22 Burst results for "Greenwell"

Teen, uncle drown during Labor Day fishing trip in St. Mary's County

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:25 sec | 6 months ago

Teen, uncle drown during Labor Day fishing trip in St. Mary's County

"Day fishing trip turned tragic in ST Mary's County yesterday. Maryland Natural Resource is, police say a 15 year old boy and his 37 year old uncle drown in the Patuxent River, a Greenwell State park in Hollywood. When police arrived. Others had pulled the victims from the water, but efforts to revive them were unsuccessful. The parent walk down to the river near Kayak launched a fish, but they may have fallen off in offshore ledge. Also,

Patuxent River Greenwell State Park Maryland Hollywood
"greenwell" Discussed on Storybound

Storybound

02:56 min | 6 months ago

"greenwell" Discussed on Storybound

"He didn't know.

"greenwell" Discussed on Storybound

Storybound

02:31 min | 6 months ago

"greenwell" Discussed on Storybound

"Judy you're..

Mina Kimes' Eclectic Career

Asian Enough

03:49 min | 11 months ago

Mina Kimes' Eclectic Career

"We want to start out by talking about your career which is really interesting to me. You've made some big changes moving from investigative business journalism too long form sports writing and fighting to hosting podcasting and commentating and these are all really. Hartfield to break into. Could you tell us about these transitions? And you know was was sports journalism something. You're always headed towards. None of these jobs were ones that I was doors or ones that I ever aspired to do. You know I kind of fell into all them So now that I've alienated. Everyone right from the trump wants to do these things Yeah no I don. I was going to be like you guys like arts writer or more cultural criticisms kind of interesting to me out of college and then I fell into business. Journalism Durin Internship for magazine called Fortune. Small Business got job at Fortune magazine out of college. Writing about finance and investing moved to doing features than doing investigative features moved to Bloomberg News whereas they're investigative team and I. I've always loved sports but I never aspired to be in sports as a career. Never ASPIRE TO BE ON TELEVISION. Never aspired to do commentary. Espn reached out to me. I'll just didn't really seem like an option for me. Just didn't seem like something that somebody like me would even do quite frankly But but along those lines I don't think business journalism seemed like an option to me. Either I mean when I was in college is just didn't occur to me so. Espn Kinda made the Kimball. The idea for me. They hired me in two thousand fourteen as a features writer. After reading your piece about Your Dad yes. So I wrote a personal essay about football and editor their name. Meghan Ren- greenwell riche down. So you you seem. You seemed like football tweet about it a lot a lot of dumb stuff. She didn't say that. But that's accurate depiction of my twitter and So I was kind of like extensively a serious financial journalist at the time but Football and sports more. Broadly was my passion. So I I was worth twenty nine or something I suppose. Yeah decided to make the leap which was pretty terrifying. What did you grow up wanting to be like as a kid Painter Oh yeah and I still pay not well not a good painter but I do like watercolor sometimes of football players really. Yeah so do you draw them to then or yeah. I do a lot of things I just get I I know insane and then I sometimes I just get a gift. Like a little watercolor set or something. And I'll just use it up and then buy another one. That's what football players do. You have a series of Philip rivers just because I like you so emotive super splitting looking and then I did them all and I said why. Don't want these. So I just auctioned off for Homeless Charity here that works with homelessness that were considered roads a great compassion direction and I was shocked that somebody wanted them and result out of money so I did it again this year. Oh my gosh you do this regularly. Wow that's cool. How much money did you make if you don't well this year? I did so. I did a Korean while. I am obsessed with the kicker young white coup. Oh yeah after the night of three onside kicks legendary night in. Nfl history. And I did a few others like marshawn lynch disguise I liked and I think I sold five of them. Maybe something five or six but I raised thirty five hundred dollars. Wow Wow you definitely interesting. Like if you're selling a five hundred dollars like let's add painter to the bile thank you.

Football Kimball Espn Meghan Ren- Greenwell Fortune Magazine Marshawn Lynch Fortune NFL Small Business Bloomberg News Twitter Writer Philip Rivers Features Writer Editor
"greenwell" Discussed on Bookworm

