35 Burst results for "Greenwich Village"

"greenwich village" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

07:04 min | 4 d ago

"greenwich village" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Um, this is something we did a few times. Over in that prior exhibitions. You might remember Kerry James Marshall, uh, curated himself a selection of works from the Met's collection. That meant something to him. So there's a precedent for this, and I think we were especially compelled to do this with Neil. Because she's often thought up to be a bit art. Historically anomalous, um, a little bit without context that she was so much her own artist her own being with a paintbrush. That she wasn't her work was never really deeply in dialogue with the work of others, either historic artists or her contemporaries, so I think this is one of the many, Um I think stereotypes around meal that we really wanted to undo and show and what you mentioned The The trio of Cassatt's on girl and Meal is one of my favorite moment. In fact, um and we're not being didactic. In this situation. You may have noticed that there were no chat labels. No explanation. With regard to individual pictures. But let's uh let viewers and visitors and contemplate and come to some of their own conclusions about the dialogues going going on between these great works of art. Randall Kelly told us what was one of her favorite paintings in the show. What's yours? Yeah, well, I mean, I will admit up front that it's very difficult, um, to to choose as you would expect, because I You know, I have one myself so much about me on the process of Being fortunate to work on this project for the last 22. Plus years, Um And I've come to love Neil. Very stuff of the way I love heard in the context of the Works Progress Administration. Um, the the Spanish Harlem period is full of great works of art, but for me, I mean, I would love to. Um, I shouldn't say hold on to my colleagues at Cleveland wouldn't like like me to say this. But Jackson Jackie Curtis and Rita Red, which is in the collection of the Cleveland. Um, Museum is really such just such a standout for me. I think partly because I wrote about This work in the context of Neil's cleared clear sitters for the catalog. And so for me, this is one of those zeitgeist paintings. This is for me. This is the seventies in New York. This is the seventies In the Lower East side. It wasn't obviously painted in the Lower East side. But, uh, Jackie Curtis and read the red were such especially Jackie with such a kind of a cult figure in the Lower East Side. Um Underground or counterculture that but for me, this is one of those moments where Neil really captures the zeitgeist. It's just interesting work. Kelly. Alice Neel also painted New York City, her home city, and she lived in all these different neighborhoods across New York and its village, Spanish Harlem, the bronc. I mean, there is one painting that is, if you stand underneath the Highline right now, it looks honest, exactly the same. Um what How does the view of the city we see in her painting shift as she as she moves through life. That's a very good question. You know, she she is. On the street in more of her early painting, so the paintings of Greenwich Village and the street teams that she made in Spanish Harlem They actually some of the ones that she painted. On the Upper Upper West Side, You know, they say that the point of view is is that of somebody who is embedded on the street, you know, standing on the sidewalk standing at the entrance to Central Park and so Her point of view on the city is literally that of somebody embedded, you know who's living it, Um, living it from the ground up. And But then, as she grows older, she begins to paint more and more images from her window. And again, this is the apartment on the Upper Upper West Side, 301 107th, I think And and maybe she's older and so getting out and about perhaps is harder. But she becomes enamored of the facade that you see that she would see outside of her window enamored of the scenes that she saw on the ground, and those are some of her most abstract paintings, and I think that she appreciates Comes to appreciate late night the the possibilities of abstraction that the city presents to her early on. It's really about the people. It's about the buzzing activity of the street, but later she is interested in the architecture that the structure of the city Before I let you both go. I want to ask you about people because, as I mentioned, this has become a hugely popular show. People are waiting in line for an hour to get through the show, and it's funny. One of the security guard said to me said Don't give us too good A review. It's been kind of crazy in here. He was kidding, obviously, but I'm curious Randall, did you Did you anticipate this? Yes And no, I thought Neil Would be a hit. Um, I didn't anticipate The additional kind of layers of meaning the project would accrue because of this past year that we've been through, um together and I think one of the reasons it's It's resonating so deeply is that Neil acknowledges suffering, um, the the human condition of suffering, but also, um, a company. That suffering is a always accompanied by a sense of endurance. Um, so there's a great resonance, I think, and also, frankly, her images of New York From the thirties. Resonates so deeply and um, around with. But the city was looking like a year ago, in fact, and also hurt hurt, politically engaged work, especially for you willing to G looks a lot like protests that erupted after George Floyd's Murder. Um, a little over a year ago. So it just hits you on multiple fronts and also say it was more of a nuanced detail. Um, Jeff and Brian, who are um It's a couple that is on the facade and signage. Just the fact the very fact that they're touching is I think resident in a way after a year of social distancing that that image wouldn't resonate in the same way without so just in multiple ways, I think Um, yeah, And we're we couldn't be happier. We're glad that people are having this kind of meaningful, deep experience. A kind of catharsis with Neil. Um, it's appropriate. That was my conversation with Metropolitan Museum of Art curator is Kelly Baum and Randall Griffey about the show. Alice Neel, People come first, which closes this Sunday, August 1st. Up next Adopting a rescue dog is.

Randall Griffey Kelly Baum Alice Neel Kerry James Marshall Randall Kelly Rita Red New York New York City Kelly Randall Jeff Neil Brian Jackie Curtis Jackie Jackson Jackie Curtis Greenwich Village seventies George Floyd Cleveland
Throw the first Stone(wall)

Your Brain on Facts

02:44 min | Last month

Throw the first Stone(wall)

"In the early hours of june twenty eighth nineteen sixty nine new york city police raided the greenwich village. Gay club called the stonewall inn. Let me set the scene for you. Gay clubs were much more than a place to get drunk or look for love in the nineteen sixties and frankly all the decades leading up to it. They were not exactly accepting of lgbt people. Being queer wasn't only societally unacceptable. It was against the law same sex relations between consenting adults or illegal in new york city in nineteen eighty and you could be arrested on the street for not wearing at least three articles of gender appropriate clothing now out on a limb here and say that men in skirts found themselves on the receiving end of that one a lot more often than women and slacks did understandably. Lgbt people flocked to gay bars and clubs refuges where they could socialize and more importantly be themselves openly. You still weren't safe there though. The new york city state liquor. Authority penalized and shutdown. Gay bars arguing. That the mir gathering of more than three homosexuals was technically disorderly. These regulations were overturned in nineteen sixty six thanks to the efforts of strident activists but things as simple as holding hands with someone of the same gender was still illegal so police harassment of gay bars continued. There was another player. In the game the mafia the mob saw profit to be had in catering to the displaced and disenfranchised gay clientele by the mid nineteen sixties. The genovese crime family controlled most of the gay bars in the village in nineteen sixty six. They purchased the stonewall inn which had been a bog standard bar and restaurant renovated it on the cheap and reopened it as a gay bar. Stonewall inn was registered as a private bottle bar which did not require a liquor licence because patrons were supposed to bring their own liquor club attendees had to sign their names in a book to maintain the club's membership facade. Police initially left the stonewall inn alone by dint of regular bribes from the jennifer easies patrons benefited by the fact that the police hassling the owners but it also meant that the owners could run the club as they saw fit which meant as cheaply as possible. The club lacked a fire exit. There was no running water behind the bar to wash the glasses. Though there was plenty of water in the drinks themselves and the less said about the bathrooms the better

Stonewall Inn New York City Gay Club
Feb 3, 1971: Frank Serpico Is Shot

Today in True Crime

03:54 min | 6 months ago

Feb 3, 1971: Frank Serpico Is Shot

"On february third. Nineteen seventy-one nypd. Detective frank serpico was shot in the face during a drug bust when franks partners refuse to help him. He was shot in the face. Many wondered if the nypd headset. Frank up my guest hosts ashen. Elena are going to take over from here to discuss the circumstances that resulted in frank. Serpico shooting and what happened when he survived. Thanks vanessa frank. Serpico always wanted to be a cop for him. It was never about the power or the possibility of seeing his name in the papers. Frank serpico merely wanted to make new york city place. Unfortunately when frank joined the nypd. In september of nineteen fifty-nine the department was experiencing rampant corruption as a kid. Frank witnessed firsthand. How a cop could abuse his authority while working in his father's shop an officer came in. First you shine when frank finished the officer got up and left without paying. Frank was stunned but assumed the officer was an outlier. Just a bad apple. He got a rude awakening. Once he became a patrolman himself years later when frank was still a police cadet he and his partner arrested. A couple of suspects while protecting vandalized synagogue. They thought the nature of the arrest should have led to some kind of award but the precinct clerk only agreed to make a note for a citation if franken his partner slipped them a few bucks. Frank realized that bribery was the key to success in the department but he refused to accept that instead he would stay honest and work his way to the top by doing good police. Work throughout the nineteen sixties. Frank didn't partake in any of the graphs are corruption. He knew his partners might take payoffs but he wouldn't. Naturally this made cops suspicious of him and it didn't help that. Frank looked nothing like a cop as a plainclothes officer. Frank didn't have to adhere to a standard dress code so he decided to look like his personality. He was bohemian long hair. Long beard psychedelic clothes. Frank lived in greenwich village and hung out with the counterculture. He was the complete antithesis of the nypd. Finally in one thousand nine hundred sixty seven alongside only ally. Detective david dirk. Frank started making noise to the departments higher ups and authorities at city hall for three years. They brought credible evidence of police corruption. And yet nothing was done. Fed up franken. david did the unimaginable. They went to the press in the middle of one thousand nine hundred seventy the new york times published an expose on corruption in the nypd. The report tarnished the nypd and led to the nap commissions formation. An official investigation into police corruption. All thanks to frank serpico in the department nuit frank coming forward. Put an even bigger target on his back by the end of nineteen seventy. He was transferred to narcotics where he was a total pariah. Frank serpico was shot in the face on february third nineteen seventy-one during what was supposed to be a routine drug bust however his partners refused to help him and let him bleed out in the hallway. He only lived because an elderly tenant called the paramedics. Frank miraculously survived though. He was left with bullet fragments in his skull and permanent hearing loss and despite the attempt on his life frank refused to remain silent later that year. He testified before the knapp commission making him one of the most important officers to testify against the police. A year later frank retired from the nypd and lived in europe until one thousand nine hundred eighty since then. He's continued to speak out against corruption and police brutality. He's still holds out. Hope that there will be fair and honest cops. Patrolling our streets.

