14 Burst results for "Greg Ashman"

"greg ashman" Discussed on Mr Barton Maths Podcast

Mr Barton Maths Podcast

06:12 min | 1 year ago

"greg ashman" Discussed on Mr Barton Maths Podcast

"Your tenure ship is manager of preston fan. Who knows which. Way it's i mean. I'm waiting any day now. I'm wade checking by emails as soon as we hang up dog. It's been an absolute pleasure. Absolutely talking trial always learned so much and i know the listeners will tell so douglas. Thank you so much for joining us today as my pleasure. I really enjoyed it and to talk to you soon sooner than sooner than three years. So they did. That was my interview with doberma- as i said the first time was on the show back in twenty seventeen it was a real special episode for me. I was walking a couple of messages with chris. Bolts and recently made the point that iraq in twenty seven team is kind of the golden age of the podcasts. Than i think i think he's absolutely right there. It was. It was the time when my whole kind of create crisis was in in in kind of is absolute peak. And it was. When i was speaking to dylan william the bjork's off daisy christodoulou. Donny quinn chris bolting greg ashman all these people just blowing my mind with everything that they said and that was when i was writing how i taught madison and so on and so forth and trees really interesting and i stopped doing the podcast and i hope people are still getting a lot out of it but i do sometimes feel like a bamboo pete. In the early days i'm trying to recapture that same. Glory and sometimes they get close. And sometimes i don't but i think hopefully you'll agree with me that this is one of those times where we're kind of back to our best here because dog is just is just the perfect gas because he's obviously incredibly. Knowledgeable is absolutely lovely blow because well making time to chat to likes to me but also focuses on the practical. And that's why i love his books particularly teach like a champion. Because it's it's all practical real life strategies the not only you've been born out in the classroom but have been tested. Tried tested and refined. Then you can watch the videos on his website to see in action as well so just just fantastic to speak to doug anyway three takeaways. I'm going to pick up on here. The first is kind of the big one firm from the conversation that was relationships and such a simple point. Dog may but that's often the most powerful ones. Because i certainly consider they'll certainly not to the less of done and that is that the focus is all is often put on the relationship to teach from people. Because that's the one you can control or at least you can can kind of control. Fifty percent of the people partnership but in the more profound one is on pupil. People the classroom culture. That's developed in terms of how students respond to each other. How they respect each other rb. Interact now what's really interesting about this thinking about this. Since i spoke to dog is for me. It was always enough that when another student was talk in the rest of the class. We just quiet. But that's all. I was bothered about the nobody was talking over. Not museum of there were quiet and respectful but having listened to dog. I realize i need to do so much more than that. I want my students attentively listening. I want them nodding. Our actively involved a woman mistook said referring back to answers so mirren said when the next one jack answers he says moore and said this. And i'm going to build upon it now. This is going to take time to develop. But what a powerful thing that what powerful classroom culture when. You've not only got students who know kind of the rule is quiet when somebody else speaks. But the rule or more importantly the norm is when somebody else speaks. I am actively attentively involved in that. So how do we do it. Let's move to the practical was duke. Says i got to introduce the why we're doing it. Why is this important. And as i mentioned whenever. I'm justifying strategies and ideas by languages. We shifts depending on the age of the students. That are that. I'm speaking to so we've gotta get the sell. Sell the dream to the kids of why this is a really important nice thing to do so we introduce it. We justify remodel it and then we practice it. I'm this goes back to one of the first conversations. I had the hat on the podcast. God knows many years ago. We're talking now. But when bruno ready was on the show and he taught loads about routines. How you introduce routines but then you rehearse the routines and this comes back to something. I've been thinking about what i've been doing. Lots of reading on retrieval and thinking about low stakes quizzes and things like that. I'm sure i've mentioned this on the podcast before so. Forgive me but our mistake. I've been making for many years. Is that what. I do retrieval practice from retrieval opportunities. It's all factual based stuff. Like out some fractions. Can you remember out so expensive brackets. I never including those retrieval opportunities whether the starts as low stakes quizzes or whatever. I never include routines. I never include the things about behavior. That i want students to remember. So what what's wrong with a low stakes. Quiz including question too is algae. Multiply out these algebraic. Fractions question three is. Why do we have to attentively. Listen to students in class. That kind of thing. Because if i want students to remember them. We got a schedule. Them retrieval opportunities. Just like if i want them to remember anything so it's really got me thinking this about relationships relationships between students and student how to build them and why they're so important and as we spoke about. This is a golden opportunity students coming back to the classroom. This one of the major things. They've missed out on this. This this connection with their classmates connection with also so it's a chance to reset charts to reestablish a norm introduce a new and i think this sounds to me just such a smart idea so that was the first one relationships. The second was technology am again. I've discussed this with with joe. Morgan say briefly. And i think it's just fascinated me how teachers embraced technology and been forcing really am for this remote learning and as i said in my early interviews with them with teachers when when we first went to remote teaching people hate in just a case of facing prince lessons just by but as teachers of how to a doubt they use of technology is kind of just gone through the roof. And it'd be great to see some of the positive stuff make its way back into the classroom..

Donny quinn Fifty percent chris today mirren daisy christodoulou madison bruno three takeaways first joe. Morgan three years first time doug second preston first one one first conversations dylan william the
"greg ashman" Discussed on Mr Barton Maths Podcast

Mr Barton Maths Podcast

04:03 min | 1 year ago

"greg ashman" Discussed on Mr Barton Maths Podcast

"Show where i interviewed people who interest. I'm inspire me from the world of education. This time around. I spoke to donny quinn. Donny's the head of maths at michaela community school arguably the most disgust scrutinized controversial school in the country is a school whose policies and practices divide opinion in both the teaching and political worlds so having read battle hymn of the tiger teaches unseen danny speak. I'm thoroughly enjoyed both experiences. I couldn't wait to get her on the show. Now in a world i for the mr barton math podcast. This interview will be split over two parts. Why ask well. Because it's so flipping long. I just thought so. Many questions las donny. And then loads of things. He spoke about prompted new questions. So the pot your about to listen to call is the planning and delivery of math lesson. Michaela going into detail about how each component works in practice. What justification is together with the discussion about michaela. Homeworks on weekly tests then donny. So long does this experiences not put her off and he will reconvene at some point in the future to these schools. The practice of drilling by kayla's behavior policy wider issues in musty chain. Have big three advice. Each's i'm probably a fabulous of all the stuff as well so wide ranging interview. We covered the following things and more why muffs teaches at michaela not thinking terms of planning lessons but in planning topics what a student topic book. Sorry while the student topic booklets lot like and how to teach his use them to aid that planning when minds it be right to teach the how before the why will then go off on a bit of a tangent and discuss introducing linear equations. A why making it more difficult for the students in the initial stages might be a very good thing to do. How does danny use the material form of podcast gas. Jon call and we'll ni together with joe bowl is known the talks one thing that really struck me. I'm reading the tiger teaches but was the emphasis on a period of reading in each lesson. So how exactly does this work. In the world of mathematics. How misconceptions address them resolve both before and during lessons. How does differentiation work. What was actual class will not like. Why does johnny not bother with plenaries. Now michaela students get maths homework every single night. What do these helmets. look like. i'm why don't michaela teaches mark books. I key components of the learning process. That michaela all the weekly tests. What do they let light. How the march and how is the resulting information utilized. And now what about this. How does dallas competition effectively. Why is controlling the narrative of this competition so important. And if like me voy shied away from publicly condemning students poor performance in front of other students. You'll find this bit of particular interest. It has really got me thinking. And finally we end. Paul while we donnie describing a bad lesson she told and what she learned from. Please stick around for this one as it is an absolute classic with a very important message. Well i'm gonna come right out and say i found this conversation fascinating don. He was incredibly open and honest and as a head of department she clearly passionately believes wholeheartedly. In what she's doing you may not agree with a lot of what she has to say. But it's cleared each components of michaela's approach to teaching mathematics. being catholic. Thought three so if nothing else should give you plenty of food thoughts now just before we get cracking. As in the last few episodes these these are really making me. Reflect on my own teaching scrutinizing routines and practices that have religiously followed for the last twelve years of my korea without really giving them a second thought. So inspired by the likes at dillon. William tom bennett greg. Ashman mark mckoy. Willem me all forma. guess. I've started to george my approach to teaching under the microscope of educational base research. And i tell you are. It has been a flipping so i've reviewed over sixty.

Michaela donny quinn Paul Donny donny joe bowl kayla both johnny michaela each lesson Jon call two parts both experiences second thought Willem over sixty Each dillon each component
"greg ashman" Discussed on Mr Barton Maths Podcast

