18 Burst results for "Greenham"

"greenham" Discussed on The Guilty Feminist

The Guilty Feminist

01:33 min | Last month

"greenham" Discussed on The Guilty Feminist

"greenham" Discussed on The Guilty Feminist

The Guilty Feminist

07:52 min | Last month

"greenham" Discussed on The Guilty Feminist

"That's what you could. And someone through a firebomb there. Yes. In July and the gorse and everything went up like Tinder. And so two weeks later was Hiroshima day and then hit Nagasaki days and we went to the clearing and then we just kind of picked up all this ash, and we just rubbed it into our arms and legs and face and then went up to the main gate of the base and started singing, you know, I sang of my nightmare and we sang various different songs. And you know, that was kind of our way to respond after being attacked was to use what they were trying the violence that they tried to use against us to use it in ways that would channel people into thinking about the immense apocalyptic extinction violence of nuclear weapons, whether they were inside the base or they were outside the base. That was always what we were trying to do. That's why we stopped the convoy because we were basically stopping it and trying to look straight in the eyes of the drivers and saying, you know, what you're driving is mega death. Are you going to drive over me in order to carry on that? Because if you can't, then you probably should not be driving nuclear weapons around. At all. Trying to connect them in with that. Which managed human in them inside them active human. And they usually stopped. Nearly always they did actually stop which is why we were able then to paint them. And show that we'd mark them. Yeah, sorry, were you frightened every day? I was just thinking living there for 5 years. Constantly putting your body into that sort of like fight or flight mode. Must have just been exhausted. You can't, you can't do that. That's the thing. I had nightmares before I went to greenham. When I went to greenham, and I started, you know, the sentry box was my first action and we took it exactly a year after the camp left Cardiff. And just for the listeners at home, this was an incident depicted in the documentary where you broke into the sentry box and then the police were around trying to get in and they couldn't. Yeah. And it was, it was quite hilarious. Yeah, it really was. And that was actually one of the first ever actions and certainly the first action that led to women going to prison. And then that was the group of women that formed the basis of the group that went to the U.S. and did the court case. What the can't stop won't stop watching sort of stuff? You know, the dramatic stuff. AMC plus has it all. Would you go to war for your family? Don't miss Ken. The all new Irish gangland drama. Ready to raise the stakes? Catch up on the latest episodes of The Walking Dead's epic final season. Nostalgic for TV's golden age, AMC plus is the home of mad men. Plus, meet a sitcom wife like no other, and Kevin can F himself, starring Annie Murphy, available ad free on demand and on the platforms you're already on. Sign up today at AMC plus dot com. AMC plus, only the good stuff. When you walked into this building today, now this is a hotel. We just needed a screening room that was sizable so we could fit a guilty feminist audience in here. But it's actually called the shortage courthouse hotel, which I had thought anything off. I just thought, well, that's where the people who've made the documentary booked at will come along and do it. But you came in like with a look on your face and going, I can't believe this event is here. This has brought back a memory, tell the audience what memory this brought back for you. I was sent to Holloway from this magistrate's court. Normally it was from newbury, but sometimes when we would say that we were not going to when they gave us a fine for occupation or whatever it was, they started off doing us under 600 year old law called breach the piece. And that's for like dancing on the silos and the central box with that. But then when we were blocking the roads and then painting convoys and things like that, it turned into something that they called criminal damage. And they then fine us. And we refused a lot of us refused to pay the fines. Some women needed to pay the fines and we'd raise the money because they had kids or they had jobs and, you know, and so on. But I've refused to pay the fine and then 28 days would pass. And then usually they'd come to greenham to pick me up, but on this particular occasion, I was speaking, I think Hackney greenham group had invited me to speak at some meeting in Hackney, and had publicized it. And so when I turned up to do this meeting, the police turned up to arrest me because the word was out. And this is where I was brought. And unfortunately it was just before Christmas, so he sent me down I think for 21 days, but, you know, and I said, can you please just send me down to 14 days and then a night before Christmas? But no, it was 21 days, so even with remission, so you had Christmas Christmas inside. But the wonderful thing was that I could actually connect with some of the other green and women who were also spending Christmas inside and a wonderful thing. Really is the most wonderful time of the year. By the way, wonderful time. Oh, you're here. Oh, great. Well, this will be more cheerful. What was it like when you went to Holloway, where prisoners who were not in for criminal damage against a nuclear base? Were they sympathetic to the cause were you seen as quite heroic there? Did they know about it? Was that a place where you were able to spread the word? My first prison sentence actually was the one that I was most scared of because the Welsh women that I had been arrested with they were all sent to an open prison. And I didn't. And then I was put in a cell, and then I heard the door open and then the keys saw jangle and then the door opens, and I could hear that somebody was brought in and I sort of turned and when she saw my face, she said, oh, you poor love. It's your first time, isn't it? And that was when I realized just how amazing some of the women in prison are and also how political are the reasons that they were in, whether it's that they had been prostituted that they had been. They were finally taken to court because they had said no to police who wanted freebies out on the streatham high road or where wherever kingsland had sex workers and the police had set basically I'm not going to pay otherwise I'm going to rest for you. Obviously, poverty played a massive role. And so, you know, some women were within ended up doing drugs, drug mules. There were addiction things. But you know, with very, very few exceptions, you know, women looked after each other in the prisons. And I think that's really important to say, so I came out of that first sentence saying I'm not actually going to declare myself a political prison in the way the suffragettes did. See the suffragettes were the mother of my revolution and you know and as you can see, I love the ending of that film, didn't you? All those amazing women. You know, because they are the daughters of greenham, whether they know it or not, you know, if we did something, it was to give courage and courage calls to courage. So this was the right way to end the film is actually showing the next generation of women that are still going to have to carry on the struggle and linking the environmental struggle. The struggle against nuclear war, because we still have far too many nuclear weapons. I mean, there were 50,000 back in the 80s. And.

