35 Burst results for "Greenwood"

Police laud actions of man who killed Indiana mall attacker

AP News Radio

00:37 sec | 2 months ago

Police laud actions of man who killed Indiana mall attacker

"Police in Greenwood Indiana are calling 22 year old Elijah dicken a hero Dickon was at Greenwood park mall with his girlfriend Sunday evening when a man opened fire shooting 5 people in the food court Police say dickon who was legally armed pulled out his weapon and shot and killed the gunman Greenwood police chief Jim eisen praised dickon at a news conference on Monday Many more people would have died last night if not for a responsible armed citizen that took action very quickly within the first two minutes of this shooting Tape courtesy W are TV Three of the victims were killed I'm Donna warder

Dickon Elijah Dicken Greenwood Park Mall Food Court Police Greenwood Police Jim Eisen Greenwood Indiana Donna Warder
Good Guy With a Gun Stops Indiana Shopping Mall Shooter

The Officer Tatum Show

01:20 min | 2 months ago

Good Guy With a Gun Stops Indiana Shopping Mall Shooter

"So to shoot it goes into the mall, the Greenwood park mall, some of you guys from Indiana know exactly what that model is at, the forgotten man, my producer, was telling me about an experience that he had at the mall and thank God he had a license to carry a gun. So the interesting thing, Indiana, just allowed for people to pretty much carry without a permit. And so a young man 22 year old man is now carrying in the mall and the food court where the 20 year old suspect who's now deceased entered into the mall, went into the bathroom, he was in there what they were report over an hour, I guess he finally got the courage to come out with two long guns for those who don't know what long guns are. AR-15s. And he began shooting. He said he fired over 24 rounds, killing three people and injuring two other people, a 12 year old girl was one that was injured as well. She suffered non life threatening injuries. But the good Samaritan, with his girlfriend, going to the mall, shopping, hopefully at Louis Vuitton. And he sees the suspect, the suspect is firing that other individuals and he takes it upon himself to eliminate the threat.

Greenwood Park Mall Indiana Louis Vuitton
The Rise in Crime Is out of Control

Dennis Prager Podcasts

01:20 min | 2 months ago

The Rise in Crime Is out of Control

"Guns, that's what it is. It's guns. So the $500,000 robbed from this store in Malibu right here in Los Angeles. Yesterday, 2 p.m. young thugs driving up probably in an expensive car. And grabbing everything they could, a half a $1 million. Retail shops are under siege. Is that guns? When a gun story, here's a gun story. Four dead two wounded in a shooting at the Greenwood park mall in Indiana. Four dead, the stupid way of doing it. The shooter is among the dead. What did they come up with this asinine way of thinking, huh? Is this equality? It's a form of equality. Yeah, every life is precious. May I say this? You lose the preciousness of your life when you murder. Okay? If every life is equally precious, human life in general is precious. And because it is precious, that is the reason we should loathe murderers. And execute them if it's premeditated.

Greenwood Park Mall Malibu Los Angeles Indiana
Greenwood Police: The Real Hero Was Citizen Who Stopped Shooter

ToddCast Podcast with Todd Starnes

01:11 min | 2 months ago

Greenwood Police: The Real Hero Was Citizen Who Stopped Shooter

"Now we've got some we've got some audio we will play and we will get to from the police department. Again, this is cut number 7. But I'm going to tell you the real hero of the day is the citizen that was lawfully carrying a firearm in that food court and was able to stop the shooter almost as soon as he began. What can you tell us about him? I'm sure you want to tell us his name that'd be great, but I'm sure I can tell you that he's a 22 year old mill from Bartholomew county. And that is all that I can release at this time. There you go. 22 year old young man. Great American patriot. You know, as interesting, I posted this on the Twitter feed yesterday. And it was one of those things that goes viral. Every now and again, we have some viral stuff, and this one had like down to tens of thousands of people weighing in on it. And a lot of these woke evangelicals. These never Trump Christians were very offended that I would call this guy a good Samaritan. And one of the people in particular said a good Samaritan would not go and shoot people. No, that's not about shooting people. It's about protecting people. And by the way, that's what the good Samaritan did.

Bartholomew County Twitter
Shout out to the 22-Year-Old Who Saved Lives in Indiana

ToddCast Podcast with Todd Starnes

01:05 min | 2 months ago

Shout out to the 22-Year-Old Who Saved Lives in Indiana

"This good Samaritan over an over in Indiana, what a what a great story and it has a very happy ending thanks to a gentleman, a young man who was engaging his Second Amendment rights. The story broke yesterday, we've got the peace up on our website. Our news guys all over this. But now we know that a good guy with a gun stopped a bad guy with a gun in the food court of the Greenwood park mall that's near Indianapolis. Happened around 6 o'clock 6 o'clock last night, when some guy opens fire, several people were killed, others were injured, and you can imagine it could have been much, much worse, had it not been for a young man we believe to be in his 20s. Who pulled out his handgun, and by the way, in Indiana, they have concealed carry. And he pulled out his gun, and he took out the bad guy. And am I estimation that makes him a hero? And we need more of this in America.

Greenwood Park Mall Indiana Indianapolis America
The Media Would Rather Focus on Greenwood Park Mall's Gun-Free Policy

Mike Gallagher Podcast

00:53 sec | 2 months ago

The Media Would Rather Focus on Greenwood Park Mall's Gun-Free Policy

"I guarantee you this story is going to spark many people today to go out, go to a range, go take a course, get your concealed carry permit, learn how to be a responsible gun owner so you can defend yourself against the evil that is all around us. And the media won't touch this, in fact, not only will they not touch it, will they avoid pointing out that as Wayne Lapierre once famously said, the only way to stop a bad guy with a gun is a good guy with a gun. Not only will they not cover this aspect of the story very much, but they go completely bonkers and say that the guy is really kind of a scoundrel for violating the malls gun free zone policy. That's how loony they

Wayne Lapierre
Greenwood Police Chief: The Real Hero Was Citizen Who Shot the Suspect

Mike Gallagher Podcast

01:10 min | 2 months ago

Greenwood Police Chief: The Real Hero Was Citizen Who Shot the Suspect

"Once again, the Second Amendment prevails. Once again, Americans are reminded of the obvious solution to mass shootings. In public places, and here is a textbook example. It's worth playing again. Let me play it again. Here's the Greenwood police chief James eisen talking to reporters after a would be mass shooter is taken out by a good guy with a gun. Listen to this. Elio's reporting, self reporting from home when they heard about it. I am PD S.W.A.T. team members were here just as quick as ours were. It was a very, very fast response, but I'm going to tell you the real hero of the day is the citizen that was lawfully carrying a firearm in that food court and was able to stop the shooter almost as soon as he began. What can you tell us about him? If you wanted to let us name that'd be great, but I can tell you that he's a 22 year old male from Bartholomew county. And that is all that I can release.

Greenwood Police James Eisen Elio Bartholomew County
Attendees Cancel NRA Convention Appearances After Uvalde Shooting

The Dinesh D'Souza Podcast

01:35 min | 4 months ago

Attendees Cancel NRA Convention Appearances After Uvalde Shooting

"That's starting for a moment of the NRA because they're having their convention. I noticed that there are some people who have who are going to be there who have canceled apparently who's the guy who's sang American pie. He was supposed to perform. Play Greenwood. Barely even add but is not habits going to do a tape message, but he's not going to be there. Now, the NRA might have considered, I mean, if I were the NRA I would not cancel the convention and my reasoning would be to do that is to concede the point. The left's point that somehow the NRA is responsible for this. I responsible gun ownership is somehow responsible for what happened in uvalde and the opposite is true. In fact, if there was responsible gun possession among some of the people at the school, this would not have happened. Right, and I am a member of the NRA, I a card carrying member. I'm going to actually I need to re sign up. You need to renew. I need to renew my membership, but see the NRA is made up of responsible gun owners across the country. And so I think that you made a point because I said, well, you know, maybe they should have canceled given the circumstances and you said, yeah, but to do that would be to give it to the left, saying that, you know, we are in fact guilty. The problem is the gun. The gun. And that a convention about guns is somehow to blame. Exactly. Of course, this is what the left doesn't really like to accept human evil as residing in