Bookworm

15:01 min | 1 year ago

"greenwell" Discussed on Bookworm

"I'm Michael Silver Blood and this poor for today. I'm excited to have as my guest Garth Greenwell you know. He's been on before with the previous book. Called what belongs to you and yet his new book called cleanness I think is still more extraordinary. Although the response to the first book was the response to the greeting of a brand undo writer of Great Dunk AC- beauty importance and Garth greenwell began his writing life as a poet. What turns you to pros? That's such a difficult question for me to answer because because it's so mysterious to me. I think it had to do with the seven years. I spent teaching high school which I think You know doing that. I discovered new a new capacity in myself to be interested in other people's lives and In the world around me and I think it had to do with moving to Sofia Bulgaria where I lived for four years and where I spoke a language other than English everyday some combination Shen of those things made me start hearing sentences. That aren't broken into lines. It's really interesting because was on the one hand there is in this new book cleanness which is a novel divided into stories stories kind of and sections stories form sections sections lead to the novel. And we're watching the the narrator develop his sense of sex and love their in Bulgaria and so when he falls in love. It's was someone who's done more frightened about public expression but the pros does. Your pros is not frightened of the six Russian. You're taking great care in sort of if James Ian Steps Comma by Comma to tell us what is thought and felt but vis mash up of James and pornography is absolutely you know. It's the first time time I think. Oh well thank you. That's a a wonderful response to the book. I mean the sentence is for me. The unit of composition. You know my great poetry. Teachers were three poets who are obsessed with the expansive capacity of English Syntax. The poets Frank Bidart Story Graham and Carl Phillips. Oh my I knew about Frank Bidart I am. I am friends with an I love jury. What a wonderful wonderfully strange person? She magnificent the real jealous But so is Ba- Dart and the third is Carl Phillips Owen. I know Karl to you or very often. I was extremely teachers. I mean this boy from you know Tobacco Farming Kentucky getting to study with these people. It's a real blessing and while you're a boy from a tobacco farm in Kentucky. It's only slightly exaggerated. I was first generation raised off the farm but every weekend every not every school break we were on the farm. Yeah and somehow or other though you had three brilliant poets who who were able to accept that you were going to become a novelist I got to have an extraordinary education. I did an MFA in poetry. With Carl Phillips Saint Louis and the night did half of Harvard which is where I worked with jewelry and then I dropped out of Harvard and I disappeared and didn't have any contact with them for seven in years while I was teaching high school for of those years in Bulgaria. But here's the thing I mean you know I wrote what belongs to you without ever studying fiction as a writer later or as a scholar without ever being a fiction workshop. And I really I think you know I wrote it using the tools that I had which were not the tools of a fiction writer the tools of a poet. Yes I think. In the case of this book it was very good for you to be in that circumstance because I think one of the program program could have done would be to expose you to people whose draws would draw with agitation about your subject brighter which in your short preceding novella mid go develops into your I novel. What belongs to you? And these are books about falling in love with a male prostitute Trieste and this is a subject matter. It's not that it hasn't been broached own. But it's not been broached easily and certainly it hasn't been broached without melodrama your book. These two who are unknown dramatic. They're calm passionate books about the fear. The comes along when you reveal yourself to another person and the other person in the first two books is that prostitute who is not used really to passion being directed at him by someone who wants to know what it's like to live a life with all the doors and windows open Right that's beautiful. That's a beautiful description of that relationship. Ya now frank. BIDART is not only one of your teachers to me. His one of the very very best and riskiest poets wits riding in America but his life is a very different kind of risk. Yes he keeps his sexual nature on a high level of the sacred and the spiritual and without that he'd rather not be involved so when he read how open you were going to be as a prose writer. What did he communicate Kate to you will so for me? I mean frank was my most important teacher and to me. He is the most important living American writer I agree and the great example of his work is a kind of utter fearlessness and determination nation. You know I think one thing that artists do that a certain kind of artists has to do and maybe to make the kind of art that I most value one has to go into an abyss and one has to follow one subject. All the way down you know. We've become very skeptical of a kind of romantic myth of the artist and I think that skepticism is a good thing but I also think that there is real risk and making that kind of art because when one goes into an abyss there is no guarantee one will come back out and writing parts of this book cleanness. I felt quite frightened frightened and I found myself in places I did not want to be. Frank was the great example. I called to mind about what what fearlessness in art looks like one of the things that most amazed me about the response to what belongs to was how much people talked about sex and just how surprised they were by the sex in the book. It didn't even occur to me to think that it was anything extraordinary because Frank Bidart was my great teacher. Frank Frank Bidart is the great potent. Nothing is forbidden in his in his work. While the fascinating thing for me is in the Bator wants to take that abyss and turn it into a holy place a sacred place and he is to my mind in that regard astonishing now to my great delight lied. I learned that it was fank. But Dart who convinced my guest Garth Greenwell to send me his his first book which dedication written on the front page is for Michael Sulfur Blunt who's discussions of literature have been unnecessary nourishment to me for years. It's an honor to think of this book in your hands with every best. I wish Garth Greenwell that written in a scroll that would be because I didn't yet know you at all with you're very first. Book published a book of poetry. I never published a book published poems but never a book so you were new to me. Then uh when you're first novel appeared and now this newest book cleanness from Farris drills is the occasion of this this interview now this book if not the gamut it runs a gamut and it has in its design the fact that the second chapter takes its narrator narrator into the Rome of the secret desire the desire to be completely dominated and and experience pain with another man in between that second chapter and the second to last chapter is is the recording of a relationship of real tenderness depth and intimacy. He find find someone who needs to be dominated and that need is extreme. The notes on the computer express a desire for no safety. No safe word. No condom a absolute surrender. Yes so the second chapter of the book which is called Gospel. Dr Dr which is the Bulgarian Word for master or Lord was the first thing I wrote after finishing what belongs to you. I had written a couple of other other pieces of what would become cleanness. I did not have a sense of it as a book when I wrote Gospodarka it was the first thing. Also that I wrote after coming back to America It was a terrifying experience to write. Because it's about an SMS bigger. And so that's an encounter that goes very wrong and in which the narrator finds himself in a kind of real existential peril. He hadn't intended to took to lead himself to the minute. I wrote that piece I knew I had to write a companion piece piece. I knew that having explored this dynamic from the viewpoint of the submissive I had to explore it from the viewpoint of the dominant. It would be years therefore I wrote this. The little saint the second to last chapter but it was at that moment. I think understanding that relationship that made me conceive this book and it was. You know both of those stories were very frightening to right but also in the little saint I wanted to write about an SM experience. That goes very right. I love what you said about Frank. BIDART and about a kind end of holiness he bestows on passions on experiences. That are very often denigrated. I wanted to treat the experiences with reverence and I wanted to take seriously this character. The little saint for whom promiscuity acuity is a discipline of radical hospitality and profoundly ethical relationship toward the other. And he you know something happens in that scene. That was a surprise to me. I didn't know where that was heading but he transforms transmogrify as we might say. You know this narrators experience what he discovers about himself and about the pleasure. He can take from inflicting inflicting pain and the little saint transmogrify that into something that is accommodating of a very humane relationship unshipped with the other. I'm Michael Silver Blunt. You're listening to bookworm. It's coming to you. From the studios of Carnegie Hall Am Talking With Garth North. Greenville about his new book. Cleanness will continue after this short break. I'm Michael Silver Bland. This is bookworm. And I'm talking with Garth Greenwell about his new book cleanness a`delicate and profane portrayal L. of language desire and sex. I would say that it's rare for this. What kind of material to be approached with a sincere.

Frank Frank Bidart Garth Greenwell writer Michael Silver Bulgaria America Kentucky Sofia Bulgaria Carl Phillips Saint Louis Harvard James Ian Carnegie Hall Ba- Dart Shen Michael Silver Bland Garth North Carl Phillips Owen Carl Phillips Karl
Garth Greenwell: Cleanness

Bookworm

08:56 min | 1 year ago

Garth Greenwell: Cleanness

"I'm Michael Silver Blood and this poor for today. I'm excited to have as my guest Garth Greenwell you know. He's been on before with the previous book. Called what belongs to you and yet his new book called cleanness I think is still more extraordinary. Although the response to the first book was the response to the greeting of a brand undo writer of Great Dunk AC- beauty importance and Garth greenwell began his writing life as a poet. What turns you to pros? That's such a difficult question for me to answer because because it's so mysterious to me. I think it had to do with the seven years. I spent teaching high school which I think You know doing that. I discovered new a new capacity in myself to be interested in other people's lives and In the world around me and I think it had to do with moving to Sofia Bulgaria where I lived for four years and where I spoke a language other than English everyday some combination Shen of those things made me start hearing sentences. That aren't broken into lines. It's really interesting because was on the one hand there is in this new book cleanness which is a novel divided into stories stories kind of and sections stories form sections sections lead to the novel. And we're watching the the narrator develop his sense of sex and love their in Bulgaria and so when he falls in love. It's was someone who's done more frightened about public expression but the pros does. Your pros is not frightened of the six Russian. You're taking great care in sort of if James Ian Steps Comma by Comma to tell us what is thought and felt but vis mash up of James and pornography is absolutely you know. It's the first time time I think. Oh well thank you. That's a a wonderful response to the book. I mean the sentence is for me. The unit of composition. You know my great poetry. Teachers were three poets who are obsessed with the expansive capacity of English Syntax. The poets Frank Bidart Story Graham and Carl Phillips. Oh my I knew about Frank Bidart I am. I am friends with an I love jury. What a wonderful wonderfully strange person? She magnificent the real jealous But so is Ba- Dart and the third is Carl Phillips Owen. I know Karl to you or very often. I was extremely teachers. I mean this boy from you know Tobacco Farming Kentucky getting to study with these people. It's a real blessing and while you're a boy from a tobacco farm in Kentucky. It's only slightly exaggerated. I was first generation raised off the farm but every weekend every not every school break we were on the farm. Yeah and somehow or other though you had three brilliant poets who who were able to accept that you were going to become a novelist I got to have an extraordinary education. I did an MFA in poetry. With Carl Phillips Saint Louis and the night did half of Harvard which is where I worked with jewelry and then I dropped out of Harvard and I disappeared and didn't have any contact with them for seven in years while I was teaching high school for of those years in Bulgaria. But here's the thing I mean you know I wrote what belongs to you without ever studying fiction as a writer later or as a scholar without ever being a fiction workshop. And I really I think you know I wrote it using the tools that I had which were not the tools of a fiction writer the tools of a poet. Yes I think. In the case of this book it was very good for you to be in that circumstance because I think one of the program program could have done would be to expose you to people whose draws would draw with agitation about your subject brighter which in your short preceding novella mid go develops into your I novel. What belongs to you? And these are books about falling in love with a male prostitute Trieste and this is a subject matter. It's not that it hasn't been broached own. But it's not been broached easily and certainly it hasn't been broached without melodrama your book. These two who are unknown dramatic. They're calm passionate books about the fear. The comes along when you reveal yourself to another person and the other person in the first two books is that prostitute who is not used really to passion being directed at him by someone who wants to know what it's like to live a life with all the doors and windows open Right that's beautiful. That's a beautiful description of that relationship. Ya now frank. BIDART is not only one of your teachers to me. His one of the very very best and riskiest poets wits riding in America but his life is a very different kind of risk. Yes he keeps his sexual nature on a high level of the sacred and the spiritual and without that he'd rather not be involved so when he read how open you were going to be as a prose writer. What did he communicate Kate to you will so for me? I mean frank was my most important teacher and to me. He is the most important living American writer I agree and the great example of his work is a kind of utter fearlessness and determination nation. You know I think one thing that artists do that a certain kind of artists has to do and maybe to make the kind of art that I most value one has to go into an abyss and one has to follow one subject. All the way down you know. We've become very skeptical of a kind of romantic myth of the artist and I think that skepticism is a good thing but I also think that there is real risk and making that kind of art because when one goes into an abyss there is no guarantee one will come back out and writing parts of this book cleanness. I felt quite frightened frightened and I found myself in places I did not want to be. Frank was the great example. I called to mind about what what fearlessness in art looks like one of the things that most amazed me about the response to what belongs to was how much people talked about sex and just how surprised they were by the sex in the book. It didn't even occur to me to think that it was anything extraordinary because Frank Bidart was my great teacher. Frank Frank Bidart is the great potent. Nothing is forbidden in his in his work.

