20 Burst results for "Greg Berlanti"

Batwoman 101: A Quick Guide To The CW's Newest Hero

Rob Has a Podcast

00:56 sec | 1 year ago

Batwoman 101: A Quick Guide To The CW's Newest Hero

"He w brace yourself superhero fans because the bat signal is on and you won't believe WHO's swooping in to heed the call from the brilliant mind Greg Berlanti and the executive producers of Superhero Smash Hits Arrow the Flash SUPERGIRL AND LEGENDS TOMORROW COMES THE MOST anticipated new series to join the C W verse it bat woman get ready to meet your new hero Kate Kane she's a survivor a fighter and all around bad ass who plays by her own rules and she's got the ink to prove it woman's story begins three years after the mysterious disappearance of Batman when Gotham city is in desperate need of a new kind of hero soon after returning home to defend her city from the notoriously twisted alice in wonderland gang she discovers her cousin Bruce Wayne's mysterious layer and his unbelievable secret with the help of that man's trusted tech Genius Luke she decides carry on Batmans mission by becoming

Greg Berlanti Kate Kane Bruce Wayne Executive Gotham Wonderland Batmans Three Years
"greg berlanti" Discussed on The Director's Cut

The Director's Cut

03:14 min | 2 years ago

"greg berlanti" Discussed on The Director's Cut

"So there's a lot. I mean, that's a big. I mean, forty days is a good schedule for this movie. But it was still a lot of things to do. So as much as I prepared, you know, like as much as as you ready to go and have things prepared as much as possible is always these one simple seeings surprise you. Like, I got this figured out. We worry about this. We'll just keep moving. And it's always this one little scene in it is one of those things with with film. No matter what no matter what how much you prepared is always the smaller thing. So I think it was mostly the schedule in some of the scenes within the schedule that probably surprised me most of. All right. I think we have time for one more question yester. Yeah. I feel like is is a really good place right now, I feel like you know, like one of the films. I love love Cooley high seventies right now at that time Michael shelters actually from my hometown directed that movie. Gordon parks in the seventies. There was a lot of there was specific filmmakers, but then there was a lot of after non African Americans direct in a lot of films of with African American starring in some of that was the case in the nineties as well. And there's always these pockets where you see these films, and then those films go away, but now is a little different. Now, think reason why I think television has a lot to do with personally in terms of there's more African American women more women, directing there's more African American men, directing there's more African American Latino and white non white show runners. So now, the vision is not actually white individuals controlling those visions, they are actually visionaries who are women. In African American so within that you have these authentic voices and different voices. And I think the audience really need that in some many of these shows are very successful Mideast films are so which will continue to make other projects and contained to make other films. So I think that's the difference between the seventies in some of the films have made in the nineties. So that's the difference in. I'm just glad to have this film at at the same time. Right. Well, thank you more time. Thank you made a beautiful beautiful movie. And and I think he made a movie that does so much for all of us as people and as directors it really challenged all of us. So it's a wonderful film. Thank you very much. Thanks for listening to another TGI QNA if you'd like to hear more you can find past episodes of directors cut wherever you listen to podcasts. We'll have a lot more for you in the coming weeks as a word season approaches, including QNA's from Joel Edgerton, Matthew Heineman and I'll follow borrowing. So be sure to subscribe. So you don't miss naps during join the podcast, please take a moment to rate and review us, and I tunes. We'd love to hear your feedback and you can help fellow Cinna files. Find this show. Thanks again for listening, and we'll see you next time. This podcast is produced by directors guild, America music is by Dan, Wally.

QNA directors guild Gordon parks Cooley Joel Edgerton Michael America Matthew Heineman Dan Wally forty days
"greg berlanti" Discussed on The Director's Cut

The Director's Cut

04:10 min | 2 years ago

"greg berlanti" Discussed on The Director's Cut

"That was like from a logistic standpoint that was tough. I mean, it was right before my director's cut two days before my director's cut. I was filling and I was feeling really really good about the cut. And actually, my wife actually told me something with his actor said on YouTube. It was actually on my birthday. And I was like he was just he was just playing around whatever it is. Right. And then I saw what he said which was counter of what the movie was. And actually the line in the limo is when Chris says. I don't see color. I see people for who. They are. If you don't see color. You don't see me that line is hit me. It came at me when I heard and saw what he said on YouTube is like no way, this can weaken have him in the movie and actually having conversation with FOX who right away was like we want to protect the movie, this guy gotta go. How do you in a mandala Phil we felt the same way? So that means going back down seven more days to shoot. And I felt like the movie was really working his scenes were great. He was it was always I felt like it was working. So to go back down to do in reshoot things that you felt wasn't your fault was tough. So mandala just to get her back into that frame mine and emotionally was a tough time. But we got there. Thanks to k- J APPA who we Ridgely wanted to come in and audition the first time around, but he was on actually your show, actually riverdell. Is it really good person? And it's it was nice to see this opportunity. But I have to say it's such a testament to you as a director that you do not feel. There's no seams in anything you did there. And it is seamless. It's really, and the fact that you did it in seven days is like a one Bank. You barely is early as an end. And a great example, I think to the community and terms of how to both prioritize being a good person and the art and to to do it integrate way. So so good for you. Thank you. And so and so as you wrapping up production and the first time and the second time you've worked with two editors on the movie, and what was that experience like your post production experience that that was amazing because Alex black and Craig Hayes, they are two guys who never even knew each other FOX Aaron Downey who's my post production guy on the movie, I said, you know, what I want to try something different. I personally never had to. Hitters always feel like always took advantage of a second third assistant editor why not have to in reason for that is because one I know that I like to shoot a lot of film, and I like to do a lot of coverage for performance sake. I don't like to do different coverage all over the set because always try to have a specific point of view in a scene. So you have a specific point of view. You know, exactly what you wanna shoot. But I like sometimes they keep the camera rolling sometimes for performance, I know as working with a young actress, sometimes I do a four five or seven takes within one or sometimes change reflection or change your word or I will just shot out a subtext to or the change the reflection within the dialogue or the performance. So because of that I knew that having one editor with soman of mount of film and with so many takes within one or two takes. It may be better for me to have to editors and one of the things. I learnt as well, actually, I see him out there. Derek and Steve right there. Those two guys that I've met I work with those guys on the Tories and one of the things that these guys taught me is is go through the film, the pass is much as possible said of just spinning one scene on three days on one scene. Just go through the whole movie as many times as you can. And with two guys I was able to go through the film about thirty times before FOX all the movie, and I was able to fill the pacing feel where things were and I think lowering two guys for the first time all the way through it made it very of it just made it very helpful for me terms of getting through the film..