Frank Serpico Frank Serpico Nypd Vanessa Frank Franken Franks Elena Detective David Dirk New York City Greenwich Village Apple City Hall New York Times David Knapp Commission Europe
"greenwich village" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:46 min | 7 months ago

"greenwich village" Discussed on KQED Radio

"That's a lovely song from The new album, I'd rather lead a band featuring Loudon, Wainwright and Vince Giordano and his band the Nighthawks. I want to end with one more song, and I want to ask you to perform it for us. It's a song by frank less. Er called more. I cannot wish you that's from one of my favorite shows, Guys and dolls. And it was hardly my favorite song from the show. But I really love the way you do it. It just feels very Very meaningful to me. Can you talk about why you chose this? And what the song means to you? Well, this goes back to the thing we were talking about earlier. I was mentioning my father's record collection. Guys and dolls was in the collection, and I listened to it as a kid. And, interestingly enough, at least it's interesting to me is that When I started my career in 1969 Guy called Milton Kramer saw me playing in a little folk club in Greenwich Village called the Gaslight. And he invited me up to talk to him about a publishing deal. And he was working for Frank Music, which was Frank Lessers publishing companies. So all the songs that were on my first couple of albums were published by by that company. I never got to meet Frank Lesser at that point. He was sick and dying of lung cancer in the hospital. But Frank Lester was one of the greats. And, you know, he wrote the music and the words So you know, he did it all. Many roads, so many different kinds of shows. I mean, there's guys and dolls, that's all kind of, you know, streetwise talk. And then he wrote, um, basically an operetta. All right. Most happy like an opera. The most happy fella? Yeah, which is so different, Both mean on melodically and lyrically. So s so I'm gonna ask you to close by playing the frank. Lesser song more. I cannot wish you from guys and dolls and the song is on the album. But this is Performance in the studio that they're doing just for us, and we'll hear Loudon on vocals, and he brought in David Men's field to play guitar on this And we'll hear Vince Giordano. Not on too, but this time but on base Thank you both. So much for your generosity in doing this for us and playing for us and going to the studio socially distanced in separate rooms and for being here to talk with us, and thank you for the wonderful album. Well, thanks. Great talking to you, Terry. Thanks. So keep up the great work, Terry. Wow, 23..

Frank Lester Frank Lesser frank Frank Music Milton Kramer Vince Giordano Loudon Frank Lessers Terry Greenwich Village Wainwright Gaslight David Men
FEAR OF FEAR

Big Book Podcast

04:27 min | 9 months ago

FEAR OF FEAR

"This lady was cautious. She decided she wouldn't let herself go and her drinking and she would never never take that morning drink. I didn't think I was an alcoholic. I thought my problem was that I had been married to a drunk for twenty-seven years and when my husband found a a I came to the second meeting with him thought it was wonderful simply marvelous for him but not for me. Then I went to another meeting hand. I still thought it was wonderful for him. But not for me. It was a hot summer night in 1949 down in the Greenwich Village group and there was a little porch out there in the old meeting place on Sullivan Street. And after the meeting I went out on the steps for some are dead in the doorway stood a lovely young girl. Who said are you one of us houses to I said, oh goodness know my husband is he's in there. She told me her name. I said, I know you from somewhere. It turned out that she had been in high school with my daughter. I said Eileen. Are you one of those people and she said oh, yes. Yep. In this as we walk back through the hall. I for the first time in my life said to another human being I'm having trouble with my drinking too. She took me by the hand and introduce them to the girl that I'm very proud to call my sponsor this girl and her husband are both in a a and she said to me oh, but you're not the alcoholic. It's your husband. I said, yes. She said how long have you been married? I said 27 years. She said 27 years to an alcoholic. How did you ever stand it? I thought now here's a nice sympathetic so long, this is for me. I said, well I stood it to keep the home together. And for the children's sake she said, yes, I know. You're just another martyr, aren't you? I walked away from that girl grinding my teeth and cursing under my breath. Fortunately. I didn't say a word to George on the way home, but that night I tried to go to sleep and I thought your some martyr Jane wage. Look at the record and when I looked at it, I knew I was just as much a drunk as George was if not worse. I nudged Jorge the next morning and I said I'm in and he said oh, I knew you'd make it. I started drinking nearly thirty years ago right after I was married my first drinking spree was on corn liquor and I was allergic to it. Believe me. I was deathly sick every time I took a drink but we had to do a lot of entertaining my husband like to have a good time. I was very young and I wanted to have a good time to the only way I knew to do it was to drink right along with him. I got into terrific trouble with my drinking I was afraid and I had made my mind up that I would never get drunk. So I was watchful and careful. We had a small child and I loved her dearly so that held me back quite a bit in my drinking career even so every time I drank I seem to get in trouble. I always wanted to drink too much. So I was watchable always watchful counting my drinks if we were invited to a formal party and I knew they were only going to have one or two drinks. I wouldn't have any I was being very cagey. Because I knew that if I did take one or two, I might want to take five or six or seven or eight. I did stay fairly good for a few years, but I wasn't happy and I didn't ever let myself go in my drinking as my son our second child came along and as he became school age and was away at school. Most of the time something happened. I really started drinking with a bang. I never went to a hospital. I never lost a job. I was never in jail and unlike many others. I never took a drink in the morning. I needed a drink but I was afraid to take a morning drink because I didn't want to be a drunk. I became a drunk anyway, but I was scared to death to take that morning drink. I was accused of it many times when she went to play bridge in the afternoon, but I really never did take a morning drink. I was still woozy from the night before. I should have lost my husband and I think that only the fact that he was an alcoholic to kept us together.

Lawsuit: Actor Cuba Gooding Jr. raped New York woman in 2013

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:39 sec | 1 year ago

Lawsuit: Actor Cuba Gooding Jr. raped New York woman in 2013

"New lawsuit accuses actor Cuba Gooding Jr of raping a woman in Manhattan hotel room in 2013. Lawsuit escalates the severity of the growing number of claims against Gooding. A suit claims the Oscar winning actor attacked the woman after she met him at a Greenwich Village Vie P Lounge in New York. The actors attorney says the alleged event never took place. Gooding already faces misdemeanor criminal charges of sexual abuse and forcible touching related to claims women of previously made against him. He has pleaded not guilty to those charges. State prosecutors say more than two dozen 11 have made claims against cutting since allegations first arose against him.

Cuba Gooding Jr Greenwich Village Vie P Lounge Manhattan Oscar New York Attorney
Actor Cuba Gooding Jr. raped woman in New York City hotel in 2013: Lawsuit

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:39 sec | 1 year ago

Actor Cuba Gooding Jr. raped woman in New York City hotel in 2013: Lawsuit

"Accuses actor Cuba Gooding Jr of raping a woman in a Manhattan hotel room in 2013. Lawsuit escalates the severity of the growing number of claims against Gooding the claims that the lawsuit claims that the Oscar winning actor attacked the woman after she met him at a Greenwich Village v I P Lounge. The actors. Lawyer says the alleged event never took place. Gooding already faces misdemeanor criminal charges of sexual abuse and forcible touching related to claims that women have previously made against him. He's pleaded not guilty to those charges. State prosecutors say more than two dozen women have made claims against cutting since allegations first arose against him. Actor

Cuba Gooding Jr Greenwich Village Manhattan Oscar I P Lounge
Thousands defy NYC curfew as protests continue

Doug Stephan

00:40 sec | 1 year ago

Thousands defy NYC curfew as protests continue

"An eight PM curfew didn't stop thousands of defiant demonstrators marching through the streets of New York City correspondent Steve casting down reports some protesters were arrested any did obey the curfew but smaller groups intent on defying the order were met with a variety of responses from tolerance to dozens of arrests in Greenwich Village there was sporadic looting but nothing close to what the city experienced on Monday night mayor bill de Blasio was angered by the notion that people were looting with impunity is never ever ever accepted it won't be accepted in Brooklyn residents of one neighborhood stood guard at a target to protected against