NRA Greenwood Uvalde
"greenwood" Discussed on Fresh Air

Fresh Air

07:36 min | 7 months ago

"greenwood" Discussed on Fresh Air

"Jenna Greenwood welcome to fresh air. I love your music. It's a pleasure to have you on our show. So that means that we just heard from The Power of the Dog. It starts like it's going to be very western ish, but not quite, and then there's other potentially menacing music intruding on it. It's a buzzy ominous sounding melody interfering with this western ish. Kind of sound. So it lets you know that this isn't going to be a conventional western, even though they're herding cattle. And it also lets you know that bad things are going to be interfering. What's happening musically? What are you doing musically? I think westerns have a traditional sound, which is big sweeping strings and sort of Copeland style harmonies, which are not only beyond me, but wouldn't have really suited the darkness of the film, I think, so the approach to this was originally to try and write music for banjo and string Quartet, because I'm a big believer that the banjo can be a great dark sinister instrument. I mean, I grew up listening to things like the violent femmes. And they managed to do that sort of country death song style banjo as the opposite of the Steve Martin. Routine about how banjo is just making you smile, which is true. And all that stuff is wonderful music. But there's also a dark side, I think, to that kind of music. Anyway, I persuaded her to let me try and write something for banjo and sprinkle that. And it was awful as you might imagine. And just sounded wrong in every way. So on the rebound from that, I just started trying to play my cello like it was a banjo. So doing the rolling finger picking thing on a cello instead. So with this strings that kind of interfere with that plucked cello sound, making the sound even more unconventional. What did you do to get that kind of menacing sound from violins or violins and violas? So I had them play with no vibrato and that's a really beautiful effect. In a way, I think the danger with writing music not on paper and relying on computers and demos is that you start to get used to how some string sounds and then just look to replicate that, whereas the variety of color that one player can make with a string instrument is quite mind-blowing and just a combination of a whole ensemble and all the directions it can go. It's really exciting and daunting and it's easily my favorite day of the year is when the string players turn up for an afternoon. Do you want the strings to be perfectly tuned or do you want them to be just slightly off? Yes. I wrote one Q for the Lin Ramsey film you never really hear. Where asking them to have half the players tuned a quarter tone flat, so just a little bit of tune, but all is out of tuners as one another, if you see what I mean. But because they're playing with their ears, it's very hard to do. So they're still making their fingers go to where their ear wants to hear the right note. So even though it was difficult to do and they were sort of weren't doing it properly, it was one of those things where you just end up being even more impressed by what they can do and how they're playing and thinking and making these sounds. One of your influences who you've also worked with is christof penderecki and avant garde composer who once said that we have to use instruments which were built 300 years ago or 200. And the newest instrument in the orchestra is the saxophone, but that's at least a hundred years old. And he said, in the century of landing on the moon, he said this during the 20th century, we still have to write for very old instruments, museum instruments. I think this is the problem. It became the problem in the second half of the 20th century. That there's not much progress because of the lack of instruments of new instruments. And I thought of you when I read that and this is quoted on an album that you collaborated with him and on. I thought of you because it seems to me you want to make old instruments sound new by messing them up a little bit by doing unusual things with them or having them do unusual things with each other. Whether it's their tunings or their dissonances, the number of instruments you use. So do you relate to that quote about using old instruments for new music? I do, because I always found acoustic instruments, certainly orchestral instruments to be capable of much more variety and strangeness and complexity than nearly all of the software I've used in the past. And I think that's maybe why, to me, music by people like penderecki and Leggett and just still sound very strange and contemporary and they still sound like the music of the future. To me, whereas lots of the electronic stuff that was done in the 60s and 70s, you hear it now and it's just, it's sort of of its time. Oh, that's so true. That is really true. And I think that all instruments are just technology. However old I knew they are. And the ideal situation is where you can just regard them as being all on the same level of importance and interest in whether it's a piano or a laptop or an electric guitar or a tuba that they're all hugely exciting things. And I remember as a ten year old, whatever, whenever my mom was driving us around, if we weren't past the music shop, my daydream as we drove past would never imagine being able to go in and buy a guitar or whatever, it would be imagine being able to go and buy a flute or a trumpet. I was just fascinated with all these different colors and ways of making music and making sounds. And in a really tragic middle aged man kind of way, that's sort of what I've turned my life into. I'm sitting talking to you surrounded by lots of those kind of instruments. But I'm wondering getting back to that penderecki quote, I'm wondering if you tried to make old instruments sound just a little bit unrecognizable. And use them in a way that sounds new, even though the instrument is old. You know, that sounds like a new sound that you're getting from it. So I was very lucky when I was in elementary school. Aged 9, ten, that we were sitting with our teacher, and he had everyone bringing their instruments, whether it was recorders or violence, and he said, okay, everyone try and make a new sound with your instrument, try and get a different noise out of it. And that really stuck with me that was just something that fascinated me then. And it's probably still in my how I work today. So yeah, just very grateful to have great music teacher at an early stage of my life. Do.

Jenna Greenwood Lin Ramsey christof penderecki Steve Martin Copeland banjo penderecki Leggett
"greenwood" Discussed on Fresh Air

Fresh Air

01:37 min | 7 months ago

"greenwood" Discussed on Fresh Air

"Today, we feature interviews with two people nominated for Oscars for their work on the Jane campion film, The Power of the Dog. Composer Johnny Greenwood, and actor Benedict Cumberbatch. The film is nominated for 12 Oscars in total. First, we'll listen to Terry's interview from last month with Johnny Greenwood. He was known as the lead guitarist and keyboard player for The Rock band radiohead when screenwriter and director Paul Thomas Anderson asked him to write the score for his film there will be blood. That score was described in Rolling Stone as a sonic explosion that reinvented what film music could be. Greenwood wrote the scores for Anderson's subsequent films, including phantom thread and the master, which opened like this. Greenwood also writes a lot of film music that is more avant garde. But some of the avant garde music is influenced by his love of baroque. He studied classical music when he was young, played in a youth orchestra and has been a composer in residence at the BBC concert orchestra. You can hear his music in three very different recent movies. Paul Thomas Anderson's newest film, licorice pizza, which is set in the 70s, Spencer, starring Kristen Stewart as Princess Diana, and The Power of the Dog, which is set in Montana in 1925. In the beginning of The Power of the Dog, two brothers who own a large cattle ranch are hurting the cattle.

Johnny Greenwood The Power of the Dog Oscars The Rock band Jane campion Paul Thomas Anderson Benedict Cumberbatch Greenwood radiohead Terry Anderson licorice pizza BBC Kristen Stewart Princess Diana Spencer Montana
"greenwood" Discussed on Fresh Air

Fresh Air

03:50 min | 8 months ago

"greenwood" Discussed on Fresh Air

"Spotify or whatever and when you search for it, you're presented with 500 recordings. And it's just I think it's just a bit of a daunting and off putting thing. There's very little curation and very little and plus you're made to feel like it's just that it's somehow beyond you and which is which is really sad, I think I do sort of more on the days when you used to listen to a record hundreds of times and get everything you could out of it. And I'm the same. I listened to a Miles Davis record on Spotify and then rather than play it again. I'll move on to the next one. And there's just none of that sort of obsession. And I think classical music especially suffers with that because if you can live with the same piece of classical music for a few weeks, it will reveal itself to you, but it's about having the patients to do that. Johnny Greenwood, thank you so much. It's been a pleasure to talk with you. Thank you for your music. And I don't know if you care very much about awards, but I wish a good luck in awards season. Thank you. Thank you, Terry. Johnny Greenwood score for the power of the dog was just nominated for an Oscar. He's radiohead's lead guitarist and keyboardist. When you think of the acting technique known as the method,.

Johnny Greenwood Miles Davis Terry radiohead Oscar
"greenwood" Discussed on Fresh Air

Fresh Air

06:18 min | 8 months ago

"greenwood" Discussed on Fresh Air

"When you're calling it a D sharp, for example. What you said was definitely not patronizing because I had no idea that there'd be a difference between a D and an E flat. On the piano, it's the same black key. So I always think of it as being the same. Sure. But string players are always taught that, you know, you push the second finger higher for your F sharp and F sharp is very nearly a G when you're playing a D major. But if you're playing a minor scale or a minor key, then you put your slightly different place. Yeah, it's bizarre, isn't it? It is very strange. But for whatever reason, it totally works when you hear it. Johnny Greenwood, thank you so much, it's been a pleasure to talk with you. Thank you for your music. And I'm expecting one or more of your scores to be nominated for Oscars. So, you know, I don't know if you care very much about awards, but I wish good luck in awards season. Thank you. Thank you, Terry. Johnny Greenwood wrote the scores for three new movies, licorice pizza, the power of the dog and Spencer, an is radiohead's lead guitarist. After we take a short break, recruit a Ken Tucker will review new and reissued music by country music star Connie Smith, who can describe as an extraordinary singer. This is fresh air. This message comes from a PR sponsor, smartwool, from hiking summits to running errands, backcountry skiing to couch surfing, smart wall base layers are everything you need to go anywhere. They make versatile merino wool base layers that offer all day comfort for all your adventures. They're the first layer you'll want to put on and the last layer you'll want to take off. Shop smart will base layers, socks and accessories at smart world dot com. You may not know Connie smith, but our rock critic can Tucker includes himself among the many hardcore country fans who consider her one of the greatest country vocalists ever. He's been listening closely to her two most recent releases. One is a new box set from the German reissue label bear family records called later shade of blue, the Columbia recordings, 1973 to 76, four CDs chronicling smith's entire output at Columbia Records. The other is her most recent collection, 2020 ones the cry of the heart, produced by her husband, country music star Marty Stewart. Together, Ken says these two releases do a lot to confirm smith's status as one of country music's finest song interpreters..

