extreme are probably not necessarily the things that are going to have that effect on me but I have my own things <hes> and so to that extent, , the the. . Solutions that were looking for while we can talk about vaccine as a solution to medical problem but the solution to our practical and spiritual issues that we're facing in our own minds really is a question of of coping with that as an individual and I think of it similarly when I think of coping with the issue of death. . All right. . Right. . That <hes>. . We we all will die <hes>. . It's a given but <hes>. . But how we die in how we face in cope with our own individual death is something that we can't share with anybody else right it's something that we have to work with. . As individual. . And I think net sense the situation we find ourselves in now. . Is is somewhat parallel to that. . Yeah that is that's really

Total Institute Tricycle Self utne Editor of The quarterly journa Greg editor Nikon sun magazine Health magazine Grayson Linda Vermont
Steps for Coping with Uncertainty with Gregg Krech

Everyday Buddhism: Making Everyday Better

04:40 min | 3 months ago

Steps for Coping with Uncertainty with Gregg Krech

"Drone on and on and with it the continuing uncertainty finding places of pieces becoming all important focus of life for many of us I. Think. In I shared with you in the previous episode that I've committed to a more consistent daily meditation practice as a way to take positive action rather than focus on all that is wrong in our country in the world. And the other thing I did was to reach out to my teacher and friend Greg Creech. One of the leading authorities on Japanese psychology to talk with me on this podcast episode about uncertainty and transitions. When we talked on the phone about what advice sir practice he could offer to podcast listeners as we whether this time of great uncertainty he said something that really struck me. He said it's not a mass issue. It's your personal situation and attachment, and then he went on to say that everyone is dealing with losses but ultimately, it's an individual thing. and. So with that brief lead in I want to welcome greg to this podcast once again. Hi, Greg thanks so much for joining me. Are Wendy thank you for having me. It's nice to talk to you again. Okay. So Great I would like us to focus much of the conversation today and I think I mentioned this when we talked on one of your recent articles coping in the garden of uncertainty. And also, if we have any time left, maybe you could talk about your recent series focused on the challenges post posed by this a pandemic, which was life not on hold right is that correct? That's correct. I though, if you could unpack what I just shared from our recent conversation which I hope I quoted you correctly even if you remember what you said it's not a massive issue at your personal situation, an attachment and then everyone is dealing with losses but ultimately, it's an individual thing. So can you talk more about those concepts Greg? First of I do think that it's an unusual situation because in terms of the pandemic that the whole world. Is suffering from this and obviously Some people are suffering in different ways or more or less but but we out all are exposed to the situation and. and. So I'm not trying to suggest that that there. Is Anything but a global. Threat to our lives into our health and but I think in terms of how we cope with it. It it really is very much an individual issue has to do with our own practice. It has do with what presses are buttons It has to do with what We. Miss that gives us a sense of impatience and agitation because we have such a strong desire to have X. and we can't have it right now because the conditions of of our lives in the world. So in that sense, our ability to work with the situation to cope with it. To find a way to accept what we can't change for example. Though those kinds of things that are coming up our individual issues and the kinds of things that will which your buttons or agitate you or. Frustrate you. At an extreme are probably not necessarily the things that are going to have that effect on me but I have my own things and so to that extent, the the. Solutions that were looking for while we can talk about vaccine as a solution to medical problem but the solution to our practical and spiritual issues that we're facing in our own minds really is a question of of coping with that as an individual and I think of it similarly when I think of coping with the issue of death. All right. Right. That We we all will die It's a given but But how we die in how we face in cope with our own individual death is something that we can't share with anybody else right it's something that we have to work with. As individual. And I think net sense the situation we find ourselves in now. Is is somewhat parallel to that. Yeah that is that's really

Greg Creech Wendy
"greg creech" Discussed on Everyday Buddhism: Making Everyday Better