Greenwich Village Mayor Bill De Blasio New York City Steve Casting Brooklyn
Revisiting the Archive: Larry Kramer

Making Gay History

06:59 min | 1 year ago

Revisiting the Archive: Larry Kramer

"I've talked before in this series revisiting the archive about anger. How it can fuel action? How an anger is partnered with love? It can produce a kind of righteous rage that propels us those of us who lived through the AIDS crisis. Know about it. Some of US learned it from Larry Kramer who died this week in Manhattan where he's lived for. Decades Larry was famous for being one of the first billions to sound the alarm during that last epidemic. The one that began forty years ago he was on the front lines even before aids was called AIDS and became a global epidemic at swept away more than thirty million lives before AIDS. Larry was best known for his work as a screenwriter and author but the virus that was claiming so many lives in the political indifference political negligence that greeted it turned Larry into a very public activist. His friends were dying and he felt compelled to do something more than to just bury the dead and mourn their loss in nineteen. Eighty-two Larry co-founded a gay men's health crisis now known as GM five years later he co-founded act up the AIDS coalition to unleash power. Act Up came to be known for its brilliant use of public protests to bring attention to the epidemic by early nineteen eighty nine. When I I met Larry AIDS take in more than sixty thousand lives. Most of them. Gay Men Larry quickly earned a reputation as an uncompromising firebrand with a fierce temper. I'm not proud of it. But that kind of person generally inspires me to run in the other direction. I was more than a little anxious. I approached the door to Larry's apartment in a building that fronts Washington Square Park in New York. City's Greenwich Village. As I said when this episode originally aired I got myself worked up. Nothing I brace myself for a tornado and found the teddy bear. Here's the same. Larry welcomed me into a spacious apartment and showed me into his all white book line living room and I took a seat opposite him across a broad desk as I said at my tape recorder and attach the Mike to his shirt. We talked about how we both had wanted to find a husband early in life and settle down and that led us back in time to Larry's memories as it confused and Unhappy College student in the Early Nineteen fifties. I pressed record interview with Larry Kramer Thursday January twenty six thousand nine hundred eighty nine at the home of Larry Kramer in New York City. Interviewer is Eric. Marcus tape one side one. When I went to Yale I thought I was the only gay person in the world and tried to kill myself because I was so lonely. Did try to What am I think that was fifty? Three was the year my freshman year. Yeah is awful. I mean I do want to go back that far curious because I was a college student on seventy six desperately unhappy. We're at Vassar College. There were there were a lot of gays. They weren't that many people think there were a lot if there were so many gays. Why was I so unhappy? Miserable person and And deaths seemed very appealing at moments during my freshman year when I was dating a woman in making off the man by in life and fifty three must have been much more difficult than seventy six at Vassar. You can even start in shifty. Three Easter I knew I was gay. I think from the day I was born and I think that there have been I. I now know that there were isolate. They were experiences all through before. I even got to Yale. And they were all covert in guilt. Inducing on on everybody's part so the it seemed as if all those early years were spent trying to deny these feelings the feelings would sort of get to strong erupt in and I would have an experience. Which would autumn always make me feel guilty in one way or another and then you put it you become. Sylvia's would come down for a while a week a week or two and Yale was awful. There was a gay bar called parolees. It was awful the time when I finally have the courage to go there. It was only two blocks from campus. But it was a million years away. It was very dark and grey and inside and smokey and and filled with old old older man and I only went the once and somebody picked me up. A car drove for like hours before we found a place that was quiet to do it and then he drove me back where you didn't say a word all of that list of yourself. I eight two hundred aspirin. Oh my God talk about slow and Miss. You must have been pretty miserable to swallow two hundred and yours anymore. Will after you wanted out. Was that who knows. It's a scene. I'll never forget the scene of taking pills the Yup and find you're still better. I didn't wake up. I I went to bed and I got scared and I call. The campus. Police came took me to the hospital and put myself and that was in woke then I fell asleep and I woke up in a room with bars and after grace new haven hospital and there. Was this very unpleasant hospital psychiatrist. Who said all right Mr Cramer? Why did you do it and I go fuck yourself or words to that end he said? I'm now you're not going to be let out of this hospital until you tell us why you did it. And I just had a few rubbed me the wrong way and I wouldn't have told who who knew why I did it anyway. So my brother who's always sort of looked after me came and got me out and he was friends with the dean of Freshmen. My brother had been the before me and And it was you know ordinarily when something like that happen you were shipped off to go join the army really in those days. Yeah and then you come back to Yale and you've grown up but they let me stay. If I went to the University of Coyote. Just his name was Dr Fry Clement Fry. And he was about in the sixties he had silver hair and it was a good looking man he whereas reptiles button down shirt and You just knew that. He cared more about Yale and he ever did about you

Larry Larry Kramer Larry Aids Aids Vassar College Yale Manhattan United States Dr Fry Clement Fry Greenwich Village Unhappy College New York City Grace New Haven Hospital GM Marcus Aspirin
"greenwich village" Discussed on WBSM 1420

WBSM 1420

01:37 min | 1 year ago

"greenwich village" Discussed on WBSM 1420

"Central are here one oh three yeah I prefer to be buried I I want to be buried in one of those places downtown you know in Greenwich Village where you where they played chess all the time I like you know I used to like to play chess a little bit not a lot but I'd like to just spend eternity watching him play chess assuming of course the park forever re open for any as anything other than a burial ground your last line thank you for calling you have a car you I think it is a Washington Park where they play the chess or whether it's famous for playing chess down there in the village that's why I want to be buried you can also pick up some pretty good drugs down there that's good to try to get more famous for drugs now than for chess all right that's it for the chump line today the trump line is the recorded voice mail message service of the how we car show you can call and leave a message at any hour of the day or night including weekends the troubling number if you'd like to leave such a such a messages eight four four five hundred forty two forty two eight four four five hundred forty two forty two press two for the trump plan leave your message we may or may not played at this time each week day we get we can also here and a chop chops if it didn't make the cut in the in in the broadcast show we post chop chops wherever you get your how we car show podcast at seven PM eastern after the show.

Greenwich Village Washington Park
The Shadow Lives

True Mysteries of the Pacific Northwest

04:14 min | 1 year ago

The Shadow Lives

"In today's podcast. I make a case for ghosts really really. I'll even take you to a haunted house that well you know this haunted skeptical. Hear me out to the very end of this podcast. Then decide decide for yourself and high school. Science teacher will be happy to discuss how we have an electrical aspect to our functionality. The electricity in our bodies is chemically created and the most obvious manifestation is the beating of the heart externally an individual might wear pacemaker. This device monitors relationship ship between heart and the electrical charge of makes a contract when two little electricity is detected than ZAP. The pacemaker fills the gap. Electricity is found throughout the human body. The flow of charged ions causes your heart. beat and your muscles to contract but nowhere in the body. It is electrical activity better documented than the brain which contains roughly one hundred billion electrically conductive biological wires. Okay point made human body creates utilizes electrcity brainwaves by nature r e m waves and. Em wave can travel forever because they do not need immediate also because they do not give up energy and traveling but because brain em waves which are not really waves are very weak and they do not travel far if you ever watched a dog wagging tail and in its wake you seen slew of hair tiny particles well if you could see em waves and again. These aren't really waves left behind. Say a person cross the room it might look. I liked particles. You saw when the dog did stale because there's no such thing as brainwaves. They wouldn't appear ways but as particles to explain and would take two or three podcast but for my purpose. I'm talking about for lack of a better description. A residue of energy. Now flashback rush back ninety years to a man named Walter B Gibson if you recognize the name it could be that you're a fan of the shadow remember. The shadow mysteries who knows Rosewood. Evil Lurks in the hearts of mad. The shadow knows Walter. Gibson Rover two hundred fifty shadows stories the adventures that Lamont Cranston. Who is a shadow? Could read men's minds wearing a long. Black Cape Slouch hat. Pulled over his eyes. He was able to fog men's minds so they couldn't see him. While you get the idea but writer and Creator Walter. B Gibson was a prolific writer times. Ten he had a typewriter in every room of his house else he wrote over a million six hundred thousand words a year more than fifteen million just about the shadow alone from radio to okay television Gibson. Some say was possessed of the shadow with his shadow rain Cape and hat. There's an old house on treeline Street to New York's Greenwich Village which harbors a strange ghost hands hustler and other ghost chasers have included. The house in their catalog of haunted haunted places. The Phantom has been seen by several people in recent years. It's dressed up in a long Black Cape. Where's of wide? Brimmed slouch hat. Pulled whole down over his eyes as links from room to room self styled parapsychologists have woven all kinds of fantasies around wow this apparition obviously spy from revolutionary war was caught and killed in that old house but wait. This ghost may not be a member. The restless data at all there were never any reports of haunting stare until about sixty years ago after the house was vacated by writer named Walter B Gibson. But why would this apparition suddenly appear in this old house could it be some kind of residue Gibson's powerful full mind a ghost. Perhaps you decide. Perhaps as Gibson once wrote only the shadow knows for sure