Mr Barton Maths Podcast

05:59 min | 1 year ago

"greg ashman" Discussed on Mr Barton Maths Podcast

"How on earth should teachers engage with research. Well the one thing about it now is i think a good place to start is to find a curator that you trust so curator every such that you trust now. That might be a colleague in your school. Who's particularly keen on on reading around things. You may have a research lead in your school. I know quite a few people do or you might know of a research school in the area. I'm props. they if they don't already they could send around a newsletter or so maria five. You know once every four night of what. They've been reading with a link to a quick summary. Alvin and linked to the original papacy. You can engage with it. I think i a curator that you know trust is a good way and it may. If you don't have that kind of locally within your school with the neighboring school promises an organization props it is the for promises the learning scientists someone who you trust who was a wide range of research you think. Yeah okay. This is a good place to start. They've already sifted through some of the staff so that had the stuff that they think's important so let me start with that or it may be somebody that you follow on twitter or blog of the you like of tom sherrington. I find to be particularly well-balanced when it comes to evaluating research if you read his the learning rainforest eight it's kind of like both sides of the fence he goes into whether it's inquiry or whether it's direct instruction so on so i don't think it's practical or feasible for teachers to try and get a restaurant every bit of research. How i think a good place to start as a curate to the tros daiva somebody local or an organization or perhaps somebody is at blog. Oreta a tweet. Tha that you that you respect their opinion. As i mentioned have a critical i i we all have biases. I know i absolutely rammed full of these days. I try to go out my way. Now to engage more with research. That goes against what i what i think. exemplifies the productive failure research. I mean it's comp a couple of times on this podcast series. I'm aware that. I dismissed it too early on because it didn't fit in with with my views on an explicit instruction so on but now i'm whenever i hear anything about phantom i really tried to re really kathleen trying to gauge. With just just to make sure the i'm not susceptible to these vices. Trimbe and reduce my susceptibility and finally. This is the last thing i decide. I think this is really really important. No matter how reduced the findings seems to be no matter. How strong recommendation seems to be. I think the key question that we all need to ask ourselves when engaging with educational research is what would this actually look like for me in my situation in my school knowing my kids the way i do knowing my challenges and constraints though i do because we are ultimately the people who are going to pull these findings these recommendations into practice and and again every classroom situations different. Every class of students is different. Every teacher is different. So it's about finding ways to take these best bats to take the call findings from educational research and then think what's it gonna take to make this work for me. Make it work for my students because you can take the strongest finding in the world but unless your students engage with that and unless you engage there it's not so waste the time i mean it takes something like him like retrieval that i mentioned before it seems to be a pretty safe. Bet that if we if we provide opportunities for students to retrieve things that they once knew they're going to remember it bats. So i take from that might be that you introduce low stakes quizzes as a regular part of your students diet. They themselves they assigned confidence. Goes all the things that i bang gone about in in my talks my books. But here's the thing if your kids don't buy into the nfl zero evidence or they think it's a high stakes quiz or all of a sudden it becomes a high stakes assessment so they start not as engaging as much. They're putting athen or trying to cheat. And so on or if you introduce it into your team and your department and they think this is actually word. Ladder can't be bothered with this or they don't see the rationale behind it and they think this is a waste of time. I'd rather just teach keep teaching kids the new content. Then he's gonna fall flat on. Its face so it's for me. it's all about thinking. What would this look like for me in my situation given my knowledge of my students my class my colleagues my school and so on and so forth not for me is the most effective way to engage with with educational research. But anyway have rebelled on and off. I i absolutely love this conversation. One i'm going to return to you know i almost feel this. Podcast is kind of coming full circle. Now i started out as are absolutely clueless. There's no doubt about that now. Fifth episodes and when i was interviewing people from the awarding bodies it wasn't about research or anything like that and then in those early episodes. What whatever people like. Dillon william cable greg. Ashman and stuff. We went research mental with chris bolton and so on and now it feels feels like four or five years later we fills about the right kind of time to have one of these these episodes where we actually dig into what the flaws the potential problems with educational research. What makes good research and so on and how we can be. Props teaches a bit more critical about it. So god knows where we go from. Here with the podcast. But i'll tell you what we've still got set three more of these this research and action series to go so that stuff's not about place to stop so Reminds me to find a mafia again for his time. Absolutely love this. I colin foster helping me organize and put together this series pakistan's dot com for the lovely jazzy music. You've had throughout the show and to you. My lovely lawlessness. Vicky on a s- be really nice. I've been doing quite a few align events of the last couple of weeks and people have said they've been really enjoying this research and action series. Streaky 'cause i never know how well these things going down. I only can ever go off. Statistics in terms of download numbers and stuff. So if you enjoy these union you got time to give us a bit of a shoutout twitchell. Some just feed my ego man makes me re make it just makes that means that i can keep make sure the podcast is going in the direction that people find useful. If that anyway i'm gonna show you think every selves bye for now..

research lead twitter Alvin pakistan Vicky tom sherrington nfl Dillon william Ashman chris bolton
"greg ashman" Discussed on Mr Barton Maths Podcast

Mr Barton Maths Podcast

06:04 min | 1 year ago

"greg ashman" Discussed on Mr Barton Maths Podcast

"Even australia. The government didn't show a lot of potential ceo t- so such sweater things Hey hey hey is doing. Research for over twenty to thirty years on cd by the government doesn't pay much attention. I know so the teachers thousands like also pay attention to the theory so feel disappointed. Happy to lot of papers ceo not to to search how to use memory and how to use memory to a full alerting teach him but after twenty seventeen. Th that twitter by i didn't williams. That's why the change. The cit actually actually really changed. Ceo and After the radar thing austrian government's policies. I think three government documents uncomfortable theory. Australia and also you vitals. Were to give a talk on coconut theater. Enter the and is suddenly realized. Corden kamilo theories are very good learning theory to to to teach and also in uk. You can say the government to push to the teachers to use code yellow theory. Uk although we have still have not oh problems About his theory to understand his theory and But i think now is very happy because ski had knows people has recognized his theory that his work but we think we should be humble because we know the largest theory should continue. Working continue progressing. We couldn't say okay now. People recruiting recognize the a theorist. Now we so we couldn't. We could do nothing more on their theory. We should continue progressing the theory and especially when need to inform teachers. How to practice in theory the classrooms obsolete. And as you said that the fought the potential studies bringing motivation and inactions in show. This is a theory that this constantly all. But i'm that was an absolutely fascinating discussion about how i loved every minute of that and as i say i think we swiss scratching the surface hit the so much more skulls. Let's leave it that. Thank you so much for your time today. Thank you craig so they. Yeah uh-huh there is my conversation with ohio once again. I absolutely love speaking to these researchers talking about topics that they're passionate about that they're interested in and that they know a hell of a lot more about than i d. Now as i mentioned in the intro. I'm cognitive load theory. Something that's cop time and time again on this podcast. If there's really started. I think when greg ashman came on the show for the first time but is caught up in so many conversations since and in particular conversations with dot alan williams and gills dolby which put the other side of the coin on their Teachers and researchers who props critical or skeptical is perhaps the best phrase of the increased circus emphasis on cognitive load theory and up section from from people like me. So i don't know how much more i can add them. What was already covered in the conversation with. Oh how in that we've done on previous episodes but it just wanted to make the point that my view on cognitive load theory these days and i've gone from knowing absolutely zero outs it to reading absolutely everything i can about it and getting a little bit obsessed with it too now. I wouldn't say a middle ground. I'm still if there's a spectrum between thinking cognitive load theory is a bit of a waste of time to think and it's the best thing in the world. I'm certainly more towards the best thing in the world but now i use it more for the practical takeaways so whenever i think about cognitive load theory and what it means to me in terms of day to day classroom practice i think things like the split attention effect so it makes me much more aware now of what my slides my powerpoint slides look like. I've got an image on their props. I'm doing a words example. And i wanna make sure that the labels i attached to that were example are integrated within the image and props. I number them as well. So i can allow my students to focus their attention on one spot on the board instead of having to split their attention between different sources of information. I'm very much aware of the redundancy effect. I try very hard. Although i failed numerous times not to speak while students are reading tax or not to simply read out the same texts. That kids are reading to talk to fall. Victim of the redundancy effect or to say all the things on top whilst kids are reading something and full victim of the split attention effect. So it's things like that. The really changed my classroom practice. That the small things but they mean that have big implications for my power points. My worksheets how i talk. How a move around the classroom my classroom environment and so on and so forth on a more general level. My understanding of cognitive load theory is as i believe led me to be better sequencing the type of tasks that i give to my students. So when my students are relatively new to a mathematical ideas and again it's negative connotations to the term novice. But i'm gonna use it here novice learners innate very specific mathematical idea. I want to be really selective with the type of activities. I give them and that's where i tend. Sue engage much. More in direct explicit instruction. Modeling scaffolding explaining supporting. My students announced. They become more expert in that area. That's when the rains. Come off. And i my students explore and do less structured activities and problem solve and so on and i know for many people..

Ceo Australia alan williams uk austrian government coconut theater ohio Corden greg ashman craig Sue
"greg ashman" Discussed on Mr Barton Maths Podcast

Mr Barton Maths Podcast

07:34 min | 1 year ago

"greg ashman" Discussed on Mr Barton Maths Podcast

"So which means actually not way without an without exclude problem based learning. Just the win you to know. At which point we need to introduce problem based learning so for example for sorry. So you go yes. And that's why so so so actually for at the very beginning when you choose represents when you have gardens but gradually when the experts increases actually programs program base nearly is more efficient than working sample effects yet and i think we mentioned before meals misunderstandings with cognitive load theory and we mentioned one of them that cognitive load theory is all about making things simpler and find that. It's not i think for me. The second biggest misunderstanding that cognitive load theory is all about guided instruction on the way through. But as you say it's not the expertise aversely fact is in that says. Look you get to a certain kind of competency or certain amount of knowledge than it is far less efficient use. What examples and that's when these less structured problems needs to come into play in. I found cognitive load theory really useful for my teaching is just helping me determine kind of an order at the type of instructions activities. I give with my students. Because in the past i think too much about the order i try. Here's a problem. Let's start this topic with problem. Now let's do a woods example so whereas now i tend to use my problems a little bit later on in a given sequence of lessons than i would have done in the past and my more guided instruction tends to be at the start and that that's been my biggest takeaway from from cognitive load theory alongside trying to reduce that extraneous load whether it'd be three woods examples or avoiding splits attentional redundancy and so is there anything else. 'cause i'm just conscious of the time we act speech all day about this and i don't think this'll be good. This won't be the last time talk. Is there anything else about your research into into concert. Blow through that you want to make our listeners aware of before we start to wrap things up. I just want to mention mentioned. Won't poland sunk. Maybe some teachers have an essay. Ot theory for everything and we could use the ot to solve law every teaching prob issues teaching province actually and ceo. T's not a theory for everything and the also an the teacher theme maybe kotei data folks. Motivation factor or emotional factor. I would say osama my some of my colleagues in netherlands the are trying to link. Scott our with motivation and emotion and a self regulation. So probably we have some more research commode in future to say whether ceo t have a very clear connection with emotion motivation recreation extra while that will be that will be fascinating to see how well let me. Just ask you warm reflection questions. And i'm going to hand over to the big three so my question is and what's an example of something important. You've changed your mind about a. I think i think something important. Probably the my. I chose to study my master from from math to method. Because i i was thinking after my undergraduate mattis. Our continued in researching mathematics and pure mathematics. But i turned my mind to from front doing the research from pure mass to math education. And because i think there's change other give gives me on another platform to understand the mathematics and because if i continue working on pure mathematics properly. I don't know how how human memory how remembering works out in. The math problems are now. I'm doing math education research and gradually understand how the human condition works and was was a difference between Cognitive shane constructivism and behaviors have arisen. So i think this cut up. Change gives me of a more broader understanding about the human and also the math education absolutely fund that. Yeah and not it. The such a complex thing. Kim education and bring all those elements into place is so important as fantastic counts. I will let me handover to you. Know how you'll feel big three. So what three either websites blog posts books or whatever you like. Would you recommend our listeners. Checkouts i'll put links to these in the show notes. So what are we gonna go okay. I'll of course i do i. I will recommend the low theory book published by swaleh. Eos carter yuga. I think two twin two thousand eleven. This is i. Lo- sierra pook an another boo. I want to recommend to to the k. teachers is. This book is nuke by that. It's published by is written by an stave. Garnett have wrote a book. Her rotor ceo t book to teachers. So that should be very practical for teachers to learn how how to apply. Ceo t in the classrooms. I think the the blog post greg ashman his hip hip post a lot whole blocks and also he's a active twitter of your activating twitter into such as the prog from greg ashman. They'll say i at accent suggestion and just just final question for you. Have just a battle this. I'm always fascinated and about john. Swallows and take on on all this and hopefully one day. John olek come on. Come on the podcast. But obviously you having worked with them quite closely. You'll know this to the me what's his. What's his take on all this. Because as far as my reading is concerned he was talking about cognitive. Load theory you know. Twenty almost two years ago so some of these the earlier research on this for from from the lights from the late eighties and yet as you say certainly in the uk so only really in the last few years that has become a really hot topic and and controversial and taken off. What's what's his view. On is easy frustrated it's taken so long for it to reach prominence. He's he is. He a bit overwhelmed. By just how popular and discussion. It's his these days. What what what's jones taken all okay. Salutes acting okay. It's an. I can't i can't tell you sound story about about the whole jones. Twitter thinks because i would say before before twenty before twenty seventeen at before the if the traitor published by dylan walian from described yang. A single most important. That's what i think. I think before that twitter and before twenty seventeen ceo actually is not very popular in.