Johnny Greenwood Connie Smith Ken Tucker Oscars radiohead Spencer Terry skiing Tucker Columbia Records Marty Stewart Columbia smith Ken
"greenwood" Discussed on Fresh Air

Fresh Air

07:18 min | 8 months ago

"greenwood" Discussed on Fresh Air

"Music from Johnny Greenwood's soundtrack for the new film Spencer about Princess Diana. Johnny Greenwood is my guest, and he wrote the score for Spencer and for the new film, the power of the dog. He's done several Paul Thomas Anderson films, including phantom thread and the master there will be blood and the new film licorice pizza, which also has a lot of music of the period that the film is set in. Preexisting music. We'll be right back after a short break. This is fresh air. Let's get back to my interview with Johnny Greenwood, who you probably know from his work with the band radiohead, but also for his film scores, and he has three films he wrote scores for three new ones, Spencer licorice pizza and the power of the dog. And licorice pizza isn't by far the first film he's done with Paul Thomas Anderson. He scored Anderson's films phantom thread the master and there will be blood. So before you were with radiohead, my understanding is you were in a band with Tom York's younger brother, Tom York, is the lead singer songwriter from radiohead. So your older brother was in a band with Tom York. You were in a bandwidth Tom York's younger brother. Do I have that right? You do, that's right. So how did you end up playing with Tom York and forming radiohead? Well, they had a keyboard player who Tom's band had a keyboard player, which I think they didn't get on with, because he played his keyboard so loud. And so when I got the chance to play with them, the first thing I did was make sure my keyboard was turned off when I was playing. And I must have done months of rehearsals with them with this keyboard that was just they didn't know that I'd already turned it off and was just they made quite a racket quite a noise. It was all guitars and distortion and so I would pretend to play for weeks on end. And Tom would say, I can't quite hit what you're doing, but I think you're adding a really interesting texture that I can tell when you're not playing. I don't think you know you can't fix them. I'm really not playing. And I'd go home in the evening and work out how to actually play chords and cautiously over the next few months. I would start turning this keyboard up and that's how I started in with radiohead. Wait a minute. I want to make sure I understand this correctly. So the first period that you were playing with the radiohead, you turned off the keyboard. And so you were fingering the canes, but no sound was being emitted because this is an electric keyboard. So exactly. Nothing was coming out. And nobody noticed. Yeah, I mean, you know, we're kind of nicely GarageBand, I suppose in a small rehearsal room and I remember the first few songs when I did start playing melodies and Tom liked it and it was very exciting. So since you've had a foot in classical music and in rock for so long and have been important in both worlds. I think the division is melted away for a lot of classical performers, but not so much for other people, because so many people don't listen to classical music at all anymore. It's just not, I think it's become more and more of a niche. With the exception of film scores. This is one of the great things about film scores is that it brings a different kind of music, often, into people who otherwise wouldn't hear it. I think streaming has been quite bad for classical music because if you are keen to find out more about classical music, you might have heard that the base open violin concerto is a great piece of music. So you go on to Spotify or whatever. And when you search for it, you're presented with 500 recordings. And it's just, I think it's just a bit of a daunting and off putting thing. There's very little curation and very little and plus you're made to feel like it's just that it's somehow beyond you. And. Which is really sad, I think I do sort of more in the days when you used to listen to a record hundreds of times and get everything you cut out of it. And I'm the same. I'll listen to Mars Davis record on Spotify. And then rather than play it again, I'll move on to the next one. And there's just none of that sort of obsession. And I think classical music especially suffers with that because if you can live with the same piece of classical music for a few weeks, it'll reveal itself to you, but it's about having the patients to do that. I know you like performing in churches when listening to music and churches because often the period of music that's being played is from the period that the church was built in, correct me if I'm wrong here, but can you talk a little bit about that about the experience of being in an old church or cathedral and playing or hearing music there? Yeah, so I've spending a lot of time in Italy at the moment and the churches there have just some glorious and strange organs that I've been really lucky enough to play and write a few things for. That's opened up a whole side of classical music. I didn't know about all these early organs that have two sets of black keys so that you can play the notes in between the notes a bit like underscores. And I have keys that reproduce the sound of birds singing and if you look inside the organ these little boxes with water and blow air through them and these instruments are four or 500 years old and it just occurs to me that when you're sitting here in one being played, you are hearing an actual authentic performance from that would be identical to someone sitting in the same chair 500 years earlier. Because the walls are the same and the pipes are the same, and the organ is the same. And this is what it sounded like. And there's a sort of exciting time traveler sort of enjoyment to be had. With that kind of music I think. You've kind of made these organs sound like synthesizers with microtonal possibilities, bird sounds, yeah. Sure. Well, you know how well you know about music notation I want to patronize you at all. But you know that F is a higher note than G flat, even though on a keyboard it's the same black key. But when you play in a different key, that note really should be slightly higher. And when you're in the previous key, it should be slightly lower. So when you're playing in E major and you have your T sharp, that's a higher note than an E flat in C minor. So that's fluidity is something that these early organs tried to try to get biased by having these by doubling up the keys. So use one of the black keys when you want to play any flat, and the other black key.

Tom York Johnny Greenwood Paul Thomas Anderson Spencer licorice radiohead Spencer Tom Princess Diana Mars Davis Anderson Italy
"greenwood" Discussed on Fresh Air

Fresh Air

02:47 min | 8 months ago

"greenwood" Discussed on Fresh Air

"Listen to classical music? No, there was never really music playing in the house other than my older sister, Susan. But in terms of classical stuff, I think it was just because I was given a plastic recorder when I was 6 as a surprise present. And then I had 5 years where I was at a primary school where I was told that no one was allowed to play the recorder until they were 11. And this just became this instrument of total fascination and frustrations like why can't I just couldn't wait to start? So I think it was just that old story of denial making something seem just all the more delicious. And once I started playing recorder, I kept at it seriously to 18. I still play it now. Okay, a recorder is a wind instrument, but you had a plastic one. Now, I had a plastic one in 6 grade because we all had to play ensemble. Plastic recorders, which were known as flew to phones, and the ones we had, I don't know about yours, but the ones we as if a wooden recorder made it with a kazoo and came up with this kind of annoying sound that was only heightened when they were 30 of them playing ensemble. Or recorder. How did it sound? I mean, I'm sure it sounded gruesome, but I was impressed with myself enough to sit in my room playing it all day. But yeah, it was just a baroque style recorder made of creamy yellow plastic by the hone of corporation in 1979 and whatever it was. So I know you love baroque music. You've loved it since childhood. Is there an example from one of your scores on which you feel you especially drew on your love for baroque? I mean, I keep doing it. It's the brutal truth. Like even in Spencer school, there's lots of things that are very influenced. And I'm using influence in the same way that a bank can be influenced by robbers. I think so it's very. So yes, you know, but that's only because all of that stuff, all of Bach and handel haydn. It's all chord sequences and that are still being used today. And it's that thing where you know music changed after that, but it didn't necessarily do anything too different. Why don't we hear that section of the score? And this is Johnny Greenwood's music.