Walter B Gibson Lamont Cranston Writer Black Cape Rosewood New York Greenwich Village
Timothee Chalamet to Play Bob Dylan in Film Directed by James Mangold

Donna and Steve

00:37 sec | 1 year ago

Timothee Chalamet to Play Bob Dylan in Film Directed by James Mangold

"Timothy shell Amazin talks to portray Bob Dylan in a forthcoming film directed by James Mangold fox searchlight confirms in reports the biopic reportedly titled going electric will chronicle Dylan's rice from Greenwich Village folk singer to rockstar particularly particularly focusing on his controversial embrace of the electric guitar in nineteen sixty five Mandel directed two thousand five to walk the line about Johnny Cash was login for versus Ferrari and more accord reports Dylan is working actively with man golden searchlight pictures on the film which has no release date as

Bob Dylan Rockstar Mandel Johnny Cash Ferrari Timothy Shell James Mangold Greenwich Village
From the LGBTQ Vault: Sylvia Rivera & Marsha P. Johnson

Making Gay History

10:24 min | 1 year ago

From the LGBTQ Vault: Sylvia Rivera & Marsha P. Johnson

"Sixth season of our podcast is focused on LGBT activism in the Post stonewall seventies two of the most prominent trans activists to emerge out of that period were Sylvia Rivera and Marsha p Johnson in one thousand nine hundred seventy the year after the stonewall uprising in New York City's Greenwich Village. The two friends founded street transvestite action revolutionaries or star and set up a barebones refuge in a run down apartment building on the lower east side in Manhattan for street kids much like themselves. They called it star House. In December Nineteen Seventy Liza Cowan and twenty year old reporter for Wbai radio conducted. What we believe is the oldest recorded interview with Sylvia Marsha and other members of star? She is a reel to reel tape recorder and set out to do a story on what was then known as crossdressing. Eventually a single reel containing an edited version of the interview found. Its way into the basement of the lesbian. Her story archives in Brooklyn New York. And that's where making gay histories self-described Archive Rat Brian. Free founded in the spring of two thousand nineteen before we share some of that incredibly rare tape with you. I thought I'd ask Brian about his experience of discovering this long lost interview. And how did you find this tape. Where were you what were you doing so I was looking for audio for the fifth season of making a history for our stonewall season listen and my mission was to find archival audio tapes that were made around nineteen sixty eight to nineteen seventy-one so I went to the LGBT center archives? I went to the New York Public Library and I went to the lesbian. Her story archives in the basement of Lesbian Her story archives. I was going through all of their cassettes for WBAI shows. I didn't find anything thing that reached back that was applicable to what we were looking for but out of the corner of my eye in the basement I saw a box of open. Reel you've you. Which is an older style of audio? Recording then cassettes would be. So what is can you describe. What Open Reel Recording is is you see in the movies or in photographs an actual real of tape. Yes these are the big reels. These are like three inch five inch the seven inch ten inch and I didn't know what was in this box when I saw it but I went upstairs to the volunteer archivist. I Rachel Gordon and I asked her if I could go through it and right there in the middle of the box. I pulled out this recording that was labeled star. I was afraid to open at because some of these tapes. They're so fragile when they're fifty Sixty seventy years old. They are so fragile that you can destroy them and I know how difficult it is to get archival material surrounding star. Yeah so what did you when you saw this. Besides being afraid that you would you could possibly damage the tape I mean it's almost like finding the holy we grow. You know you WANNA listen to it immediately when you find a tape like that and you can't why couldn't you just play it. Well for one there are some tapes that as you play. They will erase when they're fifty years old. So you will listen to it but nobody else will. So if you WANNA have a tape digitize like that what do you do. We took the tape to a studio in Harlem called Old Swan Studios that specializes in this type of digitisation. I took so much care when I took it out of that building I I was so afraid of damaging it it was like I had ten thousand dollars in my backpack and couldn't let anyone near it so I arrived at Swansea in Harlem and Robert. The sound engineer started rewinding the tape and when he did every single manual edit snapped. Oh my so. This is an edited. This was an that was done. That was then edited. And and and how do they edit tape. Well they had to take it physically and slice it and then with adhesive give glue at packed together so each and every time it hit one of these physical edits it would snap which for me was terrifying. But for him was just run of the mill he would just take the two ends reapply adhesive and keep rewinding it once he rebounded. What did he do next? Well he was kind enough to let me sit in the studio and listen to it as he played it for the first time and I knew I was listening to something very special. What made it special special for me? Because they're not just talking about the organization that they created they're also talking about their lives and they're talking about how they see the world around them and how they see gender. It's very personal. They're not altering the same line. What did you take away from hearing that recording? I think it reminded me of how young everyone was. Then I think the March Johnson and Sylvia Rivera that I've grown accustomed to. They were older by at the time. the film that I've seen of them the video that I've seen of them the recordings that I've listened to from them. They had more time under their belt. And this it was it was like they were freshly ride in New York and just letting it all about the quality of tape. You're about to hear in this remarkable and far-ranging conversation is a bit uneven. In addition to a snippet of Jefferson an airplane. You'll also notice hissing in the background. During part of the discussion anyone who has ever lived in an Old New York City apartment will recognize that sound. It's coming coming from faulty valve of esteem heat radiator. The first person to speak is nineteen year old Sylvia Rivera. The second is someone named Victor and the third is Marcia Johnson who was twenty five at the time before my mother passed away three years my mother used to Jesmyn Golf Clubs and my mother. My grandmother kept on one little blouses and girls stocks of about six seven years old. Before if I wouldn't start addressing boys 'cause during that period that's when I discovered my homosexuality was like you know watching television and placed in myself and the role of the female or just pricing myself As another there's another boy in the Mail on demand was praying such a fantastic love role in the television. And and when I left home at eleven was really when I went into transparent system and make hustling speech and the game against experiences. DIFFERENT THAN SYLVIA'S I. I didn't know secretly because My mother would catch me. She would forbid it. And by the time I was five years old I knew enough that Do these things secretly So I used to and no one was around to put on a and wear women's clothes close. I can get my hands on but otherwise I grew up quite masculine. I went to school. I played baseball. I went to college so and the beard and was the revolutionary did time in jail for Pacifist demonstrations and and Just recently I I decided what's You know why not wear the clothes. I prefer to wear what I was. I was the time I was living a masculine role that I didn't really prefer at least I didn't prefer to do it. Permanent preferred the times to be feminine And women's Lib people Feel that the women are forced to take certain roles which are unacceptable to them and they want to break out no. I've often felt the same way about being a man that I've been forced to take certain roles number one something as unimportant as the clothes I have to wear men's restrictions. Men's dress are much more severe than the restrictions on women's dress of men are forced to look a certain way and I didn't want to look that way then then of course there's a man has to be tough. He has to have responsibility to take care of people. You know suppose I wanted to be petted or I wanted to be taken care of. As I was growing up I met a lot of men. They never pale to me to my sexually. I used to try and keep away from because my hometown. You mistakes where you were out of it and they recall you all kinds of names And then when I first came in York seventeen years old that's when I started getting kind of invest breath more like a transvestite. I started out with makeup in nineteen sixty three nine thousand nine hundred sixty four And in one thousand nine hundred sixty five. I was coming out more and I was still wearing make up but I was still going to jail just wearing doing makeup in one thousand nine hundred sixty nine. I started wearing female attire full-time usually I wear dress every day of the week. I I just don't put on much makeup anything until after the dog because address too much attention if we make in the daytime they might think that I was a male. Al But if I were a little makeup they think I'm a female and he's right on I and if I will not make it night they automatically know female female they really can tell the difference about me because I'm on my way to be. SX teams

Sylvia Rivera New York City Marcia Johnson Sylvia Marsha New York Public Library Manhattan Greenwich Village Harlem Liza Cowan Brooklyn Rachel Gordon Old Swan Studios Marsha P Johnson Reporter Wbai Brian Baseball Sylvia York New York
Alec Baldwin gets brutally roasted on Comedy Central

Jared and Katie

01:45 min | 2 years ago

Alec Baldwin gets brutally roasted on Comedy Central

"Alex true passion is always been the theater Alex loves to hit the stage because it can't press charges. hello. so this is the roast on Comedy Central of Alec Baldwin Sean Hayes as the roast master but of course you have regulars that show up season to season like comedian Jeff Ross he's done a lot of roasting and Jeff Ross had a few things to say about Alec Baldwin Alec is actually my neighbor in Greenwich Village which was a pretty safe neighborhood until you moved in. if you're a big star I watch you get arrested for punching a guy over a parking spot. six nine valley your car and help your brother's business. so are you in the movie Pearl Harbor which was worse than the actual Pearl Harbor. the roads are. they are not also Robert deniro was a roaster of Alec Baldwin and Robert deniro. as you can imagine didn't have a lot to that we could air because he likes to use the curse words but we added that get some of Robert deniro's best. thank you for inviting me to do this now rocky and Bullwinkle will be the most embarrassing thing about. and that was it that's all we got the right one. this app that the app was it was pretty bad now I what typically happens is that the person who is getting roasted in this case it's Alec Baldwin you they can they can roast the people who are roasting them so Alec Baldwin took the microphone and roasted some of the people who had been resting him. Jenner is an American gold medalist to change genders and somehow still manage to be the least