FOX director YouTube Phil Chris editor Derek k- J APPA Aaron Downey Alex black Ridgely soman Steve Craig Hayes seven days three days two days
"greg berlanti" Discussed on The Director's Cut

The Director's Cut

04:10 min | 2 years ago

"greg berlanti" Discussed on The Director's Cut

"She was in that moment, but it was a very motion Reifer for her all the way through in for everybody. But you know, we we were family and it really worked out and mave. Yeah. Russell hornsby. Yeah. And really another beautiful performing. Yeah. He's great. I actually met. I I know his work for I've been known his work for like eighteen years, and I've been seeing him around. He's one of those actors that you just know who's great. And I actually actually physically met him was at actually at the four season. They got a buffet over there. Right. Is expensive buffet too? But he was there with his family. And I was there my family, and I came up to him. I said, you're amazing. I wanna work with you one day. And he knew my work. We'll work together one day. So when this project came up, I just felt like he was the guy. I saw him prior to that we he was in fences with Denzel he was also on Broadway doing fences. So he came in a lot of that audition was him was just introducing him to the studio. Introducing him to the producers even though I knew he was he's not one of those guys that you'll just think right off the bat. But I knew that he was amazing one of the greatest actors working actors working today. So I actually came in about three times. Everytime. Something better first time, we met we just talked about it in in the restaurant. He did August Wilson monologue for me. And I kept telling him I wanna math to have this edge. That's very present today. But also be a father. We talked about breaking down stereotypes. Like in the first scene. We talked about like when you notice in most films from two thousand to nineteen Eighty-four half. Those films is not a father present in a lot of those stories and some of those stories are not actually made by African Americans. Always when I grew up in Milwaukee and committee, there was always a father around. There was always working. They're always doing things. So one of the things we talked about his breaking down stereotypes most of the time. You see guys were braids tattoos right off the bat. You think he's a bad guy? And we totally talked about reverse all these things and presenting re-presented, these these cliches that we see for so long. So that's the first thing he came in was dog Wilson the second time he came with the Braves third time I hadn't with Emanuela. He just kept coming back and kept getting stronger. But that's really what a great actor Ness. What he was was a rock for for that family. And for the set, you know, and what I think is so true cross all the performances both in the depth of the character construction and in the performances themselves. Everyone comes in and does their part perfectly. Well, and they all fill like fully rounded people whether it's ISA raise character. Whether it's comments character. Whether it's Anthony Mackie's character. They all they all come right in. And and I think just to present all of those performances together. It must have been any bit of a challenge. Yeah. No. It wasn't a challenge. At all. The great thing was we had those rehearsals. And those two weeks was spending time with the family, and they'll them hanging out with each other with Sakani was seven and going out to dinner doing scenes doing improv just hanging out star with you know, with specific what Haley and her friends or with Khalil when you down there for two and a half weeks in Atlanta. And there's you just spending time with each other and everybody loved the material, especially after the table read. I like to have a couple table as I think we have one here for this particular movie, but you just starting everybody bringing something to the table making the material better you have the book as. Your back story that really helped things where we really felt like we were really there. And it just made things really work is helps when you have a great scrip with Audrey wells. And in Tina may be the thinks that she brought to the materials. Well, it just helped when you got a great script a great book and working with your DP sort of chart, the really the loss of innocence of the character throughout in movie gets more and more serious as it moves along and one of the beautiful things that I think it does is it turn turn some of the tropes of the a story on their ears twenty minutes in and becomes this..

