35 Burst results for "Greece"

EU nations work on rift over gas price cap as cold sets in

AP News Radio

00:58 sec | 2 d ago

EU nations work on rift over gas price cap as cold sets in

"European Union and energy ministers have met at an emergency meeting on gas prices as winter approaches EU nations have not been able to agree on the question of gas prices, which are expected to skyrocket the soaring prices are a result of Russia's war in Ukraine with Moscow slashing gas supplies to all the European nations critical of Russia's actions. The meeting was focused on trying to break a deadlock between countries like Greece, Spain and France who want to cap on prices to ease household bills, and those like Germany and Netherlands that are insisting a price cap could cut supplies. Estonia's minister of economic affairs Leonard believes the price cap is necessary, but it is a tricky balance. I understand that we have kind of a long way and it is a real proposal on the table, but still the security of supply is paramount if the price is too high, we can compensate. We need to compensate. But we can not threaten the security of supply. I'm Karen Chammas

EU Russia Ukraine Moscow Greece Spain Estonia France Netherlands Germany Leonard Karen Chammas
Grayscale Bitcoin Trust and its ties to crypto meltdowns

Protos

00:23 sec | 2 d ago

Grayscale Bitcoin Trust and its ties to crypto meltdowns

"5 p.m. Wednesday, November 23rd, 2022. Grayscale Bitcoin trust and its ties to crypto meltdowns. The Greek scale Bitcoin trust GBTC provides a way for investors to gain exposure to Bitcoin without having to own Bitcoin. The post Greece deal Bitcoin trust and its ties to crypto meltdowns appeared first on protos.

The Post Greece Bitcoin
Breaking Down the Obama 'Apology Tour'

The Hugh Hewitt Show: Highly Concentrated

01:36 min | 3 weeks ago

Breaking Down the Obama 'Apology Tour'

"Now, in a unique way, as a graduate of president Obama is a Harvard Law graduate as you are, you're carrying a rifle and a war zone, president Obama is off on the apology tour. How did that feel? Because you know that that's an ideologue. That's not a commander in chief. That's an ideologue spouting Ben Rhodes written nonsense. The metternich and the MSNBC is out there feeding him lines, which just doesn't match up with your reality walking point. Yeah, well, as I say in all these strong Barack Obama was the most ideological president since Woodrow Wilson, he's an example of what Jean kirkpatrick famously said about the Democrats that blame America first Democrat. And we took that tour in the spring of 2000 winter in spring of 2009. He continued to apologize for he viewed as America sands. Remember, it was on the apology tour when he denigrated American exceptionalism, which most Americans hold dear, saying it was no different from Greeks thinking Greece's exceptional or the British thinking Great Britain is exceptional, which is rarely Obama's way of saying that it's just kind of an outdated and obsolete chauvinism for one zone that we should really all transcend our petty patriotism. And become what Obama declared himself in the 2008 campaign, a citizen of the world. So it makes a certain sense that he would go on that kind of apology tour. Because he is deeply hostile to American power and America's unique leadership role in the world. In fact, he said, his client not only was strong, that no world order should elevate one nation above the other. Most

Harvard Law Ben Rhodes Barack Obama Jean Kirkpatrick President Obama Msnbc Woodrow Wilson America Greece Britain
Ahead of harsh winter, tourism roars back in Mediterranean

AP News Radio

00:55 sec | 3 weeks ago

Ahead of harsh winter, tourism roars back in Mediterranean

"Travelers are returning to the Mediterranean countries and tourism is booming thanks to a strong U.S. dollar and public demand after years of travel restrictions Among countries to beat annual record revenue halls from tourism are Greece and Portugal Stelios who left his job at Greece's Central Bank to offer boat trips around lesser known Greek islands describes the current situation as much welcomed People after COVID after two years of frustration and probably putting some money aside they decided no they should have occasion And I think the income of the budget willing to spend rose The stronger than expected comeback is a blessing for Mediterranean countries facing high levels of debt But the rebound may also ease the continent's tilt toward recession I'm Mimi Montgomery

Stelios Greece Mediterranean Portugal Central Bank U.S. Mimi Montgomery
The Driving Force of the Assault on Manhood With Victor Davis Hanson