Alec Baldwin Alec Baldwin Alec Alec Baldwin Sean Hayes Robert Deniro Jeff Ross Alex Robert Deniro. Greenwich Village Jenner
Thousands are expected to take to NYC streets to celebrate gay pride

Rush Limbaugh

00:42 sec | 2 years ago

Thousands are expected to take to NYC streets to celebrate gay pride

"Pride parades taking place around the world this month. New York City, getting ready for what's likely to be the biggest of the mole tomorrow, more than one hundred thousand people are expected to participate in this year's New York City pride March, the parade route will take the marchers near the stonewall inn in Greenwich Village where the gay rights movement began fifty years ago, this month when members of the LGBTQ community rioted after police raided the stonewall the anniversary could attract more than the two million spectators that usually attend this event, the March. Kicks off at noon. And if history is any guide, the last people may not cross the finish line until nine thirty at

New York City Greenwich Village Fifty Years
50 years of Stonewall

Monocle 24: The Foreign Desk

08:06 min | 2 years ago

50 years of Stonewall

"Fifty years ago this week patrons of the stonewall in a gay bar in New York's Greenwich Village stood up to police who had raided the venue since then the stonewall uprising has become the most storied event in the history of the LGBT, right struggle. But there's a history that has been and continues to be both under documented and overlooked. There isn't even a consensus on exactly what transpired on the evening of the uprising itself, I wanted to find out more about what forces have shaped the documentation of LGBT history to begin I paid a visit to pick Marcus at his home in Manhattan. My name is Eric Marcus. And I am the founder and host of the making gays repot cast. And we bring LGBTQ history to life to the voices of the people who lived it, and we draw much of material material from my archive of one hundred interviews that I recorded thirty years ago for an oral history book of the same name. I knew nothing about the movement before nineteen sixty nine I thought everything began stonewall. I discovered that was wasn't the case that I was really outraged. I thought why didn't I know this history to me? And so in most ways the most interesting part of our history is the history before stonewall, and I was able to find all of these people, mostly elderly, who had been there at the very beginning of the movement in the US, and I got to record their stories, my conception of LGBTQ history, changed dramatically that I spoke with people on there wasn't much written about it at the time I started my work, and so I had ideas about people, especially in the early movement that there was some how accommodation as so that all they wanted to do as simulate and it was the perspective of the people who wrote about it writing through the lens of the nineteen eighty s. What I didn't realize what the times were like and what people were up against early in the movement, and how courageous really radical, they were in their thinking that they that they imagined a world that could be different and slowly found a way I fit into the world. And then to begin changing it, and that to me made them radicals, even though some of a lot of the activists came along later looked at them and thought of them as less than and old fashioned that somehow there, what they did didn't matter very much, given the, the history of the movement goes back so far before stonewall. What do you think explains the editor of stonewall as a kind of watershed within algae, PT, Hugh history, stonewall uprising in stonewall was indeed a watershed of the movement? It was a turning point. But there were between fifty and sixty existing organizations in nineteen sixty nine there was a, a modest national movement. What stonewall did is it? Channeled or I should say the organizing that happened in the aftermath of stonewall based on the infrastructure that existed already channel, this new energy and anger into a much larger national movement. It, it inspired it triggered the gay liberation phase of what had been called the home afoul movement. So you went from fifty to sixty organizations in nineteen sixty nine to a year later, fifteen hundred organizations across the country, and then another year later twenty five hundred organizations thousands of young people at colleges and universities were brought into the movement. It was very young movement, and the people who are involved earlier were for the most part swept away some people continued on through the next days of the movement, and they brought their experience into this new phase of the movement. In fact, the first organizing meetings that were held right after stonewall were hosted by the Mattachine society, an organization founded in nineteen fifty in Los Angeles. And the daughters of leaders in organization for lesbians, founded in nineteen fifty five so it didn't. I thought that the movement sprang whole from the uprising of the stonewall inn, I didn't know, otherwise until I did my research and discovered that. It required. Concentration organizing in hard work to get from the stall uprising to the first pride March here in New York when you're later and then to this movement, that's now grown across the country and all over the world records of LGBT life have been shaped by the same divisions influence other histories, these include splits along sexual racial and generational lines. The lesbian her story archives are a historical repository run by lesbians for lesbians. I met Maxine Wolfe, one of the archives coordinate is in the Brooklyn brownstein. Whether kept most archives that call themselves LGBT are g and t they have practically no ill. Okay or be. So part of it is that we can't rely on other people to preserve our history. If you read most history books about the gay movement. A lot of what is in. There is about men and their movement, not what lesbians would doing at the same time, and even if they're lesbians in the organization, they don't get as much visibility. So this is about making sure that lesbians are at the center of that history. Also the way that we define it is very different than most archives. We define it as being as broad as possible we don't want to create an archive that's about only about famous lesbians, which most archives, they want material from well-known members of the community, and we have that, but we also value, the idea as Joan Nestle said that any lesbian at walks in here can see an image of herself which. Means that we have the papers of lesbian prostitutes, and go, go dancers, and truck drivers and secretaries as well as having papers of people like orgy Lord, or Audrey enrich, or other well-known, lesbians, would you mind showing me around? So on the first floor we put the things that most people who are not necessarily academic, researches would want to see novels autobiographies biographies. We also have literary criticism we have and Thala geez. We have poetry books. We have poetry anthologies, my favorite thing on this floor, though is we have books from other countries. And one of my favorite books is this, which was may? It's, it's called a Dikshit airy and it's handmade by a group of Japanese lesbians who brought it here, and it has phrases in English, and then Japanese, and then Japanese and English, and you can see it's all handmade. So it has things like are you monogamous? Women's take back the night it has a Butch on the streets in between the sheets. This is all an English. And then in Japanese this, reflects the way that I think, so many lesbians feel about wanting to make sure that people remember us. And that's what this archive is about the most touching thing that happens here is to see somebody come in and see something that they were part of some lesbian will walk through the door from some other state and, you know, an older woman who will say, you know, I was part of this poetry, collective in one thousand nine hundred seventy five and I bet you know, we did this book but you probably don't have it. And then I'll say, well, let's look, and then we look and we find it and people cry, you know, women cry when they come in here and see a couple of things not just something that's there's, but a place that respect. Who they are a place that is beautiful, and that is put together and that cares about who they are. And that's very important to me. And I think to everybody who is at the archives today, LGBT history is documented move freely in extensively even ever before. But as the wheel celebrates pride this month, we would do well to remember the people whose lives anti, we're not giving the attention. They deserved for multiple twenty four in New York on Henry Sheridan.

Stonewall New York Eric Marcus Greenwich Village Manhattan Founder United States Joan Nestle Mattachine Society Maxine Wolfe Los Angeles Brooklyn Editor Audrey Thala Henry Sheridan Dikshit Hugh Thirty Years
"greenwich village" Discussed on 760 KFMB Radio

760 KFMB Radio

02:00 min | 2 years ago

"greenwich village" Discussed on 760 KFMB Radio

"Anger on the streets, outside the stonewall in New York's Greenwich Village a police raid on the stonewall touched off riots that eventually propelled the gay rights movement. A completely different atmosphere, Saturday night, as New York's department of transportation painted a rainbow on the pedestrian crossing closest to stonewall the stonewall inn is now part of a national monument, honoring LGBTQ civil rights, but Mishkin CBS news. The things people do for fun, more than nine thousand nine hundred and Australia. Leapt into chilly river this weekend. Nude except for red swimming caps. It's an annual swim. Celebrating the winter solstice ninety one year old joy Walter was among those jumping into water. That was just forty one degrees. She said she might as well, do it while she's still could Alison keys, CBS news. Having a blast at home. That's one of the stories we're following AM seven sixty the PD is investigating Friday, small explosion inside of, of park home that left a thirty eight year old man injured. The blast was first reported around four thirty pm in the backyard of a house on Valencia Parkway, north of Cervantes avenue. Detectives are looking into a possibility that the explosion was related to a methamphetamine lab found inside the residence. The parent company of online, college Ashford university plans to lay off nearly two hundred fifty workers in San Diego. The company known as zovut is moving headquarters to, and the Mesa college student fashion show takes place this week at the San Diego County, fair, where sponsored by L A fitness, fitness. Get your guest pass and start today come into any San Diego caption, or call one eight hundred LA fitness. Fitness in whether it's cloudy and seventy degrees at Lindbergh field. Expect partly cloudy skies tomorrow, AM seven sixty talk and breaking news. Hey, it's Bret Witter. Bill hope you're enjoying your weekend and the Clark Howard show. Catch my show starting Monday at three on AM seven sixty talking. Breaking news devoid getting ripped off, this is Clark Howard..