AMC Annie Murphy Nagasaki Holloway Hackney greenham group Cardiff newbury Ken Kevin Hackney U.S. kingsland
"greenham" Discussed on The Guilty Feminist

The Guilty Feminist

08:15 min | Last month

"greenham" Discussed on The Guilty Feminist

"I'm sorry that's boring to you you've just seen. We saw masses of police brutality in Britain and this age is has not gone away and is looking to escalate with this new policing Bill, which is very, very frightening. But we saw proper proper police brutality and very scary things. But the KGB feels like another level to go and mess with. Were you very scared? Actually, by that time at 1985, no, because we already knew that they were talking about us as green and heroines. And in fact, I was shown a poster that looked remarkably like it was one of these socialist realist posters all of it. But you knew it was me because it had my cape and, you know, my long hair and the suffragette ribbons. You know, and I still do the suffragette ribbon thing. Because we didn't think of ourselves as tall as mother's revolution and a lot of us, including me, you know, where mothers, although I can understand in that context because the other women whose narrative was used in this film for them being a mother was a very important part. And I was actually one of the dikes at green and let's be honest. And although I did occasionally there was this American woman who turned up and started being very disruptive and we really thought she was probably the CIA and she was going, you don't look like a lesbian. Wow. Well, but Chris who featured heavily was a lesbian, but only discovered she was a lesbian actress. When she left green was a place that I think a lot of women discovered, they were more lesbian than they'd previously thought. Yeah. And she had three children, so, you know, mother would be tough on her. He looked very emotional for her to talk about. But remember, this was the 1980s. It was such a horrendously homophobic gay bashing time. So many lesbians who were mothers risked losing their children just for the fact, you know, with close 28, section 28, guess who it was that actually abs sailed into the House of lords and chained themselves to sulla's desk when she was trying to read the was it lesbians? It was green and lesbians. Was it? Of course it was green and lesbians. I remember as many and boon Sally and I knew it was supposed to be so I didn't know it was green and lesbians who crushed it. Who else would it be? Green and women are everywhere. And you know, we were going into the pawn shops too at the same time. I mean, that's the point that we were making connection, and you saw and I'm so glad in the film that they picked up on the things that I and others had said and when an interview dissolved and then Titus who, I mean, I hadn't seen since that period when sol brought her over to greenham to tell us how it was. And she's a Maori woman from New Zealand and had worked very much with Pacific women. So really, we were very much about yes nuclear weapons, but we were also about the environmental and the humanitarian harm that had been done right through the whole kind of nuclear nuclear system from the bombing of Hiroshima Nagasaki, and you see sexy co who I worked with in this last decade with the international campaign to abolish nuclear weapons. I can go figure. Set Sequoia who's 13 years old in Hiroshima at school when the bomb hit very close by. One of only two possibly three girls that managed somehow to crawl free and survived. And I didn't even know she'd come to greenham until briar the director sent me a photo and said, is this set sico? And I looked at it, I said, it certainly looks like her. And then I emailed it to her and said that's a co is that you. We had a conversation. And yeah, you know, so all these things weaving in and out. And you know, and it was that that led me on leaving greenham to decide that the next step I had to take because I kind of realized that if you do activism and you do it right, we can get a treaty. And we can actually ban. Now, INF treaty only banned one class of weapon. I mean it was kind of important because it was a very destabilizing the crews, the Pershing, the SS 20s, the war fighting, the first use, the ones that would actually start the war in the European theater, which is, of course, where we live. So, but so I realized, you could get, you know, if you're really active. And Greenpeace blessed them gave me a job when I left because I left after we got the treaty because 5 years is actually a long time, and I was exhausted, I'd been beaten up just a few times too many, and I just needed to move on. How big you are? Was it the because we saw in the film, both police brutality, but also just random men who turned up in person and through things and hurt people. The vigilantes did destroy my bit. My first ever bender that I actually made that the traveler women are taught us how to make. My first ever bender did get destroyed because he was a bender. The bender is those igloo looking things where you ask permission of the trees to bring them into greenham to take them from where they're growing. And then you bend them over, and you make a kind of igloo and you cover that with plastic and tarpaulin and some nice colorful blankets. So, you know, your cozy, and then the bailiffs come along a few months or weeks later and they tear it all down. And you see me in the middle of my bender being kind of it torn down. I thought it was a good idea just to stay in the bender and try to talk to them about it. And but there you go. But the thing is that, yes, so my first bend was burnt. By whom? Yeah. So it's quite close to the rotary men who misogynists. What was them beef? Like what were they why were they so angry because you weren't doing anything to them, even if they disagreed with what you were doing, you were peacefully protesting. A couple of them, they were called rage. Rate payers against freedom and encampments, and they used to have these horrible misogynist cartoons, adverts in the newbury weekly news. And it turned out that the reason why they had all these blood and offal and garbage and magazine with maggots in it was because one of them at least worked in an abattoir. And they probably objected to the fact that a lot of green and women were mos egans. I mean, you know, hey, this was before veganism was really cool like it is now. Wow. That's an extraordinary thing. So someone who works in an absolute payment got awful and threw it at vegan women who were trying to stop carloads. They'd come in color. Oh, no, no. They never did those. But it was when I mentioned about the attack in the middle of the night on a tent that had two women. It was right up by the silos so it was a wooden area close to the silos and it was two women that wanted to be able to kind of watch the silos and let us know what changes and that sort of thing. Hazel and Jane and it was just an ordinary ten, because by that time we were being evicted so often pretty well every day. But tucked in the Woods they weren't being evicted quite as often, but they couldn't stay there long enough to have a bender. But it was so just an ordinary little tent and two men in the middle of the night, and the women were inside. So they didn't see them, but it sounded like I can't remember exactly but they thought it was American soldiers. And it was, you know, the vigilante is really tended to chuck things from the road, but they did do they did chuck one summer July. They threw a firebomb. Right next to an area that we call the clearing, which was actually considered a safe place that women who had kids could put up their tents and camp because there was no access directly onto the big old main road. So if you wanted to say, I am not frontline section because I have children. So.

boon Sally greenham Hiroshima bender KGB European theater sulla House of lords Britain CIA Nagasaki Titus sol Chris newbury weekly news New Zealand Hazel Jane chuck
"greenham" Discussed on The Guilty Feminist