Everyday Buddhism: Making Everyday Better

04:50 min | 4 months ago

"greg creech" Discussed on Everyday Buddhism: Making Everyday Better

"Listening to birds at sunrise, and enjoying the smells and sounds of the morning in the yard and garden. In doing that, I realized I was happy and grateful. Yet the pandemic still exists yet yet civil unrest -rageous You may have heard this quote by Tibidot Han. WHO said quote when the crowded Vietnamese refugee boats met with storms or pirates? If everyone panicked, all would be lost. But, if even one person on the boat remained calm and centered, it was enough. It showed the way for everyone to survive unquote. These are the questions to ask ourselves during these times. Questions to help us remain centered, and that picked up and carried off by fear anxiety. Anger. Rage ask yourself. What does it mean to you to be calm and centered? ASK YOURSELF IN TIMES OF TROUBLE? Can you embrace what you are feeling? Ask Yourself. How did you survive a fearful experience or one of complete? Before. I heard a Dharma talk by. A celebrity. This this summer earlier on quote being with uncertainty in these times. She read the poem. Blessing the boats by the Lake Port, Lucille Clifton Black woman. I'll read it here. Blessing the boats. At Saint Mary's. May the tide that is entering even now. The lip of our understanding. Carey you out. Beyond the face of fear. May you kiss the wind. Then turn from it. Certain. That it will love your back. May you open your eyes to water? Water waving forever. And may you in your innocence sale through this to that? I think the last line in this poem was what Greg Creech was getting at. This the line. May I sail through this to that? This is about finding away for each of us individually to sail through this to that. It's about finding a way to sail. Not Struggle This is the practice of staying with the discomfort and allowing it moment by moment. As? Life, life. From this to that. The blessing of permits, which is the movement from this to that? CAN Spark a growth of equanimity. By remembering the big picture, the bigger perspective. As. My teacher Reverend Clayoquot Bossy says. means we each need to do what we have to do to keep sailing and for each of us. That's a little different. Depending on the boat were in. and. This takes us back to Greg creech and his comment about despite the fact that we are all dealing with uncertainty with loss with anxiety with fear with confusion with depression and anger. These emotions are ultimately our own, and we each need to find a way to coexist with at all. So stay tuned for.

Greg Creech Reverend Clayoquot Bossy Tibidot Han Lucille Clifton Black Lake Port Saint Mary Carey depression
"greg creech" Discussed on Everyday Buddhism: Making Everyday Better

Everyday Buddhism: Making Everyday Better

04:49 min | 4 months ago

"greg creech" Discussed on Everyday Buddhism: Making Everyday Better

"You may have seen them facebook. Instagram meam or all the means that twitter mean about the pandemic? It's the one that says we are not all in the same boat, but we are in the same storm. I heard. People say that I heard people say. Well, at least we're all in the same boat. In fact, I think I have said it. But you know the pandemic quickly exposed the hard facts that, despite dealing with the same storm quote, unquote. We are all riding it out in very different boats. Summer and yet! Some fishing boat, and some are hanging on for dear life as they fly roughly down a series of rapids on an overturned canoe. We are not in the same boat. You know some are enjoying a pause in their frenetic lives. binge-watching net flicks some are still employed, and maybe even T- making more money than before, but others are working two jobs and trying to home school their kids. Some of already buried loved ones and others are still fighting for their lives. And some are fighting for their freedoms. Some are zooming happy hours with friends every day and others are watching their child through a pane of glass at the hospital or waving from a sidewalk to a loved one in a nursing home. Some are angry. Some are board. Some are lonely. Summer terrified. Some are trapped inside with someone who is abusive. The pandemic quickly exposed the deep inequities. People live with every day. INEQUITIES! Of Income. Education. And Opportunity? Inequalities that fall disproportionately on those of collar are black and Brown brothers and sisters. As a white person I do not pretend to know how the constant challenges caused by having another skin color can change the way you're able to live. Can, take opportunities away. Can threaten your ability to make a living threaten your health and your life. But all these things that are swirling about us right now in this. Swirling see of uncertainty. Are Questions really and I? Don't have answers. And as we teaching Buddhism, it is about sitting with the questions sitting with the uncertainty. Sitting with fear. Anger and even rage every day during these unbelievably awful times I realized I am becoming a different person. Each new experience I sit with is a learning moment for me to grow and change and be challenged to evolve. Is learned to meditate in the morning every day, breathing and feeling my body and mind alive in what is in my own present moment. Listening to birds at sunrise, and enjoying the smells and sounds of the morning in the yard and garden. In doing that, I realized I was happy and grateful. Yet the pandemic still exists yet yet civil unrest -rageous You may have heard this quote by Tibidot Han. WHO said quote when the crowded Vietnamese refugee boats met with storms or pirates? If everyone panicked, all would be lost. But, if even one person on the boat remained calm and centered, it was enough. It showed the way for everyone to survive unquote. These are the questions to ask ourselves during these times. Questions to help us remain centered, and that picked up and carried off by fear anxiety. Anger. Rage ask yourself. What does it mean to you to be calm and centered? ASK YOURSELF IN TIMES OF TROUBLE? Can you embrace what you are feeling? Ask Yourself. How did you survive a fearful experience or one of complete? Before.