San Diego Clark Howard New York San Diego County CBS Greenwich Village Bret Witter chilly river Australia Lindbergh field Alison keys Ashford university methamphetamine Mesa college Walter Bill LA forty one degrees
Stonewall uprising veterans still astounded 50 years after making history

PBS NewsHour

02:30 min | 2 years ago

Stonewall uprising veterans still astounded 50 years after making history

"Violent demonstrations by the gay community against a police raid at the stonewall in New York's Greenwich Village led to the modern gay rights movement tonight as part of news hours coverage of the fiftieth anniversary of stonewall over the next several days where sharing a report from story core, as a conversation between John ban, barred and Jerry NATO both military veterans who served in World War Two and Vietnam respectively at the time. John one hundred and Jerry seventy seventy-two sat down in the veteran's home, where they live to reflect on their twenty five years together story. Core records meaningful conversations across the country that are preserved in an archive at the library of congress. This is an animation of their conversation. Hello. My name is Jerry nadeau on with John ban Vard. And I was born in Brooklyn, New York. No, no, no, no. You gotta say your name and everything. Hello, mind. Name is my name is John vanguard. One hundred years of eight when I first met, you, John. You're seventy five years old. What would have been like if you didn't meet me, I would have continued. Lovely. I been absolutely August. When we met, we were sort of in the closet. I never had a real relationship. Now we've been together almost twenty five years. And when we moved into the veteran's home, we moved in together. And a lot of people are wondering, I wonder what their relationship is, well, when we got married, they knew what our relationship was expecting. We'd be ridiculed and those very little that we got married at the veteran's home. And we said, if you came to see the bride, you're out of luck, do you remember that, of course it was very informal. He was done simply yet, we served hot dogs, which is hard waiting food. Remember, John, I was with you in a cafeteria, and somebody came up, and they were with their family, and they said, oh, this is Gerard nadeau. And this is his husband. John, I never heard that before that was very much. You've made my life complete. I could say the same thing to you. You think probably as happy, again to people, you're likely to

John Jerry Nadeau John Ban John Vanguard John Ban Vard New York Jerry Nato Greenwich Village Congress Jerry Gerard Nadeau Brooklyn Vietnam Twenty Five Years Seventy Five Years One Hundred Years
This Womans Work: Patti Smiths Horses

Studio 360 with Kurt Andersen

05:27 min | 2 years ago

This Womans Work: Patti Smiths Horses

"I've learned a lot about the records. I love and don't love from classic album Sundays. It's a program of listening events created by broadcaster and journalist Pauline. Cosmo Murphy, which for music fan can sometimes feel like going to church, and that's fitting because they're always held on Sundays at these events. I learned about an album from artists producers and other smart music people. Then the lights went down the phones went off and the audience listened to the album together straight through no interruptions. That's it. It seems really simple. But hearing a record on pristine vinyl through a world class sound system revealed things I never noticed before the experience was eliminating an often moving even when the needle skipped to bring some of that album worship here to studio. Three sixty were teaming up with CAS for a series of stories called this woman's work, highlighting classic albums by female artists. The title. You probably figured out borrows from the song by Kate. Bush an artist we hope to feature in this series. These records represent women musicians at the peak of their creative powers, and whose influences felt all over the musical map. And this first story focuses on one of the most significant albums of the American punk movement. One that fused rock with free form poetry and drew many into the artistic nexus of New York City in the mid nineteen seventies. Here's Colleen this is arguably one of the most arresting opening lines on a debut album. Jesus dad for somebody sends banana Matton it's deliver with unequivocal power. And for many is the first introduction to an artist who become one of the most important game changers of rock and roll amass Lee. Stew. Mrs my oh, Lee belonged to may. Number hearing this opening indictment when listening to the album for the first time in my teenage bedroom. It's through me into the nucleus of Patti Smith's thrilling and scary environs worlds away from my suburban hometown to the dirt the chaos and the raw energy of New York City, and it made me feel like I could do anything. In fact, I moved to the city of few short years later. Punk is built upon a DIY attitude and along with the stooges EMC five Patti Smith is considered by many to be one of punk rocks founding mothers her debut album, horses was released at the end of nineteen seventy five a full five months before the first Ramones album. But it Agneta the punk explosion more impersonal, easy, rather than musicality, the album's sprawling free form music and poetry was the until of the three minute three court sound for which punk would eventually become known as the Patti Smith group. Guitarist Lenny Kaye remembers especially at that time Peng had yet to harden into specific definition. It wasn't say the Ramones template that it would become miss. Mostly an attitude of wanting to assume some kind of responsibility for oneself and. And find your own way. Will return to the show in a moment. But first I want to remind you that you can keep up with what we're looking at and working on by following us on Twitter at studio three sixty show. And now back to our story as the sixties slipped into the seventies. New York City was experiencing an identity crisis and rock and roll was experiencing a spirituality crisis. There was a general cynicism toward hippie ideals and New York City in particular was more adept at celebrating the individual a cohesive cultural center had not yet replaced the unifying force field of the sixties counterculture movement. This was especially true with music is different. Experimental strains began to fan out and spire by other forward thinking late sixties New York acts like the velvet underground and the east village electric duo the silver apples. Around this time. Lenny Kaye was working in a record shop and doing some writing on the side. And he remembers there were few venues for local bounds in new acts to play. But then he saw poster for the New York dolls and welcomed it as a new chapter in the downtown music. Sing. With their flamboyant crossdressing and defiant posturing, the New York dolls set the stage for glam rock, a fusion of the edgy rock and roll of the stooges and the theatrical cabaret scene that was flourishing in Greenwich village's gay community a community galvanized by the stonewall uprising in nineteen sixty nine.

New York City Patti Smith Lenny Kaye New York LEE Peng Cosmo Murphy Pauline Twitter Kate Colleen Stew Bush Greenwich Village Three Minute Five Months
Peter Tork, Monkees guitarist, dead at 77 after cancer battle

Financial Issues with Dan Celia

00:47 sec | 2 years ago

Peter Tork, Monkees guitarist, dead at 77 after cancer battle

"The death of a famous singer. Here's USA radio's Chris Barnes. Giants. Peter Tork has died at the age of seventy seven is family confirming the news in two thousand nine he was diagnosed with a rare form of tongue cancer in one thousand nine hundred eighty two he spoke about the Monkees formation of the David Letterman show. Now, have you musical experience? Yes, I add been his finger in the Greenwich Village stages for two and a half years. Singing, my little did he's with my bedroom. Guitar Nasmyth, Mike Nasmyth thing and Micky and Davy who were selected for their acting experience. We're also musicians, although they weren't instrumentalists. They learned how to play their instruments again, Peter Tork has died at seventy seven

Peter Tork Giants Greenwich Village Chris Barnes Tongue Cancer David Letterman USA Guitar Nasmyth Micky Mike Nasmyth Davy
Parking brawl lands Alec Baldwin in anger management classes

Radio Night Live with Kevin McCullough

00:39 sec | 2 years ago

Parking brawl lands Alec Baldwin in anger management classes

"An actor who is known for his bad temper has pleaded guilty to a charge of harassment all the wing a November skull over a parking spot with more on this story. Here's USA radio networks Chris Barnes during a Wednesday morning court appearance in Manhattan, sixty year old Alec Baldwin accepted. A plea deal on a second degree harassment violation with Tupperware attempted assault. Charges dropped responding to over one. Hundred dollars and most complete an anger management course by the time. He returns to court in March Baldwin admitting to pushing a man over a parking spot last, November near his Greenwich Village home for USA radio news. I'm Chris Barnes

Alec Baldwin Chris Barnes Harassment USA Greenwich Village Tupperware Manhattan Assault Hundred Dollars Sixty Year
Reputation precedes 'El Chapo' as US trial approaches

In the Arena

00:38 sec | 2 years ago

Reputation precedes 'El Chapo' as US trial approaches

"Is denying that. He punched a man over a parking spot in Greenwich Village, the actor took to Twitter yesterday calling the allegations false and agreed Asli misstated Baldwin was arrested on Friday and charged with assault and harassment. Police say Baldwin claimed he was trying to park his Cadillac when a man driving a station wagon pulled up and took the spot police and. Argument and sued and that's when Baldwin allegedly struck

Baldwin Greenwich Village Twitter Asli Assault Harassment
"greenwich village" Discussed on Z100

Z100

01:56 min | 3 years ago

"greenwich village" Discussed on Z100

"Him into hot. Comedy hats. I I realized that coming to us as my father's to say. Let's take a beat. Okay. Let me introduce you to your co host lease. Thank you. He flew in from Miami froggy is here. Danielle is here. I love you. Danielle. Scary scary. Here's our writer and co host daybreak. Dave. We have other surprises coming in a straight Nate, our producers, great Nate has been very good. So far fantastic. Great producer. If you're wondering, he's straight. Now, I get the pizza. So another co host in in in co-producer today. Lisa from artery. Oh my gosh. You know, I love our tourists. My favorite, you know, her mom and dad started Arturo thousand years ago, and she continues to own it lives above it turns Greenwich Village. This is the best pizza in the city. We have it here for you today. You guys are unbelievable. So much. I love our tourists. So so so much when you have a jazz nights. What nights every night is tasked night is that every single night. 'cause I thought I was just being lucky. Here again on jazz net. Every night every night. You had a great musicians over there. Down have a bottle of wine and a pizza or a coke and a pizza whatever just hanging out and listening to jazz. It's just the best New York City experience. I love arteries. Well, let's just a part of the surprises that are happening today. This is unbelievable. Nice. I must say was the best Ray carbon. I've ever really. I mean, did you go to bed bath n beyond? Actually, those bath Mets came through Amazon prime every. Yesterday, and they were here. Okay..