Denzel Russell hornsby August Wilson Reifer Audrey wells Anthony Mackie Braves Tina Atlanta Milwaukee Sakani Khalil Haley Emanuela one day eighteen years twenty minutes two weeks
"greg berlanti" Discussed on The Director's Cut

The Director's Cut

04:01 min | 2 years ago

"greg berlanti" Discussed on The Director's Cut

"And having the cop in the community that was all fill like that was all stink of for the first time. This was a movie that was various state of for me. A lot of that stuff, really flow and flow for the actors, the biggest thing was just capturing being authentic in terms of the police brutality. Terms of the the riots in terms of the spirit of the book because so many people the the book is still number one eighty three weeks, you know, she's just and not just on the top ten number one number one. So a lot of people love the book. So sometimes you just want to capture the spirit in the injured. Gee of the book, and I think it helped heaven the writer nearby and all the actors in I disagree just to be honest beyond dental. Don't try to hard don't over-dramatize let it come from here. And that was one of the first times I felt like I did that. And how about this incredible cast a man, listen, I'm very is a man. Man. She was Russell Hornsby. Yes. She was great. Amanda was early on. She was reading the book. I was just blown away that she was she was seventeen when I met her she's nineteen. Now, she was seventeen and she was reading it on our own just to look for material for self ladder actors that age doing that I was blown away. She came in. I recognize her from the hunger game. I wasn't too familiar with her work. But when we sat down, and she was telling me from Inglewood go into a white private school going to these two worlds. What really hit me what she was saying in her white private school. She wouldn't tell her her her other students or other classmates when they go to their her house. Don't go down Crenshaw. She was worried about what they thought about Crenshaw avenue. You know, what I mean in all those two worlds of her two neighborhoods. So I'm listening to that. I'm listening to her language and house. He talks know because I'm in my forty sees nineteen. This is really the area the book, I really wanna capture the spirit for young people as well. Even though I never looked at it as a Wii movie. I felt like kids are very smart. They very intelligent. And I feel like I could just play it like I would just make a movie for everyone. So she came in. And I was just blown away by her. She had a tough job because she's in every scene in terms of her rehearsals. And and it's like she's giving two or three different kinds of performances too because she moving between those different world. Yeah. She's moving between these two different worlds. So she breaking down what those two worlds are in Inglewood and in inside of garden heights her behavior. Her patterns, her language would change very slightly. And also the rehearsals just to get her in the moment of being in. Not acting is being in the moment. So hurry hersal with double header for like two weeks, two and a half. Maybe and basketball all those things I just felt like it was my duty just to guide and and also allow her room to bring external things to. The materials. Well, and I'm sure you're not shooting consecutively. So then also when you're doing it, you're shooting at a pitch perfect emotional performance out of order. And so you're reminding her on the day, she's probably doing four different scenes from four different moments in the film. Yeah. Yes, she we're all over the place. One of the things I try to do the hardest thing was really shooting the the killing the shooting of Khalil because that was over two days, and it was really day second week almost in the schedule. We were very struck and in the moment and pre production because the Philander Castillo happened in Minnesota. So taking all that information. A lot of this from YouTube. You see all this? This is live is is in the moment is not dramatizes. Just you can't believe what you really seeing so in Florence in emotional level, but also on a on a visual level, but trying to maintain that are remember we had no breaks for lunch..

Russell Hornsby Crenshaw Amanda Inglewood YouTube Philander Castillo writer Khalil basketball Florence Minnesota one eighty three weeks two weeks two days
"greg berlanti" Discussed on The Director's Cut

The Director's Cut

04:02 min | 2 years ago

"greg berlanti" Discussed on The Director's Cut

"Scraped? Great to have everyone here. Great to be here. I'm so honored to be here. I I really was just I told you all this backstage. But I was so utterly blown away by the movie at at does so many things so well, it's such a beautiful film. It's such an important film. And I don't think just an important way foam. I I really think one of the most important movies of this year or many many years recently. Thank you. Thank you. Thank you. So let's talk about how you came to make this film. Yeah. The the book came to me around. Jay, worry, two thousand sixteen one of my VP of development semi the book. I was actually working in New York. I was actually working on a show for marvel Luke cage. It was like a winner coal, and I was working daytime. And and the book came in. I was trying to read it at night. It's really sometimes it's hard when you work in on his show. How do you go to read? So I was able to read the first chapter I was sort of blown away about the ideal of identification. This young girl straddling two worlds, and I was able to identify that. And I feel like within the African American culture, and sometimes another coaches as well, sometimes you you code switching between two worlds, and I felt like I've never seen that in a film before. And as I kept going. I was really struck by the language how Angie Thomas wrote this book, and I just felt like just fell fresh it just felt very new and and also is very relevant at the time. So. I just felt like this is something that I was connecting to me inside. So I just got on the phone with her very early on and very easily themes kinda came to me, the ideal the structure, and which characters and I just kinda did a pitch and meet her just bonded right away. So that's how it all kind of came together. And the script was written by the late incredibly talented, Audrey wells. I where you where you all. Yes. Let's give remedy. Were you all were you involved in the development right from the very beginning? Since you've read the book prior. Yeah. I was the first I had a pitch with Elizabeth Gabler Aaron similar often just talked about how I saw the movie Audrey was reading the book at the same time as a mandala. So it wasn't published yet. So is this book, which is sort of floating around. So I got an a phone with with Audrey. And I remember our first conversation. She was concerned about she's like, you know, for me is move. This book is written by African American and is so much your experience me as a white woman. Do you feel I should walk away from this? And I told her I said, I really believe as it African American director, and as it African American author that really I wanted a professional who can adapt the book, structurally, inciting incident three extra pressure in really deliver. Everything I said in terms of dialogue in you. Got the book. You have me we have actors we can work on that. So when I got the first draft is one of the first times where I felt like I was just excited. You know what I mean? Because usually you get a draft. He goes other way, and you find you find yourself like die. Gotta pick all the pieces up. I'm not ready to give this to the studio, but I was excited right away. I remember calling air civil off. I like I feel like we have a movie, and that's her you know, that was Audrey. She was a professional, and I love working with her and thought she did amazing job and she cared about the project lot. And what was the most heading love having loved the book as much as you did and been as passionate about as you were what was the most daunting challenge to you in terms of? Realizing as filmmaker. I think the biggest thing really was just just getting it, right? In terms of fell like for me. I had the talk very early on with my father. My father had a talk with me, and I had various uncles and cousins coming out of prison than from walkie, Wisconsin. So I feel like that was inside me the ideal of being black in America..