Frank Frank Bidart Writer Garth Greenwell Bulgaria Kentucky Sofia Bulgaria Michael Silver Harvard Carl Phillips Owen Carl Phillips Saint Louis James Ian Carl Phillips Ba- Dart Shen Karl America Kate Graham
Philadelphia Flyers mascot Gritty is being investigated over claim he punched a 13-year-old boy

KYW 24 Hour News

01:19 min | 1 year ago

Philadelphia Flyers mascot Gritty is being investigated over claim he punched a 13-year-old boy

"Grady facing a lawsuit a flyers fan says the man behind the orange mascots amassed punched his son in the back during a photo session back in November and now police are involved a wide W. stem the men as live from South Philadelphia of the story hi Tim good morning Brandon yeah Chris green well from Delaware he's so upset at what happened and how the flyers responded he tells CBS three he's dropping his season tickets and always be a flyers fan but I lost a lot of respect for the team after any treated a long time season ticket on after us in November here at the center green well took his thirteen year old to a photo shoot with ready they got the picking green well says his son tapped ready in the head now moments later Greenwell says the mascot got got out of his chair and punched his son in the back now he says his son was heard to the ended up at the doctor's office other bills ended up being about three hundred dollars according to me well and he complained to the team and and flyers and he asked for an apology from them and then something special to be done for his son he says their offer of all you can drink passes at the bar here was not good enough for them I agree well is not buying that the flyers are saying that there was no video of the assault in a statement the team said it took the allegation seriously and they did investigate but they could not find any evidence so police Brandon are now looking into this incident with ready

Grady Philadelphia Delaware Flyers CBS Greenwell Assault Brandon TIM Chris Green
Garth Greenwell Reads Jean Stafford

The New Yorker: Fiction

08:17 min | 1 year ago

Garth Greenwell Reads Jean Stafford

"So I studied poetry for most of my really for most right and I picked her recently and you know I am a there's this remarkable ability that she has and that's a combination that I find very few writers get right eight one another that austerity is combined with an almost combination of kind of lushness and then something almost acidic thinks she's very widely read these days I wonder why why you think in flattering our sensibilities and I think there's a way in which her very precision I love these kind of old world words that sometimes you feel like she's rehabilitating to feel like she's stroking a cat as she uses it and there's something in that maybe that doesn't feel periods well not from the period many other writers just at all who sometimes even terrifying truths both of her I think great fling with sexuality and with desire and with those to be reading Jean Stafford much more as I say I'm convert and a proselytizer career in the in the forties and fifties early fifties and after that it was only stories S. in her life she stopped writing for a long time and you do get the sense that writing it just unsparing of everyone she's unsparing herself she's types who sort of made her feel like a country Bumpkin at their parties you and you had a little internal debate about which story to read and you the setup of the story has this incredible economy and I think you're almost sort of framed by a single action or situation so in if the door at her mother who is on the telephone with her her mother's sister beginning to end we are in this static situation and the and so there's a way in which you feel like you know she just fills the story people in this story is what I was talking about before that there is I mean this story is hugely away and one is staring into an abyss and that abyss is right well we'll talk some more after the story and now here's the incident the child's hair is a site and it will be many moons to a decline like a grown woman like you or me dear at our most hysterical sure probably doesn't sleep I can't stand it if she's turning mental onto aunt louise the door to the bedroom across the hall was and now half off the bed drooping and askew it taught Hannah an outdoors it is snowing on the Christmas trees