Nate Danielle Mets Greenwich Village New York City Amazon Arturo Miami Dave Lisa writer producer thousand years
"greenwich village" Discussed on The Steve Austin Show - Unleashed!

The Steve Austin Show - Unleashed!

02:01 min | 3 years ago

"greenwich village" Discussed on The Steve Austin Show - Unleashed!

"Not that i know of but i'll tell you a story when i was your age and he told me this incredible story there is used to guys who were brothers he's to talion guys who used to show up in the late sixties early seventies george used to work at a down in in greenwich village and these guys would offer to give them money and but kept saying you know you should let us manage you we'd like to manage a career and then george would be friendly yeah it sounds great you know i could use some help and they finally went nights at george let's sit down let's have a conversation we're going to go to a restaurant let's let's put together a deal so we'll be representative from now on and he said where do you want to go to dinner and they told george the restaurant and george said i'm a really picky eater and they picked the place that i said sorry guys i don't like seafood and that's how he got out of it if they would've picked any other place he would have gone he's just didn't like seafood or whatever the remember whatever the talian or seafood or something he didn't like he found out twenty years later these two guys were responsible for over one hundred murders new york city thing they were mobbed there mafia and he had no clue that they were in the in the mafia and there's also a kinison story that is frightening that that sam used to live in new york this is in sam kennison's book that was written about him by his brother bill kinison even met bill no bill kinison wrote a book about him called brother sam and you were fan of right and samples from houston are you from houston or austin i was born in austin and we grew up on her mouse out the houston one hundred miles south of houston in town straight down highway denying southwest sal you're gonna be in a golf down by victoria victoria okay i spent the whole week in houston so as i was staying fifty nine over by by bush intercontinental but i kept going up and down fifty nine to do radio and tv appearances all week this week fifty nine zero easy but you can own forty five and you might as well paying a number on.

greenwich village george representative new york sam kennison bill kinison houston austin golf bush intercontinental twenty years
"greenwich village" Discussed on KBNP AM 1410

KBNP AM 1410

02:26 min | 3 years ago

"greenwich village" Discussed on KBNP AM 1410

"The charles river and suddenly becoming a boat man that is something to say and and to experience as a passenger on board and bob i if you just joined us we were talking about what is it you're going to see as you're passing by hither and yon the last place that bob mentioned was boylston street and if i had to compare if you've never been to boston if i had to compare boylston street to some other cities i might compare it to to some degree madison avenue because of the kind of chic boutique shops and whatnot that you'd find but maybe compared more to bleaker street in greenwich village because it it's you know the old town house he kinda houses red brick houses from the late eighteen hundreds early nineteen hundreds and it's just one of those really charming place and there's a place called polston spa i want to say in new york it's not far from lake george it kind of looks like the main street that goes through that town if you've ever been there just adorable you know it's just the kind of place on a nice day you just wanna take a walk all the windows of shops and there are many restaurants with outdoor cafes and very cool place so after you go through boston street boylston street look at me i'm guy got combination with boston spa boylston street then what mystery you take less on our charles street which is actually the old shoreline of the charles river which is why they call charles street chelsea has kind of cute little shops little left namebrand shops more antique shops things like that a bit further down which we don't necessarily go by but it's a great place to kind of walk around after the tour and kind of go back and see checkup a neighborhood and beacon hill we go from there between the public garden in the boston common up beacon hill passed the state house down through the west end down by the td garden and then we by the old south meeting house we go by the museum of science and then we go over by north point park which was one of them main parks created from the big dig project here in the city they basically took a an old dump and created this amazing new park that ever move all.

charles river greenwich village new york lake george chelsea boston north point park bob i museum of science
"greenwich village" Discussed on Marty and McGee

Marty and McGee

01:59 min | 3 years ago

"greenwich village" Discussed on Marty and McGee

"He's got ripped jeans and like his part time barista and songwriter in greenwich village got but the oh g of the espn rooster family is khuda the rooster and and i'm told we didn't talk about sports enough last week and my wife is the first one always telling me that and she asked where have the where's the russo rewind been and saw contacted cooter not tear and it is indeed tom for the ristori one did you fall asleep after happy hour no wi fi on the tractor just coming back from fishing time to catch up he's the rooster rewind on mardian mcginn we're to start where you're where you are from although you might not sound like it and that's in the state of louisiana the new orleans pelicans throttled golden state last night bump them steph curry one nineteen one hundred getting that series back to two one mr big how about how about playoff rondo that that's what i love note not rajon rondo it's playoff rondo now that's his new name i did a story with him i had forgotten this and salt interview with him and i had to go back through the fouls i felt a store with him for us being a magazine several years ago he is a he's a fascinating individual and and he shows up when it goes down a little bit of a different do like thirteen assisted game he's basically like the millennial basketball player that we all hate then like throughout the regular season they're like i'm rajon rondo on his show just wake me whenever the actual playoffs gate here and then boom you get it you get the unbelievable game he told anthony davis last night mcgee this is fantastic he told him before the game hey make sure you get a nap in in davis turns them and goes wide and the universe goes i why do i need an happened he goes get ready for fifty tonight in.

greenwich village cooter mardian mcginn rajon rondo anthony davis mcgee espn louisiana basketball
"greenwich village" Discussed on KELO

KELO

01:30 min | 3 years ago

"greenwich village" Discussed on KELO

"Claim that plaintiff was not sure and eventually escorted out of the bar because of his perceived support for president trump is not outrageous behavior that's the official ruling of of new york supreme court justice david cohen let me say that one more time the judge said the fact that the plaintiff was not sure and escorted out of the bar because of his perceived support for president trump is not outrageous conduct this is where we are this is this is america in twenty eighteen and i get that it's new york but there are a lot of new york's around the country there are liberal cities there are crazy triggered unhinged miserable people who can't get over the outcome of the election who do not respect the fact that many millions of people support president trump and they don't know what to do with that and the best they can do is discriminate an attack and offend the way this guy was discriminated against a miserable place called the happiest our bar in greenwich village new york city loved to get your reaction to this story as we kick things off for thursday edition to.

trump new york greenwich village president official david cohen america
"greenwich village" Discussed on Out of the Blocks

Out of the Blocks

01:42 min | 3 years ago

"greenwich village" Discussed on Out of the Blocks

"Ninety eight or ninety nine i bought the buildings that were next to me and there was a one area that was an office space and i had it sitting there and it was empty and customers were coming in and they say what are you going to put over there and jokingly i said i'm thinking about putting a cigar shop in and the next thing you know customers are coming in today and one are you going to get the cigar shop open so i thought well i'll open them up put a few cigars in air starting but the business next thing you know the business was very busy and i'm this is more work than i thought it was going to be put it was going to be just a little fun thing so one of the salesman that called on me i was talking to massive body eleven at hand in let's not far from here i said what do you think about running cigar shop that's the bunk carreira alec bradley black market the arroyo cvt medeiros got dominican also with an october went queen bait thanks the race started the business back in nineteen ninety nine or two thousand so route eighteen years in i ended up here used to be a sales rep for about nearly ten years and ray was one of my clients and when i got tired of traveling and living out of a suitcase i came here to start running that this for him and here we are my name is david john bhaluka where at mount vernon tobacco company at two twenty one west reached st.

salesman medeiros david john bhaluka alec bradley ray mount vernon eighteen years ten years
"greenwich village" Discussed on Out of the Blocks

Out of the Blocks

01:45 min | 3 years ago

"greenwich village" Discussed on Out of the Blocks

"Would you say that's true joe wanted to feel homey friendly so it really works the big thing when we opened on was i went to open my own salon neil said so i can pick the music he didn't want the disco style feed one all the techno stuff so he wanted something show tunes you are obviously a fan of the theater of musicals you have posters for my fair lady and hairspray and the really modern million walls and here talk to me about your love for theatre well i think a lot of gay men especially for my generation had to fall in love with fantasy because they couldn't take reality i mean it was very hard to be a gay man in in the sixties and early seventies and so for me going into the world of film and theatre was away that i could express myself that i could not do in the concrete world of reality i see young people today i'm happy for them that they can solely express themselves without the fears that we had growing up but i also see that they don't bond in my perspective the way that gay men did back when i was young and gay you know my day you had you didn't have social media so you had to go to bars you had to have conversations you had to filter through people now today it's all instantaneous you go on you know do like gray i hate grade you like green i hate green and then they build their relationships about around how much someone is like them whereas an rda we built our relationships on what we actually had to talk about which was our our differences.