ceo Twitter greg ashman John olek jones poland osama Scott uk dylan walian Garnett netherlands
"greg ashman" Discussed on Mr Barton Maths Podcast

Mr Barton Maths Podcast

03:47 min | 1 year ago

"greg ashman" Discussed on Mr Barton Maths Podcast

"Like definitely work and home. Also, I'd say like not only in a high state to eat sticks exam context. But if you want to like get some people over the hump to get them like into a place where you can start to use some of these thoughts and like longer-term drivers then you know, yeah, like use rewards used one with it use whatever you need to but use as little as possible move those extrinsic motivators as soon as you possibly can. Yeah, it doesn't trust in and my my my follow-up question to that is is where the sanctions fit into this. Perhaps is it do they have literally the same effect as as reward in terms of the fact that they are extrinsic potential short-term motivators. Is there any difference at all between sanctions and rewards in terms of the effect? They have a motivation? Honest answer is I don't think I have read enough to really give a like a highly confident answer to that. My first guess would be that. Yes, there's there's similar but with the yeah, the only be a gas. I think I'm going to check in a gas myself as well just for a while. So we're both guessing on this one. We might as well my my take on this and this is for my limited reading and also as I say, my mom calls it and behavioral Economist past is that the only difference is that people human nature seems to Value the loss of something greater than gaining something. So taking away something seems to have a more powerful effect than the potential to to gain something and there's loads of lovely experiments by Carnival to Traverse key and so on about this and I think that comes through in some of the research. I remember reading a few years ago. I taught Master sent sanctions a potentially more powerful. But again the mess he comes through loud and clear its short-term. It's extrinsic it. May I like that phrase get you over the hump it may get you on this potentially wage. Louis cycle between you know success motivation and so on and so forth, but maybe a bit more sustainable long-term but yet in terms of a a long-term strategy on their own, I think yeah sanctions are problematic, but that's only nothing I know a lot about but that that's my tail. And so they just to build and I think like Los version tactics become easier when people's have more to lose Faith the more the more time the more motivated people are and the more they learn the more they are successful and the more then you can start to win some of those lots of birds and strategies, but I think about like you say this This probably a lot of a bit of room for some extra some additional theorizing around there. Right? Let's turn to these late if the core Drive is down the five of them that your list and and not just to be clear. These are your long-term kind of Drive is for sustainable intrinsic motivation. Now if if I was writing this book perhaps I would end on this first one cuz this is all I had all I had upped my package was success. This is as far as my research went and I'll tell you what I thought going into reading your book and that was that there's a definite relationship between success and motivation. My instinct had always been well when I was teaching I had it the wrong way around I would plan for motivation believing that if I could motivate my kids they would be more successful. But the more I read and Greg Ashman was the one who really kind of took me onto this particularly mathematics achievement in in early years by early years. I mean kind of a younger kids six years old seven years old and solid gold going through primary the relationship home. Used to be the other way around that if students are successful or believe they can be successful. They're more likely to be motivated. So that was my take kind of going in and what if I got right and what I've got roller perhaps well, how does success play a role as a core driver of motivation?.

Greg Ashman behavioral Economist Louis Los
"greg ashman" Discussed on Mr Barton Maths Podcast

Mr Barton Maths Podcast

10:23 min | 2 years ago

"greg ashman" Discussed on Mr Barton Maths Podcast

"High understanding. Sorry High Success Algorithms so they felt successful. And then you stuff like a great. As an illumination laser to reinforce understanding and reinforce algorithm worked rather than to use those algorithms same with bus stop we prefer to use for division even though it's understanding why staffing optimal like stops magic. Also you can show some why it works but it's like Whoa kind of intense. The bus stop works but the pope is very high success. So that's why we stuck with it so even though I mean in some things we decided to cut loose under say they have to be if they fail this algorithm. They're going to feel like failures. So we have to have a high success algorithm that works for the weakest child who can't who struggles to organize on page in particular children struggle with them. Fine Motor skills. So that's the reason we go for. That translates really really heavy of this is probably the biggest thing actually is in the way that people teach the biggest emphasis on lessons and I think the main focus. My most recent blog is not to say questions like let's say is often an equation of make it easy to picture like four x plus three equals laughing instead of sane I'm going to charge. I'm GONNA take three. What's eleven. Take three Craig as because pointless question said things like what have? I got here on equation to account. Tell you can't tell you what you have to what it means to solve. Because children looking for experts three and they try to solve it by getting X. Ecosphere of simplifying and an imaginary start solving middle so I will even checking. They can express what they can see in front of them. And they say okay. We're going to solve the equation. What's it mean if you ought to solve the equation? We weren't acid acid X. X. Is going to be an associate losses stuff where you're asking almost not so open that it's like what do we do because that doesn't help at all but questions where there's very little clue about the actually no? So what have we goes is a focused question. But they're very little clueless form to one question. Oh with the whole class but you might Paul you see pause so it'd be like what have we got here crank. We might have say Sean you weapons and equation Okay we're going to solve it what to expect up until you partner show you can hear the Mossy or whatever they might also and I wasn't mean to sit ex always saying the name second and county few seconds two four seven to feel the house bill to thinking time not just accountability be. Don't to think you have to be fast be good But then saying okay what we use to help solve we use in. Hey this word. But S- make opposite of gems so inverse order of operations How do we know why do we make so getting South Remodel? This is Just how big focus on what we do. Why do we do it? Resolve in equations the opposite of doing the calculation or under the calculation. So sort of gems are gonNA use snag because it's the inverse making sure they can always articulate what they're doing why so then even than articulating. Why go to subtract three? I on making an historic every single time saying subtract three from both sides so just teeny things like that being so even to think about with my your lessons. Yesterday we were looking at a really horrible speed distance. Time question that they didn't like and Saint. Okay well sort of I can do. They'll look to said we're going to highlight the final. Says we have to. We have to. We have to get the speed so there are like moving toward fan speeds. GonNa read list of things. We need for speed or any time and distance and they know to write a little check boxes time tick distance or total time. This books total distance box gets more focus of. Okay now we're going to dissect whereas the information we can use for distance then they go to draw diagrams swan. There's a lot of as soon as you look at it. What are all the strategy to break down with us How did you know what to do? Why did you do x? I think a lot of time we show examples and even example problem pairs as I do it now. You do this. And then the gap in the middle is. How did you know to us so huge mother? Teaching is on. What things on the page? Tell you to not do it. So even you may recall from the twenty whatever's officially of complaints. The first year the exams had been twenty seventeen. Yes there was a lovely question for his paper. The frame that was a rectangle with a diagonal and this is at exile and all the children felt it was an area question was actually a frame made of wire. She length question has gone up at on so a lot of practice after his out of. How do we not do Lang's artist? You buy the wire per meter not per meter squared soon. Helping them is actually quite. Ambiguous question. Scissors made metal strips sexually picture. This this two-dimensional so I can totally sympathize with the kids. Feel that way we looked. But then there's a lot of focusing on the unit. So that wireless sold per meter so it must be for and we talked about like a linear units powerful want. It must be lines so you talked a lot about why that means power to he knows that area question so just how tonight see all these clues to give tasks to know what to do yet. I'll tell you what though I think. I don't mean this declutter well what I think. Maybe you take a bit for granted to this. Like this is a whole Johan. Department's doing galactic. I remember when I first into three years ago. It was you and Greg Ashman who were the first people who opened my eyes to fight met department would literally make these kind of granular decisions that we are going to say. Teach everything with well as much as we come with equations. We are going to teach this in this way. This in this way like this is a big thing. View isn't it. You make a decision and everyone in your departments. That's muscles the Stephania. Really big thing because it also matters that if I get across in your ten that I can rely on these things haven't happened and vice versa. So it's a biggie. So say that's probably the final thing that makes it so different. Sense of goal focus that everything's about maximizing grades so sense so to nude is sort of understanding that we can only get the best grades if we're also developing their character. Most I mean you can. I guess you could set up an exam factory where you help the kids all like meet the target that they need to get for. Progressive Syrian. What for like to pass the getting the kids to actually do way more than might have been expected of them and they may have expected themselves is. You can't do that unless they're actually really committed as people as kids to do the best they can and to really thinking hard and I think the accents are so hard now that the only way to do it was to develop them as thinkers and develop their zillions undeveloped a sense of obligation to each other to support each other because a lot of working in your pairs the stuff. I thought so I feel. It did marry with other goals teachers but develop in them as people around us. Good people in our community and so on I'm one of the metrics was the exams. But they felt like would be reasonable metric of. Everything's we knew they couldn't get such good results unless they were actually good to work with with each other final question before we saw mass conference. And did you do anything? Different in terms of revision in the bill to exams. Was it just teaching? Because obviously you're gonNA finish the content. Some point was there a deliberately soon. We are going to revise an assertion. We finish the content extremely lace with my class. I finished the content two days before the exam. Back the tweet retrieval from day one so we knew that we dedicated over years. Thirty percent of our time division retrieval. So so I knew that it was wasn't we hadn't revised until two days before vestige of lesson times in testing or preparing for tests senator revision or starters. It's probably more like four. Percents started booklets that are mixed practice and things and also other minorities but examples like veneer doing one thing with them. We're always trying to draw. Hotlinks six apple circle themes like you saw today so revisions happening all the time so it was my apartment denike which will happen. I The exam. I don't know I mean it was. They were like One Way Collie anyway. He said that the bottom set of higher because the kids who inches of what was expected of them for they would vote appropriate of here if they don't cotton threes and fours. It was quite funny. Entering for hires. Try guys see what happens? Yeah and it was fine in the end is it. Takes a very long time to get those kits through the courses massive. That's like a big shift as well because I used to teach. Let's get through the 'cause I now. Let's start revision. But he's completely wrong. Isn't it now? At least that Sorta seems wrong in terms of what we've seen work for us so we are revising all the time but that also by revising by mixing it with this stuff gets forgetting times. He returned to things as well. So takes about Israel so the staff and say the only thing that differently is the group one and Group. Two and the two foundation groups finished. The course early run was the only totally totally white-knuckle one was the final two weeks before we didn't do any really hard stuff with them is almost like marathon training. We actually really ticked down to just build confidence so like for example the morning the exam old just Kennison remember had factor go traffic but not enough nothing fancier messy everything just around building up that confidence because we knew that sitting there for an hour and a half was going to be an exhausting experience. You want like with anything that would have made them stressed in the week leading up to it made them stay up late. Trash was a nightmare. Actually thought in the final week is so much worse if they stay place now sleet. Sleep is so much more useful to the stage Then I mean the only kids my group for example who did badly compared to Max vacations or my hopes for them. Were two boys whose moms had bought them. Iphones at the start of exams. The present so yeah. Yeah so awesome. Gift condescended like extremely short term. Motivation there But both of those boys give their phones earlier in the English and amazing achievement. So I guess the mum's is like a gift or two. They're trying to like I understand but obviously those boys were just exhausted. Of course incredibly exciting to an hadn't had a month 'cause they'd given obvious which meant they've made great progress but of course exams. They were so exhausted like some of them. I saw like I could see through the glass of their fallen asleep in the papers and say great five years down the drain. Because you're tired so that's part of why we actually really dial things down the close. We got the papers. We thought the opposite nightmares. Stay up to three. Am revising stress vacillates. And we've got a good little teaser. That DALLAS WE GOT MARK. Healey common back on the show to a call about sleep in..