America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

01:43 min | Last month

The Driving Force of the Assault on Manhood With Victor Davis Hanson

"If you had to choose which of the sources, the focal points of the assault is most damaging, is it academe? Is it wokeness? Is it the assault on faith the assault on family? Is it third, fourth way, feminism? What is the epicenter, the driving force of the assault? If you had to choose one. If I happen to do one, I was suppose is the university. That's where all bad ideas start and they start with the premise that their leisure, and their affluence that allows them to have a pretty soft, critical life of other people, is basically the result of the work of men from Greece through the Roman period, the renaissance, to the enlightenment, to America. And so they target particular men that they hate. They hate the founders. Can not stand the founders. They can not stand Jesus Christ. They can not stand Socrates. So in their way of thinking, even though they enjoy the elements, they take it for granted of market capitalism, reason, individual freedom, constitutional government, scientific inquiry divorce from superstition, and that's what make them that's what made them who they are. They hate the people who gave them that and for some reason they focus on men. Men, men, men did it. And each group then says, well, I want to live in the United States. I'm risking my life to come across the border or I'm a feminist corporate mover and shaker, but I don't like these white men who created this society which I indulge in.

Greece Socrates United States
"greece" Discussed on The Amateur Traveler Podcast

The Amateur Traveler Podcast

02:35 min | Last month

"greece" Discussed on The Amateur Traveler Podcast

"So user is always with seafood. Uzo goes with seafood. Okay. Whereas thi poro just goes with any small dish. And then I know ouzo, and we've talked about it before in the show. It's a very strong distilled I don't know the other one though. So it was always has a nice and it's not from grapes. I'm not exactly sure. I think it's from various states. I'm not an expert on uzo. I just know it's not the difference with that chipotle. It's cheaper to actually have three names and I've asked numerous Greeks. What the difference is and nobody can tell me. So there's cheaper what they call it on mainland Greece. They call it SQL. And then on the island and in Crete, they call it rocky. Oh, okay, we're talking about rocky. Okay, got it. It's all, but it's all basically the same thing. And distilled from what is left over from the grapes after they make wine. Okay. So, yes. So Greeks, the ancient Greece, the vine, the wheat and the olive or sacred. The still in Greece, they use every single part of those three plants. So not to go to waste, what's left over from after making wine, they distill the skins and not everything that's left. And sometimes when I was an acid, I had a rakhi that they said had been distilled four times. So I don't know if there's a number they can just keep on distilling it, but it was incredibly smooth. Probably the best stuff I've ever had. It's evolving. Every year I want to go back to Greece. It's getting more and more popular and they're more a variety of tipper. Of course, there's a lot of homemade cipur too, just like homemade wines. People make their own wines, and then make tea portal. So sometimes the best stuff comes in a plastic bottle. Okay. Anyway, I was given a bottle and Keith had this year. And it was amazing. It tasted had a nutty taste to it. Got it. But anyway, so you go and I'm sorry I'm getting off the topic. And this little Nikki you go to these restaurants and they have a whole menu of different people. And it has two varieties. Either with anise or without. Okay. Now I know you wouldn't think about going to a restaurant or staying in a hotel without reading its reviews first. You wouldn't go to a destination without listening to the amateur traveler episode, but what