Susan Spencer school handel haydn Bach Johnny Greenwood
"greenwood" Discussed on Fresh Air

Fresh Air

06:18 min | 8 months ago

"greenwood" Discussed on Fresh Air

"I just love that. And I'm not sure exactly what to ask you, but can you talk a little bit about shaping it into that version of the theme? Sure, I mean. I'm a big fan of these historically very inaccurate recordings of baroque music, never done in the 70s, 60, 70, 80, even before the authenticity police stepped in and made everyone play with the right size of orchestra and the right kind of islands and because it's sort of glorious hearing this baroque music done with big romantic orchestras for all that would never have sounded like that. So that was a reference I sent to Paul. And he was also talking about that Kubrick film, Barry Lyndon. That has some big baroque orchestral things in it. And it was just on my level another excuse to get in a room with an orchestra and just revel in that beautiful big sound they make. Well, let's take another break here, by the way, thank you for that music. I really love it. Thank you, Terry. So let's take a break. My guess is, Johnny, Greenwood, and he you probably know him from his work with the band radiohead and also for his film scores. He has three current film scores for Spencer, licorice pizza, Po Thomas Anderson film and the power of the dog. And he's written film scores for Paul Thomas Anderson's there will be blood, the master and phantom thread. We'll be right back after a short break. I'm Terry gross, and this is fresh air. Let's get back to my interview with Johnny Greenwood. He is a composer and musician who you probably know from his work with radiohead, but also from his film scores. He's done several film scores for Paul Thomas Anderson, including the master there will be blood and phantom thread, and now he's written some of the music for licorice pizza. And he also has two other new movies that he's done scores for an addition to licorice pizza. There's Spencer about Diana Spencer, Princess Diana. And the power of the dog, Jane campion's new film. You started writing film scores Chris Paul Thomas Anderson asked you to write music for there will be blood. What was your first reaction when he asked you to do something you'd never done before? Had you ever thought about doing film scores? No, I hadn't. My reaction when Paul asked me was just excitement that I was going to get access to musicians and be able to write music for someone. And the fact that it was for a film, I didn't really up until that time pay that much attention to film music really and I just thought this is going to be a bit like being in a band with somebody except in a bandwidth Paul and the people who are making this film and going to be contributing music to it. And as a way to disassociate from it, I suppose and feel like it's not really to do with me. And when I started thinking like that, I just found it really enjoyable and fun to throw lots of music in this direction. Do you find it helpful to know that I have to write music that fits this mood or that fits this scene? And there's a purpose that defines what the music has to be. Is that helpful in digging out music from your brain? To know what it's for. It is, but I mean, there's a few cues in phantom thread that were written specifically for the scene they're in, but they're the minority really. It's usually more a case of writing music about the characters or the scenery or the story itself. Like in there will be blood, I remember being really taken with the story of HW in this sort of abandoned boy being taken. And I enjoyed writing quite a lot of, I suppose, quite sentimental music for that. And I enjoyed that easily as much as writing the more atonal and stranger. You know, relatively stranger orchestrations and things. And I try and avoid things like click tracks. So quite often, the players are just being asked to play two or three minutes of music. And the poor editor or director have to just, you know, put up with something that might not fit a picture or even move the picture around, so it fits the music. But this is partly from just trying to avoid computers as being the arbiter and how music is played and how tempos are conducted and we'll just ask the players to play something three or four different tempos. And then do the work in the edit and to making things work with a film itself. When you write for a movie, are you seeing the footage of the senior writing for before you compose it or you're composing it before it's even shot? Usually a lot of it gets written when I see the first test footage or footage of like with Jane campion's film, it was saying all of the footage of New Zealand that was standing in from Montana. And just seeing the colors of the film and understanding the script and the characters. And that's already lots of really fertile ground to start writing music. And I'd rather write twice as much music as needed and just keep going rather than panic about dropping the level of the music at the right place. So a line of dialog can be fitted in exactly in the right second and so I'm very indulged in that way in I'm allowed to start at work very early while films have been shot or even before. You started studying classical music when you were a child. How did you go in that direction? Was it through school were you assigned an instrument? Did your parents.

Paul Thomas Anderson Po Thomas Anderson Princess Diana radiohead Johnny Greenwood Chris Paul Thomas Anderson Spencer Barry Lyndon Paul Jane campion Terry gross Kubrick Greenwood Terry Johnny Montana New Zealand
"greenwood" Discussed on Fresh Air

Fresh Air

01:51 min | 8 months ago

"greenwood" Discussed on Fresh Air

"Johnny Greenwood..

Teen dead after exchanging gunfire with ex-police officer

AP News Radio

00:48 sec | 11 months ago

Teen dead after exchanging gunfire with ex-police officer

"Authorities in Aurora Colorado are investigating a shooting by a former police officer that led to the death of a team it's the third shooting incident involving teams in Aurora Colorado in recent days in this incident police say they were called to a report of two people shooting at each other on a street they found a seventeen year old boy who died of his injuries and a wounded thirty six year old man who turned out to be a former police officer for the Denver suburb of Greenwood village investigators believe the shooting occurred when the former officer argued with a group of teens about careless driving in the neighborhood they say at some point both the seventeen year old and the adult pulled out guns and started shooting at each other detectives are working to determine who was the aggressor I'm Jackie Quinn

Aurora Colorado Greenwood Village Denver Jackie Quinn
Fires Force the U.S. Forest Service to Close

Environment: NPR

02:24 min | 1 year ago

Fires Force the U.S. Forest Service to Close

"For the first time in forty five years the us forest service has closed the boundary waters canoe area is wilderness in northern minnesota includes one million acres of lakes and rivers and forests many of which are now on fire. Minnesota public radio's dan crocker. Reports many of the fires here are burning within the boundary waters. But the largest is just south. It's the greenwood fire and it scorched more than thirty square miles of forest and it's forced the evacuation of nearly three hundred households. I met one of those evacuees. Doug landy at a recent public information meeting. He lives in the woods near the tiny town of isabella. That's a summer for mao for watching the forest to get compromised. He says the forest is tinder-dry from extreme drought and unusually hot weather earlier this week. Gusty winds sent the fire roaring through a chain of lakes surrounded by dozens of homes and cabins mike birdman and his wife got a call from the county sheriff telling him their cabin is still standing. But he's afraid at the forest surrounding it will look like a moonscape we're approaching seventy and it's not going to grow back in our lifetime and yeah there's just so much uncertainty it just like a slow motion disaster happening just to the north in the boundary waters wilderness rangers have paddled into warren campers that they have to leave. The original closure order was set to expire today but it since been extended at least another week. That's a big blow for the many businesses that count on these few months to outfit those campers. We have people from all fifty states who come here every summer to experience the boundary waters jason's aboard ski runs the outfitting company in the small town of ely which bills itself as the canoe capital of the world in august. It's usually packed with visitors. Canoe strapped to the tops of their cars. But not now and you know to have sort of this immediate closure and have to tell somebody who's traveled from texas or california and are like standing in front of us ready to go out for a week in the woods that actually everything's changed and your boundary waters vacation is off is really difficult. The forest service is encouraging tourists to canoe and camp in areas outside the wilderness. Ends aboard. Ski is trying to stay positive. But says there's nothing comparable the paddling into the amazing boundary waters itself

Us Forest Service Dan Crocker Doug Landy Mike Birdman Isabella Minnesota Warren ELY Jason Texas California
"greenwood" Discussed on The Q&A with Jeff Goldsmith

The Q&A with Jeff Goldsmith

02:35 min | 1 year ago

"greenwood" Discussed on The Q&A with Jeff Goldsmith

"I'm moving into the feature narrative space at the moment so working on some really exciting films a in western australia and developing theories as well for the streaming so sort of jumping strike back into the crazy world and gracing. I at the same time trying to find on next subject. So were you know we get on the phone every time like who can we get So you know we never make a film about the ten mice famous bands will. I'm next time we'll just pick one band or one person and and from that. That's that's great crazy. What are you working on. My speech of film narrative in post production seriously read which is a film production company. Don't ask peaches and then. I've directed on comedy series called the Which is like a sketch show. That just came out worldwide on amazon Drops every week so we just talked episode trae yesterday and then yeah joining a fashion show here. This fashion work and then yet mental started a show with netflix spot. With the pandemic that could just disappear so just wanna yet waiting to say the next few weeks but definitely busy usually ought to life holdings at once but i'm working on Threes threes could wait is still split. Your focus belichick. My dad is well. Yes that's anyone and so. I'm excited to see that when you're done with a bit look you both. I think you for being so generous with your time. I really loved this movie. You painted such an intimate portrait of artists making art and not really always knowing where they were going. But having the comfort in air studios to be able to fail when they needed to and to find a way through it and that really resonated so congrats on a great movie. And cody gracie. I can't wait to see what you do next. thank you. And that's how they went down special. Thanks again to cody greenwood and gracie otto for being so generous with their time and coming down to chat about their latest film under the volcano. And remember folks. Let your friends and family know. About under the volcano. This is an independent film. So it's great to get the word out there and it's such a fun film to watch so You bill thank you for telling them about it. You know folks. This was originally done as of virtual screening have an invite list. It's free to sign up for you. Could find it at backstory dot net slash events. And you could sign up to be on our newsletter and you'll get invites when we do virtual screening so you could watch the film and see the qna before anyone else and you'll also get updates about what we're doing with the magazine.