Greg Creech Reverend Clayoquot Bossy Tibidot Han Lucille Clifton Black Lake Port Saint Mary Carey depression
"greg creech" Discussed on Everyday Buddhism: Making Everyday Better

Everyday Buddhism: Making Everyday Better

04:35 min | 4 months ago

"greg creech" Discussed on Everyday Buddhism: Making Everyday Better

"To episode forty five of Everyday Buddhism making every day better. I hope everyone is finding places of peace or at least stability in the continuing uncertainty of our lives. And as I've been sharing in many of my most recent episodes, I've been trying to find ways to deal with many of the troubling emotions that have arisen for me during these times. Just like I'm sure you've all been doing. And as I, shared with you in the last podcast episode I started writing poetry again to help process. Some of the trauma was previously holding onto. And that I was in that was slowly. Being revealed to me by pandemic politics. You know it helps in that it brought. Many repressed emotions to the surface for me to look at into find ways to hold them tenderly so that they wouldn't rise up and strike out at others. I'm not saying. I'm there yet because I'm certainly not. I'm still struggling with all that, but at least i. now know what's really hiding underneath. The TRAUMAS and hurts haven't been completely cleared and released, but now I recognize them for what they are. But also more recently committed to a more consistent daily meditation practice. I always meditated <hes> sometimes more all. How shall I say disciplined than others <hes> sometimes <hes> using different techniques, sometimes, saying Oh, I will always do it every morning. Always whatever evening <hes> but I really started a nice focused. Focused practices for the last <hes> about twenty one days. I think twenty twenty one days and you know what they say about twenty one days in the. Creating a habit so <hes>! I've actually <hes> deepened the commitment to this meditation practice because I realized I needed to do something other than focusing on the horrible outside and inside of myself. I needed to take action to positively change the direction of my personal boat, rather than sitting in fear and horror as I watched the storms continuously roar and threaten all of us and myself. And this leads me to the focus of this short. Episode, Which is also a promotion for the next episode, and it contains a request for you. The listeners to get involved Sakib listening. So I reached out to my teacher and friend Greg Creech one of the leading authorities on Japanese psychology <hes> about a week ago to ask him to be a guest again on the podcast I felt that if there was anyone who could help, be a beacon to guide us through all these storms these continuing. Storms it would be greg. We had a nice conversation about uncertainty and about transitions. And in that conversation he said something that was like a wack across the back of my head <hes>. From a stick, by then, Roshii he I asked him what advice or practice he could offer to podcast listeners, as we weathered these storms and looked into the future with great uncertainty. He said something like. Well it's not a mass issue. It's your personal situation and attachment. He went on to say that everyone is dealing with losses, but ultimately it's an individual thing. And that really struck me because I realized that. Up until the time I actually committed to that meditation, practice and May. Yeah the meditation practice. I had been more looking at what was out there. That was so bad or what was inside me. That was so bad without <hes>. Without, taking individual responsibility for

Greg Creech Reverend Clayoquot Bossy Tibidot Han Lucille Clifton Black Lake Port Saint Mary Carey depression
We're All in the Same Storm But Not in the Same Boat