Audrey wells Elizabeth Gabler Aaron Angie Thomas New York Wisconsin Luke cage VP of development Jay America director
"greg berlanti" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

WIBC 93.1FM

02:08 min | 2 years ago

"greg berlanti" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

"Now, you don't have to shop that business your let's talk about that business. Tell your friends not go to that business. But should the business really be forced is this the society that you want now that question can be asked just like it was without anger without a you're stupid. Tell you don't know what you're talking about shut up and sing. No. She wants to engage. Let's let's go and engage. Let's go and engage. Let's talk about the reauthorization of the violence gives women act. And let's talk about what it does. And what it doesn't do? Let's talk about where it creates issues. Let's talk about the the effects of their legislation in totality. Just because it has a name that you think is valuable doesn't mean that the legislation itself is malleable, so let's get into that. But no one's going to get anywhere. If I if you're on the political, right? Tellers left. I. Toss it to the side as if it doesn't matter. She has more likes on one Instagram post, then you will ever get in the totality of your social media feeds ever. That's power. Maybe you shouldn't discount it so quickly. I'm Tony cats. It's one of the most important midterm elections in recent memory with so much stay and come November elections do have consequences, and whether it's a Redway vote Republican or blue way, the Democrats have a shot and taking the house back. We're hanging Ted and writing it all the way to November this midterm election is going to be a base. Electricity focused on the things that are important catch the electoral way. On ninety three Blue Wave football is my train for Spencer. James I want you complaint from Beverly Hills. Yes, sir. The whole game is about to change now belonging, this is your way out from executive producer. Greg Berlanti comes the new show inspired by the incredible true story. I'm asking you play for something bigger now. Because when you do you be unstoppable..

Greg Berlanti executive producer Beverly Hills Ted Tony Spencer James
"greg berlanti" Discussed on All of the Above with Norman Lear

All of the Above with Norman Lear

04:38 min | 2 years ago

"greg berlanti" Discussed on All of the Above with Norman Lear

"You know i think this our culture in our world is a really good job i mean he was already kind of growing up as a as a as a closeted gay athlete in so i think he was kind of oh you know once once that started to change in his life and he could be who he was i think he discovered a lot of things but i self that he's you know but you know so so closeted gay athlete there's a story right their own amazing he's he's had he's had a remarkable journey yeah you know had been a pro soccer player come out before did he come out while he was still play he was he came out and he was playing in the not the premier league but one of the team he's playing for leeds in yeah and he came out there and he when at the time he retired when he came out 'cause he thought he couldn't do both came back here to los angeles and which is when we met and the galaxy said why don't you want to practice with us and he started going to practices and then they said well why don't you put on a jersey one know got him back into it and so he and then he ended up playing for four years out here and i went to i mean i was you know he's joke that yes he was he was one of the first few out players in professional league but i used to say well i was one of the first professional spouses my case because i would go to all the games and i would sit with all the wives of all the players and you know and so i got a whole different viewpoint on the on the whole thing but i i learned a lot about soccer is i fell in love with them they'll bet do you still follow soccer or did you kind of like he does he's still he likes basketball more inside him between him and my father there's always a game of some kind on the house and my son is the same way so it's like all three of them in its four there's four guys in the house of us and and they're always all watching something or planes and he's always playing something i have zero totally skipped a generation right it went from me get me went to my kid yeah and and and you know another podcast neil gaiman said on his podcast them off i think oh yeah and he and he saw a lot of years ago my partner at the time he passed only a year ago now jerry perenco when the great men of the western world he had an idea with jimmy neither lander the original jimi needed to that indoor soccer which was going to be a big thing and he came to me and said he'd like to would i like to join him in putting a with needle ladder and we bought a indoor soccer team in detroit and indoor can never came thank you may have just been early but i love the the way things turned in our world jimmy needed lender junior has reached out to me to do a broadway show wow i mentioned in the name needed landau everybody you know the name they knew the need your family owns more theaters in new york than anybody ever owns and by that i mean four five six i don't know how many but say in in the city and in the theater it's a it was really just them jackson's right and schubert yes it's it's it's a name like the shootouts everybody knows issue but the fact that that concludes that way that he so i'm gonna come to you which one have you ideas you want to take the broadway okay excellent and then come in to play it perfect this is gonna work out great so ladies and gentlemen we have been talking about all of the above we've scratched the surface on some of it with gregg berlinde our guest paul hip sitting beside me and thank you greg always a joy to see norman but it's a special special to extra special tonight thank you so much that has been some of all of the above this lifeless dan sorry i'm norman lear and you can find the issue wish to anita down you can find me on facebook instagram and twitter at the norman lear and you can find me on facebook instagram and twitter at all.