Craig X. Ecosphere Paul Greg Ashman DALLAS Lang Sean Johan Healey senator partner Max Kennison Israel Trash Group
"greg ashman" Discussed on Mr Barton Maths Podcast

Mr Barton Maths Podcast

14:59 min | 2 years ago

"greg ashman" Discussed on Mr Barton Maths Podcast

"Okay. So Chris Bolton first off welcome back to the PODCAST APP how he got only good. Thanks for having me back. It's always been available on anew to build a real pleasure tonight contractually obliged to say a lot so that's gone now this year last on you've been on a few times using kind of confrontation ways but this is the last time you on properly was October. Twenty seventeen which was part too we teased apart. Offend we've kept the crowd waiting so before we dive into part three. What what have you been up to in the last well over two years now been that long two and a half years everything by Mike complete my life completely changed? I just started working it up then at that point so he had the were there. Were five of buzz in the basement. Defendant to shop and now the fifty something of his walking out of a lot large two storey office in old street. So yeah been working really hot so build Atlas Company and build the team. It's been a Helluva Jenny really exciting. Adjust them for the benefit. Let's newsworld away. I'll give you a free plug. A just just tells a little bit about Oberlin. Hey It's an online study division platforms cover the full edibles. It just powered by communist science not official intelligence so the idea is to guarantee that anybody who when the courses would get ama stop and at this point we also the back. That up was a money back guarantee in the future we wanted to be an absolute guarantee. JEEZ flipping back fantastic. Okay right well the reason you're you're back. Chris is because I remember seeing this. I forget what which research had it was whether it was research had national one of the regional ones but you were given a toll about so cognitive science. I'm in either the title or Glib e you will to this sentence cognitive science. He's almost useless for designing designing effective teaching. Now when I read that I thought is I lost his mind or as an sprints because the thing is Chris Y'all kind of one of the main people responsible for getting me into appreciate in the power of cognitive science and reading as much research as I could get my hands on and change in my teaching teaching based on the findings of this and then I read the you've changed your mind so I'm I'm a combination of confused and annoyed so you've got to explain what what's going on. Did you really believe this is is operatives is almost useless for defy designing effective teaching on Sleigh. Yes I think so after all. It is a theory of people commission. So it's closely tied to ideas about human letting so what it's no is a theory of instruction action okay. I'll tell you what before we get to where we have to define if he thinks cognitive science is one of these phrases that gets pumped it around the what. What do you mean by cognitive science? I understand it as they tried to put this. In my own words I find the people that know more than me correct make but minds on so if you say it's a theory of could mission. We talk without one. I I guess I think of a AH Some exciting theory of human mind all have thinking hostesses take place the the positive involved in that from a psychological perspective at a conceptual perspective rather than a Biological Niro physiological perspective. The two can be related. But I think where it's slow on the cusp of understanding how to connect this theory of cognition to model physiological models of how the brain works so that that can tell you something about About Leonard is about the condition of up condition of of learning the poses. Take Nice. That's quite distinct from telling you how to take something on Monday and the one of the reasons. I'm concerned the Chris is the as you got me into into into thinking about cognitive science but now a lot of people are into it right and I know there's a danger that we're in this kind of twitter bubble where we only see. The conversations are being conducted over twitter. And so on. And you can get blindsided into thinking that that everybody's engaged with with with research bulletin certainly more teaches on than I've I've known throughout the majority of my career. More people are talking about whether it's Bjork's work or cognitive low theories on and so forth so are we going wrong. Should we not be talking about this if we want to improve teaches. I think we should be But what I'm worried about is I'm worried that actually very soon say within the next I guess. Cognitive Science is going to be dismissed by lot of these people. As last decade's fad by bio by which people the people who propose it now all the critics of now nope by the critic despite the so. I think so if let me stop giving you like a bit of a time line is my experience with us so I fash back a little bit too. Doesn't six coach pitch ten downloading and produce. Why don't students like school too? I think very very important important texts into the Bengal. An ice started letting to train. Its teaching twenty eleven at the point that I started everything about my training was about constructivism. That was a lot of things about cognitive conflict. There was nothing at all about time. Cognitive Science as we understand it in any way shape or form and I started reading things like the cushions patent dominating spoke over the Christmas up to my first time having a pretty terrible bowl. Best time of trying to teach things and for me this was this was relate to it. It's completely changed my world when he started trying to stay with my two about none of my two-dozen heard any of this stuff before when he spoke to my colleagues about it none of them heard before as a felt like there was Daisy Christodoulou by by the this quite a bit and then me and Jacoby start banging the drum of this as well but this is about. It's if I go and I speak to my little world anyway if I speak with I I Judas at the university about it. They've never heard of anything around cognitive science. If I speak with my mental mental illness. They'd never heard anything about it. Like calling most the other teach versus. Haven't heard about it as well and just listening. Sorry to interrupt. You mentioned it to kind of key. Sources the Willingham Book. That's that many readers. Many listeners will be familiar with the Kushner swallowed clot paper. That's the why minimally minimalist structures to start one. Why yeah why? Minimally guided instruction is Anna Defective. And just again. The reason I'm asking you. This is where I'm looking off Paul cash and it's coming on the on the show in the next couple of months what what was so profound about that. Protect that paper in particular so there was a quote from that paper Ms View really good ones but one of them. That always stuck with me of last year's was the Abe all instruction is too old to long term memory if nothing has changed in long term memory nothing has been learned and like most of my Ed teacher training had been fairly pie in the sky. Compensation it was very. What do you think good? Teaching looks like leading questions. Like AH quiet classrooms. Always the best classrooms or like really high level step around the purpose of schooling and education and shaping the lives of our students. What are we won't find students over the next twenty years? Nothing about what. My job job is on Monday and this gave me a profound sense of clarity. My job is to Ulta. What isn't that long term memory? A now I need to learn how to do that and both this paper and Williamsburg will also very good on them extolling rolling the virtues or other role as long term he plays in human cognition so I tended to start off being quite as afraid of longtime memory i. I can't memorization. Rote memorization and other quotes from that paper. That's the things like him the past that he has to the company signs nights. It's revealed to us that had to go that long term memory is not just a passive repository of discrete isolated facts nor does it have nearly a peripheral referal row in human cognition on the country. It is a central dominance as structure in human cognition So it is this whole sort of reshaping of my understanding of what independent creative critical thought is. It's not the sort of abstract nebulous the idea. It was something that could be concrete The function of what we have in long term memory the the amount of knowledge we have have the relationships between the knowledge as well Plus a few other things so yeah I felt like it gave a Philadelphia to give quite a bit of clarity around while my job was and where if I could go next to learn more and I'm picturing here so your read this and reading the Willingham booking he chooses and and that in any of it I associate you and Joe Kelley a bit of a breakaway group. Here just kind of in secret reading this the way things out is it like that kind of seed the secret about it. I think we're both very noisy about it. I think quite a lot of people would rather just shut up edited Kicked a lot of this off and then Yeah Joan I with the first of all of us if you were than others did come with us in in two thousand seventeen missile launch. For the first time that would become hugely influential. Twenty thirteen man Joe. Other friends started writing blogs out these things as well L.. Daisy launched a book seven minutes. And so do you get some sort of momentum starting over up to twenty thirteen twenty fifteen gene very important here and you launched this madness. This podcast I this is going to play a really important Ronin things I think and so in two thousand sixteen. We're five years on and something really important happened that I think most people aren't aware of Michael Stephen Monday lead. I'm not sure what you'd call a government expert repoll or what exactly but essentially if you google Monday report and Yuen Diy report you'll find that He led a team of people to produce a framework by which initial teacher training providers ab should be structuring. That causes that they supposed to be delivering training in line with the guidance in this framework and it included a requirement to teach training teachers about cognitive signs about working memory about long-term as well as so important ideas in assessment daily as well I remember thinking on the one hand when I looked at that. This is a seminal moment but on the other hand because it's a great work without much more behind that is it's quite thing what it says. I think most was training providers if they were so inclined could largely ignore it or do sorta band minimum to say that they tick the box so I was a little i. I wasn't confident. It was going to have the impact that I wish it would have and then in two thousand seventeen to two extraordinary things happened the the first ones that Dan Willing but is famous tweet saying the more lead about it the more I thought John Swallow cognitive load. David was the single most important daily Foale teachers to to learn about and I think up until that moment this was seen as a bit of a niche thing that some people were doing that really sent it mainstream. Not that all still Dylan William is not right. I think he's done Willingham. Dylan William the tweet us. Sorry Dylan William. Yeah and that's probably the most famous tweets in kind of education real history. Is that right. That was the one really kick started absolutely exactly and in the same year you interviewed daisy and Greg Ashman and a few of the people as well and these are the people who started getting you to all the evaluation be thinking mid-career Crisis Chris Subsea using right. Now I can definitely I know what that would feel like a little following. Yeah you published a book explaining on that and and every school being whenever. I've been visiting training speaking wince. Mass departments mess teaches. That will reading a book so at least within maths departments that ascent cognitive science hype mainstream. So that'd be really exciting. This is a problem because I'm sensitive. Twist Taylor 'cause that's a nice happy end in right for it let. Let's lessen the conversation there. But wh- academic. You'RE GONNA go wrong here. What could go wrong? Exactly the right question. So what I think's around I think so I feel like I hit. The limit of cognitive science could often means a teacher quite a longtime ago. But I'm okay with that. I appreciate that. This is a natural limit. It's not everything I appreciate that. It's naturally unlimited what it can offer but then when I go is okay. I spent quite a long time reading about this and talking about it and discussing it with friends friends and colleagues and I'm comfortable with that idea of a limit but what happens if you're one of the sort of mid mid adopters midterm adopters. I who are now part of the mainstream part of the lodge largest group of people who haven't prepared to put in that same level of that's amount of time and what they're hearing hiring is This is the latest thing this is GonNa. Finally I turn your teaching around. All like hyper accelerate your teaching so that all the kids are GonNa be doing amazing things you start looking at. What's out there and you run into a whole bunch of problems so at Clay Hill and a few others started talking about this idea that the cold lethal mutations as one of them which I think is brilliant one of the best examples?.