Greece Crete Keith Nikki
"greece" Discussed on The Amateur Traveler Podcast

The Amateur Traveler Podcast

04:58 min | Last month

"greece" Discussed on The Amateur Traveler Podcast

"Galerius was, I told my first base there, but the Roman ruins, he's the one who built up the city and there is his palace. There's the arch, which was built victory, I don't know who they were for some military victory. A hippodrome, a forum that the Roman forum, which is a huge site, and they discovered by accident when they were building the foundations for the court in the 60s. In the 1960s, only went 40, 50 years ago. And they're building now a metro and they have found this is all recent. They're still having open the metro station because the archeologists are busy excavating more ancient ruins. These are classical times. Rules from the classical Greece. So it's really rich in history. One thing you skipped over, which is halfway in between the 300 BC and the 380 time period you named just for those of you who are familiar with the New Testament and of course. First and second letters through this special movie in Thessaloniki at the same place. Yes, oh yes, of course. Thank you for reminding me. That's all right. I've got another podcast that talks all about that kind of stuff. Yes, and so during the Byzantine years, it was the second largest city after Constantinople. In Greece, you will never hear a Greek say the word Istanbul. It's still Constantinople. But I think a lot of people don't realize that it wasn't that long ago that Athens was a small town that it had, I don't know how you say it. It had been a big city, obviously, but it had become a town of maybe 5000 people. Even though now, I don't remember what percentage of Greeks live in Athens it's huge. It's about almost half. It's about 5 million and I think they're 11 million who live in Greece. So it obviously a lot of history there, but it's interesting that at one point or for a long period of time, this was the larger city. Oh yes, yes. Definitely. And much more important during the Middle Ages during the Byzantine time and during Ottoman rule.

Galerius Greece Thessaloniki Athens Constantinople Istanbul
"greece" Discussed on The Amateur Traveler Podcast

The Amateur Traveler Podcast

05:57 min | Last month

"greece" Discussed on The Amateur Traveler Podcast

"And I got my bags back on the road. I'm heading out there and I'm ready to go looking real good in my passport oh no amateur traveler episode 820 today the amateur traveler talks about Roman ruins, Byzantine churches, markets and a promenade, fortresses, and fairies, the kind that are boats. As we go to the saloniki in Greece. Welcome to the amateur traveler. I'm your host, Chris Christensen. Let's talk about Thessaloniki. I'd like to welcome to the show Carol from ambrosia travel, who has come to talk to us about Thessaloniki Greece. When I reached out and said I was interested in people to talk about Greek destinations. Carol was recommended for me. So Carol, welcome to the show. Thank you. And what's your connection with Greece, first of all?

Chris Christensen Thessaloniki Greece Carol ambrosia
Dave Bratt Weighs in on Larry Summers' Latest Comments

America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

01:55 min | Last month

Dave Bratt Weighs in on Larry Summers' Latest Comments

"Out there called Larry summers who is rather outspoken when it comes to what's happened in the last year and a half in America and we have our eminence Greece when it comes to the national economy. He is the dean of the business school at Liberty University. Dave brat from a congressman from Virginia. I'd like you to react to this rather outspoken little clip from Larry summer, play cut. We basically had inflation under control for 40 years, despite the fact that the price of oil fluctuated despite the fact that there were all kinds of supply shocks. We lost the thread along with many other countries. About a year and a half ago with massively expansionary policies, relative to the size of the GDP gap, he's not backing down, Dave, I think he's going to be deported off Martha's Vineyard as well. So give us your reaction to that little clip. Yeah, well, he is a genius intellectually, right? Larry sorry, he's ahead of Harvard and the head of the World Bank for a while. All these kind of things. He's got the pedigree. He's got the brain. He can write the top journal articles and all that. But what's noticeably striking about that clip is that it's really the first time he mentioned the fiscal overreach on the stimulus. All these guys kind of wait until the obvious, right? So now the shoe has dropped. Markets are freaking out. England had Armageddon and would have had a sovereign debt crisis yesterday. If they wouldn't have weighed in on the long term, whatever they call them over there, bonds. The bonds. And so it's good he's saying it. The left still isn't saying it. He's

Dave Brat Larry Summer Larry Summers Liberty University Larry Sorry Greece Virginia America Vineyard Martha Dave World Bank Harvard England
John Zmirak Shares His Thoughts on Italy's New Prime Minister

The Eric Metaxas Show

01:33 min | 2 months ago

John Zmirak Shares His Thoughts on Italy's New Prime Minister

"There's a new prime minister in Italy and she speaks clearly and firmly about the importance of borders of national sovereignty of answering to the will of the voters, not globalist elites. She is pro family, pro life as far as I think. I think she inherits a difficult situation, we should not get our hopes too high about what she'll be able to do in office because Italy like so many of the European countries is run from afar by the European Union. It pulls the strings controls the budget if Italy tries to rebel too much against the European Union's policy of managed decline and the gradual replacement of Europeans by immigrants mostly from the Muslim world. If she rebels against that policy too much, German bankers will pull strings and bankrupt Italy. Look what they did to Greece. You remember what the European you don't think there's something like a Brexit could happen? I don't know what they would call it. They would call it Feng wool or something. What would it be, what would you call it, but you don't think the Italians could conceivably. It would have to. They would have to pull out any country that wants to actually be sovereign. Has to get out of the suicide pact that is the European Union. And eventually get out of NATO, which is a nuclear suicide pact. Now,