western australia cody gracie cody greenwood gracie otto netflix amazon
"greenwood" Discussed on The Q&A with Jeff Goldsmith

The Q&A with Jeff Goldsmith

06:19 min | 1 year ago

"greenwood" Discussed on The Q&A with Jeff Goldsmith

"And that's how. I kind of really your documentary and that led to your first documentary film. The last impressario yet. Yeah and that was amazing. It was just a mid seventy credit. Incredible paypal's remarkable. But he's last style in the white Kind of doors open for me pasta after the film but it was incredible like personal kind of film to make on someone who's a suspended yes such quality time at the end of his life. And yeah and i guess 'cause he'd started theater and my mom had in my dad. I was fascinated with that era. That's awesome and then we're going. Get to cody one more second. But you guys got. We also transitioned into television. Which is a totally different type of directing you did pipo and then you did the other guy what were what. Were your kind of lessons trial by fire of your tv experience coming from short films and documentary past on love because it so fast and said you know you get a chance to take on a show that you know you don't have to spend body bodies of your life on i love to straight. We should like eight ten pages a day. So such a Editing like four days again kind of a rough cut of the episode. so it's a it's a male cutting out very similar in that. We like spayed bossed unsleeping tei super fun so i like to be nominee police on my first feature film at the moment in that said completely different process as well. Is it some kind of the script to begin with whereas daca i think we're in the editor like twenty. Wait till something. It was a really long edit process and yet so i just like doing it all. I think it has straightened get easily. Pigeonholed into just one category to still this try reading. That's that's a smart tactic to move around you. Leave your options open. Yeah that definitely makes sense. Cody tell tell us about your path like what what made you choose entertainment. I know you also started with some short films. I mean in in a similar way to gracie. I grew up with parents in the entire industry. My mom's studied documentary making at ucla So i studied media older high school. I was completely obsessed and then i went straight into media added university so i did that chila here in western australia. And then i had the same idea as gracie. I wanted to go on an exchange program. And i ended up going to oxford. Brookes in oxygen uk. And doing the film over there. And then i came back from Von before you move on site interrupt. What was just same question that i that i asked a second ago. What was what was the highlight of your film school. Experience did it did it. Click something for you or could you have gotten away without going to film school. I think i think that that part of film school. I could have got away without going to but the i went from oxford brookes over. Ucla and i did It was just started with a significant independent producing. And i loved it and i think that may was really when it clicked my love and producing because i'd been floating around in different roles. The film wasn't sure exactly what aspect it was and then when i went to ucla all like oh yeah this is. This is what i meant to be doing. So i probably could've skipped everything prior to that. I just going. Ucla done this tickets. But anyway you live in your land there you go and then you're kind of first. Big official feature documentary was angela's rules which also is in the music realm of documentaries. So what was your biggest lesson of of doing that even though you had done shorts before that and you had produced before that yeah. I had a really incredible introduction into the film industry. Because the first documentaries that i've ever worked on were four on national indigenous broad kosta here in australia and i say and there were. There was a set of fifteen documentaries. One being angela's rules that was directed by emerging indigenous for mike is about everyday indigenous australians in the face of adversity so that were the most incredible stories Angela's rules is amazing story. There was a spinoff quote. Family rose here in australia But is essentially about a family of nine indigenous women who raised by a single mom. And they're locked the kardashians. They're the most hilarious family and they really wonderful. Intelligent women But angela the oldest Is a singer and so it was sort of about her journey being a singer and also what the family has sort of gone through. But yeah it was. You know that to be my introduction into the film world. It's still want the biggest highlights of my career and sort of where i started so i feel really fortunate. That's cool and it prepares you for today's film which we're going to get into right now. Tell us how the two of you kind of coalesced and what your initial idea was when you realize that. There was a documentary. Potential for under the volcano. Not not to be confused. With the john. Huston film of the seventies by the way i kind of love as a as a as a very depressing movie. Yours yours is. Yours is completely different very different. Yeah it has it. Has a personal origins is story to me. My mom was a audits and she was living in months. Rat in the seventy s. She'd heard about this island in the caribbean where the haba was always going to be too shallow for cruise ships and planes could land lose three mountainous volcanic and She decided to go down there in the seventies and start a career as an artist Pro after being a documentary film mica and she was down there in the late seventies and a guy called george martin who happened to produce the bagels was also down there at the same time and they met and he said oh you know. I'm building a recording studio here. And so she was the during the first few years of the studio Became really good friends with all of the musicians and then would sell her artwork to them to make living so we would gracie night when we were interviewing people at work was all throughout the house. Which was really cool. That's what i would always go down monster as a kid. My mom would hold on exhibitions in antarctica. Which is the neighboring altamont threat And i was kinda impulse postponed.

ucla gracie chila oxford brookes angela cody paypal Brookes Cody western australia Von oxford kosta australia uk Angela mike Huston george martin caribbean
Dating and Marriage in America's Prison System With Elizabeth Greenwood

Relationship Advice

01:51 min | 1 year ago

Dating and Marriage in America's Prison System With Elizabeth Greenwood

"One thing. Sam told me that he will sometimes get letters from people who are interested in him. Often women Austin after his story has been featured You know in the news on cable through crime series. I loose so interested in that phenomenon because i think like many of us. I'd always heard about that. I'd heard about it. It's a little extreme iteration. You know the women who wrote the scott. Peterson and i was just always interested in you. Know what's that about. So i started poking around this topic and i got a late stuck with a really interesting organization called strong prison. Wives families and a are nonprofit Of sixty thousand members worldwide. All of whom are supporting a loved one. Who's incarcerated these. Are you know real people. These aren't prison groupies writing famous serial killers. These are all just everyday people who have a spouse or partner who's incarcerated headedness is a group health. I'm so amazing. Women really that grew but all of whom have a husband or boyfriend incarcerated. And i was really kind of off to the races. Once they met some of these members you have very nuance In particular backgrounds experiences. And i just really wanted to know. Why would someone pursue someone in prison all five couples. I trace my book. Met law incarcerated. Meaning that they did not know each other prior ci prison so they met via pen pal website or volunteering. Your prison ministry often. They weren't looking for anything in you know cut to twelve months later and they're walking down the prison aisle so may book traces the ups and downs of those five

SAM Austin Peterson Scott
"greenwood" Discussed on Nobody Told Me!

Nobody Told Me!

03:24 min | 1 year ago

"greenwood" Discussed on Nobody Told Me!