joe neil
"greenwich village" Discussed on Out of the Blocks

Out of the Blocks

01:45 min | 3 years ago

"greenwich village" Discussed on Out of the Blocks

"I'm neil four i'm co owner of neil suhair studio eight five six park avenue with my husband joe peta we own it together equally but we also have an entrance on read street to four west riester which is the life of this block you guys are married tell me the story of how he met oh no you cannot put that on the radio oh no not even an edited version no it is absolutely not i tell you thirty five years together congratulations worked together we lived together wherever apart you may not want to tell me how you met then but tell me what you found in each other that was special and how it was that you ended up being together instinctive well i personally believe that it's much more important to like your partner than to love if you like them lovell show up and i truly believe laughter is the key to everything i always tell people you can give yourself an orgasm but you can't tickle yourself because when all the fireworks go away in a relationship if you're not laughing what do you have we moved here in nineteen ninety design the place we have original barber chairs that were built in nineteen ten and then we have torian dressers because when we opened our salon men and women basically did not go to the same space so we wanted to create an environment that was both male and female friendly so when men came in they saw barber chair so they thought they were in a masculine space women tend to look more at the victoria dressers so for them the same space became feminine so each became comfortable in the environment.

joe peta partner neil suhair barber thirty five years
"greenwich village" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:18 min | 3 years ago

"greenwich village" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"The city is renaming a street in greenwich village to honor a fierce champion of women's rights and progressive causes as wnyc's bridge bergen reports the corner bank and greenwich streets will now be known as bella abzug way congresswoman bella abzug was never a slave to convention not in the hat she famously wore the position she took or the titles she wanted to be called he says do you prefer being called ms i said i don't care what you call you can call me congressman mrs some people call me bella abzug in nineteen seventy two one year into her three terms in congress representing greenwich village in parts of manhattan she lived on bank street near greenwich for four decades that's where the street sign is going up bell was the daughter of russian jewish immigrants she went to one hundred college and columbia law school when other schools refused to admit women she was a lawyer and an activist who believed power structures needed to be transformed suppose that instead of just the eleven of us women in the house that were more than two hundred instead of just one in the senate there were fifty and suppose that instead of only twelve blacks there were five times as many that's at the first meeting of the national women's political caucus in july nineteen seventyone we have got the put our organizing ability and energy to work to thrust women into political power plus sherman they're necessary sound familiar her daughter liz abzug who runs a leadership institute for young women says she still lives by those words i live by them personally i think that that statement is the most relevant today as it was back then council speaker cory johnson whose district includes herblock says he's surprised to street wasn't named after bella already she fought against poverty and racism she introduced the first gay rights bill in congress her first office when she was a member of congress was above the duplex which is a famous gay iconic spot and now the city is giving her a spot to commemorate her own icon legacy i submit that what is good for women will turn out the big good for the country bella abzug died twenty years ago this week richard burgin wnyc news.

liz abzug richard burgin columbia law school manhattan congressman congress bella herblock cory johnson greenwich village sherman senate greenwich bella abzug bergen wnyc nineteen seventy two one year four decades twenty years
"greenwich village" Discussed on We Watch Wrestling

We Watch Wrestling

01:55 min | 3 years ago

"greenwich village" Discussed on We Watch Wrestling

"Project pope greenwich village police turn your papers by the end of the day class we're going to watch it again and all right era religion class also could be watching pope greenwich village sell randy posted this after the the the awfulness the the shooting that happened in florida it's a teeshirt that says dear god why do you allow so much violence soon our school signed a concern citizens so this is clearly a so this was a correspondence between god right and someone else in god wrote back to your concerns students i'm not allowed in schools signed god what if i o new orleans nutty that post but what if that's actually a photo he took over a shirt michael hayes was wearing yeah viewed as guy pull out on the photo it's got like a phony tail at caught in the hat michael in a in a very very rare situation of not being in purple suit michael just at a tshirt mogul pulled on your fanny books we could see the bottomless shirt oh god ruled that letter coup i'm a tweet this out i'm just gonna throw a much sense i gotta get that on instagram immediately that don't really add to the conversation sybil no by how loud you shrieked did you remember that we're going to bar wrestling on thursday yes of course can't wait times a million times a melanie does elsewhere in on thursday e take a couple of days often unless we record on friday the patriotic and then sunday to go back to work it's a little bit a wrestling but then you got ta get some time all i got notes done some rest saying that i was watching and gone s laments and steph that i wanted to bring up okay we don't have to get to it now i don't want to blow my wide so early in the show but i have some thing well maybe now before you you're wad i hear concern and then you have the floor well do on me to start.

randy florida michael hayes michael instagram sybil steph pope greenwich village greenwich
"greenwich village" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:28 min | 3 years ago

"greenwich village" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"For wnyc comes from cardis in school of law in greenwich village the national jurist magazine inner spring 2017 issue named cardoso the 14th fast law school in the nation for practical training cardoso law bringing law to life w n y c independent journalism in the public interest 939 fm and am 820 npr news and the new york conversation live from npr news and culver city california and wing brown for the sixth day in a row protests continue in iran over soaring unemployment and rising prices that have driven many people to the point of desperation at least twenty one people have been killed during the demonstrations and hundreds had been arrested us ambassador to the un nikki haley says the iranian government is trying to blame its enemies for the protest and she says the un must not be silent this is the precise take care at a long oppressed people rising up against their dictators the international community has a role to play on north the white house is expressing support for the protestors but stopping short of calling for regime change meanwhile the iranian government is trying to stem the flow of information about the protests on social media former cabinets secretary in san antonio mayor who liane castro is launching a political action committee to help democratic candidates and perhaps himself 4 run at the white house and pierre's john bernett reports the new pact is called opportunity first leon castro told the texas tribune in a recent interview that opportunity first is looking for young in progressive political talent at all levels from congress to mayors to county commissioners who are running in the 2018 midterm elections castro was appointed by president obama as secretary of housing and urban development he seen as a rising star in the democratic party observers speculate he's laying the groundwork for a possible run at the white house and 2020 he hasn't said whether he will or he won't castro was on the shortlist for hillary clinton's running mate since hualian castro left the obama administration the former head secretary has lent his influ johnson latino politics to several congressional and gubernatorial candidates john bernett npr news austin stocks finished higher across the board on the first trading day of the new year on wall street the dow rose one hundred four points or zero point four percent you're listening to npr news.

president obama npr austin castro democratic party liane castro san antonio iran brown california culver new york obama administration hualian castro hillary clinton wnyc congress texas tribune john bernett pierre white house secretary social media un iranian government nikki haley law school cardoso greenwich village
"greenwich village" Discussed on KKOB 770 AM

KKOB 770 AM

01:51 min | 4 years ago

"greenwich village" Discussed on KKOB 770 AM

"Hello elle on here all hello everybody mark levin here our number eight seven seven three eight one three eight one one eight seven seven three eight one three moment when here breaking news the loser joe scarborough announces he's leaving the republican party announces it on the late show a stephen colbert joe is gone greenwich village always was a patty oh he's was apache he talk about what somebody selling so you look at this you look at the circus that's going on and tend to collude verses actual collusion the obamacare disaster where the republicans have all but surrendered every inkling of any principle whatsoever you see what's going on in our country had the progressives have so succeeded in almost every way and so i want to ask you something or better yet i want to explain something as time goes on when you release a book in the sales begin to get smaller inspire let's just the nature publish you really do wonder you wonder if it was worth i look what's going on in this country i pointed what i think are common sense problems whether it's the donald trump jr situation are obamacare and so forth and he hit a caller who asked me what i'm selling.

mark levin joe scarborough republican party greenwich village stephen colbert obamacare donald trump
"greenwich village" Discussed on Two Man Weave

Two Man Weave

01:39 min | 4 years ago

"greenwich village" Discussed on Two Man Weave

"Well i know you got the screening of the film in the uh in new york again it's called mr chips it's at the ifc centre on six th avenue right there in the heart of greenwich village i really strong suggest everybody gets out a chance to chicken suit check check out and see it a remind you of a greater era a in in in in basketball my final question before i let you go and i wish you a great night i know people new yorker to love the love the film why don't we have as many players that we used to in new york liquid you used to be every single year this one that one to is the highbrow knows that the highbrow do the lesser known does what happened kenny a a big go goal ito nobleman cool number one group mentor the environment i think a lot of god we're doing different thing or you especially going into the music business environment they going out a new york it gonna prep school then they they sell together but nobody playing all the wall like you use through the summer leave not the same the talks has not filled up in the summer on not a lotta read a lotta leave the job he's got citywide boise yesteryear all hype puts us l core or type believe you could play wind playing in the stomach four or five games a date brands like that no more then this is this is the the circumstance he's lobbied young kid growing up you know enough one current home the this difficult and um do they have to go to prep school would then they you know something happened what a mess up and then they come back it is just the structured no more way for be different ever you're the whole generation now with this saw social media and everything.

new york ifc centre greenwich village basketball new yorker kenny social media boise