Jean Stafford Hannah Louise
"greenwell" Discussed on 600 WREC

600 WREC

14:04 min | 2 years ago

"greenwell" Discussed on 600 WREC

"Back. John Greenwell junior with us your phone calls as well. John. There's no question. There's probably an appearance government cover up here to hold back on disclosure in your opinion. Why why aren't they letting us know what's going on? It's a hard one. I this isn't a popular answer. But I it's one that I lean towards and that is that the government doesn't have anything to disclose because they are clueless. They don't know. Exactly. What's there? There is no collusion because that's a popular, you know, a area behind it. But I think they might be as confused as as you, and I are on on what is going on in the skies. I think that's a big possibilty. I'm not saying that that is exactly how I feel. But I think that that in itself if it were true is a threat to national security because the implication behind the United States being clueless is is fairly detrimental to our society. That's scary. It is that exactly it. And I believe that that plays a role in potentially that true national security threat that number one this is a phenomenon that we cannot control. We don't understand and we can't combat. And I think that that that really is out of everything that I've seen and and have researched. That's what I lean towards because I think that you know, when you get into the intelligence of a civilization that can traverse the stars. And you know that you have to bring up the debate. Would they communicate with us would they care to communicate with us? Would they care that we're even here? I mean, there's so many different questions that we have to tackle when answering that and I think it's a in my opinion, very egotistical way of thinking that they would want to come down here and save us and save humanity. Because to be honest with you, it's it's the same. It's it's the same notion that we would go into the middle of the Sahara desert, and, you know, put up a ten foot wall around an anthill to make sure that nothing attacks that little anthill. Sadly, humans aren't like that they they don't plant a flag and try and communicate with the ants. There's very select few. You that are interested in studying the ants I happen to be one of them. I find them fascinating. But other than that. It's just not how intelligence works, and we are closer to an aunt when it comes to intelligence than it would be between humans and something let's say a hundred thousand or even a million years in more advanced than in questions here in who believes that benevolence comes with, you know, great age in great knowledge, that's not necessarily the case of anything. They may know that it's easier to pilfer, you know, earth's and planets that have, you know, humans or beans that are inferior to them. That's right. Yeah. Wanted to lash shows I did for history channel was on this very topic. And it was exploring that if aliens were to come here, and they potentially wear Gress of how would they destroy us? And why and what I did was explored. The reasons why that when it came to survival. If you manage was able to leave the earth which one day, we will have to do whether it's tomorrow next month next year next millennia, we're going to have to do it because our planet will end. So if we one day do that, and it comes to the survival of the human race, and we approach another planetary body or planet or whatever. And there is life on it. In order for us to survive of we have to potentially harm or kill that life form that is lesser than us when it comes to intelligence, what we do it in my opinion. Yes, we would. And that is the reality of what we're looking at what I did. And the show is explored. Why AM telling civilization just wouldn't care? They destroyed something because the reality that the moment humanity learns that aliens are out there. Just one civilization the minute. We make contact the odds that that is the only civilization in in the universe is is pretty mill. And why I bring that up as it's that Amtel analogy again that that one anthill is one out of hundreds and hundreds and hundreds of thousands of Anson and colonies, and so on that are just on this planet, let alone in the universe. So if they are there than there are millions of civilizations there and them wiping out just one in order to survive. I don't think is out of the question because I think humanity would do it. And they probably have done it before. I would I would guess. Yeah. I absolute guess that. What about the abduction phenomenon? Join. What you're thinking? That's an interesting one it it's one that is intriguing. It's but admittedly, it's not one that I focused on. I mean, I've talked to a lot of people who have had those experiences. I have a lot of questions, but to be honest with you have always felt that. I just don't have the the psychological background to really understand it and grasp it, and again, I'm not saying that it's a psychological issue. But what I'm saying is to explore it an ultimately comprehended. I really think to be honest with you. Let's go to the phones here for you George in Saint Louis. Welcome to the program, George go ahead. Get us started. Here's here's what I don't understand of for for observers on earth to see the beginnings of the universe. That means light travels at a certain speed that means for us. IBM position and state the beginning of the universe names that space had to be bent us, go faster than the speed of light. Telescopes to see the next fifteen billion years now how how him have aliens solve the problem of bending face. Did anyone ever questioned that? Yeah. I think so I the first part if I understood you correctly, I don't I don't think you necessarily have to bend space to see light from fifteen million light years away, or whatever it is. It's just that's traveling at the speed of light. That's what what happens the second part of your question. I think that that is the debate about all of this that that would be you have to if you're talking about humans. You have to bend space and time because humans can't survive as you know, try right? So but take it to the next step. What if and this is a fascinating topic a show in itself that there's a lot of speculation in the scientific community that the the biological selves that we are today, the biological beings that make us human? We are starting to merge with computers were starting to merge with machines. I'm not trying to make this all sides fi on you. But that is the reality of what we're we're going towards and there's governor. Research, and I've got a lot of foia requests open on this. And I've gotten a lot of documents on it on implanting chips in the brain to control mechanical extensions of our biological self. And so one day, it's not just going to be an arm or a leg that were interfacing with the brain, it could potentially be entire body and the minute you do that the minute you then interface into entirely being mechanical that brings up a whole separate debate. But the minute you merge into a machine like artificial intelligence time is relevant then you can travel the stars at the speed of light or even before it because time is relevant. The only thing the only reason time means something does if because we're biological, and we die, you know. I mean, that's that's really it in the terms of of the cosmos and the universe. It becomes a relevant. And if if we were achieve that, it's terrifying notion, but if we were to achieve. That that brings up a whole new world. So to speak on how we traverse the stars. And that's not me just being crazy. That is a big topic of debate by people much much Marta than me thinking that if we contact aliens one day because a lot of the scientific community does not believe we have yet. But if we do it will be with a machine, and it is a fascinating debate. And it's not one that you hear about all the time. John did you come across any documents about the UFO's trying to shut down our nuke missile sites? Yeah. Yeah. And and there are quite a quite a few instances where you have not only the shutting down of nuclear sites, but I've devoted a whole chapter of in the bottom of of incursions on nuclear installations. So they're seemingly seems to be a. In attraction between whatever this phenomena is and nuclear installations, I actually approached trying to disprove it. But the reality is like especially through the nineteen seventies. There were a lot of UFO sightings that we're seeing in and around these bases with our most powerful weapons and again alien or not it doesn't matter that proves beyond any shadow of a doubt. There is a threat to national security. No question entree to the to the company line. But there's absolutely documented threat next stop. Let's go to baileigh and the Moines Iowa welcome to the program. Hi bailey. Hi, Debbie with us. Go ahead. Okay. So I was wondering I watched the movie the fourth kind and I've seen it before. But I just talking about this. I was just listening on it. And I was wondering what his opinion would be on all the footage and recordings from that movie about Abigail Tyler. I'll be honest with you. I'm not real familiar with the movie about all the currencies that happened in normal noble. Ask right. It's very it's a frightening. Frightening case, I'm not sure that those are I think that are probably more Hollywood to tell you the truth. But we've done a program like that might be worthy of doing another one on that. I'm not so sure whatever happened to these people John something happen. But nobody really knows exactly what it is. It could be ET related. I I'll definitely have to check it out. I wish I had a better answer for you. But I honestly have not seen a great movie, though, great movie, if you're in the something that's a little edgy and scary. That's say. Well, that's my middle name. Let's go to Robert and fort Madison, Iowa, first time caller. Hi, robert. How you doing George? Okay, sir. Thank you. Yes. To tell you about the clothes. You have both off father in the grateful, easy and the bible to two thousand years for price. Walk the earth. You can read Zeke you'll described circular dent heating, not far wheel. There's five six came down. He said Holly polish Bronco in Greek and they had faces in them. And each time. They turned the all time just like a spaceship. Of course, they had they landed up in it took them over to Israel and the land and showed them how wicked was and when he let him down. He could send a man write this down. But he described I mean, he'd be -scribed to the hills spaceships when they landed a parent when I go up and down move, and so two are with carrying his throne, and that's not a spirit that needs to travel somehow, and you know, man, went to the moon, and he thinks, you know courts. Behind that. You're breaking up on at the end Biblically speaking, John lots of great UFO cases in the bible. Yeah. Funny. Quick story is back when I first started. I was in high school as you mentioned earlier. And in one of my religion, classes, it was a Catholic high school. We did a kind of a debate a debate exercise, and I brought up could we do, you know, UFO's and potential references to aliens in the bible, and they agreed to let me do it. And we actually won the debate. If you can believe it on our side 'cause we explored those bible versus I'm not saying that that's what is in the bible. What what I am saying? There's an enough to reference in there that makes it kinda curious what exactly it is? Because we were going into some of the scriptures that talked about flying scrolls. And we kind compared that contrasted it to people talking about cigar-shaped UFO's nowadays, the buzzword is the pick tack you up. Oh, all of which are the exact same shape. In the sky. But the descriptions go back to how they can describe it at the time it was written. So we pulled a bunch of verses out of the bible that that explained it and at a Catholic high school. I'm not sure how much that went over very well. But who like I said we won the debate. I was pretty proud about it. Let's go to Cornelius in Alexandria, Louisiana. Hello there, sir. Hello, Jordan, John. I was just telling Tommy John that we had a guest UFO siding, a place called nacogdoches, Louisiana, and our news director, Al quarter mindset will coast to coast needs to hear about that. So we had something fall out of the sky near place called Nakisa, Louisiana, which is about sixty miles north of Alexandria. So if you look that you might be able to see that. But I wanted to bring up something I think, it's spiritual technology angel tech almost like that caller that just called behind me. So I believe you can get references from the bible that this is spiritual tech or angel tech, and where they can become physical, and none physical, and I believe you right with man and machine gonna merge, and that'd be the worst thing for us..