four years
"greg berlanti" Discussed on All of the Above with Norman Lear

All of the Above with Norman Lear

03:44 min | 2 years ago

"greg berlanti" Discussed on All of the Above with Norman Lear

"And everybody can check that out then the people that we work with at archie comics roberto mukasa and john go water and you know produced with us sabrina which is you know in the world of archie universe that's going know and and then we've got she'll call god friend in me that two young gentlemen who created brought us that's coming on cbs this friend did to me and it's a you'll like you'll like the show very much yeah it's it's a gentleman starts getting facebook requests from god and and he he finally says yes and god start suggesting friends to him and and these people sort of all have a meaning and purpose in his life and he follows that that path and it's anyway it's it's it's that's that's really exciting too so he believes god is into that's the question the question of the thing is is in fact god that's sending messages through social media and and so it it it feels like in the vein of think of a lot of you know we did a show years ago that didn't make it past two years but was we liked very we enjoyed making very much called eli stone which was you talked about at the time which was an it's in that similar vein it's got a great sense of humor and it's it's anyway so a norman lear call you on the phone out of the blue right exactly yes into facebook i did keep all the emails he would send i still didn't believe until i actually sat down with him for lunch i didn't i did not believe that it was it was it was realised anyway so so yeah we've got a bunch of that stuff coming in the fall and and we're excited about all of it so this this bid fair that'd be number fifteen sixteen at center no we've got those are the four within the body of the fourteen who've worked yeah how's it working with your spouse i have to say i mean it's a joy it's been a joy everyone everybody always likes him more than and everybody might want everybody always likes when he's around me because i'm sure it alters my mood in some way and so but it's he's and it's been he was professional athletes pro soccer soccer player and so he made the switch really in the last year and he's been but he's been optioning other things in pursuing them watching you know i've got so many great friends that are in the business also and he's just been talking each of them in watching and learning over the last couple of years and really fearlessly made the leap from one career to an and and i think people who come out of athletics i find this is true of people come out of the armed services to like they're so task oriented and they're so they actually like work they worked so hard then they really have goals and they're really sort of you know he's just very he's been really detailed about how he wanted to pursue this and he's really passionate about most the stories that he's been interested in are in the world of sports i know nothing about sports but like you i feel like i know people and and and so at least i can bring knowledge of the business and storytelling into worlds that i don't know as much about and partnering with all these people who are either younger than me or have a different life than i've had you know and they often bring a whole new perspective and an and it does keep you younger i think in more excited and intrigued so he's it's it's been great yeah that's this he had no idea before he knew that he wished to that he had the ability to do what he's doing now i think i think i think he's always had an interest in the arts but i think.

archie roberto mukasa sabrina two years
"greg berlanti" Discussed on All of the Above with Norman Lear

All of the Above with Norman Lear

02:06 min | 2 years ago

"greg berlanti" Discussed on All of the Above with Norman Lear

"Then there's the production side of it which i also didn't know then there's the you know boss side of like being ahead of a crew and budgets and right i didn't know about any of that stuff and you know that all fell under your it it did i mean everybody tried to help me i think everyone really knew at the time that i didn't totally know what i was doing there were a lot of individuals around me both at the network and that the studio on our production crew that wanted to help me succeed and taught me so i was always learning i've always been learning on the job with this job while never stops that will never stop i find myself doing that involved in the latino data show so this so much patina that i know nothing about and it's just it's a kick to be in school learning this way those families handle these problems i don't feel nobody can say to me we wouldn't do that if i think because as a human i mean being the fact that i know what father reacts in sundry accented the patina is what changes but the humanity of any situation i figure i understand it in any language and so i've had those with rate in race with with black actors i'll accept that they can teach me an awful lot about the culture but not about a father and the son and the daughter in the father and us etcetera etcetera yeah because we're all just another version of each other yeah we are just version sary's outer did you have some of that on one of the shows they see that in the documentary where you talked about that on yeah in the documentary we talked about we talked about doc documents around you this i went to your premier or no you're you what's that anyone done a documentary on yes oh gosh no.

"greg berlanti" Discussed on All of the Above with Norman Lear

All of the Above with Norman Lear

01:45 min | 2 years ago

"greg berlanti" Discussed on All of the Above with Norman Lear

"The tail end of full phone cord in the sherman oaks galleria and i worked at a insurance company and and i i would save up those and those jobs in the night quit and then and then i write for a month then i'd i'd get another job and then right for a month i sorta did that way for about two or three years and then i had finally had a script that all my friends read that got passed around and got me my first job in television what was what was that that became a film that i directed in two thousand called broken hearts club and it was it was an independent film premiered at sundance it premiered at sundance and at that time so is it feature film it was the first thing feature film that i was the first thing i wrote that got me any jobs or got me work the first thing that aired or that anybody saw was actually dawson's because it got me a job on dawson's creek that film got you the devil dawson and then i went into the writer's room the first day and all the writers were talking about story and they were you know getting ready to shoot something in a month later we were shooting something and then we were editing and we're casting all at the same time and i realized how much like theater it was where i came from and it was dialogue driven and writer driven and the writers were making the decisions and they weren't being kicked out of the room when production decisions were getting made and and you know they were there for scoring and you were there for castain and it was a really immediate and and it was sort of like a blend of of theater but also blend of of novels in the sense of like you could do something that was really attenuated long stretch out a story moving in different directions and then i looked backwards on my life and realized just how many hours i spent in front of the tv set and that the whole time i was kind of learning you know i would i would you know i grew up with your shows we didn't have a vhs yet they weren't invented.