"I think <Speech_Female> stories. <Speech_Female> That again <Speech_Female> can really teach <Speech_Female> us all a <Speech_Female> lot about love. <Speech_Female> Generally <Speech_Female> and a lot <Speech_Female> about relationships <Speech_Female> generally <Speech_Female> and <Speech_Female> you know why <Speech_Female> did is <Speech_Female> about us <Speech_Female> that sometimes. <Speech_Female> Nick says <Speech_Female> choose <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> untenable <Speech_Female> scenarios <Speech_Female> for ourselves. <Speech_Female> What keeps us <Speech_Female> coming back <Speech_Female> and windy. <Speech_Female> You fold <Speech_Female> walk away. So <Speech_Female> <SpeakerChange> i <Speech_Female> hope all of that <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> Elizabeth as you know. <Speech_Female> Our show is called. Nobody <Speech_Female> told me and <Speech_Female> we always ask our guest. <Speech_Female> What <Speech_Female> is your. <Speech_Female> Nobody told me <Speech_Female> less than so. <Speech_Female> What is it that <Speech_Female> nobody told you about <Speech_Female> love behind <Speech_Female> bars <Speech_Female> that that you <Speech_Female> learn along the way that <Speech_Female> surprised you. <Speech_Female> Or what <Speech_Female> words of wisdom <Speech_Female> might you have for. <Speech_Female> Someone who is <Speech_Female> is falling for <Speech_Female> someone in this kind <Silence> of situation <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> great <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Music_Female> One thing that i <Speech_Female> saw time <Speech_Female> and again <Speech_Female> that i just could <Speech_Female> not have imagined <Speech_Female> if the outset <Speech_Female> was <Speech_Female> how <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Female> the process <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> of choosing <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> a relationship <Speech_Female> for <SpeakerChange> yourself <Speech_Female> that is not socially <Speech_Female> acceptable in the <Silence> eyes of a lot <SpeakerChange> of people <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> how that process <Speech_Female> of standing <Speech_Female> in your truth in <Speech_Female> saying you know what this <Speech_Female> is. What i want <Speech_Female> in. This makes me <Speech_Female> happy <Speech_Female> even if you don't <Speech_Female> understand it even <Speech_Female> if grandma doesn't <Speech_Female> understand <Speech_Female> that this <Speech_Female> is what i want. <Speech_Female> Yeah how <SpeakerChange> what <Speech_Female> really built <Speech_Female> so much self <Speech_Female> esteem for <Speech_Female> some of these women <Speech_Female> to the point where <Speech_Female> once <Speech_Female> this was possible <Speech_Female> for them. What else <Speech_Female> is possible <Speech_Female> eating. I saw women <Speech_Female> go back to school. <Speech_Female> Asylum start their <Speech_Female> own businesses <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> in just really built <Speech_Female> these incredible friendships <Speech_Female> among <Speech_Female> other prison wives <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> and experienced <Speech_Female> this kind of <Speech_Female> empowerment <Speech_Female> eight. <Speech_Female> Some lynch <Speech_Female> you. That <Speech_Female> was so <SpeakerChange> so <Speech_Female> cool. <Speech_Female> And i <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> think that <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> what nobody told <Speech_Female> me is that you know <Speech_Female> the right <Silence> relationship <Speech_Female> for you <Speech_Female> might not be <Speech_Female> either a relationship <Speech_Female> for someone else <Speech_Female> <SpeakerChange> in. That's <Speech_Female> totally <Speech_Female> fine. Everyone <Speech_Female> could learn from that. <Speech_Female> I mean it's such an interesting <Speech_Female> topic. <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Female> They're just like <Speech_Female> us. The <Speech_Female> problems were the same. <Speech_Female> Yeah <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> yeah well. <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> How can people connect <Speech_Female> with you and <SpeakerChange> learn more <Speech_Female> about the book. <Speech_Female> Sure so <Speech_Female> you can follow me <Speech_Female> on social media <Speech_Female> at la's <Speech_Female> greenwood <Speech_Female> for you <Speech_Female> number. Four <Speech_Female> letter <Speech_Female> u <Speech_Female> A website <Speech_Female> is liz greenwood <Speech_Female> dot com <Speech_Female> and the book <Speech_Female> is love lockdown <Speech_Female> dating sex <Speech_Female> in <SpeakerChange> marriage. <Speech_Female> America's prisons <Speech_Female> we <Speech_Female> thank you so much for for <Speech_Female> joining us. this has been <Speech_Female> really <Speech_Female> fascinating <Speech_Female> mazing. <Speech_Female> <SpeakerChange> I really couldn't <Speech_Music_Female> put it <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> <SpeakerChange> founded <Speech_Female> that way. Thank <Speech_Female> yeah best <Speech_Female> of luck with <SpeakerChange> it. <Speech_Female> Thanks a lot. I appreciate <Speech_Female> it and they speeding. You <Speech_Female> nice <SpeakerChange> to meet you <Speech_Female> too again. Our <Speech_Female> thanks to elizabeth <Speech_Female> greenwood. Her latest <Speech_Female> book is called. <Speech_Female> Love lockdown <Speech_Female> dating <Speech_Female> sex and <Speech_Female> marriage in <Speech_Female> america's <SpeakerChange> prison system. <Speech_Female> I'm jan <Speech_Female> black. And i'm <Speech_Female> laura owen. You're listening <Speech_Female> to. Nobody told <Speech_Female> me. Thank you so <Speech_Music_Female> much for joining <SpeakerChange> us.

Elizabeth america greenwood elizabeth laura owen
"greenwood" Discussed on Nobody Told Me!

Nobody Told Me!

02:57 min | 1 year ago

"greenwood" Discussed on Nobody Told Me!

"Welcome to. Nobody told me. I'm laura owens and i'm jan black and on this episode we'll explorer question many of us have probably pondered but relatively few of us have experienced. What's it like to fall in love with someone in prison. Our guest journalist. Elizabeth greenwood spent five years following me ups and downs of five couples. Who met during incarceration. She's written about it in the new book. Love lockdown dating sex and marriage in america's prison system the book profiles people who took the greatest leap of faith to develop a relationship in an environment that is by design meant to keep love out elizabeth. We thank you so much for joining us. Thank you so much for having me. What is it about this..

laura owens jan black Elizabeth greenwood america elizabeth
"greenwood" Discussed on With Friends Like These

With Friends Like These

01:30 min | 1 year ago

"greenwood" Discussed on With Friends Like These

"Vast bank just built its new headquarters. In what what had been formerly greenwood owned land There is a new building being built by a wpn energy that is again on formerly greenwood. Land the The baseball stadium. One oakfield where the also drillers stay a play where tulsa drillers play was once greenwood and to To the south you have a A building that was black owned that is no longer that block. That entire block is no longer black owned and then to the north along Thirty six street you have a lot of developers who are buying up land And none of this is black. Owned said seems to me that this gentrification issue which yes pressing in from all sides kind of forces us to look at reparations a little differently maybe what does that look like for you. Yeah i think you know There was a report that was released. In two thousand one By the tulsa race massacre mission itself and their first two recommendations were direct cash payments.

tulsa two thousand tulsa race massacre first two recommendations One Thirty six street oakfield one greenwood
"greenwood" Discussed on With Friends Like These

With Friends Like These

05:14 min | 1 year ago

"greenwood" Discussed on With Friends Like These

"Of downtown all of those business owners wanted all of downtown. They wanted to basically double the amount of wealth and commerce that they could have By having that land in moving the black community further to the north away from the road tracks and away from the from this kind of buffalo downtown area. The massacre was somewhat opportunistic. Let's say right. Obviously there's evidence for some truth to the to the story the cover story. I'm called a cover story. Maybe just a narrative the master narrative but then once it happens there is this existing. I would say covetousness that propels the tragedy but let's zoom past that right the land time machine. I don't know maybe at the same intersection like a a year later. Two years later what would be a good time to land I think a great time to land would be september fourteenth nineteen twenty two So just a little more than a year later And what you see on that day is a newspaper article coming from the black dispatch oklahoma city announcing the reopening of the williams dreamland theater lily williams theater she of the the confectionary store exactly And the article mentions that she reopened that building As well and and we can still see that building today on the corner of greenwood and archer and it still has her name on it And it says nineteen twenty two very proudly at the top of it so that is something that visitors to greenwood can still see today which i think is wonderful Really speaks to the. I mean the word. Resiliency is thrown around a lot. I like to use the word resistance because tulsa really did all it could to stop the community of greenwood from rebuilding and yet greenwood did rebuild The business district rebuilt The red cross reported in december thirty first of nineteen twenty one that of the twelve hundred and fifty six homes that were burned. Seven hundred sixty four were in some stage of rebuilding and repair So you see a a greenwood community that has sort of everything taken away from it. Every law and ordinance that the city could possibly pass to prevent them for Rebuilding bc. Franklin sued the city sued the mayor sued essentially the entire power structure of also end one And so you see greenwood with community. That is very are That won't back down a greenwood community. That won't back away. That won't let this event in this tragedy define who they could become an define Their dreams and ambitions they didn't they refuse to sell their land. They refused to give up their land. They refused to give up their community. Instead they work very very hard to rebuild it very quickly And one of the more amazing things is actually see film footage from nineteen twenty four to nineteen twenty eight that was shot by reverend Solomon sir jones and many people and they can be forgiven for thinking that this footage from before the massacre But it isn't a shot on sixteen millimeter and sixteen millimeter film. Stock wasn't invented until nineteen twenty four. And does it. It looks pretty much the same it. The same bustling community. is it the same inclusive community. We find that There are White employees of black businesses. We find we find zero family a very prominent Oil family has a grocery store in greenwood so a russian jewish immigrant family established as grocery store in greenwood There's an asian store that we found in in the directories. We found latino grocery store avila royal family at a store in greenwood so quite a bit more diverse. I think than than most people realize we are of course talking about capitalism here. So let's take a break to remind you that it still exists and hear from those who support this podcast with friends. Like these is brought to you by credit karma. Starting something new can be nerve racking. Wouldn't you like to know beforehand whether it was going to work out or not. Credit karma can give you more confidence before you make a decision. Credit karma game changing technology shows you tailored offers for credit cards and personal loans. That you're more likely.