Italy European Union Greece Nato
Rabbi Jonathan Cahn on the Meaning Behind 'The Return of the Gods'

The Eric Metaxas Show

01:47 min | 2 months ago

Rabbi Jonathan Cahn on the Meaning Behind 'The Return of the Gods'

"As promised, our friend rabbi Jonathan Khan is back with us in the studio look he's right here. Welcome. Hey, always great to be here. All right, listen, you and you, it's like you go big. This book, you have a new book out. Just brand new brand new called the return of the gods. So the first question I have to ask you because it's a very provocative title. What is the meaning of this the return of the gods? This brand new book. Yeah, I have to say Eric, this is the most explosive book I've ever written. I think if you read it, you see that. I know because I read it. And I'm going to pretend that I don't remember anything in it. I'll talk less if I shut up. Yeah, this is the opening of a mystery that's behind everything art, the transformation, what is transforming our culture, our children, touching the Supreme Court. Everything going back to the Bible and going back to the ancient tablets of Mesopotamia. And the ultimate, the first thing you asked is we hear about the gods. Could there be something actually real to the gods. The gods are fiction, but mythology, but could there be something? Okay, now to be clear when you're talking about the gods. The gods of ancient Egypt, the gods of ancient Greece and Ancient Rome, if we're talking about Zeus and Aphrodite, we're talking about marduk. We're talking about all of these gods. So you and I, as believers in the Bible, we would say those gods are fiction. And yet, not really. Yeah, yeah. Yeah, there's another realm to it. And the thing is, what if there's something real about them and what if they are at work now entities or principalities, the Bible speaks about it? What if they're at work, they have returned because we've opened the door.

Rabbi Jonathan Khan Eric Supreme Court Ancient Rome Egypt Greece
"greece" Discussed on The Amateur Traveler Podcast

The Amateur Traveler Podcast

05:00 min | 3 months ago

"greece" Discussed on The Amateur Traveler Podcast

"Now our more goes being larger and once you arrive in the port, the easy thing there is you can walk right to the rental car facility if you've set it up in advance and you have your car waiting. So that's again another nice convenience of a small island like that. But I think if we wanted to talk about our itinerary on day one, we decided to check out this monastery that we had heard about that was supposed to be in a cliff. That's one of the main attractions on a more ghost and it's called a pana Jose. And typically, we would like to have a site, maybe we'll check it out at our convenience, but we decided to just scope it out. And we drove it was about a 15 minute drive from where we stayed. And unfortunately, you can't see it off the road. Are you park in an area that is a small car park. And you then have to walk up a series of stairs. And there are many stairs. It takes about maybe 20 to 30 minutes to get to the monastery. But these stairs aren't super steep. They're gradual incline. So it's very comfortable. But what we saw as we walked these stairs, it just blew our mind because slowly but surely you are walking cliffside quite high up with the deep blue sea beneath you. And all of a sudden this white just magnificent white building appears inside the cliff and it is literally built into the mountain and the interesting part about this monastery is that it is apparently known to be the second oldest monastery in all of Greece. Now I tried to confirm that's true and I think maybe a definition of monastery might differ from place to place, but it was built in ten 17 or ten 27 depending on what you're reading. And it's cliffside, 300 meters above the sea. It's about 8 stories high and again, as you curl around this cliff, it's just more and more of this wonderful white embedded in The Rock monastery starts to reveal itself to you. And we were honestly in awe.