The Guilty Feminist

08:01 min | Last month

"greenham" Discussed on The Guilty Feminist

"Our guest today lived at the green and common peace camp for 5 years. She is the director and founder of the acronym institute for disarmament diplomacy as well as a cofounding strategist and organizer of the international campaign to abolish nuclear weapons and part of this movement that won a Nobel Peace Prize. Please welcome Rebecca Johnson. I know. And some of you in their daughters. Well, Rebecca, you've got a standing ovation there, by a lot of people who are grateful not to have died in a nuclear Holocaust. I mean, the people at home haven't listened to so try not trying to do it in a way that doesn't give spoilers. But as a documentary, so I think it's probably all right to say there was no nuclear war. Probably all right. So if you're listening at home, we've just seen this absolutely remarkable documentary about a movement that started at a kitchen table in Wales, gathered momentum, lots and lots of women who walked to greenham, then chained themselves in the 80s to rails, actually broke into this camp where nuclear missiles were being held making Britain a target. But also this group movement of women grew and became an global movement of women saying we don't want this for our future. We don't want things for our children, and then that grew into a movement of civilians men too. And what was the most remarkable thing for me was Gorbachev saying who if you're very young and you don't know Gorbachev and Reagan ended the Cold War, and when Gorbachev was asked, why did he trust Reagan? He said I didn't. And he said, I trusted the green and common women to hold Reagan to account and if I disarmed not allow him to arm. And that must have been that was so emotional to watch, but that must have been so emotional to hear. Yeah, it really was. And I actually want to say that what he said was and I only have it from the interpretation because Russian isn't one of my languages. But what he said was he basically knew that we would not give up. We the greenham common women were not going to give up. At greenham, I mean, that's how I heard it that we would not leave greenham until the U.S. missiles were going. So then it was possible to negotiate with Reagan. And that's so interesting is that the people have to hold their leaders to account. It's really makes a difference. Because had that arms race continue to continue, we could all not be here. We could have someone could have pressed the button. And so what you did when you went down and you probably thought, well, who are we to stand up to these people and this might look a bit hopeless, but gathered such momentum that you actually forced their hands. And that I find absolutely extraordinary. And women would, of course, doing this also in the U.S., our court case. In November of 1983, from that quite a lot of women started to fan out across the U.S. and make the connections. And remember there was a peace movement. You saw Seneca, the basin upstate New York. A lot of green and women went to Seneca and frankly a lot of American women went to green them. And one of the women who took part in the air traffic control action that you saw kind of dramatized. Yes, there was a little bit. If you're listening at home, there's a little bit of dramatization in this. It's mostly documentary footage interviews real footage from the time. But there is some dramatization. But I think it's very, very classically done. And it's very seamless at first I didn't realize it was traumatization. And then I thought, okay, this is a bit too good now that they had cameras in all of them. Okay, all right. I get it. We woke up old. I mean, I think, honestly, I don't know if activism keeps you young, but I thought you all looked remarkably similar to how you looked back in the day. I thought I thought you were all you were all doing very well. Given you slept outside for ten years. I honestly in the elements you faced the elements. My activism suits you. I can't think that side for 5 of those years. The weather is whether it was one hot water bottle weather or two hot water bottle weathers. You know, or actually quite nice, but that was only summer and funnily enough. Quite a lot of women tended to come down for summer. It's like a really good camp for summer. Yeah, fair weather activists. I get it. Listen, I think if I had camped there for one whole summer, I would be telling everyone. And I'd be dining out on that. But you also did absolutely extraordinary things. You went to the USSR, right? Yeah, I went in 85 on a bus that was entirely women and it was gray green buses of any of you remember, anyway, who had two women drivers and we had a couple of women who spoke Russian and we also did that thing of camping at the steps of the block of flats that Olga lived in and waiting out the KGB. I think we had four KGB and there were, or maybe we had three KGB and there were four of us, I think it was, and they weren't letting us up. And so we stayed and we chatted and we sang some songs and we chatted and we sang some songs, and Olga knew we were there, but we couldn't go up until at least two of the KGB had to go to the Lou and for some reason decided they had to go together. And at that point at that point, a couple of us slipped through the door and run upstairs and met with Olga T had wonderful cakes that she'd made. And we met with the baby that she had that she had not aborted the baby that they told her she should have bought that she wouldn't. And I met that amazing young woman while she's not even so young now. Just at the premiere of this film during the London Film Festival. And it was just a very emotional moment. And she's Olga again. You know, you met her daughter at them, and I met her. The little boy in that we also met him. I mean, he was must have been lying or something like that. But also meeting the daughter that she had despite all this pressure on her from the Soviet authorities. To terminate the baby. Olga is what a woman who was, I would say Rebecca's opposite number in Moscow, because there were, of course, as sting pointed out, I hope the Russians love their children too. There were certainly lots of Russian people who were wanting an end to this and Olga was a woman who worked with greenham common women and herself almost went to jail for three years and was advised by the government to terminate her pregnancy at that time because otherwise she'd be separated from the baby. She didn't, and she was given a suspended sentence. Tom, can you just see in a little bit earlier the first time algol was mentioned, I'll just I'll just tap in. So just can you just pop that in just for the people at home? Because.

Gorbachev Reagan acronym institute for disarmam greenham Rebecca Johnson KGB Seneca U.S. Nobel Peace Prize Rebecca Olga Wales Britain Olga T USSR New York London sting Moscow government
"greenham" Discussed on The Guilty Feminist