sixteen millimeter oklahoma september fourteenth twelve hundred jewish Two years later russian a year later fifty six homes one today Franklin december thirty first Seven hundred sixty four nineteen twenty one reverend Solomon sir jones red cross nineteen twenty two lily williams theater greenwood
Revisiting the Details of the Tulsa Race Massacre With Elizabeth Taylor

My Favorite Murder with Karen Kilgariff and Georgia Hardstark

02:06 min | 1 year ago

Revisiting the Details of the Tulsa Race Massacre With Elizabeth Taylor

"This starts monday. May thirtieth nineteen twenty one. It's memorial day in tulsa oklahoma and the rest of america so a nineteen year old boy named dick rowland. Who is a shoeshine that works nearby. He goes into the drexel building. Three nineteen south main street and he gets into the elevator because he needs to right up to the top floor. Because that's the only place where there's a blacks only restroom in the entire area on. And he has a black man and so he has to go. There is the only place you can go right. So this elevators operated by a seventeen year old white girl named sarah page so they at the very least seen each other before because she's the only elevator operator in the elevator on the drexel building and he's clearly had to had to use that restroom at the top of that building before so soon after dick rowland enters the elevator a clerk at drexel's first floor clothing store ren burg's here's a woman scream from the elevator so that clark rushes out to see a black man running from the building and then he goes into the elevator area to find sarah page still in the elevator and what he described as a quote distraught state. So the clerk assumed. Sarah's been assaulted and he calls the police. The police arrived. They speak with sarah. There is no written statement on the record. it's never taken none as ever taken. The police began an investigation and the exact details of what actually happened in. The elevator are still unknown but most people believe that dick either trip wall. He was walking into the elevator and fell and grabbed sarah's arm to steady him saw or he stepped on her foot as he walked into the elevator and then grabbed her so she wouldn't fall over but there is basically physical contact and the it's likely she screamed because she was startled by it. I saw dick immediately ran knowing that the worst would be assumed about his actions and his intentions no matter how innocent the incident actually so dicko's to his mom's house in the greenwood district

Drexel Building Dick Rowland Sarah Page Ren Burg Tulsa Oklahoma Drexel America Sarah Clark Dick Dicko Greenwood
Mississippi Group Honors Fictional Man in Song 'Ode to Billy Joe'

AP News Radio

01:00 min | 1 year ago

Mississippi Group Honors Fictional Man in Song 'Ode to Billy Joe'

"The death of Billy Joe McAllister in rural Mississippi was a fictional event in the nineteen sixties hit song but Billy Joe now has a real tombstone in Mississippi Hey Joe McAllister jumped off the Tallahatchie ode to Billie Joe was written and recorded by Bobbie gentry the sad tale about a young man who ended his life June third jumping off that Tallahatchie bridge in the gossip that followed a group of locals in Greenwood Mississippi gathered this week to honor Billy Joe McAllister and give him a proper resting place U. S. senator Roger wicker among them mourners told tales as if they knew Billy Joe and then unveiled the tombstone at the Tallahatchie flats that reads he loved the river even unto death Billy Joe McAllister isn't real but he was portrayed by actor Robbie Benson in the nineteen seventy six movie based on the song I'm Jackie Quinn

Billy Joe Mcallister Mississippi Joe Mcallister Billy Joe Bobbie Gentry Tallahatchie Bridge Billie Joe U. S. Senator Roger Wicker Greenwood Tallahatchie Flats Robbie Benson Jackie Quinn
The Tulsa Race Massacre: Where Are the Reparations?

In The Thick

01:56 min | 1 year ago

The Tulsa Race Massacre: Where Are the Reparations?

"Week was one hundred years right. Since the tulsa race massacre occurred this is when a mob of white people with support from local politicians and the police killed an estimated. Three hundred black americans burned down over one thousand two and fifty homes destroyed businesses. And all of this in the greenwood district of tulsa oklahoma. Which by the way was known as black wall street because it was so thriving so dynamic so filled with life and economic potential. Well okay no surprise. None of the white attackers were ever convicted for this crime which happened after a false report of a black teenager attacking a white girl. The girl later dropped the charges but white local media ran a racist article with an inflammatory headline which essentially incited the mob attack. So okay the role of media and journalism historically in this country. Let's take a look at that. Also white media. There helped cover up what happened in this. Like incredible part of the united states in the greenwood district barely any mentioned in the newspapers in textbooks government officials locals so finally one hundred years later. There is a reckoning happening in mainstream establishments. I have a question whether or not if george floyd had not been murdered. You know how extensive with these commemorations be but president biden visited tulsa this week. It's the first time a. Us president has done so to acknowledge what happened in greenwood. He did meet with survivors. I posted this jamila from nicole. Hannah jones who by the way shoutout were watching out for you and unc is are on that what nicole hannah jones said was the only thing i'm interested in right. Now is the reparations

Tulsa Greenwood Oklahoma George Floyd President Biden United States Hannah Jones Jamila Nicole Hannah Jones Nicole UNC
Biden Marks Tulsa Race Massacre in Emotional, Graphic Speech

AP News Radio

00:51 sec | 1 year ago

Biden Marks Tulsa Race Massacre in Emotional, Graphic Speech

"Hi Mike Crossey a reporting president Biden marks the Tulsa race massacre in an emotional graphics speech this is not a right this is a massacre one hundred years later an American president finally spoke to the horror of the Tulsa massacre that saw the thriving Greenwood district also known as the black Wall Street destroyed terrorized Greenwood torches guns shooting a world on may thirty first and June first nineteen twenty one a white mob swarmed looted and burned at Tulsa's Greenwood district as many as three hundred black Tolson's were killed afterwards thousands of survivors were four time forced into internment camps in his remarks Biden said the nation must come to grips with the following season of denial for a long time schools and also didn't even teach it let alone schools elsewhere hi Mike Rossio

Mike Crossey Tulsa Biden Greenwood Tolson Mike Rossio
Biden To Visit Tulsa To Mark the 1921 Tulsa Race Massacre

NPR News Now

01:07 min | 1 year ago

Biden To Visit Tulsa To Mark the 1921 Tulsa Race Massacre

"Live from npr news. I'm giles snyder on day. Mark one hundred years. Since the beginning of the nineteen twenty one tulsa race massacre. The attack by white mobs on the black neighborhood of greenwood known as black wall street span. Two days left as many as three hundred people. Debt of course polanski of member station k. wgn s. reports from an interfaith prayer service marking the centennial. The attack vernon ame church is one of the only structures to partially survived. The events of one hundred years ago clergy from many fates gathered there monday morning to dedicate a prayer while the reverend jesse jackson senior group in prayer for an end to racist violence and a reaper. The black wall street back then. President biden is scheduled to arrive in tulsa on tuesday in a proclamation recognizing the centennial of the massacre. He says he is committed to rooting out. Systemic racism in america for npr news. I'm chris polanski. In tulsa

Npr News Giles Snyder Vernon Ame Church Tulsa WGN Greenwood Polanski Mark President Biden Jesse Jackson Chris Polanski America
Hundreds Gather at Historic Tulsa Church's Prayer Wall

AP News Radio

01:00 min | 1 year ago

Hundreds Gather at Historic Tulsa Church's Prayer Wall

"A prayer wall is been dedicated in Tulsa Oklahoma to honor the victims of the nineteen twenty one massacre that wiped out a prosperous black neighborhood what you're seeing in a service to honor those killed when the Greenwood district of Tulsa known as black Wall Street was attacked may thirty first nineteen twenty one buildings were burned and looted and somewhere between dozens and three hundred people were killed a prayer wall similar to Jerusalem's wailing wall has been dedicated outside the historic Vernon African Methodist Episcopal Church Reverend William barber and Katie you L. this wall is not for us to remember the fight they fall the role is to give us the courage to fight the fight we still have to fight president Biden who will visit the neighborhood says after the businesses were destroyed Tulsa officials deliberately passed laws making it too expensive for blacks to rebuild hi Jackie Quinn

Tulsa Vernon African Methodist Episc William Barber Katie You L. Oklahoma Greenwood President Biden Jerusalem Jackie Quinn
3 Documentaries You Should Watch About the Tulsa Race Massacre