Greece
Unleashing the Beast: A New IRS

The Trish Regan Show

01:15 min | 3 months ago

Unleashing the Beast: A New IRS

"Appalled here because somehow the answer to not having enough tax revenue is to just, oh, hire more IRS agents and then you'll be all set. Look, again, I'm not advocating that people not pay their taxes. Let me be very clear on that because it's actually critical that people pay what they owe, otherwise will turn into a country like Greece, which if you recall during the European debt crisis, it came to light that nobody was actually really paying what they owed. There was this huge underground economy and I think one example they showed us was swimming pools, right? Because you had to pay a certain tax, you had a swimming pool and so nobody had a swimming pool allegedly and then it turned out when you went and did these aerial photos from high above in a plane. It turned out they're all these swimming pools. What do you know, right? So people were trying to avert the taxes that they would otherwise face. And this is what happens if you live in an economy where the government is so onerous as to tax, in fact, too much, which we can save that debate for another time. I would just argue in this particular instance that it's going to have the opposite of the intended effect. In other words,

Swimming IRS Greece
The Christian Foundation of Our Nation With Bill Federer

The Charlie Kirk Show

01:44 min | 3 months ago

The Christian Foundation of Our Nation With Bill Federer

"People will say that there's nothing exceptional about America. And that America is not a Christian nation. Tell us why that is historically incorrect. So Muslims invading Europe, the Catholic king of Spain tries to stop them, can't, then Martin Luther starts the reformation. The king of Spain tries to stop that and he can't, and he finally makes a deal with the protestants. And he is called a piece of Augsburg of 1555. I took German in college and you know how to say 1555 in German? Film styles from 404 from sake. I think it sounds funny. Anyway, 1555 piece of Oxford, it let every king decide what's going to be believed in his kingdom. And so suddenly Europe, you have England being Anglican, Scotland, being Presbyterian, Holland being Dutch reform, Greece being Greece, orthodox, Germany being Luther in Switzerland, calvinist in Italy, Spain, France, et cetera, Catholic. And if you didn't believe the way your king did, you fled. And those were the people that spilled over and founded colonies in America. So I read through every charter of every colony. England, you had the anglicans founded Virginia, Puritans founded Massachusetts, congregationalists founded Connecticut and New Hampshire. Baptist founded Rhode Island. Dutch reform founded New York. And the Swedish lutherans found that Delaware and New Jersey and Catholics founded Maryland and then the quakers on the Pennsylvania. So just like Europe, there was a different denomination per country in America was more or less a different denomination per colony, and they didn't get along. And

Spain America Europe Augsburg Greece Martin Luther England Anglican Oxford Holland Luther Scotland Switzerland Germany Italy France Massachusetts Virginia New Hampshire Connecticut
What Is NATO?

The Charlie Kirk Show

01:23 min | 4 months ago

What Is NATO?

"What is NATO? NATO is the North Atlantic Treaty Organization. NATO was formed post World War II, and it was formed with the idea of trying to hedge against the Soviet Union. Now there are some good reasons for that in the Soviet Union was an evil empire in more ways than one. Albeit, I don't think we're quite honest with some of our relationship with the Soviet Union. We did partner with the Soviet Union to defeat the Nazis. After that there was this mad dash of who will control Europe and NATO was formed. NATO has 30 member countries. These countries, Albania, Belgium, Bulgaria, Canada, Croatia, Czech Republic, Denmark, Estonia, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Iceland, Italy, Latvia Lithuania, Luxembourg, Montenegro, the Netherlands, North Macedonia, Norway, Poland, Portugal, Romania, Slovakia, Slovenia, Spain, turkey, which I never quite understood. United Kingdom and the United States. These are 30 independent member countries. And there is what is called article 6. The article 5 article 6 of NATO, which is the mutual defense clause of NATO, which is an attack on one, is an attack on all.