Everyday Buddhism: Making Everyday Better

04:35 min | 4 months ago

We're All in the Same Storm But Not in the Same Boat

"To episode forty five of Everyday Buddhism making every day better. I hope everyone is finding places of peace or at least stability in the continuing uncertainty of our lives. And as I've been sharing in many of my most recent episodes, I've been trying to find ways to deal with many of the troubling emotions that have arisen for me during these times. Just like I'm sure you've all been doing. And as I, shared with you in the last podcast episode I started writing poetry again to help process. Some of the trauma was previously holding onto. And that I was in that was slowly. Being revealed to me by pandemic politics. You know it helps in that it brought. Many repressed emotions to the surface for me to look at into find ways to hold them tenderly so that they wouldn't rise up and strike out at others. I'm not saying. I'm there yet because I'm certainly not. I'm still struggling with all that, but at least i. now know what's really hiding underneath. The TRAUMAS and hurts haven't been completely cleared and released, but now I recognize them for what they are. But also more recently committed to a more consistent daily meditation practice. I always meditated sometimes more all. How shall I say disciplined than others sometimes using different techniques, sometimes, saying Oh, I will always do it every morning. Always whatever evening but I really started a nice focused. Focused practices for the last about twenty one days. I think twenty twenty one days and you know what they say about twenty one days in the. Creating a habit so I've actually deepened the commitment to this meditation practice because I realized I needed to do something other than focusing on the horrible outside and inside of myself. I needed to take action to positively change the direction of my personal boat, rather than sitting in fear and horror as I watched the storms continuously roar and threaten all of us and myself. And this leads me to the focus of this short. Episode, Which is also a promotion for the next episode, and it contains a request for you. The listeners to get involved Sakib listening. So I reached out to my teacher and friend Greg Creech one of the leading authorities on Japanese psychology about a week ago to ask him to be a guest again on the podcast I felt that if there was anyone who could help, be a beacon to guide us through all these storms these continuing. Storms it would be greg. We had a nice conversation about uncertainty and about transitions. And in that conversation he said something that was like a wack across the back of my head From a stick, by then, Roshii he I asked him what advice or practice he could offer to podcast listeners, as we weathered these storms and looked into the future with great uncertainty. He said something like. Well it's not a mass issue. It's your personal situation and attachment. He went on to say that everyone is dealing with losses, but ultimately it's an individual thing. And that really struck me because I realized that. Up until the time I actually committed to that meditation, practice and May. Yeah the meditation practice. I had been more looking at what was out there. That was so bad or what was inside me. That was so bad without Without, taking individual responsibility for

Greg Creech Traumas Sakib
"greg creech" Discussed on Everyday Buddhism: Making Everyday Better