The Guilty Feminist

08:10 min | Last month

"greenham" Discussed on The Guilty Feminist

"Ticket, which you can watch for 48 hours. On Thursday, the 4th of November, we're doing a special guilty feminist with grace patriots going to be like later with Joel Holland, except it's going to be later with grace and me, where I'll be asking her what inspired her to write the songs on her latest album and in between she's going to play them for us. Do not miss that. It's going to be a really wonderful night. You can get tickets for both from king's place code at UK. On the Tuesday, the 9th of November, there will be a guilty feminist at Soho theater, keep an eye out for the lineup. And I'm doing a stand up comedy show called the guilty from a stands up, which will have some of the classic material, but mostly be brand new and stuff that I don't really want to put on the podcast because I don't want it to be on the Internet. So come along, the themes are coming out and going in. It will be from the 30th of November to the 4th of December live every night at Soho theater in London. I hope to be touring elsewhere, but so far, we only have London dates. But the Australia and New Zealand guilty feminist tourist back on, I will be there from the 13th to the 27th of July, with a range of exciting co hosts and guests. Please check the website to see when we are coming to you. In Sydney Melbourne, Canberra, Brisbane, Adelaide, Wellington, Auckland and Christchurch. I hope I haven't left anyone off there. Also, you can join our Patreon if you would like add free episodes and also other special content. All these links are in the show notes or go to guilty feminist dot com. And now on with the show. I am a feminist, but when I first got excited to do this episode on the greenham common women's peace camp, I thought to myself, I'd have been there. Yeah. I'd been there. I'd have been one of them. And then I read about it and realized the camp was active for 19 years. What was I doing in 2002? And I realized that she's 19 years ago, I realized I was watching ally mcbeal and Facebook hadn't been invented, so I don't really honestly remember what I was doing. And I was like, oh yeah, though these women are better than me and always will be. I'm a feminist, but recently I crashed my car. And the first thing I did was ring my dad and say, I'm a small girl, fix this. Did she use those exact words? No, but I did so good. Can you do something? To make this not happen? No, but there's nothing I can do. You're in Bristol. Which was true, which is true. You rise to the occasion in a feminist fashion. Yeah. Did you tell your wife? No, she couldn't help me and that scenario. Well, I was where you need a husband. This is when you need a husband. You can absolutely borrow it on. I don't know how useful he is in car situations. I'll be honest with you. I could also use a husband in addition to Tom an excellent husband. Don't get me wrong. But a car husband slash a DIY husband. Oh, my dad's like a like that. But he's just like, baby you're in Bristol, there's nothing I can do. I'm a few in Bristol. You're gonna have to bring someone there. That was interesting. He was coming from. Okay, listeners. Listeners male listeners around the country slash women who are good with cars and things like this, DIY. If you are willing to be a local husband for an event always. Where we can just plug in. Like a comedy husband, a comedy feminist husband. Yes. So if you're in Bristol, this is the number that you text. Yeah, Barry, you're my Bristol husband. This is an example of a smashed up the car. Exactly, a Manchester husband, all the shelves are falling out of the tour van, I don't know. What do you think much more is like? The shelves are all now at the top of that. How bad is it? Yeah, I don't know why you're talking about has shelves, but I don't think I had a tour van. I'm fucking over the moon. My friend's going better than I thought. The train's broken down. If I come and pick me up and run me to hero or drive the train, fix the train. I mean, this would all be very useful. Okay, so there's no sex. That has to be very clear. Oh no, I don't think that was on the table. No, I didn't think it was, but just Barry. Barry and Bristol, if you're listening, David Dorsett, if you are listening, there is no sex on the table. Well, the chair or the bed, or anyway, or any of our train, not got yet, so that's on the train. None of the locations have sex in them. But if you could occasionally come and help me just be a husband. I think when he heard husband he knew he wasn't getting much sex. Maybe. I've never had one. I'm not saying marriage always kills sex. But I'm saying it doesn't help. No, no. The biggest helper in this is it certainly puts on life support and then occasionally gets it's not a definitive. The word husband or wife is not an aphrodisiac. No, I'm a feminist. But having thought, oh, I couldn't possibly have been a green in common woman. I read further, and it's said that sometimes they dressed up as witches were known for dressing up as witches. And sometimes teddy bears, and I thought I'm back in at a fit right in. The full cover I would definitely have got, I would have had a really elegant witch costume and occasionally like a some days a cutesy teddy bear situation. I thought Ryan back in all over Instagram on that. But then I read further and it said people used to come and physically attack them, which is like trolling before Twitter was invented, but in person. That's a 3D troll situation where people just come and literally attack them. And then, worse, local pubs wouldn't serve greenham common women. So you'd have long days protesting, and then you've got a camp overnight, so what you've obviously needed a little, you know, white wine spritzer, don't eat with a situation. You pop down to the local pub. I mean, I don't know how they knew who they were, probably they're just as witches and teddy's. Probably gave them away. But then I was like, oh, when I read more about it, I was like, oh shit, no, no, no, absolutely. I was right back to green and cold when we were better than us and always will be. I'm a feminist, but my wife looks after all of my finances because I literally can't be trusted with my own money. Yeah, that's not. That's not great. No, I am partly to a woman. That's quite feminist, isn't it? Is it? It's quite punk. I mean, yes. Yes, I see what you mean. I see what you mean. I mean, I'm no better in fact, I'm worse, because I'm in a similar situation, but the holder of the keys of the kingdom is a man. Oh, I get, yeah, I know. Again, Thompson's key. I just don't care, no. I'm just like, oh, so many oh, this account, you have to put it on. I'm so bad at all that stuff. When Alice, my partner and I first met, I had so many credit cards, but all of them had like 400 quid, and it wasn't like I'd racked up loads of money. It was just someone who'd been like, would you like credit card? And I've been like, all right. And then she has to be like, this is a terrible idea. What are you doing? And I'm like, let it out. I'm already off the show handled. I didn't. Well, it's good that you met her. Thank fuck. In so many ways. Yeah, no, I think it's good, but one of the things about marriage is, I think it exacerbates your best and most qualities. Because the one that's good with money just goes, let me do it, and then the one that's not good with money goes, oh, I never have to do this again. So just give us a chair of your marriage? Just the three of us. Only one person's happy enough about it to cheer. Just give us a groan if you're married? We're happy to do that. Give us a sort of gentle gay if you're married, just a year, I am. I won't comment on it. That no one enthusiastic how they give the chair if you're not married. Very much happier. Someone is literally like this punching the air. Like that is just for the listener at home. Okay, so if you're not, I'm gonna say further if you're not in a long-term relationship. I'll tell you what happens is that you just relinquish responsibility for things you don't like, because why would you bother when they're there? Right? Now what happens is ten years in, you now are physically incapable of doing those things. You don't know. The world has moved on. You check books don't exist anymore. And.

Soho theater Bristol grace patriots Joel Holland greenham common women's peace Barry London David Dorsett ally mcbeal Canberra Christchurch Adelaide Wellington Auckland Brisbane grace Melbourne Sydney New Zealand king
"greenham" Discussed on Woman's Hour

Woman's Hour

05:58 min | 3 months ago

"greenham" Discussed on Woman's Hour

"How judgmental you. When you see your reflection. I'm why do some mirrors feel more flattering than others while creeper putty spoke to psychotherapist and author. Susie orbach and to mirror experts. Dr melissa cow. All about this. She started by asking what makes a bad mirror. What we call it a bat mira where is actually essential in your imperfection if you wanna put it that way and we see that. Come down to three points. Ease the angle of the mirror the tint of the mirror and the lighting surrounding mirror so the angle of mirror is the most flattering is when the mirrors actually slugging away from you so they lean on the wall and with a with a slight slant with the bottom near at you and the top away from you this actually magically elongate your legs a lot i love your use of the word magically. Yes so it gives you the proportion that you probably like to see. So that's a bit. More flattering then detained. Eddie probably know a normal mira has a green-tinted because of the irony has inside. That's probably the most unflattering way because it gives you that. So we're looking at a gross tint which is probably the best because he gives you a son case complexion which again is just suffering Updated dated legs and the sun kiss complexion. Yes go ahead. His son the lighting that is surrounding where you stand in front of the mirror. If you have a very strong lights above you a spotlight right above you is shining down on you. It's costing the shadow down so where your joy line you know. All your bags are all essential rated which end probably essential aging at the wrong places on what you're wearing. So the best lighting will be a dispersed like so imagine sunlight is very dispersed so it actually soft and all those that imperfection so ideally. You wanna lie this actually in front of you from the mirror and reduce the along some of the fitting rooms. There have got it right. They actually have lights to strips of flights either side of the mirror if softens the imperfection and to let you look a bit. You're clear on yourself. We live in an age of social media. Melissa i wonder understand whether the same principles apply to taking a selfie. Yes actually now. We have a lot of the selfie. Stick with a ring mirror. That actually Round your phone that is trying to create that effective spell about the line team so the light actually comes from behind your lens. So it's giving you disperse light. The best southie is way you actually angle your phone a bit lower down. You want to anglophone from waist down rather than top down. So you don't want to have the toll pass and take your phone at i level so you want to lower it down to your waist level or lower so to give you again back elongation theological. It's so technical. I just take the camera off in front of my face and click click there. You have it at a really important question here in your home. Where should the mirror spe- actually. I have good some tricks for myself too. I actually put any shadley share near my front door. Front have got a lot window. So it's It's so i do. Have some dispersed lighting. Which is good. And i had this heavy nearest so i didn't hang it so I put it on the floor so naturally you would leave the mirror onto the war so again giving me that angle. The only thing. I don't have i didn't have the orange humira. All the rose tints. I i have a normal mira but the angle right and the lighting right..