Nato Soviet Union North Macedonia Albania Bulgaria Croatia Estonia Czech Republic Belgium Denmark Latvia Montenegro Lithuania Hungary Iceland Luxembourg Europe Greece France Germany
4th member of Maine delegation tests positive for COVID-19

AP News Radio

00:50 sec | 4 months ago

4th member of Maine delegation tests positive for COVID-19

"A Democrat from Maine is the latest member of Congress to test positive for the coronavirus The White House today is hosting the first congressional picnic since the pandemic with the vice president cabinet members senior officials and hundreds of lawmakers families and staff invited to the event on the south lawn definitely not attending in person will be made congresswoman Shelley pang who tested positive for COVID-19 She is experiencing mild symptoms the main Democrats says she's fully vaccinated with two boosters She's the fourth and last member of Maine's delegation to announce she had come down with the virus Pin Greece said in a statement that her positive test is a good reminder that COVID is not done with us Senate majority leader Chuck Schumer won't be there either his spokesman announced Sunday that the New York Democrat had tested positive and was experiencing mild symptoms He plans to quarantine but continue working remotely Jennifer King Washington

Covid Shelley Pang Maine White House Congress Cabinet Chuck Schumer Greece Senate New York Jennifer King Washington
Jay Monahan Only Cares About the PGA Top Players

Fore The People

01:50 min | 5 months ago

Jay Monahan Only Cares About the PGA Top Players

"If you are running this country, like this is true like liberalism at its finest, I feel like with Jay running this tour right now. I mean, how he does not care about anyone on this tour except for the top guys. And showing right now more than ever. I mean, the fact that he added these events to basically to the top 50 guys in the FedExCup for next year to play in all these guaranteed money events. It's going to be harder for guys the average guide to keep their car now. I mean, whoever is on that pack and who is an average player. I mean, let's take aurora. I mean, there's some fantasy. I mean, the guy has never had to now he's earned the right to be where he's at on the course. But he's never had to grind for his PGA Tour cards. So take a guy who is an average guy who might be on the board, and why aren't they like raising their hand and saying, what are you doing for us? Because as I can see right now, they're doing nothing. They're making it harder. And I mean, yes, we don't sell tickets Greece and Murray doesn't sell tickets like Rory McIlroy does, but at the end of the day, you have to look out for your whole tour. You can't just look out for your top guys. I mean, it's just like in the real world. You have to look out for the small business people. I mean, that's just who runs the country who runs the two door is going to be these small guys as well. I mean, yes, we are replaceable, but at the end of the day, we've earned our right to be on tour. We did everything we could to get there. And we're doing everything in our power to stay there, but you guys are making it way tough for for us. I mean, two perfect examples is the barbasol and the barracuda this year. They added 50 spots for European guys. It's easier to get in the John Deere this year than it is the

JAY Aurora Rory Mcilroy Murray Greece John Deere
Feminists Threaten to Withhold Sex After Roe Decision

Dennis Prager Podcasts

01:49 min | 5 months ago

Feminists Threaten to Withhold Sex After Roe Decision

"I think the story of the weekend, it is related to roe V wade, but it is not that the roe V wade decision is such it is the threat by various feminists on the Internet to withhold sex from their. Significant other or for that matter, any insignificant other. That's a good one. You should ask that your daughter at college. Did you ever hook up with a significant other? Or an insignificant other? I like that. SL or Io. Anyway, or even husband. Until roe V wade is once again the law of the land. The reason I think it is the story of the weekend is that it reveals a great deal about an aspect of feminism, well, more than an aspect, but in this case an aspect. Of the profound irrationality at the heart of feminist proclamations. Are you familiar with any threat on the part of men after all, it goes back to ancient Greece, threatening men with deprivation of sex. Are you familiar in the history of the world? Of the earth, with its intelligent population, that is the homo sapien. Of men ever threatening withholding sex.

Roe V Wade Greece
America Is Not Rome or Ancient Greece, So Where Does This End?

The Charlie Kirk Show

02:40 min | 5 months ago

America Is Not Rome or Ancient Greece, So Where Does This End?

The Left Pushes Western Civilization as 'Fundamentally Bad'

The Eric Metaxas Show

01:52 min | 6 months ago

The Left Pushes Western Civilization as 'Fundamentally Bad'