Tommy John George Catholic high school John Greenwell United States Louisiana Sahara desert Alexandria Amtel Robert Saint Louis Israel IBM Jordan nacogdoches Marta Abigail Tyler Nakisa
"greenwell" Discussed on KTRH

KTRH

12:45 min | 2 years ago

"greenwell" Discussed on KTRH

"Greenwell junior. Let's start with what you've been able to find it since nineteen sixty nine. And again, that's the majority of the books. So we're not gonna go to deep into. We'll save a lot for April. When you come back in your on again with George Noory when the book drops. But, but what what are some of the cases that you've been able to find that the government was willing to admit to once you started poking around using foia? Sure. Well, the definite one that that deserves the the biggest mentioned for me is what got me interested in this at the age of fifteen. It was the first document that I had read now, I don't claim to be the one that discovered it through foia. It had been out in. And that was one of the only government documents that I was able to find before I taught myself how to use the freedom of information act, and that was the nineteen seventy six Iran incident document, and to summarize this this was nineteen seventy. Six. So this was about seven years after the closer project blue book, and again, I I want to punch the point that the that the military and the government's stance after nineteen sixty nine was that they just did not care about UFO's. They solved the mystery. They were able to explain the majority of them didn't care about the, you know, percentage of ones that they couldn't explain and don't don't bother us anymore with it. And yet this four page government document intelligence report from a UFO siding in Iran. Was the first thing that I read, and it was a document that showed that multiple f four phantom jets in Iran worse seemingly shutdown strategically a by a UFO craft. And as you read this story, you see that this UFO in in a in a Sifi sense was kind of like a mother ship. And the reason I say that is there were multiple UFO's that came out of this original UFO one even either landed landed on earth or hovered right above the surface as these pilots were trying to engage the object, whatever it was against shutting down to different f four phantom jets, multiple UFO's out of it had no explanation, and you read through this thing, and you realize this is not technology. We had in nineteen. Seventy six or eighty six or ninety six or beyond. This was something that was physically there. The pilots described it as one third the apparent size of the moon. So if you're looking at that a full moon, it was twenty three nautical miles away from the incoming f for that. That's how he described visually the object. It was also confirmed on radar. So obviously, it was a craft that was there. They saw what the human eye and radar and yet they've never been able to explain it. So I'm reading through this case. And obviously, it goes into much more detail in the four pages. But I I'm reading through this case, and I'm going this. This can't be real. There's no way that the government is going to admit that this case actually happened at that. They have no explanation for it has to be fake. And that was what I read on the internet that it was real. And it was obtained through this thing called the freedom of information act. So not to backtrack a little. But that is actually how I got started was reading through this document and filed a freedom of information act request. It's my first one back in nineteen ninety six to agency called the Defense Intelligence Agency, or the DIA you don't really hear you hear about a more now just because of current headlines with UFO research, but back then you you didn't hear about them that much me here about the FBI and the CIA, and, you know, more recently, the NSA, but not necessarily the the DIA. So I filed the request and sure enough it was absolutely real. And I was hooked from there on out number one the documents shouldn't exist because again, punching that note that after nineteen sixty nine they didn't they didn't care about the US. But on top of that this was an intelligence agency that was collecting UFO reports from around the world because what I did next was I filed for a request for what else did they have. And so I discovered that wasn't only the nineteen seventy. Eighty six ran incident. But this one agency had UFO documents throughout the decades through the seventies through the eighties through the nineties. And when I first hit him it was the late ninety. So the two thousand student exist yet, but so they had it through at the time through the present day. What I found interesting was that the most reductions was in the ones that were closer and more recent to what I was requesting them. So the ones in the nineteen nineties were the ones that were most heavily blacked out. They were considered secret and top secret. So obviously, it was still a highly classified topic. And there were well over a hundred pages that I was able to that I was able to find. So that one agency alone disproves, what the government wants you to believe they didn't care about it. They didn't research them. They they felt everything was explained. Well, if all of that was true, then there's no reason for them to collect all of that information. And intelligence on UFO incidents throughout the world. And keep it. There was no reason for that. And yet they felt the need to do. So. So that one agency taught me there had to be more to this topic. And sure enough I started at that point just hitting any agency that I could find and discovering that it it was not just the DIA anymore. It was the CIA the NSA they all had reams of information that was still classified all the way up through top secret to your credit that as a as a teenager. That was your question. I trying to imagine my fifteen year old self in. If I were writing a foia request to the government, I put it probably would have done something snarky and stupid. Like, you know is the statue of liberty wearing a bra or some I wouldn't have had the I mean, I was interested. But I wouldn't have thought I wouldn't have taken it. A seriously as you did. And it's really the cool thing about it is the the accumulated knowledge that you've put together. And in fact, what a great resource you source. You are for history channel and producers for TV products. And and your. Yet at the same time. We know this is sort of weird. But we also we don't know what we don't know. So we don't even know necessarily what to ask for. So I mean, there could be an incident which is like one of the most incidents of all time that the government knows about. But nobody knows that it exists enough to be able to ask for it. And they're hardly gonna put it on the top of the fault of the government dot com website. That's one of the tricks to the foyer is you have to figure out how to ask for things where you don't own it certain incidents documents projects, and so on, but in the same respect you'd have to skirt the line between being broad enough that you're not missing out on things, but not too broad because if you're too broad the government agency can say, hey, wait a minute in your it's called they call it. A burdensome search your request requires a two to burden some of a search. So you need to round it down a little bit. So if you're too broad they'll say now, we can't do it. So you have to skirt the line between that and and, you know, being not specific enough that you don't get those incidents that you don't know about. Because like you said, we don't know what we don't know. And if you don't know what to ask for you try and do a what I call a broad stroke request where you're looking for all types of incidents. So there's depending upon the. Agency, you start picking up these little tips and tricks on how to ask for things, and you know, key words, and how to search, and you just kinda have to learn as you go. And it's it's frustrating at times by you, do get these little nuggets that that show you that they're they're not being fully honest about this topic. And I'm not sure why still I I don't have a brilliant answer for you on what the motivation is. I have guesses, but at this point, I mean, I just try and collect as much evidence. I can and and figure out how each agency works because they are all different on how they handle foia requests them what they'll search for and so on and you just target them a strategically and see what you come up with. You mentioned evidence. And so what are what are is how how do they respond to multimedia requests for photographs videos films? What can you get? Well, you name it. If it's a government record. You can get it under the foia. So digital records photographs videos video file CDs. Cd roms DVD's you can get all of that. It comes down to the fees that you're gonna pay and how you ask for it. What's kind of nice? There's a lot of agencies keep inventory lists. And you kinda again just pick up these things over the years that sure they will inventory their list of let's say videos, and so you can query the NSA and say, you know, give me your inventory list of videos that you currently archive, and and, you know, in in some cases, they will give you that list. If they don't have a list, they're not required to create one under the freedom of information act. So the foia only allows you to request documents that already exist, they do not it does not allow you to request something to be created. So again, you just have to learn which age. Agencies. Have these lists go after the lists? And then file another foia requests for specific videos that you're interested in and then it's it's the same process. I mean, a lot of times of videos can be redacted you'll be watching it. And then all of a sudden, you just see a black box appear over your screen. You know, you can't see it. So sometimes it's humorous. I mean, it's frustrating, obviously. But humorous where you know, you you you you wanna see what's going on? But but it's it's classified. And so they blackout literally certain parts of the video. But but back to your question you can request anything. And and and this sometimes you got to pay for it. But you'll get another frustrating thing that they'll do that. I've run into way many more times than I wanna count is that they will give you like thirty s generation photocopies of a photograph, you know. And so you can't get an eight by ten glossy and a lot of cases. Instead, they'll say this is the best copy we have available, and they have photographed before or they've photocopied the photocopy of the photocopy. And you just you know, she'd like these dots that represent the photo that's fairly frustrating. When you get right. If like that, but but anything is is up for grabs even down to blueprints. And also, all sorts of thing contracts. You can go after anything. So what's the best visual evidence? If you know seeing is believing what's the best visual evidence that the government has coughed up on a request that you've asked for that's in the book. Well, are you talking about photographic or Datta graphic video document the stuff that I mean, I think documents is interesting, by the way, I mentioned before. But I it's really cool that you were able to you did the reproductions. The did the facsimiles of the documents themselves. So one can not just take your word for it. But one can see the document not have to go through the trouble of putting in a foia request themselves. But but you're yeah. What what what are they giving you where it was? The photo that the government wouldn't want people to be looking at maybe because it's so telling and they'd have no explanation for it. Yeah. Sadly, photos are very hard to come by. I did discover draft that was from of all places the national forest service, and they had this is just from the last about seven years or so that somebody in one of the forest took a picture, and there was a UFO, and it and.