sundance dawson writer sherman oaks galleria three years
"greg berlanti" Discussed on All of the Above with Norman Lear

All of the Above with Norman Lear

03:44 min | 2 years ago

"greg berlanti" Discussed on All of the Above with Norman Lear

"And and you could still feel head of the curve like people will watch it and come in and go that episode how did you know it would be so timely the audience would be talking about this talking about that and you'll say because you know we just we were just experiencing it and and i think that's one of the great things about television is how it really gets to be a part of the conversation yeah you you know know but some of what you're doing with and that's like an amazon where it everything you shoot is on for months later right yep we're done day it's all there right it's true yes very hard to be quite topical although i think you guys do meshal job of it on day at a time i think it's well because their problems that are eternal persistent in yeah do you have shows that netflix you shoot them all at one show right now that we're doing that's straight to next lakes we have one show that we did that i'm really excited about the audience for the audience to see it we did with lifetime this year is based on a book called you it's a it's a one of the darker things we've done it's a love story from the point of view of a stocker and and it's it's it's it's sort of five hundred days of summer meets dexter and it's it's it's i you know i think the audience is hopefully going to be as delighted and intrigued by it as we were you know by the book and that's coming on but that's been sitting in the as an example of what you said in this day and age that's done we finished that months ago and it's not gonna air for a couple of months right and so that wasn't example of one that we knew to your point you know that we you know and there were subject matter and things that we made jokes and comments about and things that have come in past or song you know he's coming pass and you feel like oh it's gonna feel old we've got to replace that so you're trying to be mindful of the shows that way i think greg where where were you born i was born in new york in suffering york but i grew up in westchester county mostly in in rye new york right so you when you when you i i don't know whether you thought about being an actor or director or i did i was always a storyteller i did puppet shows for birthday parties and i wanted to be before i realized i could i could participate in in television and be someone like you i wanted to be jim henson was my idol when i was really young kid and i would do build puppets and do take them all around probably a little too old into high school probably and and that led to writing plays and play writing and and in college i wrote theater mostly in studied and studied theater and then had a company that wanted to do a production of a play that i adapted that never actually got made based on a book and net brought me to los angeles and and the theater company ended up not doing the show and i was sort of stuck in l a and i started reading tv scripts and reading movie scripts and writing you know pilots and writing series and trying to write movies and make my way in really where did you get those scripts from where are you getting script i was in i would i took a lot of temp jobs i tell you a temp job at different studios and i would i sort of considered it at the time i thought okay i'm going to do this like it's my own paid grad school like they're paying me to do the job but i'm going to teach myself out of do this by reading and and i read a lot a lot of scripts and i would try and emulate the rewrite them and straighten the voices of different characters and trying to teach us the muscles so that if and when i ever got the opportunity to do it and so i worked at a couple of film companies and then and then i would take temp jobs that were just awful awful i was a phone operator when they still had like pull.

five hundred days
"greg berlanti" Discussed on All of the Above with Norman Lear

All of the Above with Norman Lear

02:58 min | 2 years ago

"greg berlanti" Discussed on All of the Above with Norman Lear

"Years when it was used a lot water cooler talk on a cool yeah yeah next week at offices everywhere around the water cooler they talking about see it's her version of that negative it's the twitter cooler i guess it's right after i think it's it's interesting there's so much now for people to do there's so much for you know so much content they can see they're not you're not just competing with the shows that are on the air right now you're competing with every show ever made because of their fingertips and video and every everything i have things i worked on ten years ago twelve years ago that people will come up to me now that they've just discovered and talk to me about now and there's a whole kind of really cool renaissance go by one explicitly wow that's very i probably have still i was i was not the creator kevin williamson was of of dawson's creek but i was the first show i got i i show iran and russia i gotta had a job on it i still have more people talk to me about that and now all those people that grew up watching it or people that were maybe in their twenties watching have kids that are now watching it and finding so you know they'll talk about they'll say i we watched all these episodes with my daughter i rewatch his episodes of my son and it really is the gift that keeps on giving him it was a relatively young art form when it still is you know and so now we're seeing a whole new level i think of like you know like great books great shows that you created hopefully never go away and who could have guessed when there were four three and then four networks right nobody was saying too much too much too much too much now we have one hundred or thousand four networks i mean there is don't you find a couple of times a week at least somebody you respect to saying you mean you're not watching someone sound yes yes oh i know i feel so and then yes there's so many things to binge into watch i have a new rule where i need at least three people to tell me about something i feel bad about that three to feel bad watch it i'll watch it i'll watch it if i feel back but you know and even still though with all of that stuff you still i still feel find myself searching for what's the next thing i'm really kind of into you know an and excited by usually a lot of times unfortunately this day and age you know the news provides us with so much as you sort of indicated so much entertainment and so much stuff to watch it's it's hard for me when i get home to not watch the news i for an hour and a half and and what do you tuned into it msnb msnbc you go from chris hayes to rachel maddow i do the horizontal correct some if i get home early enough i start with you know then the afternoon i forget her name sir chris matthews i matthews yeah and then prior to him is like chuck todd and katie tourism there now and that's why didn't injury natural and it's.