Cognitive Science Willingham Daisy Christodoulou Chris Joe Kelley Chris Bolton twitter Oberlin Mike Atlas Company Dylan William Bjork Ulta Joan I Bengal Biological Niro official Michael Stephen Clay Hill
"greg ashman" Discussed on Mr Barton Maths Podcast

Mr Barton Maths Podcast

13:02 min | 2 years ago

"greg ashman" Discussed on Mr Barton Maths Podcast

"Your teacher plan thirty new. That's not enough right so We have a lesson. I join which are less of flow? which is everything that's happening all throughout the lesson and we get them to kind of script take what they can assign and I guess the yeah? I mean I'm quite interesting practice. We've put went to bed but I think you have to. You know you'll first explanation that you give might may not be that good and and the first time you give. The explanation probably shouldn't be in front of a class that you know very well when you die. It's by teaching. A AH call wing gets so part of the process of lesser preparation is actually thinking about your actual class and and running through the explanation and and reforming in it with someone else say we tend to wear possible relevant because But we send them impasse pass to schools so that they can practice these bits. The script tonight I think it seems like it. Probably Signs Kwa to script script an entire lesson but if you just script tie the bit the way you're talking to the whole group as well Then actually that's not that's not too much but if you'll give them something to think about the words that you use the teacher are you trying to give the students you teach in the people's among a model to help support a destruct eh. Thinking about this. So that's that model should work for all of your examples so big thing that we think all the time is The one example poston enough and a Nelia free lesson I watch. I think there's not enough examples here an USA kind of broadly to mean either Examples that the teacher talks a by all the students talk by as both ways. Like if you're answering the question that still an example of different types of thinks US Albee your your distinguishing between kids practicing three things that there's not enough examples preceding practices. That right. Yeah say say I guess feed from ways of thinking about that but life. The whole class kind of stuff does often in a fix on pools before before they go onto independent practice and I guess often people miss I the middle bit way. Half like more guided practice. If you're doing the kind of thing thing though. I think it is sensible to that kind of thing. If you'll relatively new to teach in it fails like A. Yeah like a moss. Admiral US something. They're more in control for that kind of thing. It's what they used to see. I guess is all and I'll tell I'll tell you what interest while lots of things interest in that you see. You said once again SAMBA. The rehearse the scripting in the rehearsing again thinking about this now. It seems so obvious that that's such a useful thing to do but I I don't know about you dear well again you've a slightly different experienced means tons of training but I never did that was. That was never never even thought that that that was a sensible thing to do because and again whether this is cursive knowledge but I thought well of course I can explain what premature is because premises such an obvious thing. But it's obvious to me because at I thought about it for years but that's why yeah those explanations don't often home because the first time you're verbalizing limits is in front of a class. Am It's interesting. It's a big part. Is this this conscripting rehearsal. You are yeah. I think it's important. I mean the problem. If you don't do that it's not that it's disastrous. It's it's okay rides. Yes yes you can mostly get away with one of the things that happened for me as a teacher areas. I thought I always say Kay Eventually because you know like twenty nine I of thirty people go if I saw something and then unrealized laugh the I should be thinking about the one person yes And that's that's stuff that does and and and that's one of I think that makes it difficult to learn from teaching experiences unless you unless you try and control those experiences in some way try again to the minute. Yes it basically works like the kids. Thank King or if there's a problem you don't get immediate feedback on it because it was okay. Kids fill in the gaps. Because I've already done this before so in your body explanation Russian they fill in the gaps and they get on with the task they can do the task and maybe the Tusk was a bit too easy side like do it anyway so you just learn from the experience in a way that you could Say I guess we get them to. Brian died try to meet them. I take it but like Cadet near the iphone decision limited on time and whether they said about sometimes they say the value of things later but ah we really came. They write down what the pupils meant to be doing. Because it's very easy to focus on what the teacher's doing and you. You have to say anything that you're in control of anything you can change Like a Canadian Infants what People's opinion but they behalf do include trying to create what the lands will be thinking about that details AF- explanations say specifically things like what they'll actually say what the board will look like if they're writing on the board The specifics of the examples that they use so you know sometimes I will never die and I might some questions and then it was four x minus full and ended up that thin and and van. So's fool the fool. It Green is roles in this said the specifics of the example Tempur. What about Eric sample is exemplary like highways? It giving them a kind of structure enough example. If you're GONNA do mole what they look like how are they gonNA do. They exempt pools. So you know. La We talked about the dividing fractions. Things say one thing I might do with dividing fractions. He's asked lots and lots of questions Where maybe get chump to non-citizen like how many half saw they won't on how many calls won- have any tenths other woolen? How many seventeen? Celerion warm and ask a lot of questions of the type and then I go and so how many questions where I changed the one. Say the same type of questions but in to fool right so so you drawer in like a generality of the questions. So if I do that kind of lesson I'm going to build up to a point. Where hundreds and hundreds of questions in relatively short space of time? So so I don't Wanna include all of them but I am asking all of them in the same kind of way and may be got six or seven different types. So I'm building. The high. Many patients saw there in a veil submitting. This is fascinating this to let let let me ask ski this Condo your am listener to quite a few episodes of the podcasts on a lot but we had the navene risk veon Shamshad she shed a booklet and it blew my mind this book line. I know a lot of reaction for from from teachers and it was essentially a script scrub scripting terms of the teachers to follow in terms of the words that they'd say the examples they choose the the practice questions that they give following these examples and so on it was the definition of kind of prescriptive teaching. And I like if navene had been on the podcast. Let's say three years ago I have been thinking. What the Hell is this? I thought would have been horrendous. that as a teachable having kind of been warmed up to it by speaking to the likes of Johnny Quinn and Greg Ashman centrally planned. Lessons are a really big part of this. I wasn't as kind of shocked by Walton evine sad but but then I guess what I'm getting to here is whereas all the things that you talk about or obviously vitally important the teachers to do incredibly challenging. Do things for the teachers particularly beginning teachers to able to do so. What's the argument against say? You're giving them essentially a booklet. Lighten Avin's begins with a script for. Let's say you know the first you know ten lessons. They teach US something like that. Them sitting down to reflect ALB- having helping delivered the lesson having through the lesson and reflect on what were what didn't why they think he sequenced in this way. Why you included this number of examples? Then they build ought to be able to do a bit more independently because it seems to me like I mean obviously you know they sounds like a really challenging thing firfer novice his teachers to do. Yeah the I guess. The argument the argument against that is we don't necessarily have those materials of good enough quality. Kuala that you can just give them. I recognize a shame. But it's but it's a by the way like if you're in Japan your new teacher rule Singapore or China or something like that is what you do yes nice we. As detailed as Levine's books would be without be rights. I mean I'm not enough to to be able to data but But he's not that kind of thing is it's it's examples. It's the practice. What's his questions on kind of trump's that that would yet take Selena genetic connect him US concepts angelman self? Yes I do yes. Yeah so like doc I think well like with lots of things I think That is a really useful resources for teachers. I to see how it's all put together in the older and things An estimate tricky in those because he deliberately mixes around when you'll GonNa meet things if you like. The fraction bit through from when they first made a fraction to win their on fractions. That's a really interesting in progression and really good a Martin it for kind of like thinking about subject knowledge. It's not the only way but is a good place to start from but we kind of disdain well and if exit site ain't nobody but we just don't have that in the same way as they do in say Japan Pan for For this which is why I always would suggest a mine that if beck and data. Let's start with the start with textbooks because I'd say similar when you stopped it but like textbooks when the enemy correct were worse than you could a batch of on a for me worst. The I didn't win a textbook and if I did I would take the questions and do something with oil dependent. Take a question here questioned but you could have textbooks that are really nicely structured and developmental and bring gain like into to leaving Have Space type two. Hardly ever have good mixed-sex sizes might took his back my research. But you just don't really get textbooks that the properly and take account of what we know by high to organize the textbook. Yeah I guess the problem. Is We just ready to help though. And I and even even worse than nuisance expert would be stand page one and work through it h to page eight page full when naturally that if you had to really well textbook that the this really sensible way to do And I think ultimately what you would want is reme Ryan is kind of a useful a useful place to stop and it gives you but you have ran the edges today with the stuff. Yeah I agree I well one quick point about textbooks this this..

US US Albee Japan poston beck reme Ryan Kay Selena ALB Johnny Quinn King Brian navene Cadet Eric sample Walton evine Avin Levine
"greg ashman" Discussed on Mr Barton Maths Podcast

Mr Barton Maths Podcast

03:18 min | 3 years ago

"greg ashman" Discussed on Mr Barton Maths Podcast

"On previous episodes the meyer about all this research it doesn't matter about cognitive science working memory and all that kind of thing if the kids don't put the it's all a waste of time sixty minutes stop there with one eye on the homework and another ion naira on wall sapper whatever it is isn't going to be as good as dedicated focused hard solid sixty minutes so it's not just the time. It's how student spend that time him and for that. We need to get kids on board with it. We need to show them the benefits of and so we also need to bring parents in and again this is something that's going to keep coming up in this take away the role of parents parents parents not not being able to necessarily sit down and help students with the mathematics the english on the history homework but to check kids doing it to check the do not in the right conditions and also to help support the teachers in the message that this is an important thing that gets to be doing the role of parents the more i read read the more i speak to people the more i'm convinced it's absolutely massive and that comes to matzec zayed's he probably criminally we haven't discussed the enough on this podcast. We did it with a lucy right cross smith when she came to talk about and the cambridge mathematics expresses but i definitely want to talk to more experts on this but again speaking broadly net with <hes> the role of parents and comes into play again this negative messaging ceiling on ambitions. I always struggle. Matthau is never good at maths. Just kinda low was the aspirations but also the point that often i forget the over praises boswell kind of falls prey saying oh well don't you do really when the kids own that that can be just as as damaging is not giving students the price not giving them the confidence they need to props over commissons -iety as i say society is something that i've only scratched the surface off and it's a massive thing that yet i i need to. I need to look into more sleep while up how many times have mentioned these intake ways now sleep and i'm not gonna do a big thing on this now so i've got a special sleep episode coming up soon but the big thing for me is is increased awareness. It amazes me that it isn't at the forefront of all schools policies sleep because it doesn't my whatever else you do you if kids don't sleep in the not taken information not retaining information than processing information sleep needs to be the big the big thing and as i got an episode all about that coming up less couple motivation motivations sonate in one my views on motivation completely changed whenever i started reading eating research into it i was often of the well i was always of the view that you motivate kids to help them be successful but then the more i read typically reading the work of greg ashman ashman in the studio. He put me onto suggested. The line of causation was the other way round that actually you get kids being successful in that in that motivates them and you get onto this virtuous circle but but i find it interesting that the question that broadly net would pose there is how'd you get them into until out virtuous circle cheese fries. How'd you get them onto the flywheel because this is this kind of self fulfilling get kids feeling successful than motivated and the more successful than the more motivated. It's brilliant kick. Start the process. Do you need that extrinsic motivation to kick start the process..