Susie orbach Dr melissa cow Eddie Melissa shadley
"greenham" Discussed on Woman's Hour

Woman's Hour

03:34 min | 3 months ago

"greenham" Discussed on Woman's Hour

"Singing route. Two is a i can see on the co. You're smiling quite quite broadly. The singing all parts of it was what kept us. All going women made up songs. We picked a choon and everybody would just have guy when we just add lines and it helps to lift your spirits when you are working together on anything and i think that that was something that fills us with infusing gasa because it does get a bit flat when i first went there we had actual structures. We had benders that we lived in we. I lifted an ambulance thought was rosy times but then they made illegal to have structures on the common illegal to have fires on the common. And it just got harder and off because we aren't the sort of adapts on how to live without those luxury items as they turned out to be. I was going to say because in one sense. You're talking with smiles and warm memories wanting to help and rebecca feel strongly about this as well. How people remember this huge women's movement from around the world but the reception to you was mixed. I'm even got a message here. That's just came in so dodging hippies with zero understanding of global politics at rebecca. What would you make of that. Because that's that's one of the ones. I can probably read aloud. Yeah there's a lotta strong feeling. And they're always around social justice change. Occ messages on that. Why naive factor called the green and women accenture because well didn't share in the and the tabloids certainly put it in other ways. Yeah and it's really interesting. Because obviously i think it's naive site week. Women stink living somewhere flooring thousands of women around the country getting discussions about feminism and nuclear proliferation close to dinner tables every house in the country costing hundreds of thousands of pounds of damage to the american english governments across nearly twenty as it would be. It would be naive to say that was not a massive thorn in the side of the establishment and they didn't change the relationship between men and women and it didn't create a dialogue nationally and internationally around what we should do with weapons and how we should handle sows. military's clearly you can't send just one. Group has responsibility for changing basis. But you can you would be to say a massive campaign. The largest lead competence. Suffrage didn't have a huge impact on that. There's also that the you mentioned the tabloids. I think is really interesting that the tabloids particular incredibly bulent about lesbianism at the camp and things like that particularly on that but it goes up to that point. That wasn't even a public discussion around the fact that there one lesbians even now not so jeannie that can back in the bottle one of the ripple effects of greenham is that you know we all much more open about the fact that women have same sex relationships as well. Do you mind me the time. But civilly was something. That's one of the movements. That may. I saw lesbian on the tally on tent. And i saw it in the papers. I thought oh my god. I'm not the only one. I'm gonna go bad. That's might be that brought together for lofty ways into that. That primary relationship didn't have to come from that. Which is you can never go back from the its radical rebecca morton and sioux. Say speaking swimmer. Okay here's a question for you. All how often do you look in the mirror another question..

rebecca jeannie rebecca morton sioux
"greenham" Discussed on Woman's Hour

Woman's Hour

04:33 min | 3 months ago

"greenham" Discussed on Woman's Hour

"But the idea of pushing a button miles away And murdering generations of people just was completely unacceptable to me and not was. That was my motivation. However when a goal there. I realized that i was a lot more naive than i thought. I thought that was a very soest inimitable and i got there and i suddenly realized arriving at yellow gains and talking to the women that i realized i knew absolutely nothing so it was it was really. It was an education. It was the style to my education as to the place that women have in the world and learning. That actually could say now. And we're not going to do this and we're not gonna have violence and we are going to look after each other and we're gonna look after our planet and i think that was the start of my education. Hold that thought for a moment. See we're going to hear a clip of some of the women explaining their reasons for staying at greenham. This is an eight pro. Nine thousand nine hundred eighty three. I was looking to hear about the campus when it first started. And i just came down. We'll to see what was going on and became emotionally involved and the women's peace come to me was that look death in the eyes and find some hope and strength to be able to find what seems to be the ultimate threats to our destiny where let us change see. Oh miserable day. But there's no real taste when i see i don't want to stay here any more in rolette because over. Its mess boys. You can see your sentiment here and we're talking about laughing and let you just create energy. i mean. sometimes it's hard to get up to begin the daily tool against cruise. It's guy i really enjoy. Being part of the for being here is to show that people can do things for themselves ordinary people. We started to call ourselves. Common women now not green and women who which puts over the idea of being very ordinary an ordinary people can do something about it and we all making the government. Think again we'll come to that in a moment but life there apart from the education a lot of that sitting around the fire talking to women from all sorts of backgrounds. But it was pretty hard as well. You know no running water freezing cold winters you did have to sort of stick out say absolutely however as you will properly discover and you have a group of women you become very creates if we made our own showers. We supported each other. We help teach to kind of find different ways of approaching things working together. It's incredible how actually you can make things work very well. We had sort of groups of women who sort of focused on what they were best start. Some women were really good organizing the processes of calm and so they set up so of food tents and showers and such facilities. Other women went and the fence everybody found well-suited them and they did that and together. We've owned a whole protest as as a whole load of individual women doing it their own way. I wanted to get back to rebecca as well though. Because i said you were five when you went. What are your early memories of going to the with your mom. I have my mom. We'd take faded pies de things like nightwatch where they with. Local women with sits in god tense the living that kind of really good sleep for that cruise. Watch say that the army can with moving missiles amounts. She's called telephone trees which are the dinosaur version of social media and things Say she was very active..

rolette rebecca army
"greenham" Discussed on Woman's Hour

Woman's Hour

05:17 min | 3 months ago

"greenham" Discussed on Woman's Hour

"Me. He's actually kissed me. He hasn't done against ads but yes yes. I think when you when you've got child who's a little bit different Those little things become absolutely massive. But there's some ingredient magically that and yes there are holidays Around but they're also days when it is just wonderful and fox hunting and completely magical and my son is one of the funniest people i know Like i laugh at loud him. most days. lauren getting messages. Say thank you for bringing this up and creating this space. You're a slightly different stage of course to lab. How are you feeling now as you go forward with this laura positive nosy so swollen two days. That's an always tickets in one in classroom suggesting a very very nervous about that. But i'm so pleased that did reiten and i just it just came a place of wanting to be heard and wanting to share and just sitting here. I think you could call video one. Lauren gibson and claire walker and on thursdays program. We heard from parents of disabled children who say they find themselves being blamed or under suspicion when they ask for help. You can listen back to that on. Bbc sounds and your emails came in. Francesca said i feel very grateful to have had your discussion about senator. Today i have a six year old son who's been diagnosed with. Pd is a little known condition under the umbrella of the autism spectrum. It's been an emotional struggle but we're very lucky to have support in place. It was good to hear your guests and remember that when not alone. We've all had horrific moments at soft play that we can laugh about later now forty years ago this week. Thirty six people from a campaign group called women for life on earth marched from cardiff to the greenham common. Raf base in. Newberry embark shirt to protest against the british government allowing us nuclear missiles british soil realizing that marching was not enough many state at greenham to continue their protests and we're joined by thousands of women from all over the world to form the greenham common women's peace camp. They stayed there for almost twenty years. In what would become one of the longest and most famous examples of feminist protest in history. While last week another group set off from cardiff to commemorate and follow the roots of the original protesters rebecca. Morton is one of them. She was taken to green and by her mother. Aged five and is the co author of out of the darkness. Green voices nine thousand eighty one to two thousand a book which shares the recollections of many of the women who lived at greenham common including say first rebecca. Morton told them where they were during their walk. We are optimistic. Telling each other reminding each other..