Everyday Buddhism: Making Everyday Better

17:58 min | 1 year ago

"greg creech" Discussed on Everyday Buddhism: Making Everyday Better

"To the share the fourth in a series of episodes talking with the buddhist teachers that nat only educated me in the dharma but shaped my life for the better. One of my first teacher said everyone is your teacher because everyone is a buddha and that is true but but there are some teachers who come into your life and have a major influence on you. I'm thrilled to have another one of my teachers reverend sacha robin a priest in the immediate order joining me for this episode where we talk about how the whole of messy humanity is met by the divine when we relax our sense of control and know that life accepts us just as we are those are such as beautiful words. I know you'll delight in sach is gorgeous descriptive ways of communicating the heart heart and soul of spiritual practice buddhism pure land buddhism refuge and yes the f. word faith so here we are at episode twenty five of every day buddhism making every day better and the fourth in a series stories of episodes where i will talk with my teachers teachers that helped shape. My life is a buddhist practitioner and a better person. I think like greg creature couple the episodes ago. I may be your surprising to hear that i she. I consider her a teacher. <hes> never told her point blank but maybe hinted around a few times uh-huh <hes> so in this episode. I am talking with such a robin. Sacha is a shortened version of her full buddhist name name such vanni which means eloquent communicator of the truth. I just found that out today and researching you <hes> i i sliver chilly met sanchez a student of david brazier sense as books and teachings and as a student of the vowel twenty two who program through the immed- academy of zen therapy <hes> and as a friend of the immed- order. I don't even know about twenty two still exists but there you go hooks up plug <hes> i went on to explore her small stones writing programs and learned so much from her as has not just a buddhist teacher but a writer <hes> a writer who helps you stop and look at things around you and turn that into a buddhist practice and i found that her buddhist name eloquent communicator of the truth to be spot on actually were just talking about that in our little chat prior <hes> <hes> where she can be painfully honest in a writing and i think you will enjoy that uh sacha is for people who don't know who you are. Dr sacha is a buddhist priest to runs a pure land buddhist temple associated with the amita order in malvern in the u._k. And she runs it with her husband kosta. She's also a psychotherapist in private practice and a successful author of both fiction action and nonfiction. I don't know how she does it all but she and her husband cast but also used to run writing our way home offering mindful writing courses i. I don't think they do that anymore but it was one of the things that i so enjoyed <hes> but i have a sneaking suspicion if you ask a a sacha who she is. I suspect her answer would be that. She's an ordinary person. In fact she would probably answer that she she isn't an ordinary fullish person so in the introduction to her latest and just-released book plug unplug plug coming home refuge in pure land buddhism she puts it this way quote. I am an ever shifting mixture sure of light and dark deluded an enlightened and i know that i am acceptable. Just as i am and that you you are also a mix of awful and wonderful and you are also illuminated by the light of love so i think that from sake is a wonderful way to introduce both her and pure land would assume so welcome statue and thank such thank you for joining me and he say why judgements <unk> wonderful introduction. I can't say anything that's fat now. We're gonna we're gonna have a lot of time mm to fill them up. I'm going to ask a couple of questions and then you're up so are so how would you answer the question who who are you. I just did it for through the words of you. Are yours your own things over a buddhist priest writing a temple a psychotherapist an author people who don't know i know her as a facebook friend i know she also looks after a vegetable garden and cats and bunnies end soon soon to be a new puppy so i think she's in for so who are you. Sacha yeah start with a small question. They don't do anything easy so yes. It's an interesting question. Isn't that <hes>. I think that they're all scenes in the various things that i do <hes> so i once some poet in england cool selima hill i went on a cool ones and she said that's nipping as poet one of the by products of living as a poet is poems parents kind of salafi swath of you like and as a result o- being in relationship with the world in a particular way and and so i guess the one of the ways of looking at the different things that i do <hes> is that they're all kind of a byproduct of some <hes> central co on. I guess some some things that i brought to this world and that needs to be investigated. There's service would i'm. I think it's defined gotten. If you've heard the anger donald h yeh grazie talks about all the vying. It's like some millions of the world with <music> an everything that we do revolves around it somehow <hes> trying to work something else something three and i would have said said why the guy that might providing my my central cohen was something about us being able to tell the truth so in my books novels often foul people who are finding waves speaking. Something hasn't found a space to be heard <hes> as a therapist. I'm helping my clients to find our interest rates it or bring into it. Bring into the world's <hes> as a buddhist priest the same but i think the kobe gives you a different nonce now which is more about coming me into relationship with the divine i think wow <hes> and the the that's my job as a little may and also hopefully can help others to to do that never way <hes> wherever the divine is for them he might be the bushehr might be something entirely different wiping nature. That's that's something that the that remains important tanned. Yeah is a thread that runs through. You know that's interesting because i think that's what it for those of you who run out and get such as book. I think that's what you'll find. There is the it's sort of a it's a i. I love this kind of thing. As sort of a of a hack put myself is is the juxtaposition of like the real earthy goofy awful stuff and the divine and sacha has a wonderful way of kind an inner weaving although so much so that it's like <hes> you know there's sometimes there's no transition and i think that i think that puts the people who are very linear and