government UFO Defense Intelligence Agency NSA Iran CIA George Noory Greenwell US Sifi FBI seven years twenty three nautical miles fifteen year
"greenwell" Discussed on News Radio 1190 KEX

News Radio 1190 KEX

01:35 min | 2 years ago

"greenwell" Discussed on News Radio 1190 KEX

"On the internet. This is coast to coast AM with Ian. So actually. You could easily say that John Greenwell junior has been tangled up in blue project blue book since he first started to try to get government documents back when he was a kid starting at fourteen filling out foia requests, God bless. It's it led to a great website the black vault. If you haven't seen it yet. Go see the primary docs, that's what I really love about this research you see the primary material, but you don't you're not just getting a derivative material. You can go read the memos at the same time as you're reading his new book, which won't be out until April. The book is called inside the black vault, and he talks a little bit about his relationship with these searches for foia material, but also goes in and using the very same documents, which the government claims proves its case that there is nothing to these investigations in Roswell the project blue book yada, yada that you can go look at the very same documents, which the government presents to say see nothing here to look at. And he uses them right back at them to say, see what you're missing that book won't be out until April. As I mentioned, but we get a sneak peek at it, and it's only appropriate with this new show on history channel project blue book. We'll talk about it next with the author on coast to coast AM, this is he pundit..

John Greenwell Ian
"greenwell" Discussed on KOA 850 AM

KOA 850 AM

01:35 min | 2 years ago

"greenwell" Discussed on KOA 850 AM

"On the internet. This is coast to coast AM with Ian. So actually. You could easily say that John Greenwell junior has been tangled up in blue project blue book since he first started to try to get government documents back when he was a kid starting at fourteen filling out foia requests, God bless. It led to a great website the black vault. If you haven't seen it yet. Go see the primary docs, that's what I really love about this research you see the primary material, but you don't you're not just getting a derivative material. You can go read the memos at the same time as you're reading his new book, which won't be out until April. The book is called inside the black vault, and he talks a little bit about his relationship with these searches for a material, but also goes in and using the very same documents, which the government claims proves its case that there is nothing to these investigations in Roswell the project blue book yada, yada that you can go look at the very same documents, which the government presents to say see nothing here to look at. And he uses them right back at them to say, see what you're missing that book won't be out till April. As I mentioned, but we get a sneak peek at it, and it's only appropriate with this new show on history channel project blue book. We'll talk about it next with the author on coast to coast AM, this is he in..

John Greenwell Ian
"greenwell" Discussed on WRVA

WRVA

01:35 min | 2 years ago

"greenwell" Discussed on WRVA

"Wide on the internet. This is coast to coast AM with ends on it. So actually. You could easily say that John Greenwell junior has been tangled up in blue project blue book since he first started to try to get government documents back when he was a kid starting at fourteen filling out foia requests, God bless. It led to a great website the black vault. If you haven't seen it yet. Go see the primary docs, that's what I really love about this research. You see the primary material. You don't you're not just getting a derivative material you can go read the memos at the same time as you're reading his new book, which won't be out until April. The book is called inside the black vault, and he talks a little bit about his relationship with these searches for a year material, but also goes in and using the very same documents, which the government claims proves its case that there is nothing to these investigations in Roswell the project blue book yada, yada that you can go look at the very same documents, which the government presents to say see nothing here to look at. And he uses them right back at them to say, see what you're missing that book won't be out until April. As I mentioned, but we get a sneak peek at it, and it's only appropriate with this hot new show on history channel project blue book. We'll talk about it next with the author on coast to coast AM, this is he in. On it..

John Greenwell
"greenwell" Discussed on KLBJ 590AM

KLBJ 590AM

01:44 min | 2 years ago

"greenwell" Discussed on KLBJ 590AM

"Relied on the internet. This is coast to coast AM with. So actually. You could easily say that John Greenwell junior has been tangled up in blue project blue book since he first started to try to get government documents back when he was a kid starting at fourteen filling foia requests, God bless it's led to a great website the black vault. If you haven't seen it yet. Go see the primary docs, that's what I really love about this research. You see the primary material. You don't just getting. A derivative material you can go read the memos at the same time as you're reading his new book, which won't be out until April. The book is called inside the black vault, and he talks a little bit about his relationship with these searches for foia material, but also goes in and using the very same documents, which the government claims proves its case that there is nothing to these investigations in Roswell the project blue book yada, yada that you can go look at the very same documents, which the government presents to say see nothing here to look at. And he uses them right back at them to say, see what you're missing that book won't be out till April as I mentioned, but we get a sneak peek at it, and it's only appropriate with this hot new show on history channel project blue book. We'll talk about it next with the author on coast to coast AM. This is. And. I was a.