reiten Lauren gibson claire walker lauren laura Francesca greenham common women's peace cardiff Bbc autism Newberry british government Morton rebecca
"greenham" Discussed on Woman's Hour

Woman's Hour

03:40 min | 3 months ago

"greenham" Discussed on Woman's Hour

"Your child has learning difficulties when they said it to me. Even though it had concerns is still felt like a paunch and my response was to kind of expired and say no. He's fine. it's locked down. He's not seen any of the children for nine months wonderfully they said well you can gather evidence and we'll have chats about than i did. Stop steven differences. We'll delve into the mysterious and magical ways of the mirror and why some mirrors are more flattering than others. And we'll hear about the motivation for a group of women who forty years ago this week march from cardiff to the greenham common. Rf base in newbury to protest against the british government allowing us nuclear missiles on british soil. I think it was incredibly visceral fear. It's not dissimilar to the fear that the very rightly have now if climate change that we should all have. It's not dissimilar to the fears that many show about male violence locally nationally globally. And we've just committed as a government. In britain suspenseful two percent more On on nuclear weapons is that if all h ask on kiro communities sepoys yourself a cup of what you found say i'm buckle up but first described by the washington post as the funniest woman. In america friendly bits is an american writer. Social commentator humorist and new york legend. You may have seen her. Emmy award-winning nominated netflix. Series pretend city. Which was fran talking to her friend and film director. Martin scorsese about life in new york where she's lived over fifty years. It became cult. Viewing during lockdown as people craved city. Life friend who is jewish enga- shazar opinions on everything from gender technology politics. Parenting and more if you're not familiar with her caustic wits shelby on tour in the u k. Next year and a new book the fron liebowitz reader has just been released. Sometimes women say they feel invisible when they get older but the opposite seems to be the case in terms of seventeen year old friend. Emma spoke to her earlier this week from home. I think more of a concern of straight women that has ever been a concern of mine bud..

newbury british government steven cardiff shazar Emmy award washington post new york britain Martin scorsese netflix fran america shelby Emma
"greenham" Discussed on Woman's Hour

Woman's Hour

03:36 min | 3 months ago

"greenham" Discussed on Woman's Hour

"Emily wise These all white women and often that's because The kind of Being doubles is having access to funding an investment dollars and women kinda very often unable to access now so as i take it was saying their asthma. Venture capitalists are prepared to invest. But is it because they are already privileged beautiful white women who comes through with an idea and that's why they get they get the funding to go off and become a girl boss absolutely and i'm very uncomfortable with that word because i think that the problem is that it is women taking on the persona of success in male. Tom's traditionally the whole idea of boston. Someone who's really bossing around you wouldn't normally associate with with a female. It was always you think that the bosses always a man culturally as well and then this kind of taking on labels and putting on labels on yourself. It is makes me very uncomfortable. Because i think that it definitely excludes me accented in my fifties you know i've i see myself a successful i would never call myself a girl or a boss and you know this is the problem that it is an age thing as well and it is very very white This whole idea that you know. I'm i'm going to be in this privileged position. i'm going to be the top of the of the pecking order. It is what has happened with men. All along with success was seen as about you being at the very top. And i've i've always tried to tell people who talk about you. Know just the netflix episodes that you broke the glass ceiling. You're a female all female kitchen you know..

Emily asthma Tom boston netflix
"greenham" Discussed on Woman's Hour

Woman's Hour

03:34 min | 3 months ago

"greenham" Discussed on Woman's Hour

"I all the watch. The ways the wise not decision on sexist sore in for policy women raiding one. Another the logic behind that decision. And where's the man alaskan get manservant and carry on the game. So i'm not sure that's to do with men. Football's move reports. I think access to men and women just in general. That's fascinating women sort of stand there and say well. Why why do they want. The whole debrief don't stand there and see it and the the kind of want to know that the one of the law and the rationale behind and that's one of one of our jobs is to make decisions obviously clears why by do you find that the funds i mean. How many times have you done this now. With the madness guy was twice. Refunds twice refunds. Yeah because it's been a funny all time. How has it been with fans because obviously the refs not that popular a lot of the time anyway. Yes i've compared with. Funds cannot noisy out. Favor seems pleased we was without adrenaline. You will out to to noyce or yeah definitely prefer it. Because last season your plan watches in silence. And that's not. How much should be do you. Do you feel that. This is the beginning. Then for are seeing women officiate. Man's much as the norm are we. How close are we to that. Becoming more of the norm. I mean are there. Many women coming up behind jay. Yeah we've got a lot of really good Yoga gills criminal and in the men's gave who officiate week in week out now to me. I would see it is all because i'm involved in this industry. I say every week but i think you'll yet. There was a victorian played at me to hurricane opal one to three years time. It will just be the norm on. Nobody will even mentioned. We'll say we'll see if we get that. I know sean see alice. The first woman to become a professional match officials. It was a big inspiration for you. In what i didn't know sean before got obviously everybody knew. She was and the shawn's because of my team on the women's game so great to be involved with gregg invokes all against raiding a lot of a lot of the girls who operate the top level half children and take me off to them because what does make an obstacle after myself on games. Lot because like sean. Notley alan lisa have children and they have to organize. The kids lives around around the world in and being aware into them to believable will come as you say coming up behind very strict in real life as well. Let's just say that first person that you were you made that bet with After that joke with that they must be looking at you now in an interesting way always. I always mention it. Because they don't think koby also offer. A grid of the friendship still continues. I'll just thought wanted narrative lovely. So it's rebecca thanks for joining us and again rebecca welch many messages about greenham coming in joel says the green and women's camp change a lot of attitudes about a lot of things and pave the way for all sorts of stuff that has helped empower us and another one. Here i was on so many of the green and marches in the eighteen. Amazing memories of the women who've able to live there all those years and a couple of the message masters about hippies to not so complimentary ways but that is it..

hurricane opal sean noyce Notley alan lisa Football jay alice gregg shawn rebecca welch greenham koby rebecca joel
"greenham" Discussed on Woman's Hour