"Liberals already in the 80s, they were pushing this then and of course they've had great success. They're pushing this idea that western civilization, the west, as you're calling it, is fundamentally wicked. It is a bad thing. And they lump it in with colonialism and manifest destiny, whatever they need to do to make it seem bad. And they say western civilization has got to go. So, of course, you and I know that Shakespeare, classical Greece, everything that has contributed to create the most free culture in the history of the world, which is to say the United States and parts of the west comes from these traditions. So I think we need to start by saying that the folks pushing this agenda, they're being dishonest. In other words, they have an animus against something and they don't really care what they need to say or whom they need to lie about to push this agenda forward. Well, that's absolutely right. I mean, I say in one very enjoyable, if I say so myself, section of the book, very interesting to notice the things they don't do this on. So for instance, I explain. All of the founding fathers in America have been done over in recent years for connections with racism, slavery, colonialism, same three sins, always thrown out there as if no other people on earth ever committed any of these crimes, of course. It's been all of the enlightenment philosophers have been attacked for connections to slavery, racism, colonialism. Abraham Lincoln, north and south in the American Civil War. Connections with racism, slavery, colonies. So I say at one point in the book, I say, who isn't this done again? And one of the most important thing is it's not done against his Karl Marx.

Greece America Abraham Lincoln Karl Marx
Chris Reed's Vision of What Will Soon Happen With Biden and Putin

The Eric Metaxas Show

02:11 min | 6 months ago

Chris Reed's Vision of What Will Soon Happen With Biden and Putin

"I'm talking to my friend Chris Reed with Morningstar ministries. So Chris, you're sharing something shocking and extraordinary, challenging for a lot of people. I'm sure listening, you had an angelic visitation. You're giving us the details for a lot of people. This is way beyond what they can handle. But I got to say, I know you. I know enough to believe that this is exactly what happened. So you're saying the angel said to you very clearly, very distinctly that Biden will leave office. We don't know why. Maybe a health issue that Putin will leave office. We don't know why. Maybe health issues. But they're leaving office. They're going to be removed. Kamala Harris will be president. That's a nightmare because I can't think of anybody less fit to be president than Kamala Harris. What an embarrassment that she will be the first woman president in the United States of America, horrifying. You said Elizabeth Warren will have a prominent role. Maybe that means she'll be vice president. We don't know. What else? Okay. And then he then he began to talk about how that the frequency of crises in the world would lead to a outcry for some for someone to emerge on the world scene to help bring peace to provide world answers in the problems that are happening. And I think we could all agree and I'll say this quickly. You know, crisis is not a new thing. 20 years ago, we would hear about crises on the news, but it seems like, especially the last two or three years, the frequency and intensity of the crises have increased. There's no doubt about it. It's like the closer that a woman gives gets to, you know, giving birth, right? The birth pains become more intense and more frequent. So I feel like that we are coming to something. And here's how he said it. He said, because the people will look for someone to provide solutions to emerge to help bring peace between the contentious nations. He said that France wants another Napoleon, Spain wants another queen, Greece wants another Alexander, and Rome wants another Caesar.

Chris Reed Morningstar Ministries Kamala Harris Biden Putin Elizabeth Warren Chris United States Of America Napoleon France Spain Greece Alexander Rome Caesar
Ken Klukowski: 'Roe Was a Horribly Written Opinion'

America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

01:44 min | 7 months ago

Ken Klukowski: 'Roe Was a Horribly Written Opinion'

"Roe was a horribly written opinion. Arguably, there's not a single paragraph in that opinion that is actual legal reasoning where you unpack the law and then apply it to facts. You get philosophical musings in there. They talk about ancient Greece and whatnot. Stuff that has nothing to do with how you interpret the American constitutions. And so when the court in 1992 by a 5 to four vote, it shows not to overrule roe V wade, which was from 1973. The court threw out everything in roe. It's trimester framework and all of this other stuff had done. Because Rome was just an embarrassment. I forgot to mention, and the trimester framework was just cut from whole cloth. They made up this trimester framework where the state has an interest, the state doesn't have an interest. And there was no legal justification. They just made it up. That's right. That was justice blackman who just was who said looking back on his life that he would rather have gone to med school than to law school. And so, you know, read into that what you will. But that's right. Understanding that that was a legally indefensible framework they threw that out and then Casey brought in what was a viability standard that instead of three parts of a pregnancy, there's only two. There is before a child is viable outside the womb and then after it's viable and the issue of whether something is an undue burden on a woman seeking an abortion before viability and but that too proved to be a completely unworkable framework and that was a, that was a big part of justice Alito's opinion