twelve years ten years
"greg berlanti" Discussed on All of the Above with Norman Lear

All of the Above with Norman Lear

02:30 min | 2 years ago

"greg berlanti" Discussed on All of the Above with Norman Lear

"Is greg berlanti on television and so forth fourteen shows right now on the air under his leadership so hello greg high fourteen shots it ladies and gentlemen thank you fourteen shows the man as yes her what was your highest record norman of shows on the air one time on the air i think maybe we had seven shows on the airlines i watched all of them yeah single one yeah but but greg but they're scripted to the dont just know they're our our longs they're all our long hours kate his response you know the truth is obviously is you know like there's eight h have show runners each have executive producers that are their day to day on each and i'm i'm you know i probably do more than the do less than the majority of individuals that work on those shows remember them all so i now at a place where when i work with an actor i say to them i'm very honest with you're either going to get the characters name remembered or you're going to get the your your actual name remembered but not both that's because i will once i scribe name to them in my head and that's i think more results of being a father of a two year olds than anything but definitely i've had to write a lot more stuff right right you're gay yes greg berlin yes and so do your you're married or married and this two and a half year old came about he came he came two and a half years ago but we got married after the fact we did hollywood way where we go first then then which is a little harder to do when there's two guys have to actually still plan for it and everything but it made price so your wedding pictures on with with the three of you in the picture made for great wedding picture it wa it was yeah i mean it was good to have the kid then get maps yeah it it certainly i think we were so also happy that day you know it was it looks that way the picture everybody's just full of joy i mean growing up in the seventies and eighties is i i did there wasn't you didn't think you're ever going to get married if you're gay kid when you realize you actually wondered i am gonna live you know because i i was thirteen and fourteen and realizing i was gay right.

greg berlanti greg berlin greg kate executive hollywood two year
"greg berlanti" Discussed on Scriptnotes Podcast

Scriptnotes Podcast

02:21 min | 2 years ago

"greg berlanti" Discussed on Scriptnotes Podcast

"So it's it's a weird it's a whole weird thing the hallway thing all right dan is a question he asked how big production companies like bad robot work they geel from the studio and that funds the company and the development of shows and movies what's the corporate structure like when jj's paid to the production company he just takes salary speaking as a company odor why would jj want to deal with the business running stuff wouldn't you just work as a freelancer what happens to the company if he's directing for six months it would seem that the revenue that people jj would make as a company is insanely profitable so anyway i don't mean to pick on jayjay but i was just thinking of him as an example so bad robot is a company that makes mission impossible movies they make westworld they make other j abrams movies that could make star trek so i've got him with meetings on them i've ever written anything for them but they have really nice offices out and santa monica they have a lot of people who work there and they're really smart great people so they're busy doing stuff there deal with paramount but they're always doing other things they started video game company as well so craig why do you not have a bad robot well no no one's asked me to i think that the the prerequisite for these things is television so people think of jj's movie guy is actually a tv guy he came out of tv and when you come out of tv and you're making a few hit shows then there's a massive revenue stream so earlier this week dan there is a new story about greg berlanti who is an incredibly prolific television producer with warner brothers and they just made him a think it's a ten year deal for four hundred million dollars that's guaranteed for hundred million dollars and then it goes up from there and the reason why he has fourteen shows on the air apparently which is insane and so this is really a television empire business and this has always been around there have always been these these little mini studios that were mini studios making television so chuck laurie as a little mini studio back in the day stephen j canal would make oh yeah you'd make a lot of the action programs that john grew up watching he had a little mini studio m t m m t m and john wells a mini stewart right so these these have always been around and now we have this crossover where they're making television and also big movie franchises so how does it work basically yes the studio will make a.

dan jj craig greg berlanti producer warner brothers stephen j canal chuck laurie john wells four hundred million dollars hundred million dollars six months ten year
Cnn, Anthony Bourdain and Robert Thompson discussed on KNX Programming

KNX Programming

03:05 min | 2 years ago

Cnn, Anthony Bourdain and Robert Thompson discussed on KNX Programming

"Oh he had a lot of them in his early television shows they had to put a disclaimer that it was for mature audiences his language and all of that kind of thing and certainly he's written and talked about a long history of some pretty significant substance abuse as well so yes this was clearly not a person without a troubled past but nevertheless it's it's so so shocking in that i think he was at he was doing the most important work of his career over at cnn on that show parts unknown i mean very few people back when he was a chef got to eat his food then they became introduced to him with that book kitchen confidential and then he did those other shows on food network and travel channel but what he was doing over at cnn was in a completely different category some of those episodes were real masterpiece talk about that what meet him both so unique and so compelling l cnn is going to continue to do their non breaking news documentary series and anthony bourdain was one of the first when they started doing those but yes he was clearly in a category all by himself thank you so much syracuse pop expert antivietnam robert thompson again anthony bourdain debt at the age of sixty one it's four fifty time for your money facebook shares fell almost two percent after it issued a new apology facebook says a software bugs that user's privacy settings for post to public for ten days in may facebook says as many as fourteen million people had their setting switched and it will soon start letting you know if you were one of them warner brothers is paying a bundle to hang onto a top showrunner through twenty twenty four reports say greg berlanti is at least a three hundred million dollar man the hollywood reporter says his contract extension is a four hundred million dollar deal berlanti has a record fourteen scripted shows on the air including the arrow and riverdale terminator.