Woman's Hour

05:24 min | 3 months ago

"greenham" Discussed on Woman's Hour

"Would be foolish to save a massive campaign. Such like the largest. Let's campaigns suffrage didn't have a huge impact on that will say that the you mentioned the tabloids i think is really interesting that The tabloids particular incredibly virulent about lesbianism and things like that particularly particularly by on not but it goes up to that point. That wasn't even a public discussion around the fact that there were lesbians even now. That's the genie can back in the bottle. One of the ripple effects of greenham is that you know we all much more open about the fact that women have same sex relationships as well. You might not the time but civilly was something that one of the women sets me. I saw lesbian on the tally on tent. And i saw it in the papers. I thought oh my god. I'm not the only one that that's my people that brought together for lofty wise to open bet. That primary relationship didn't have to come from that which is an tonight's toco i. I was reading so just a final thought from you. If i can't always reading from one of the women who who green say there's a debate about how effective it was in terms of its initial mission around nuclear and people do debate that that's a whole other discussion pops or a different time. But it's exactly what. Rebecca was just starting to say that there were bigger things to come from it around what women perhaps learned and some of the discussions around feminism. Do you think that's what if you know nothing about it. Do you think coming new to it. That's what you could take from it to are. You would have to be because you look at the whole science. The wet the role that women had back then. My mom's vowed to to obey my father. That was the way it walls that and then suddenly you've got us looking at prison the way that the prison service work because we as green women were were committing crimes and being convicted we coming into prison and we were saying the way that women were mistreated imprison and the the fact that women were imprisoned for minus sacks of small amounts of money is was not in incarcerating dangerous people away from society. Which is something. I believed it all so i think we have to look at the role that women played in society as a whole a lots of people are getting in touch with what it did for them as well in those different feelings that elicited some of them very positive some of them not so. But that is exactly what you remember. I'm sure as you will be marching and walking. Good luck forgetting there on friday. Thank you for taking time out of that. Walk rebecca morton and sioux. Say now just to tell you about something that i mentioned right at the beginning of the program because we always want to market when there's a first for women female football referees still arrest site even rarer sites when it comes to officiating the men's game early this year. Rebecca welsh became the first female referee to be added to the english. Football league's national group list for men's football and became the first woman to officiate an efl matinee poem when she took charge of higher gets to league to defeat to port vale. But apparently rebecca. This was never your grand plan. First of all congratulations and good morning. This wasn't the plan which people are shocked to hear about both..

Rebecca rebecca morton Rebecca welsh sioux football Football rebecca
"greenham" Discussed on Woman's Hour

Woman's Hour

05:18 min | 3 months ago

"greenham" Discussed on Woman's Hour

"Fear they is not dissimilar actually was one of the reasons why this prescient protest to to remember remembered on an rekindle. If you like it's not dissimilar to the fear that the very rightly have now if climate change that we should all have. It's not dissimilar to the fears that many b-share about male violence locally nationally globally. These are the kind of undo we've just committed as it government. In britain to spend forty percent more of our on nuclear weapons is that evolved our nhs coming off of your communities. So there's there's an awful lot green and women were addressing a in that high of the cold war. The actually is really really really important for us to to be inspired by day. Women inspire women. That's kind of why we're all here. Let's bring in sioux. Say good morning. Good morning you one of the original women from greenham you eighteen. I believe when you went. What motivated you. I was i was eighteen when i went. I would not want it. The original walkers I joined mostly. I think because my both my parents belong to send day and i've been a sort of active part of that. My dad was a conscientious objector. And actually my mom was read in the war And beyond. I'm an so. I had quite a balanced view of you know to to have an me to protect people to support the un and to go in for crisis situations. Yes i see fully with that. But the idea of pushing a button miles away and murdering generations of people just was completely unacceptable to me not was. That was my motivation. However when a goal. I realized that i was a lot more naive than i thought i was. I thought that was a very sauce. And i knew it and i got an i suddenly realized with you know arriving at yellow gains and talking to the women there i realized i knew absolutely nothing so it was. It was really It was the start of my education as to the place that women hop in the world and learning the actually i could say no. And we're not gonna do they some. We're not gonna have violence. We are going to look after each other. And we're going to look after our planet and i think that was the stocks of my education. Hold that thought for a moment. See we're going to hear a clip of some of the women explaining their reasons for staying at greenham. This is in april nineteen eighty three. I was looking to hear about the camp almost when it first started. And i just came down really to see what was going on became emotionally involved in.

sioux britain un
"greenham" Discussed on Woman's Hour

Woman's Hour

04:53 min | 3 months ago

"greenham" Discussed on Woman's Hour

"I i think it's only just starting to hit what's what's happened zone just it now so i think there's a lot of I think i need a bit of time to to figure out what's happened and what it means. But i mean. I still moscow correspondent. I am at least formally still very closely tied to russia. Yeah no it's a big big question. Going forward because russia is the setting that it was part of my life but it was also my meaning. I mean it was my. It was my whole being i i i kind of feel a lot into russia over the is kind of a losing that is quite a big hole of course and it must be incredibly obsessing. Yeah it is an. And even now i mean i cried of the beginning after admit Mainly i think that the shock of it and and just just the fact that it's happening but yeah now it's anger is one of frustration. Because i think this is about sending a signal to all journalists in russia. Not just the foreign media that you know. you're not protected. That free speech is is under threat and russia and that all of us who thought we were and do think we're doing the right thing by challenging. People with our microphones that that you know. We're we're we are being watched them. That's all the russian journalists who the brave independent free russians who are still working in russia that lives to becoming more difficult by the day. And you know. I think it is a very worrying signal line and a lot of of foreign journalists very word in russia now that perhaps some kind of red line has been crossed. I'm happy and that makes sense that we could hear your voice. Speak freely this morning and it's very important to do so our bbc moscow correspondent sara raynsford inexa. She puts it not able to be in russia the country. She's called home for the last twenty years. I'm sure we'll speak again. When pops she's she's talked a bit more about what she's going to do next a message. Come in from e. saying where it as a badge of honor mr raynsford with the hashtag woman's hour well forty years ago this week. Thirty six people from a campaign group called women for life on earth march from cardiff to the greenham common. Raf base in newbury berkshire to protest against the british government allowing us nuclear missiles on british soil realizing that marching was not enough many state at greenham to continue their protests and we're joined by thousands of women all over the world to form the greenham common women's peace camp. They stayed after almost twenty years. In what would become one of the longest and most famous examples of feminist protest in recent history. Well last week. Another group set out from cardiff to commemorate and follow the route of the original protesters. Rebecca morton is one of them. She was taken to green and by her mother. Aged five and is the co author of the book out of the darkness green and voices eighty one to two thousand a book that shares the recollections of many of the women who lived at greenham common peace camp including sue say and they join me live now from that..