All Things Considered

02:06 min | 1 year ago

3 Documentaries You Should Watch About the Tulsa Race Massacre

"Marks the 1/100 anniversary of the beginning of the Tulsa Race massacre, one of this country's worst recorded incidents of racial violence. Starting on May 31st 1921 and armed white mob aided by complicity or complacent officials killed as many as 300 men, women and Children in the area known as Black Wall Street. Burning it to the ground. Numerous events are taking place this long weekend to mark the centennial, although disputes rose when particularly high profile event was canceled, reportedly in a disagreement over compensation for three elderly survivors who were supposed to take part. But other events are proceeding and there are lots of opportunities to learn more about this traumatic but consequential moment, including numerous TV projects. NPR TV critic Eric Deggans has picked three documentaries, which he says you should not miss. For a long time. The Tosa race massacre was the attack America forgot and obliterated Tulsa, Oklahoma's prosperous black own Greenwood district, also known as Black Wall Street. The riots by white moms was hushed up by local officials and overlooked in history books. But that is changing as several TV outlets mark the centennial with documentaries on the massacre and its aftermath. It's an effort educate Americans on a horrendous attack, which burned down over 1200 homes and killed between 103 100 people. Among the best and most cinematic of these efforts is the history Channel film Tulsa Burning the 1921 Race Massacre Co directed by Emmy winner Stanley Nelson and executive produced by MBA star Russell Westbrook. This film opens with Reverend Robert Turner, pastor of Historic Burn in a M E Church who regularly visits Tulsa City Hall with a Bible in a bullhorn, reminding residents of the atrocity You are standing in a crime scene referred Turner Pastors. The church where black people hit in a basement tow avoid white moms 100 years ago. He now supports efforts to excavate a local cemetery where victims of the massacre rumored to have been dumped in unmarked graves in passing the

Tulsa Eric Deggans Greenwood District NPR Stanley Nelson Reverend Robert Turner Oklahoma Tulsa City Hall America Russell Westbrook Emmy MBA Turner
"greenwood" Discussed on Pod 4 Good

Pod 4 Good

01:33 min | 2 years ago

"greenwood" Discussed on Pod 4 Good

"We are very excited to have Carlos Moreno on the podcast today. I was how you doing doing great doing great. So you have a multitude of jobs, but the reason we have you on the podcast today because you're working on a project that's called the victory of Greenwood. Can you summarize what this project is for our listeners? It's been a project that's in a long time coming. It started actually in 2001. I was asked by the Oklahoma Eagle at the time to help come up with a special.

Carlos Moreno Oklahoma Eagle Greenwood
"greenwood" Discussed on WTVN

WTVN

06:11 min | 2 years ago

"greenwood" Discussed on WTVN

"Is an area that is called the Greenwood district that Greenwood district was the location of the nineteen twenty one the race riots massacre here in Tulsa right that is where are they held their grief of their Argentine celebration yesterday and again today there's some activities going on there today so last night we are actually the best began yesterday afternoon where were you there were I would say a few thousand people there we had a heavy rainstorm most of them kind of went elsewhere in the interview that back into their homes or just underneath some places by the time al Sharpton spoke last night there were there was there were hundreds there but I would not say it was a huge crowd and part of that was because it was raining and again your parents also I would say that that was you know he was a good crowd and it was a very lively and very friendly event but not a lot to really complain that there were protests there was nothing like that going on right it is not running again from Tulsa Oklahoma Brian are they gonna be cordoning off an area where people can protest I know that a lot of the trump rallies that have an area where you can go you can protest to be louder when wave your signs everything else that I can let go of the mix with the people waiting to go in but will there be an area for that there yes there there isn't there have been places located across the downtown area where that could take place one of those is up almost a mile away veterans park where what's being called an anti hate rally is taking place this evening about the same time the president trump will be taking the stage also that's one location but I can tell you the way the security is here you feel very secure once you get close to the arena because three blocks or four blocks or more away in all directions all we have but concrete barriers that are put up National Guard army troops are there members of the Tulsa police department are there and then you walk another block thank you to Princeton area where you have to make your way through that and this is just for the general public is making their way into the POK center right another block to occur through a a serpentine type line that you would do you know any sporting if there are any concert and then they will go into the POK center so your well away from the POK center well away from where this act outdoor experience is going to be taking place up before you know before you can even get there you've gone through multiple security checkpoints anything that takes place yearbook photos perspective it's going to have to be blocks away from the officer is trying again reporting live from Tulsa Oklahoma the side of the trump rally tonight not right right you would have been conversing all morning V. attacks and you thought you'd be in earlier and then it was delayed a little bit of the late again but what what's the process to get in and why it why is it being delayed we know okay what is it you know everything is still on schedule for the general public I could tell you that because they are still they will that be a national line that got the book closer to the second checkpoint it's all under way that began a couple of hours ago a debate as far as we know into the V. okay center is still on schedule for the doors open at three for the rest of us anybody that has any type of set up where we have been you know set up or the media and there are three places where we do that no I won't go into great detail on that but I can tell you from my understanding of what is taking place there have just been multiple security checks and sweepstakes in place I don't know if that means anything I just know that this is a it's a huge undertaking of security and that I would say that that is what is the way to rid of us getting in but not complaining same thing we're going to be there hours ahead right handed sounds good H. Brian Gavin Tulsa Oklahoma one last question you probably been talking to people we'll be camped out and waiting and an element of the two or three days right so these people camping hi I talked to a woman from Kansas city we're going to hear since Monday I talked to a gentleman from Lufkin Texas with a driven man and you got your Tuesday many of the people that I talk to that when I got here Thursday have been already here from Tuesday and Wednesday all of it and it was interesting it looks very much like almost like a kill greeting at another college of football game for their right along the side of the street initially they were from the POK center but when a temporary curfew went into effect they had to move a few blocks away they were they were down at the front of the line because of where the winds are set up but they were sitting there they were getting to know each other they said that was one of the benefits of that to be able to talk to folks like buying to the respective they got to know each other they had moved this year the shared water they they think they can personally talk politics without kids they were pumped so I can tell you almost everyone I talked to they said that they were so excited for this to take place they wanted to be here one of the reasons I wanted to be here is obviously they support Donald Trump but they say the feeling that they had during the last campaign but they've had up until the time of the pandemic they want it back they were tired of all of this pandemic stopping being older for their houses they were ready to get out and they ready to kick things off here and they are excited I'm telling this is going to be a loud crowd times that doesn't happen seven is that what it is seven o'clock central all right eighty eight in the one last thing is not a question but did you see that that your your your boy here got retweeted by the president last night I did not yeah he he rejoice at all yeah I tweeted something about Susan rice and about how she she's been lying around so for years and he retweeted it and since then you're you're gonna find this to be obvious but since then people have complained about my tweet and Twitter is investigating it so I guess you get retweeted by the president you get investigated by Twitter you already were on their list now you're on their super duper that's right it was a bright great report from but also great insight I love hearing a about how to set up is going and a hundred thousand people in the streets of Tulsa in a positive fashion supporting a candidate I think would be a welcome relief in a welcome sight after all these pro testing and and all this this this back and forth against each other this entire time it must be amazing to be there well it.

Greenwood
"greenwood" Discussed on KTOK

KTOK

02:01 min | 2 years ago

"greenwood" Discussed on KTOK

"In the Greenwood district which was the site of the nineteen twenty one race massacre in which white mobs killed hundreds of blacks and destroyed what was known as black Wall Street from the weather center on the storm team it'll be cloudy today look for rain and we'll have a high in the low nineties tonight will drop to the mid sixties tomorrow the first day of summer but it'll be cloudy we have an eighty percent chance of storms that high of eighty eight I'm Jacquelyn Scott newsradio one thousand Katie okay newsradio one thousand Katie okay studios or service of universal men's clinic for medical solutions for Edie yellow teeth learn more at universal men's clinic dot com this report is sponsored by mothers against drunk driving delays on northbound I. thirty five due to an accident at I. two forty we also northwest thirty six that out to deny it and south of sixteenth street a Mustang road I'm counting cars sent with your Oklahoma City area traffic for victims of drunk and drugged driving our grief is unique but you are not alone you always have a place at mad call our twenty four hour victim help line at eight seven seven Matt help or visit Matt dot org everyone's loving what diamonds direct is doing right now it's the best stimulus plan ever five years zero interest financing on any purchase with no money down it's diamonds direct way of helping you make your money go further as we all look forward to better days just pick any item indictments directional cases get the amazing value price you know we're known for making no down payment and spread your payments over five years without paying a dime in interest that means a six thousand dollar designer ring is yours for just one hundred dollars a month this makes everything more of an a time when we need it most pendants bracelets bands colored gemstones designer fashion jewelry take the price divide by sixty and that's.

Greenwood Jacquelyn Scott Katie Oklahoma City Matt