you know and i mean it's like the bottom off. I'm not saying people are put off by writing. I'm saying it can be confusing to people who don't have that sense of okay. I'm just gonna you know it's like i had a friend. I introduced a book into a book to her. It was delight inside the dark. You know the book on tura yet yes one of my favorite books of all time and i introduced it to a friend who was leading workshops at a high corporate level in xerox and i told i told her that this might be a good it was the sort of the learning forum or something i forget what was called and i suggested that that might be a book that she she would never have thought of and that she could. She might try try it and she she read the book and she said oh my gosh this thing reads like a river so i think that's what i'm trying to say. They long winded that you write like a river and in and it's sorta like you know. It's not the same no matter where he is step in yet yet. It's still the river and and in unless you're willing to kind of go with it. You might get a little lost so nice. That's interesting and ye saying that makes me think of look. As i really admire i come the more you you vice yeah yeah and <hes> and richard war. I think it very well well. I remained shapiro. I really appreciate those office who are able to really bring the whole of them messy humanity to the title. Yes the messy humanity. That's the thing you do that so well. Ask the expense of yourself. Most of the vitamins wait a minute. You kind of kind of blind out what books this is now well then once you see it in writing. How does it feel for run so you know too. Many people like in the u._s. And even possibly other countries you know that sort of mix of buddhist priests and psychotherapists many they seem a bit conflicted sort of on this whole sort of realm of the messy humanity and <hes>. I think to a lot of people especially in the u._s. Where psychotherapy is little bit different than it is in the u._k. Because of the licensure and so forth and it's it's structured in such a clinical and clinical qualifications. I think the thought of a a psychotherapist and a buddhist priests might seem czar to people in our country and maybe offering so you know in episode twenty three the one before this one i talked with greg creech about buddhist psychology wiped the master of japanese psychology <hes> which was a wonderful time with him but can you talk to us a bit about being both a buddhist priest and you sort of touched on it but maybe up with more buddhist priests and psychotherapists and so for you what makes compatible it might be the divine and what is the driving influence for you serving in both of those roles great question so i came. I became a psychotherapist before i became a buddhist. I was an atheist when i when i became as like terrapin which sounds more <hes> for most people's head. I think they've the long way from that. Use your have <hes> originally. I think psychotherapy was just a way old. Follow <hes> helping people discover the truth. I guess and speak it helping people to comment relationship and i'm beginning to notice with me. What happens happens for them. Nation ship with others with the world and i did the buddhist psychotherapy training with with dhamma pitcher david brazier and that influence that was that was hugely helpful in terms of personal transformation <hes> the probably the biggest thing in by inc also that training was ski show sankara's <hes> model of the therapist krist that decline basically being someone who's low on faith and the therapist someone who has more faith. I'm still the therapist and boris percents sits with them and so some of the and find their own again and leaves at least he's that's the kind of the endpoint so says that mobile really resonated with me that that way of thinking about will appease <hes> and i think that still is probably the easiest way of speaking about the link between my book in my religious role in my work in in a road of of <hes> secular healing. I guess uh-huh is i am grounded in my faith and that allows me to be present with clients. You have lost have lost that sense of feeling held by something i space. It's possible for today's positive than to to emerge in a way that safe. That's so <hes> that's so so pure land and for we'll see we're going to go into this more but for those because i'm sure if not half more than half of the people who listen to me could never have heard of pure land buddhism latte or yeah or if they did. They may have a really strange range impression of it is so strange to be honest. I think those of russell follow it. Maybe are a bit strange. Maybe that's we can only speak for myself. I don't know the but i i i always i have the sense of my listeners but my audience grow so i don't wanna know who my listeners our but i have the sense of my listeners from the beginning inning as being way more secular because that was the sort of the hook based on the name of the podcast so i i always always try to explain things. You know probably deeper than my guess would like to go. I'm reading with you because i think that's something that's. I'm glad you said that because it's really important to me that if we use language that come over trigger for people like the f. word favor to get into cadets. I'm i've got targeted by help and it's not the f. word that people think we're talking. It's helpful to do a little bit of translation around around that so so as not to exclude people who don't feel that we're speaking about their experience is my experience of life is it's. It's the two levels the broader a tour. It's about it's a steadiness. It's a sense of things being cave. No i don't know what's going to happen. Could you know those those kinds of things that to me. That's his that's. His faith needs so yeah. That's you know so. Let's get get to a this is a great opening. We'll go into later. I think will in a little more depth of you know to plum here unless talk about up pure land buddhism sent your book is titled coming home refuge in pearland buddhism and sort of a primer or intro to pure land buddhism. You had another book about that too but we'll talk about that later. <hes> so in the west like i said i hinted at i believe it may be both the most invisible and the most misunderstood if it is. I'm the buddhist paths zen and tibetan buddhism here in the west are very well known but the practices involving <hes> mita me taba you know the boot of infinite lied however you wanna term it have been you know although prevalent in east asia and maybe widespread even in <hes> <hes> southeast asia and some in tibet because they also practice <hes> the visualization sutra.