greg ashman ashman sapper lucy meyer matzec zayed Matthau boswell cambridge smith sixty minutes
"greg ashman" Discussed on Mr Barton Maths Podcast

Mr Barton Maths Podcast

16:05 min | 3 years ago

"greg ashman" Discussed on Mr Barton Maths Podcast

"Gentle Academy Switzerland on twitter. The new Pacey in this reflection decided to focus on example problem pass given that is probably the most consistent pedagogical approach. I've implemented this year generally speaking of when the minute similar way to how Craig's at the math in his book with a silent teacher wet example sample followed by a minimally different question many whiteboards. It's an incredibly efficient approach and I'm. I'm really happy with it but my concern on specific occasions is similar to something Greg Ashman mentioned in a previous post and that's that they don't necessarily induce descending desirable difficulty so I'll spend some time using on some of the things I've read an thought about in this regard firstly Michael Persian discussed his implementation in a recent podcast episode which involves having students individually individually analyze word example paper this I think might aid independent development although with possible increased in cognitive load due to the entire example presented in one go rather than being broken up so they'll have to be some brief explicit instruction learn how to manage this I think I don't think it'll be as efficient but with the right group the right conditions right problems could improve of a worthwhile city skills secondly. I'd like to trial more variations of example popping pads ah recently by McRae's making every mass lesson counts which was great by the way and I specifically like the section on Example Problem Pass in the Book Hammer I too incomplete example problem pairs and which missing step can be the beginning middle end. This has been shown to have high effect especially become especially when combined with the students self explanation. It's a technique I've heard more recently backwards fading the both Mart mccord's and Chris mcgrane of describing that podcast episodes there's also incorrect worked examples in which students must identify what is incorrect before trying similar problem and also strategy comparison what examples in which a number of different facilities have presented to students before they are asked to do a problem I've used them at preferred strategy tody or encouraged us one of the trucks out laughing hugely new there but a good reminder to use different approaches for different objectives different variations in example problem pass main juice some desirable difficulty and promote deeper thinking which is why I'd like to do more of them and it does make it clear the starting correct example problem pads is beneficial to reduce confusion and the being especially by the type of example problem passed into doing but also how you want the students approached them is really important especially offering cracked example problem pass more recently. I've I've also wondered about ten in sequence round top students to problem example pass which is a result of digging into purrs competent to failure the show shown when students try problem. That's just started. I reach they become more attuned to what they know in. Don't know that AIDS learning the instructional face some initial research has shown that if the instructional phase draws on students solutions it can have greater benefit student learning and so using strategy comparison Jason examples generated by the students could walk while in this model I should also know that failure seemed to more effective with conceptual based tests rather than procedural ones I might lighting contact from the problem example Pazar most suitable or more suitable pedagogical sequence for higher retaining students who haven't high enough levels of motivation to persist with the problems but also high enough knowledge foundations targets of the problem in the first place and benefit from the generation effect. I go I googled whether anyone looked into problem. Example pass and there is some interesting initial research from coppins atoll. I was really surprised that they found no difference in tests performance of both high attaining students and low attaining students. If if the students will give an example problem as or if they're giving problem example pass however given the research was conducted with pub puzzled like problems they speculated the students didn't lose motivation with the failed problem-solving attempt because they curious about the solution strategy afterwards which might not be the case for more procedural problems that more common example problem pass sequins also give him the students with primary age. The motivation festivals might be different to students of Secondary Age Indeed Vanguard Guitar found that problem example problem past resulted in increased test performance over problem example Pez in a very specific second view setting and also that less efforts expanded when when learning with example problem bears I they're more efficient so wells problem example pass mainly produced similar task performance under Christ specific conditions. They could be useful in some scenarios quite a lot to ponder there ultimately if we want to aid the development of students is think is in mathematicians than I think utilizing greater variation and example pop and pass and also using problem example as the right conditions will provide additional pedagogical tools to help meet this aim thanks doc. I'm maths teacher and teaching learning coordinator.

Switzerland twitter Greg Ashman Mart mccord coppins atoll Craig McRae Chris mcgrane coordinator Michael Persian AIDS Pazar Jason
"greg ashman" Discussed on Mr Barton Maths Podcast

Mr Barton Maths Podcast

12:59 min | 3 years ago

"greg ashman" Discussed on Mr Barton Maths Podcast

"Be order operations with negative numbers. So it just lists. What the things are to be covered in this unit in the in the broadest in simplest terms. Then as a separate excel document every year, I have a document that has every week of the going down the left and across the top five. Got you said when you write your night ten year eleven time we get to your nine year nine hiring United fan Dacian. So it kind of splits a bit there and in week one. It will say start unit such and such and then say in week six it might say and you'd at such and such. So they know so the teachers know that they have this block of time in which to cover that unit. And I don't try constrained by half terms because that changes, of course, every year, and it's this idea of going back to what we said about lesson being the wrong of time, you can extrapolate that term is is the wrong time too. You know, certain section of working. So I just say will this unit is going to be four weeks or three weeks away. So this is where we started this is where we ended. And then I also in their say where we're going to have. Assessments which units they're going to be on. So that's the kind of general this is how we're gonna fix everything in time documents. And then did the very first year. We did this. I have a wonderful lady department who spent a long time chatting to that too. And she said, why don't we set up? She people are going to find this hard because when you've been used to teaching three lessons on rations. And now you three weeks not going to know what to do with the time. So she said, why don't we do some more detail documents where we say, this is what typical series of twelve lessons could look like on this topic. So she was fabulous spent ages producing these things with me. The one thing I found out recently is we've got to be careful with those because some people can get tempted to think well, I got to do less than one lesson to lessen three go to stick to that rigidly not wasn't how it was intended. What it's supposed to be is if you're not sure what this might look like, then this could be what it would look like. But please don't think that you've got to do it like this because I don't want to plan out. Everybody's lesson by lesson. Because if I do that how they respond to classes in front of them. It's a fine line. Isn't it? Tricky. And again, this been one of my kind of internal debates have been having most of self, and I changed my mind, everyone, I speak to so when I spoke to kind of Greg Ashman, and he first introduced me to the idea of kind of set almost centrally planned lessons within a department. My immediate reaction was no, that's ran this. And then the more thoughts about our for that makes a lot of sense. It's equally for less experienced teachers. But also for more experienced is just the benefit from kind of collective wisdom of voters. And then just the last episode. I was I was into navene Rizvi as mentioned and her lessons are essentially scripted. Like, she's written down the words. The to the t the exact words that she's going to say in these booklets that the kids have and will play Pinak. I don't if I go that far. But again, the risk this fine line. Isn't there you want you want a structure you want to well-thought-through wave way teaching something that again relies has been produced by you with your vast experience combined. With your colleagues, but at the same time, you you want teach his as you hit the had that you don't want to be a row by the class. You want them responded and be flexible to to the needs of the kids is a real to bounce to strike his intent it is. And this is possibly why I can kind of see how these two things can work together. This idea of all scripting something, but will and the idea of having freedom because if you take say what we were talking about initially led to this which was talking about my flip chops, and how more a whole unit I have safe thirty pages, for instance, where the questions and where I think it will progress. There's no reason. Well, I save those in central areas. So each on computers, we have the mass department area, and we've got folder free units. And people say that resources in that if they find something like it goes in their worksheets PowerPoint anything people say, Dr fraud, stuffy, Matheson's, and all this kind of thing. And but I've saved my flip charts, and which means anybody can use them. So if somebody wants to go with my flip chart, they might actually look that sequence and go, well, I got the top set now. And I don't think they need to do this page or this page because they've got that ready, and they can just skip through and do, but the the process and of the whole thing is planned, and how people use it is then where where they have freedom. And I don't know how many of my stuff do look at these charts. Create maybe none of. I know. But then there in case they want. Doubts interest in one task the last couple of questions on on planning a lesson and the biggies I do apologize for this. And the first is just assessment for learning. We we kinda talk the pawn and throughout book. Do you have any kind of definite ways that your getting a sense of how your kids again on you mentioned exit tickets kind of towards the end or even kind of partway through Lassen? But I'm thinking also things like mini whiteboards and kind of show of hands. All this kind of thing. What what are your ways of getting a sense of how your kids are understanding and the work that they're working through? We discuss this very thing in our department meeting tonight, and we talked about many white boys, and the general consensus seemed to be we love the idea of mini whiteboards. The practicalities of them. It makes them a better pain in the neck. I'm going to tell me interesting go. Well, they're great because you can ask the question. You can see everybody's answer straight away. But the pens run out, and they the temptation is there to scribble it, even if you put them on the floor. They're still you got the picking up the putting down and the little scraps of cloth to clean them ended end up everywhere when they get penalized fingers in it. There's all these little things that actually make it not quite as diligent as it seems to be when you stop and think about it in the first place. That's interesting. So a no go from anyway boards. Well, some people might -partment for them or do still like to use them. Some some people just said, I I can't go there because it's too too much facts. So you know, that we have if they want to use them. They can use them. I have sometimes use them. Again. It depends on the class. And it depends on how well I think the class will respond to them A-level mind when I know that. Those jobs are more responsible. And they're not gonna mess with them on the whole. They can be really. Yeah. I think certainly when I've seen them at least useful is when the kids aren't used to them on the scene bit kind of a gimmick or nice one. The why Baltar outlets mess around with these when they're the best when it's just the norm when it's just an only, but again, the still no getting away from. Yeah. The pens. They'll doses I've seen a few people haven't kind of stuck on the back of Chas a little pocket. Whether it's got the the whiteboard, the pan the rubber and Sonus off. That's quite nice. But I think that there is that trade off isn't that there's massive benefits when they work. Well, but he's finding a way to make that work can ask Jim it. What what do you do? Instead, then how would you get if you wanted to quickly get a sense of how well your kids stand in something? What would be your technique? The thing. I mentioned already about asking a question and giving them Surti seconds to answer and say once as we go around the room that won't ideas, very very regularly. Interesting and the cashier Nova massive one eight and this this is big. And it's the thing that I I'm on you mentioned you around before I'm specialize in it runs in about this. Any anyone who's fortunate enough to invite me into speak to that stuff? This is what the hearing about these days. I'm not my views on difference Asian. So I just wonder. Is it something that you're conscious off in your in your mind, when you're planning these sequence of license, and when you're in the lesson yourself, are you thinking how do I differentiate and any few are, what are your ways of differentiating throughout these lessons? Now, I'm not thinking naturally not tool, and I use to think about it so much and now I think about it a tool in it so liberating, and it's made not scrap indifference to the attainment of students. Is we start thinking about differentiation? In fact, all that's happened over recent year is is results have remained consistently good. And if anything started rise a little bit and not thinking about differentiation has not had any negative effect whatsoever on that. And I know that Jesus results as before, you know, that's not our main aim. But that is the way that we're measured is one way of seeing how well you do on the whole but differentiation or the the lack there of has not made a difference. Now. That's but I need to qualify that. Because what I don't want is for anybody to listen to that and go gee overseas and thinking about the children in front of and thinking about what to do. But in fact, what's happening is entirely the opposite. Because what's happening is I'm thinking in more depth about it. And I'm thinking we'll buy the. End of this sequence of lessons, and then narrow it down by the end of this hour or the Saudis the next two hours while I need everybody in my class to be able to do in order to move on is this. So how do I design my lessons, and what we do to make sure they can all do that. And if there are some that get that sooner than others than there are also things that I can will day. I might for instance, says X challenge questions that get them to more deeply. All think about nuances of ideas that they might not considered. Otherwise, I might sometimes I have absolutely no problem with somebody who understand something. Spending an extra ten minutes doing some more questions on it because it ten minutes extra practices not going to hurt. If it's going to be nothing. But good. So yet I remember agonizing before over our. No. So so that I know they're gonna get three quickly on earth and going to do to them to do. And now, I think well, that's okay. I can do a little bit more. It's not problem. It's not going to hurt. But that comes in a wider context of thinking so much more carefully about what everybody's doing. And where I want them all to be at and one thing I really dislike now is the not done it for a long time. And I'm I'm glad it went to wall ago. But it's this idea of differentiated learning objectives, and all and most and some because for me the minute you set lesson out, and you guys. Will some children this class are only going to be able to do this? You're putting a ceiling on. So I think it's having opposite effect because people we would present different location to us as a way of making sure that everybody had access to what your teaching. Whereas actually if you're protein in the way, I just mentioned what's happening with the almost. And some what's happening is that your putting ceiling on a certain number of children in your class. And you're saying I I automatically expect that you're not going to be able to do what associate. Absolutely. And especially if you're making the decisions of who those kids are before the lesson you're asking for trouble. Because again, you'll inevitably if you're anything like me, you'll you'll have got it wrong. Kids will surprise you. And and it's almost a self-fulfilling prophecy. You expect kids to struggle. And then they end up struggling, and and also if you make that decision in the class than you base on pretty dodgy evidence. Like a couple of kids answered a couple of questions, quite miles. All of a sudden panic and give them some extension work. And so on so forth is yeah. Is fascinating is differentiation. And now Jimmy something's happened there during the interior. It's only happened. I would say, well, I'll tell you the people it's done Donnie Quin, Chris Bolson and the risk v. And that is I have a set of questions to us. You we've spent two hours of us. I quite lesson. So I'm gonna I'm gonna ask you got one more question to ask you here. But I'm gonna ask you will you return to the podcast for Paul to Germany because as a little teaser trailer in the things that we haven't discussed I've got a whole series of questions on ruining maths department, which when I interviewed Amir hours e it was one of our most popular podcast because people were fascinated whether they're actual heads of departments or aspiring heads all just gonna teach his who want to hear how the departments room. They love anything