John Greenwell
"greenwell" Discussed on WHAS 840 AM

WHAS 840 AM

08:03 min | 2 years ago

"greenwell" Discussed on WHAS 840 AM

"Hey life stressful enough don't take time, out, of, your, busy, workweek waiting on a plumber this is Billy Greenwell. With Greenwell plumbing southern Indiana simply dependable plumber project repair scheduled with us on Saturday at no additional cost that's right Saturday water heaters sewer stoppages or just a dripping faucet Greenwell plumbing plumbing, is, what, we, do, a, one two nine four eight nine thousand or Greenwell plumbing dot com I. Mean somewhere along the line someone in my family entered at on a ship in New Orleans is the way we traced it. Back and became a sharecropper ultimately drifted to Saint Louis and then and. Then ultimately Louisville and then was, a, sharecropper and then our family had. A foothold in America For, that No It's an attractive nuisance says lawyers say America was an attractive nuisance I just had to have it so I forced my way that's not gonna work that we can't live that way without order the rule of law has to be in place so when you block. Buildings you're not winning over one mine all you're doing is making a lot, of people angry who. Are, trying to get. To work who are paying taxes who are paying for services for immigrants and everyone else that uses them collectively use your. Brains and maybe someday. You'll understand the system has to be in? Place in order for. All of, us to feel like we're getting the. Betterment of what America offers us.

Billy Greenwell Greenwell America Saint Louis Indiana New Orleans Louisville
"greenwell" Discussed on Deadcast

Deadcast

02:18 min | 2 years ago

"greenwell" Discussed on Deadcast

"He says, what do people do for small talk in places where there isn't some kind of extreme weather Greenwell. Well, I grew up in California and you still you still just talk about the weather. You talk about always good. Yeah. You talked about the difference between sixty two degrees sixty six degrees, and if you're a delicate, California flower, like I am, you feel that difference and it feels very important. And so you can never replace the weather even in California appalling. Like it goes down like five degrees, you like, oh, it's so brisk guns like to get a parka sixty four yesterday. Yes, that is literally a direct quote. I have said. Wrought, you have an answer. Well, that's a, that's a that is a good answer. By the way, I think it's generally sports, but the one that's always fascinated me is like high school sports, like the idea that you're just talking about other people's kids. They like maybe you're in school with your kids. You're like Brandon's looking like a beast this year, right? Have you ever lived in a place where people do that? Talk about high school sports. No, not adults. I mean, I have friends that had buddy that covered high school sports, New Jersey for a while. He could like talk to people's dad's about that, but something my dad's doing leader in life as he goes with one of his buddies to Don Bosco high school football games, and I didn't go to Don Bosco. It's like a big program. Now they send guys all the high end one programs. He just goes of them just go there and the guy didn't go to Don Bosco either they go and they just like watch other people's kids play football, which I thought was kinda weird into signing day to. I don't know, not really. I mean, like he mostly talks to the parents of other because my dad is is like this, like talks to the parents of the kids that are there like they'll sit and like rooting section and they'll be like your sons, very talented, pumper in the guy will be like, well, yeah, you know, thanks for saying. As we wrap up a fabulous name of the dead, cast the shows produced by dairy Maura. We featured music by Corbin Hayes was mixed by Jamie Colosio. You have, of course she wants send us into voice, notary melted guests. That's been dot com or tweet us using the hash tag dead gas also find us on apple podcasts, panoply, NPR one or whatever else. Wherever else view or short beaver podcast, we will see you guys next week. Greenwell raw. Thank you very much. I buy.

Don Bosco California football Greenwell Jamie Colosio Brandon New Jersey apple Corbin Hayes NPR sixty six degrees sixty two degrees five degrees
"greenwell" Discussed on Longform Podcast

Longform Podcast

03:15 min | 2 years ago

"greenwell" Discussed on Longform Podcast

"One story in the washington post about how the militias were essentially creating a black market for real estate in baghdad this was not something that had been reported on before but you know what they would do is they would go to your house and they would say we're going to buy your house for this lino dramatically underpriced and then if you said no you know the next time they'd come with a gun and the offer would be much lower and if you said no again like the third time they would just kill you and so i had met this guy just in the market who had just sold his house after his promise to his dying father had been that he would keep the family in this house and he was just forced to sell it and so it was one combination of just listening to this really emotional heart wrenching story and one part like really hard like sort of numerical reporting like tracking down how this trend was manifesting but i also had to do like daily kind of round up style articles because i was the junior member of the bureau so it was like twenty five people were killed in a car bomb in this neighborhood and thirty people were killed in one over here and to american service members were killed like literally every day just doing that roundup if it had been a different era like if you just been doing this in nineteen ninetyseven and seventy two thousand seven and there wasn't the same sort of fatalism about newspapers and such like would you have just kept doing that like would you become some foreign correspondent with us question asking his like do you kind of like resent coming along when you came along was that what you really wanted to do i don't know i mean you know another version of the ninety seven versus two thousand seven question is like had i come along in two thousand seventeen like the washington post is doing great right now once bazo spotted all of my friends who had stayed who started around the same time i did felt like it had really paid off for them you know they had made it through the dark days and now it was great and i think the likelihood that i would have remained there would have gone up dramatically but i also can't say i regret it because it's led me to some really cool places and i do love editing in a way that i didn't expect to and i love management in a way that i didn't expect to and i have a an aptitude for features in a way that i don't think i could have dreamed of at that point so i certainly don't regret it but i do think there is an alternate version of my life had the years been slightly different where yeah i just never left the washington post for sure but the really isn't like an alternate version of your life where you were doing journalism ridden no i mean i think i briefly well it briefly thought about going to law school and then i applied to pg programs in american religious history after i left the post but basically now i mean i've been doing it i was fourteen when i started doing journalism so it has seemed like a very wind e path in some ways an incredibly straightforward path in other ways i.

washington
"greenwell" Discussed on Longform Podcast

Longform Podcast

01:34 min | 2 years ago

"greenwell" Discussed on Longform Podcast

"And it's unclear what the timeline for that will be but at some point this company will be sold unless like they don't get offers and i think that's i understand so little about media financing and how corporations work that like i have no real sense of whether we will sell despite the fact that we are a profitable media company that also in my unbiased opinion like does some pretty good shit on the internet you know maybe we don't sell in univision keeps us in that's probably really bad for us house morale at the moment the deadspin staff is filled with incredibly chill incredibly hardworking people and so the mantra ever since i've been there and i've only been there for months the mantra ever since i've been there is just you blog through it like you just keep writing and it's really fucking inspiring it's so cool i have the best co workers and you know when the shit goes down their reaction is sort of like five minutes of like god we're all gonna die in slack and then it's right back to god who has this breaking news story it's just a really cool environment to be in and it feels really fun even when everything might be going badly what do you do in the like five minutes when it's like a oh god rog ina di it's still.