CNN Anthony Bourdain Robert Thompson Facebook Reporter Berlanti Syracuse Warner Brothers Greg Berlanti Hollywood Three Hundred Million Dollar Four Hundred Million Dollar Two Percent Ten Days
Facebook, Greg Berlanti and Reporter discussed on KNX Programming

KNX Programming

00:51 sec | 2 years ago

Facebook, Greg Berlanti and Reporter discussed on KNX Programming

"Learn more about the studies in the journal science karen adams canucks ten seventy newsradio one fifty time for your money facebook shares fell almost two percent after it issued a new apology facebook says a software bugs that user's privacy settings for post to public for ten days in may facebook says as many as fourteen million people had their setting switched and it will soon start letting you know if you were one of them warner brothers is paying a bundle to hang onto a top show runner through twenty twenty four reports say greg berlanti is at least a three hundred million dollar man the hollywood reporter says his contract extension is a four hundred million dollar deal berlanti has a record fourteen scripted shows on the air including the arrow and riverdale terminator fans listen up a virtual reality experience inspired by twenty fifteen terminator.

Facebook Greg Berlanti Reporter Berlanti Karen Adams Warner Brothers Hollywood Three Hundred Million Dollar Four Hundred Million Dollar Two Percent Ten Days
"greg berlanti" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:46 min | 2 years ago

"greg berlanti" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Here that i didn't even know why needed to hear until after i came out and every time i would hear them they would have an impact on me and they seem so simple and one was i still love you in that sort of what the dad is kind of saying in this scene and then what mom says which is what drives her character really into the third act is an you deserve love and again i thought that was really specific that part and then john garner went to acted on the set that day in our lead actor burst into tears hearing the message and and i looked around and all the crew was trying there is and that's when i started to realize like okay wow this is very specific to the experience but it's really something everybody needs to hear and forgets clearly along the way that you know you deserve the life that you've always wanted and speaking of aspirational moments and i don't want to give too much away but there is this beautiful scene at the end of the movie it isn't spoiling it to say that he lied gets us happy ending its hollywood movie it's a romantic comedy there's a happy ending and there's a kiss and the kiss is yeah it's a great kiss and it feels like you've been waiting for it for a long time in movies than i cry now in part when i see it because so many places i've been all audiences young and old straight gay have applauded that moment and i'm old enough to remember you know audiences laughing at gay content in movies and it was so validating to see everyone root for simon story you know greg berlanti is the director of love simon thank you very much more and more schools are using drills to prepare students.

john garner greg berlanti director simon
"greg berlanti" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:46 min | 2 years ago

"greg berlanti" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"That i didn't even know why i needed to hear until after i came out in every time i would hear them they would have an impact on me and they seem so simple and one was i still love you in that sort of what the dad is kind of saying in this scene and then what mom says which is what drives her character really into the third act is an you deserve love and again i thought that was really specific that part and then jin garner went to acted on the set that day in our lead actor burst into tears hearing the message and and i looked around and all the crew was trying there is and that's when i started to realize like okay wow this is very specific to the experience but it's really something everybody needs to hear and forgets clearly along the way that you know you deserve the life that you've always wanted and speaking of aspirational moments and i don't want to give too much away but there is this beautiful scene at the end of the movie it isn't spoiling it to say that he our lead gets us happy ending its hollywood movie it's a romantic comedy there's a happy ending and there's a kiss and the kiss is yeah it's a great kiss and it feels like you've been waiting for it for a long time in movies you know then i cry now in part when i see it because so many places i've been all audiences young and old straight gay have applauded that moment and i'm old enough to remember you know audiences laughing at gay content in movies and it was so validating to see everyone root for simon story you know greg berlanti is the director of love simon thank you so very much more and more schools are using drills to prepare students and staff for.

jin garner greg berlanti director simon
"greg berlanti" Discussed on About to Review

About to Review

02:16 min | 2 years ago

"greg berlanti" Discussed on About to Review

"Even at school and i think it's his age most no lifeline when he feeling overwhelmed or use ethan retreat into playlists and find find find solace there but they music would make five have happy i been very much a lot like media to the sun go woman occur happy when i try and make myself out of that mood and about upside is looking your own i just think and they are all looking out that director greg berlanti so as kevin smith has put it the berlanti verse of ero and flash and all of those cw shows keeps you very busy what about love simon drew to the project and made you want to be involved primarily bill that i wish it just when i was young and i thought it was such a rare thing have you do those appointed of a movie like this actually have a preventive center romantic comedy with those with old and happy ending those are all things i you know i responded to viscerally whenever and wonderful wonderful opportunities when i was watching the film some word that came to mind for me were friendship fear truth and acceptance so for all three of you i would like to know what was the last thing you did that scared you on a dallas morning talk shows good morning exit we not the most comfortable situation via about that was lightening to bragging well just because it's live tv and.

kevin smith simon ethan director greg berlanti dallas