navene Rizvi Greg Ashman Lassen Pinak fraud Jimmy Sonus Chas Donnie Quin Jim Nova Germany Paul Matheson Chris Bolson ten minutes three weeks two hours four weeks nine year
"greg ashman" Discussed on Mr Barton Maths Podcast

Mr Barton Maths Podcast

17:33 min | 3 years ago

"greg ashman" Discussed on Mr Barton Maths Podcast

"So they have it. There was my interview with David died. I really hope you enjoyed that one. And God much out of as I did. I found David an absolutely fascinating guest. I'll be perfectly honest with you. I was a little bit nervous before this conversation purely because David is clearly so bright. And so well read and this subject matter, not only does it fascinate me. But it's it's full demento important is fundamentally important to our job as a teacher our jobs for those who are as parents for anyone who interacts with with with children hose, just who's it genuinely interested in in how intelligent develops. What we can do to to help kids get clever. So it was one of those conversations that are really wanted to get right? And I and I'll reflect a little bit more about the impossibly some of the mistakes made in the interview a little bit later on in these takeaways, but first off just a few kind of practical things that have been pondering since spoke to David the first is an we come back to this every now and again on the podcast just out flipping art is to move schools and annoyed of people talk about this people always talk about the father's heart starting off as an end key tea or even a student teacher. But it's very hard. When you're in a stop light teacher, and you feel uncomfortable. And you've got you routines, and the kids know, you all this kind of stuff, and you move school, and every reputa- all the reputation, you built up everything that came before is just it just crumbles crumbles to the ground. Nobody knows who you are. And if like me you moved into quite a challenging school. It could be really really difficult. So what? Coun- we do to to help. Well, I was thinking hard about this. And this is something I've been looking to observe in in my own school of Las fuse. Whenever new teachers joined what really helps is if your teacher in a school. And a new member of staff comes in maybe comes into the mass department or your English department, or whatever it is. I think it can be really helpful to talk to the kids about not teacher. And I it sounds that stupid this, but just to drop their naming conversations like Mr. Birch Bayh a teacher joined the school at Lasca, please. And Mr. Burke's into forty oh, Mr Bush those or or just to be seen. It sounds pathetic would just seen out and about with teacher break or at lunchtime in the corridor or something like that. What that does? I think anyway, is it shows the kids that that teacher belongs that that the new teacher is part of the fabric that they've got allies that one of the teachers now once they see that particularly if if. The scene with a well established teacher, then it just helps integration a bit more as opposed to what I see sometimes. And I've been I've been the victim of this. Sometimes when you go in that, and you feel very isolated yourself, and you feel about isolated from the staff, but you're also then isolated from from the kids, and you feel about a loner a bit of an outsider, and it can just make that transition even more difficult than than inevitably is going to be anyway. So I guess my thing to take away from this is the case hard enough being that new teacher myself and having experienced that are really know it is so that if I now see a new teacher join our school or join on departments or something like that. Or even if their student teacher, schools direct or something like that. If I can not only make them feel poverty palm. But make explicit make visual. So all the all the students see them as part of the team that I think he can really help ease that transition. He can make them seem. An established member of the team in the student size, which is really important to ease that Trump saga transition. So I was one of the biggest one that I've taken away from both David's book, and our conversation was this on peer groups. Now, whenever you say peer groups have a big influence. I mean that that's pretty obvious. But the number fifty percents the p groups can count the fifty percent of differences in IQ that surprised me it was it was that high. And again, it got me thinking, what was the takeaway that we'll can individual teachers themselves do about this. Well, I guess the most important thing is that they can create a culture within their own classrooms where learning and success of things to be celebrated is a case of trying to create that as the social norm because once that social norms established that that that being successful asking questions not being fearful of making mistakes doing home. Homework being proud when you achieve things if that can be the social norm that's incredibly influential on on on students 'cause students just like don't want to want to be accepted won't do is quite hard to be to be seen as different you want to kinda follow the group. And if the group is following this particular positive path, then it can be kind of self fulfilling prophecy that things just get battered bathroom batter. But we've all been in classes where that's not the case. And I've certainly told any many classes where you've got kind of disruptive groups of students and now have in kind of listen to David in readies book and try to dig that deep Princess, I'm thinking that that that those kind of groups need to be picked up on quickly and separated to try and stop it being a self affiliate prophecy the other way where he kind of feed off each other students were I'm not doing any work. I'm messing around will neither Milo, blah, blah, blah, blah, and guess worse and worse and worse and worse. So I think. Kind of not been not kind of settling on a seats in plan. If it turns out that there's a couple of groups who is just not working for. I'm being quite proactive and moving things around and could be something practical that teaches can do and also on that same thing. These quite common practice in a lot of schools there. If there's a particularly disruptive child in a class say to disruptive kids in a class to move one of those kids into another class. I'm not gonna work. It can work will both ways really it can work if the social norm in the class at the child's be moved into is strong enough, and positively of the child actually then adheres to that social they they start to realize. Okay. This is the way things are in this class. Best thought changing my mind cause otherwise going to be an outcast. But I've also seen it work. The other way round whether character is strong in off and populate often influential enough that they changed the social norm themselves and things start going the wrong way. So it's. There's no easy answer to this. But it's really made me appreciate the power and importance and significance of peer groups on children's learning. And it's something that I'm just going to be on the lookout for. And there's no harm fuss rule with how best to deal with it. But I can't just let it subtly cont. Let these kind of negative pig groups on the one hand kind of makes situations worse for each other. And at the same time, I want to harness the power of the positive pig. Route relationships to translate these positive social norms. It's going to be best for everyone. And the third thing. I just wanted to talk about briefly was this this concept of powerful knowledge on a mentioned this in the podcast that I'm going to try and think how this applies to to Mufamadi my own subject. Now in his David explains. The powerful knowledge is I'm going to quote here that which provides reliable explanations and a sound basis for making judgments about the world beyond the narrow limits of experiences now as they. Authenticated and in his INSEE in the conversation and also in he's book, you can kind of see how it's going to be the case for subjects like English and history. There was some knowledge. That's this going to teach kids about the world around the beyond the limits of that classroom experience, but what he starting mathematics, and we have a little bit of disagreements on the kind of why you do things and so on and so forth. I've been thinking long and hard about this for me. And the co gotta my to this is not a definitive answer by any stretch immagination. But for me, powerful -nology mathematics is is all about connections. I think maths is bad for students and students have a negative impression of mathematics when it seen as low to disconnect. Two chunks, right? Will learn in this this week will infractions this week next week will learn in Pythagoras next week. We're learning those just load a separate things for me powerful. -nology math is seeing how all the different areas of mouths connect together. How fractions connected decimals? Connect to percentages when negative numbers come into play. How connected to everything? So Matty, no longer seen as isolated topics. Now, a really simple way to do. This is just to harness the power into leaving or as Anna Nicole's it into weaving. So always look for petunias east and bring these high value topics like fractions decimals percents, she is negative algebra into all the topics that we stood. So these kids are always seeing the link always seeing that the thing that they learned last year or three years ago five years ago, it's coming back again because it's all connected Massey's, one wonderful connected subject together. So that's one way to harness interweaving, not needs Cafo curriculum, plumbing, Catholic Catholic scheme of work ordering to make sure that there's opportunities for this interweaving and also kaffa plumbing to make sure that those opportunities are taking a vantage off the topics answer in isolation that wants to basics of the topic of taught then these other high. Volley topics are woven in there. But also this ways to make these connections, and and harnessed this powerful knowledge and in other ways, so I'm going to be reflecting on this in my interview with with Alex quickly, which I've already recorded, but I'm going to be releasing next. But one podcast, and I'm going to be talking there about a new thing. I do when I'm introducing a topic. A new way to help students make connections a million. This is a bit of a teaser because I want you to listen to that episode because again is is is one of my favorite conversations. But I think by making these connections by showing students where things fit into the big picture of mathematics is that of isolated topics. That's when the knowledge that we give kids become powerful. Again. Just just my view on that one. And knew the thing I thought about you can see Hyde lots think about all this conversation is this struggle and failure. I find it fascinating. That David says that this has been a bit of a kind of failure. A culture developing 'em in teaching. That's something that I've certainly felt enough. I've spoken about at numerous workshops that I've been looking to to be invited to speak out. And you've got to get the culture right of calls. It a culture of era within the classroom where kids all afraid to admit mistakes bought for me. There's a fine line. You don't want kids struggling too much. If if everything's a struggle if the permanently asked to be outside of that conference own if the permanently finding things difficult, then you need some strong character to be willing to keep assistant in the face of concent-, struggling constant failure. And so for me that struggle has to come alongside success. I think kids are only willing to struggle. This is just just my view only willing to struggle on only willing to kind of put up with failure. If firstly they've tasted success in the past. And Secondly, they think that struggling failure is going to lead to more success in the future. After. So they've got to experience success and have the viewpoint that they can experience success again in the future. And also just going back to what dog lamb of spo- as talks about with this culture of error. One thing I've started doing now is making sure actually script Soma interactions, and they sounds a bit ridiculous. But particularly when a child's made a mistake, and I want to actually use that mistake and share it with the rest of the class because I'm pretty sure that if we don't get this tackled now, it could be a problem that just grows and grows and grows. I've got to be really careful in my interactions. Both with that students who's made the mistake. I'm also with the with the whole class themselves. So with that student, I'm going to say to them, Jim. And if I just borrow your work and show it to the rest of the class. And if they say to me, I've made a mistake. I'm going to be honest. I'm gonna say, yeah, you off and I'm not going to say, but I'm so pleased. You've made a mistake sounds quite patronizing. And that's not true. I'm not pleased that they got it wrong. Wrong. That's the wrong message. What I'm pleased about is. That thou willing to allow me to use the mistake that they've made to help them out on the rest of the class out. Saw make sure script my interactions in that way. Thank you so much Josh for allowing me to to share the mistake you've made with everybody because I'll tell you why you made it in this instance. But I reckon there's at least four or five other people don't make same thing if we can get a soil down. Now, it's going to be to the benefit of everybody song, really careful in the language that I use an will change with different kids in different classes. But I think a lot of time gets spent less employing thinking about the resources we use the questions that we ask the examples. All those things a fundamentally important bull. Certainly one thing I've not spending time thinking about over the years is the language that I use. And that's something that I think is fundamentally important something I'm going to be reflected on and working hard wrong over the. Weeks months and years. Finally, finally, we returned to load theory. And he's one of those things it's been a recurring theme in this podcast. Then we've got kind of extreme views on this. She get Greg Ashman who's a massive cognitive load theory advocates and listen to my to tease with Greg. If you wanna hear more about that. And then also we had Dr Jala Williams on recently. He's not quite a Musset cognitive load theory advocates fascinating to hear different viewpoints on this book just to take the slightly different. Tune on. I started thinking about contemplate theory and other aspects of my life outside of education. So, and I mentioned that I'm currently do not NATO classes me, and my wife, and I'm experiencing extreme cognitive overload trying to figure out to change not peace and use bottles and all this kind of soften all things after a member about safe sleeping positions for babies and all this kind of stuff. But also I've been thinking about comedy of load theory in terms of my interview in tecnique. I need to get better. At interview quite annoyed with myself at a couple of points, in my view with David and three the key point of the interview is was was trying to figure out what influences I q, and I was fascinated to to try to get to the bottom of parental influence. This is P group influence, but if you listen back to it, I was tempted to flip and try and call this hour edited to maybe sound bit batter kind of bundle three or four questions into one. I asked David to reflect onto quotes than us then everything closely big question about how schools can harness the power of PA groups without I dig into what effect pig reaps. Have why parents have no effect beyond the certain age and all this kind of stuff. So it's all well and good using cognitive load theory when I'm teaching, but I need to start using it a bit more in terms of incident and stuff. So I'm making a pledge hero making this public. So you can listen out C is Lee stick to this. I'm gonna try an atom is my question. Atomised interview, I'm going to try and break questions down into into smaller kind of Aries. So that the personal interview and can focus on that one area before then build it up to the next and build it up to the next Bill tonight's, although is it's too much from the gas. It's too much for the listener and sold and so forth so annoyed about myself about but I'm going to turn into a positive. I'm going to try and loom from it. Anyway, I think off takeaways Fennell flipping sorry for banging on so much. There was the so much high to think about as older amaze me to do is offer a few. Thank you. So I thank you to podcast dot com for the lovely jazzy music throughout the show. I'm massive Funke's to David died out. Absolutely move talking to David his books wonderful strongly advise, you check it out to be a link to it in the show along with all the all the things we discussed about David big three as well. On the Massey. Thank you to you, the listener keep it on tuning into these podcasts. I'm trying to brunch outside of my comfort zone with with interview in English, teachers and primary school teachers and silence. Oh, fourth. I hope you enjoy these kind of episodes where we go a bit difference. And then of course, I have to bring it back in off some months teaches on gossamer absolutely fascinating guests lined up over the next few weeks. And if you joy these podcasts do me to favors that'd be amazing one leave a quick review or rating or wherever you get your podcast from. And it just helps more people find these shows. And Secondly, if you've got a colleague doesn't listen to this podcast. I mean, firstly what are you doing hanging around with them? Secondly, maybe to get them on board. Why don't suggest one of you favorite episodes? It. Maybe this one with David died maybe Dylan William and maybe Dr Helen Williams. It may be daisy Christodoulou could be Chris bowl to pick a favorite episode and recommend that they listen to it. It might just get them on board. Anyway, I'm gonna show sold. Now. Thanks so much for listening. You take care of yourselves of buying.