univision deadspin five minutes
"greenwell" Discussed on Longform Podcast

Longform Podcast

04:49 min | 2 years ago

"greenwell" Discussed on Longform Podcast

"I will thanks to mail chimp i here's max and meghan green i megan greenwell how are you i'm okay how are you i'm well i'm doing fine good i'm good it's nice to be drinking a beer with it is it's a friday afternoon united having a beer i feel like it's deserved yes for both less yeah yeah you feel like you've had a week it's been a week i wanna talk to you about all the things okay your career you're writing cool you various pitstops cool but i have had a busy week i've not been following media twitter as i normally do i don't totally understand what is happening with your company and i was wondering if you could explain it to me sure well my company is owned by univision communications reporters for my website and other websites within our company have reported that that company is pretty fucked can i curse i yeah right okay so you and your colleagues have reported that you're like mothership is fucked it's totally fucked yeah financially because it has massive debts that it cannot get out from under i can take no credit for the reporting but i have very smart colleagues who've done the reporting are there like business side people in your office yes so here's a question i have like you publish a story on deadspin or like you rerun a story from one of the sister sites on deadspin and the headline is essentially like univision is fucked and he's like business people have messed up yeah and then like you like go to the bathroom or go get a cup of coffee yeah and you're standing next to one of these business people who fucked up yeah what is that like well so the top executives are not in our building which is cool although i do feel bad for like our head of pr who like is not only in our building but like he sits like across the room from me basically and he is really kind of a saint actually about like dealing with this and just being like him again how are you and also like he's going through hell because we're putting him there but you know one of the reasons i was interested in working for this company in particular was because they will run the stories that nobody else will run and there is no better example of it than oh my god our company is fucked and here's six weeks of reporting about exactly why it was not a screed or a hippies at all it was really just like here's the financial case that shows that this is completely unsustainable how do you go about i understand it wasn't you personally doing it but like how do you go about reporting on your own company's fuck nece it's really the same way report on anything else you know like you still have to go through the communications people to get the official story you're still finding people on linked in like sending them cold messages because the people who have fucked it for the most part are so many levels above us and univision is headquartered in miami so they're not with us i am in them and like some like company retreat or something no you haven't come ida i with the fuckers i i have come eye to eye with my boss's boss who is upper management at that comes money i don't think he's the problem in fact i think part of our problem is he's like essentially a puppet that doesn't have i was falling until your is went really big no no no no no your houses bosses the public and his bosses have essentially gotten the company in so much trouble and of course part of the story here is universal only bought the gizmodo media group when peter thiel sued gawker out of existence because of a petty grievance and so univision picked us up essentially in a fire sale i say us although i didn't work there then and now you know less than two years later is just sort of like fuck it like we have to get rid of these people how are they getting rid of people the people are getting laid off no i meant they're getting rid of our our unit like by selling us but it is also true that they did what was supposed to be layoffs and our union negotiated down to buy outs that we lost two people from deadspin that took voluntary buyouts that were not you know involuntarily dismissed but the news this week was that univision is getting us up for sale.

meghan green megan greenwell six weeks two years
"greenwell" Discussed on Longform Podcast

Longform Podcast

02:42 min | 2 years ago

"greenwell" Discussed on Longform Podcast

"Hello foreign podcast i'm excellence game here with just one co host aaron lamour how are you sir we shouldn't pretend that we're here podcast and we actually just watch the world cup final and we're trying to do double duty that's right we're just taping this in your basement rest in peace croatian team i enjoyed your play very much evan ratliff is on sabbatical in some beach somewhere and this week on the show i talked to megan greenwell meghan green while is the current editor of deadspin she's the editor in chief of deadspin the sports website she's been in that job for all of four months and we talked a lot about what it's like to come into a job like that and also what it's like to like takeover a website like deadspin that was like the outsider insurgent for so long and now it's fourteen years old yeah this is i think a theme in the show because we've been doing this show for so long but many of the publications that were insurgents when we started our now incumbents and the state and the whole tone very different in those two positions those longer the underdog even if you want to believe that you're still the underdog and i asked her about that a bunch but also we talked about her career before deadspin she's worked for esquire new york magazine espn the magazine she was out doing good magazine with an friedman before that blew up in terrific fashions into her law for podcast and megan greenwell also from your hometown berkeley california to that went to the same high school i believe she's a couple years younger than me she was also involved in journalism at the high school level she was all i was involved in nothing theater and we'll we'll talk about that but megan yes she wrote for the high school newspaper and her second story actually sent a guy in berkeley to federal prison and it became this national news story that a high school reporter had broken open this huge case and we talked about that to what it's like the have your second article ever get you like in the pages of people magazine max i understand that the decatur book festival is happening again sure is labor day weekend last year long form picked a group of authors who brought him down to the book festival we wanted to do it again this year male chimps said no and they asked shea serano of the ringer to do it instead says all kinds of amazing authors going with shade to the cato book festival labor day weekend and you can read along with them this summer at read this summer dot com you were just at the beach as just at the beach read some books read more and go to read the summer dot com to figure out which ones you should read.

evan ratliff editor friedman berkeley california reporter shea serano aaron lamour megan greenwell editor in chief new york espn the magazine decatur fourteen years four months
"greenwell" Discussed on Barstool Radio with Dave Portnoy

Barstool Radio with Dave Portnoy

02:18 min | 3 years ago

"greenwell" Discussed on Barstool Radio with Dave Portnoy

"We don't right right so that's i think everybody's like what what is that people were like congratulated what yeah right and i saw him like directly like had a contest i know it is like well that's the pricing so it moved a little faster that's the point of the story meghan greenwell green monster some may know her as confused with the one i wanted to eight wagner see when you want to do what i want to use the phrase that'll be used against me but don't do that just don't do it don't do it don't do it play it do it there's no reason have you heard our siren yeah this is to say in my opinion we this is a should i hate i try not to get in these fights and for the most part i stay out of them but this particular tweet piss me off so much because megan greenwell tweeted all right i'm gonna say like offense alignments tweeted tweeted that the barstool sports twitter announcement from twitter sports and said hey jack maybe not seen all the rape threats barstool people have sent me on your platform but you might consider checking them out now i don't know one at barstool has sent her any kind of a fact okay so what she did was she did the loosey goosey it sounds like maybe it's employees barstool could could someone have sent something guarantees sense how have not said over and over and over those people are scumbags like if you send a rape trial to anyone your fucking asshole get off twitter you're you're you're you're not speaking for us and that's the other thing like i wish someone would speak up i'm speaking of right now i'm literally saying right now if you if you start attacking people on twitter in the name of barstool you're being an asshole and you've been doing that on hold where we disagree on that i agree with you i agree with you to a to a point like you and if you are like threatening riper you're an asshole if you bring merit and attacking her just trying to have a conversation that's fine if you're defending us in like a normal human being way you call her an asshole wrong right we agree on that whole isn't a term that can be taken totally right on that.

wagner megan greenwell jack twitter meghan greenwell rape
"greenwell" Discussed on The Chalene Show

The Chalene Show

01:48 min | 3 years ago

"greenwell" Discussed on The Chalene Show

"Ready to eat foods that my ancestors didn't eat that my body i might have recognized it on the shelf the my body doesn't recognize it and that's what kind of led me to define butcher box was to once i realized what impact it had on me realizing that i was now eating meat that was eating food that was likely inflammatory right today animal and so why is it that that grains and corn etc are inflammatory or are they inflammatory and why are we feeding them to our animals or feeding them to our animals because in the nineteen fifties it was basically discovered that if you were to administer antibiotics to an animal and feed it a massive massive grains you can put a ton away on an animal very cheaply and this is after the war people were very focused and still really today are the the the masses are focused on cheap meat eating meat but having it being credibly incredibly cheap so the industry's response to that was how do we put as much as possible as fast as possible on an animal rather than how do we do things the right way in a way that's best for their stomach their gut their we'll have you cow's stomach is different than human stomach and it doesn't process greenwell so it's it's not it tends to as you said there's inflammation concerns there's issues with health over a health of the animal there in typically when they go to a feed lot it's very confined space so there's lots of other cows round it's a stressful environment basically everything about it is just a stressful inflammatory.

greenwell