sacha robin Dr sacha david brazier greg creech writer facebook pearland sanchez malvern kosta private practice east asia xerox southeast asia cohen tura shapiro richard war tibet
"greg creech" Discussed on The Art of Manliness

The Art of Manliness

04:29 min | 2 years ago

"greg creech" Discussed on The Art of Manliness

"Conflicts, how to act when you don't feel like it had to stay motivated when the initial rush of a new project, religion was worn off and whites better to have a purpose driven life rather than fee. Driven life Weiner conversation unpacking the idea that business is not the same as purposeful action in why we need self reflection to tell the difference between the two after the show's over. Check out the show notes at dot IS, slash art of taking action. Greg, Creech welcome to the show. Thank you bread. It's a pleasure to be here. So you run is to call the Todo stood up there in Vermont where you are basically introducing in Japanese psychology, which I had no idea existed until I read your book Japanese psychology to Americans. So start off talking about one facet of Japanese psychology moreda therapy, correct tests crap. Not right. So what is Maureen therapy and how does it differ from some what we're typically are, you know what we know about psychology in the west woke me to therapy was developed in Japan roughly about a hundred years ago, and most western psychology is really kind of rooted in European culture and philosophy. Going back to the days of Freud, where in in Morita therapy, you really see a form a model of mental health. That's. Drawing on eastern philosophy on Buddhist psychology on zen. And so it's really a very different paradigm than you find in most western psychology Revie like in the west, it's all about you lay down the metaphorical Mr. difficult couch, talk about the source of your problems by so doing talk therapy, or there's cognitive behavioral therapy, you figure out wrong thinking and then you fix that. Does Mauri did theory duty thing like that or do they go different route? Well, I would say for the most part, they do go different route. I think that one of things that characterizes a lot of western therapy Anders so many different models, but is a focused primarily on feelings. So I think the outcome that a lot of therapy is looking at is the idea of making people feel better or few more comfortable or somehow be cured by getting rid of unpleasant feelings like depression, anxiety, and the way I'm describing it actually sounds very attractive. Except that I would argue that it's not a ineffective and even meaningful outcome. And so it retu- therapy really does is it looks as the outcome is to really help us live our lives. Well, not by changing feeling states, but by learning to coexist with those feelings states, while we do the things that are really important for us to do our lives. And so instead of trying to kind of fix our internal world, whether that's through, you know, talk therapy your dream analysis or getting into our unconscious minds. It's really very practical approach, and we think of the east as being mystical, but it's really very practical approach of learning to cope with the ups and downs of our feeling states and the craziness of our thoughts, chaos in our mind and still be able to not just live functional lives, but actually do the things that are really important for us to do our lives. So Maria, they're, they're gonna, say, don't wait until you stop feeling depressed until you take action or do whatever you gotta do. You know, you have to. That you're gonna feel the press, but you can still take action on the things you you need to do in life? Yeah. I think with depression as with, I think a lot of unpleasant feeling states. There's a general sense that there's a sequence to kind of carrying ourselves in the sequences I to move from having an unpleasant feeling state to pleasant feeling states, essentially get rid of those feelings then we can actually live our lives well, and what you see in Morita therapy is the idea that we can actually coexist with those unpleasant feeling states even depression while we do things that are important for us to do in our lives and nice benefit to that, is that often by making that shift to actually taking action beginning to do those things, that's part of our cure that the the movement from being inactive, non purposeful to actually doing things that are very purposeful important to us actually is part of what makes it possible for us to learn to cope with those difficult and challenging internal states. Whereas you wrote a book summarizing Rita therapy and other facets, Japanese psychology called the art of taking action..

depression Morita Creech dot Weiner Vermont Japan Mauri Freud Anders Rita Maureen Greg Maria hundred years