David Coun Mr. Birch Bayh Massey Mr. Burke Milo Mufamadi Mr Bush Lasca Matty Anna Nicole Catholic Catholic Alex Hyde concent Greg Ashman Dr Jala Williams
"greg ashman" Discussed on Mr Barton Maths Podcast

Mr Barton Maths Podcast

06:15 min | 3 years ago

"greg ashman" Discussed on Mr Barton Maths Podcast

"Participation. I could not agree more. It was a game changer of me and not. Papers is such a readable paper as well. So yeah, I'll definitely put a link to that David and second reflection is an example of something important. You've changed your mind the bounce. Well, I'm gonna change my mind all the time. And and it really irritates you people go, you know, you change your mind that sort of shows as of lack of interest, flexible rigor. You know, you get new information, you should change your mind. Don't do that something really roll with you say, so yeah, I think you know, I think in your position house about to be afoul, the one of the sort of the here sticks started using once a hand, my children is to think of why staying in the Australian guy would have been happy. If this is what my kids are having in that classroom, and an excellent thing that really helped me to think God actually should be. But I want to have this. So if he's not gonna fly kids probably isn't good enough for anybody's. I like it felt good way. Thinking a lot. I'm final question from me. David, what do we should know? When you first started Alson, you career that, you know, now a wish on his mind that there was a debate about the best wage which children, I didn't know that the to broadly opposing philosophical camps. And I just thought who's only one ROY answer and to to to think anything else lives in some is is somehow on Athena. And I wish nine the were the were the walls. An old debates have been arraigned for lower L time. Thus Greg Johnson fantastic. Well, final pain is time dove is to your big three, and I'll put links to all these in the show. So what three other websites or blog post, would you recommend our listeners checkout? Okay. So it's really gritty hard. Then I thought that the Assad expressed north thinking about this or blood so read regularly. I think I'm sure he must have had insecurities of suggested, this are really think Greg Ashman blog. Filling. The pail is is a sort of extraordinarily. Vast mean the man's supposed to every day. And has an insatiable appetite. I live critical thinking about education, and I've met a lot from him and and know on similar journeys too, many solid recommend Matt's blog at all say I'm going to recommend. Three-star learning experiences poker shenice book that he that he writes with the. Oh, cover benign, how awful Meriem. I think it is. Not jim. I think that's right. I might be wrong. That's you know. That's he's a he's a pretty well known prominent research. He's he's talked his he's is very good. Of expressing translating some abstract ideas into into ways, which at least I understand. So maybe other people will as well. And I think my third recommendation is going to be is one which is less banked education. And I think it's the the the blog only into that which I learned most from often of that really really surprises me and it slate star codex. Say that one more time they have not heard of this one slate star codex, right? And it's it's the guy you might say is is a doctor. And but he's a he's a he's a thinker an an a skeptic and he takes. He looks ill. Looks sort of research ideas from all across the realm of ideas. And and and writes essays about set and produces ways of thinking, and and critiques the constantly sort of blindside surprise me. And I really really really love reading what he comes up with them on that block. Wow. Three excellent choices, then they'll be links to all those in the show us as well. As the other things that we've discussed and David all that remains for me to do is to. Thank you. Thank you for a couple of things and firstly and most obviously giving up your time to to speak to us today. This has been another to our epic. And I really appreciate yes, we're recording this just before Christmas. So so thank you very much for sharing healthy, Chris in b. Secondly, I'm just from a personal perspective. And whenever I was kind of I engaging in educational research. Researchers is one of the one of the blogs, I came across I and whenever I was researching for my book, like what basically I won't have a book if it wasn't feel blog because yours was always the first place. I went to kind of the practical easy to digest ways of understanding into leaving spacing growth, mice not lead me on a journey to then check out the blogs, and the research that you reference, and it's as a mass teacher to to to learn so much from a subject, that's probably is far removed from mine is is you can get it was just it was absolutely brilliant. I'm a massive fan of mentioned on these podcasts before if you're of all your box particular this recent one, but also the one you wrote with with Nick rose who's been on the show as well. And I will be Lincoln to all those in the show. So thank you for your time. David and funky for all you do and kind of sharing your expertise. I know it's helped me, and I know he's helped a lot. Of listeners. So thank you very much. We. Hugh. So

David Matt Chris Assad Greg Johnson Alson Lincoln Greg Ashman ROY Nick rose Hugh jim