russia moscow sara raynsford mr raynsford Raf base greenham common women's peace cardiff bbc newbury british government berkshire Rebecca morton greenham common peace camp
"greenham" Discussed on Woman's Hour

Woman's Hour

05:34 min | 3 months ago

"greenham" Discussed on Woman's Hour

"The official reason is that this is purely. Tit for tat. The russian government. I got called into the ministry when i was eventually allowed back into the country that took twelve hours. First and foremost it took twelve hours of negotiations to stop them. Deporting me so. I sort of hung on in in the airport in moscow. I didn't get on a plane as were a lot of frantic phone calls being made to say this is wrong condemning essence. Saying you shouldn't be sarah out so after after all those those calls on my behalf eventually was allowed into moscow. But i was called into the foreign ministry the next day and i was told that my whole chapter of my life with russia was over that they wouldn't be renewing. My visa and i was being kicked out and they kept saying this tit for tat that russian journalists had been denied leave to remain in the uk and i was simply an equivalent so that the problem is that that journalists case that they cited that was two years ago and there was never any frustrating time. Never any jumping and screaming shouting about it and it's been quite clear that ever. Since my case became public the russian authorities have been very reluctant to name this russian journalist. So if it's tit for tat you know who who is this all about and why we never heard about it until now so it feels. It feels much more personal than that. It feels much more worrying. I think than that. This isn't the bureaucratic move at something. I think much deeper. We should probably point out. You're not the only bbc correspondent in russia. There's also your colleague. Steve rosenberg. Who is still there understand. Do you think being a woman has any bearing on it. I always say i'm not. I'm not a woman. I'm a journalist. You often get referred to in interviews and things kind of agenda becomes an issue and you sort of. Say this instance. I'm i've got a microphone correspondent but maybe the certainly a practical element to it. Some not necessarily you know just talking. Specifically about steve. Of course but actually this is a political move as well they know this is happening in the context of really serious deterioration relations to russia and the uk and when looking for a uk journalist target first and foremost obviously the bbc is the most prominent british news organization operating in russia. But also you know it's a fact of life that most british journalists are operating in russia excellent journalists really probing challenging challenging brilliant journalists and a huge amounts about russia. They also happen all of them. Pretty much be male and almost all of them to be married to russian so perhaps you know there is a practical practical element which is kicking me out is easier. I married to an englishman. I don't have that family tie to russia. So maybe the thought it'd be easier but certainly when i face the foreign ministry Last month i don't think they quite realize the depth of my own entanglement with russia the fact that they had such a deep personal relationship to the country going back many many years though it did take the.

russian government foreign ministry russia moscow Steve rosenberg uk sarah bbc steve
"greenham" Discussed on Woman's Hour

Woman's Hour

03:14 min | 3 months ago

"greenham" Discussed on Woman's Hour

"And maybe one day return anti kenniston pay on assad a labour councillor in harry. Thank you Commenting further on operation. Warm welcome the prime minister. Boris johnson said we owe an immense stat to those who worked with the armed forces in afghanistan. And i am determined that we give them in their families to support. They need to rebuild their lives here in the uk. I know this will be an incredibly daunting time. But i hope that we'll take heart from the wave of support and generosity or the expressed by the british public. Well last night and talking about landing and coming in. I'll be in very different circumstances but somebody again changing country against their world but as as a very different circumstances we're told a threat to russian national security came back to uk short. She is sarah raynsford. Bbc moscow correspondent. And someone who's been living in in an reporting on russia for over two decades on the tenth of august over a month ago. She was told that she was being barred indefinitely for the protection of the security of russia and allowed into the country for the sole purpose of packing up her life and leaving but why her watch chance if any does she have now of returning. Salvadorian suit joins me now. Good morning good morning. Is this your. This is your first morning back. Yes it is. Yeah strange warning. I was going to say what's that feeling. The word back all because i haven't lived in russia and sorry in in the uk for twenty years. Basically i left. my first. Foreign assignment was to moscow in august. Two thousand and since then i've worked in russia and in other countries and but always going back to russia for two decades so coming to the uk even though foreign ministry. We're telling me they were sending me home. It doesn't really feel like coming home offices familiar. It's not it's not my home and you know. Russia was my home for very long time so it feels like i'm kind of more in exile than oh really yes and i'm sure well i've read that you would like to go back. Yes but i've been told very clearly by none other than the fsba security service that they don't want to see me back. I was. I was handed a piece of paper eventually. The border in moscow showing me to airport on august tenth untold the sign and it said that i was a threat to national security so it was obviously a shocking shocking moment. And i've kind of been expecting something. I've been given signals the for them that my situation in moscow is a little bit precarious. I've been put on short-term visas. I'd always had annual visas to make reputation. Visa always renewed up until about a year ago and they started putting them on three month freezers and two month fees and i was getting signals that you know that things were were not necessarily as they should be. But i didn't ever expect what happens when i tried to reenter moscow from bellarusse earlier. This last month now Certainly never expect to be labeled as a journalist as a threat to national security and the russian government keeps dismissing that part of the key ignoring that part it they keep saying it's just my visa not being renewed when it when it came to an end at the end of august. But it's not that it's something much deeper much more sinister frankly. I'm quite scary. Do you have any understanding what you need to put you in that position..

russia moscow sarah raynsford uk Boris johnson assad fsba afghanistan Bbc Russia russian government
What Does It Mean for the UK To Warmly Welcome Afghan Refugees?

Woman's Hour

01:39 min | 3 months ago

What Does It Mean for the UK To Warmly Welcome Afghan Refugees?

"Morning. The government has set out more details of operation warm welcome the scheme to resettle thousands of afghan refugees all of those who've arrived on the afghan relocations and assistance policy. The scheme are helping. Those who helps schemes gives me helping those who helped the british military in uk. Government in afghanistan will be given immediate indefinite leave to remain the government's pledging twelve million pounds for additional school places. Three million pounds to support. Nhs access and a five million. Pound top fa- councils in england wells and scotland to support the and meet the costs and help meet the cost of renting properties. Here's mr for overseeing. Afghan resettlement victoria atkin speaking earlier on the today program. We ten thousand people who are in quarantine hotels that moment This is the largest ever evacuation scheme in living memory and so it is going to take off and local of an charges local communities a bit of time to put this framework in place. But that is what we're working on and so today's announcements not just indefinitely to remain but also our determination help children Start their education again. The extra funding for them to support them a school the funding for adults to learn english. Those who don't speak english well also The promises in relation to housing the discretionary funding. We're giving to councils. This is all part of enormous Exercise in integration. And just remember that the of the twenty thousand who will come here over. The coming years will be women and children.

England Wells Victoria Atkin Afghanistan FA Scotland UK Government