Roe V Wade ROE Greece Blackman Rome Casey Alito
"greece" Discussed on The History of Ancient Greece

The History of Ancient Greece

05:39 min | 8 months ago

"greece" Discussed on The History of Ancient Greece

"According to Socrates, the clouds of the play's title are quote great goddesses of the empty headed. They fill us with skill and logic, brainwaves, sophistication, and the art of duping fools. Garbling the truth, talking beside the point, spellbinding, meaningless oratory, and brow beating. Socrates then tells the skeptical strep cities that there is no Zeus. The clouds of the real divinities. The old man still confused by this revelation, then promises to never make a sacrifice to a traditional God again, and claims that he is ready to learn to be the best order in Greece. But first, in order to test his intelligence, Socrates asks strep cities a number of questions. By the end, he learns that the old man does not have a good memory, nor is a natural speaker. However, he is a natural swindler. So Socrates agrees to take him on as a student. The philosopher then begins the induction ceremony for his new elderly student. The highlight of which is a parade of the clouds, the patron goddesses of thinkers and other layouts. The clouds arrive, singing majestically of the regions from where they arose. Introduced to them as a new devotee. Strep CDs begs them to make him the best order in Greece. They reply with the promise of a brilliant future. Then, Socrates leads him into another room for his first lesson. And the leader of the cloud steps forward to address the audience. Putting aside their cloud like costumes, the chorus declares that this is the author's cleverest play, and that it cost him the greatest effort. He reproaches the audience for the play's failure at the end of the festival. Where it was beaten by the works of inferior authors. And he praises the author, AKA aristophanes. For his originality and for his courage and lampooning, influential politicians such as kleon. The course then resumes its appearances clouds, and Socrates returns to the stage in a huff..

Socrates Greece AKA aristophanes
"greece" Discussed on The History of Ancient Greece

The History of Ancient Greece

05:50 min | 8 months ago

"greece" Discussed on The History of Ancient Greece

"And welcome back to the history of ancient Greece. Episode one O 9, Socrates. Socrates is widely considered to be the father of western philosophy, because his students would go on to found many different philosophical schools of thought. And thus his influence would be felt for generations. Unfortunately, though, he left behind no writings of his own, as he was vehemently opposed to writing down any of his teachings. Therefore, he owes his renown to the impression that he made on those around him. Above all were his students, who recorded almost everything that we know about his life and what he thought were supposedly thought. The two primary sources for Socrates then are Plato and xenophon. But he had many other students. Such as antisthenes, a sky needs of, euclides of megara, fado of Elia, and Simon the shoemaker. The very little of their writings remain. Collectively, these writings are known as the socrate koi logoi or socratic dialogs and consist of reports of conversations or thought exercises that involve Socrates and some other people or persons. The so called socratic question lies behind exactly how accurate or fictitious these accounts are to the historical Socrates. Many scholars believe that at least in some works, Plato put his ideas into the mouth of Socrates and in doing so, exaggerates him quite a bit for specific purposes. In fact, according to diogenes laertius, many of Plato's contemporaries, who were also students of Socrates, accused him of reimaging Socrates in his own image in order to further his own interpretation of his master's message. Notable among his critics were fatal, whose writings are now lost. And xenophon, whose writings present a different view of Socrates than that seen in Plato. And so while scholars have traditionally relied upon Plato's dialogs as a source of information on the historical Socrates. The image of his teacher that has come down to the present day from antiquity could largely be a philosophical construct..

Socrates Plato megara Greece Elia diogenes laertius Simon xenophon
"greece" Discussed on The History of Ancient Greece

The History of Ancient Greece

03:24 min | 1 year ago

"greece" Discussed on The History of Ancient Greece

"But in spite of its <Speech_Male> apparently decisive <Speech_Male> outcome, the <Speech_Male> war did not <Speech_Male> establish a stable <Speech_Male> balance of power <Speech_Male> to replace the uneasy <Speech_Male> one between Greece's <Speech_Male> two superpowers. <Speech_Male> Nor <Speech_Male> did it create a new <Speech_Male> order that brought a general <Speech_Male> peace for a <Speech_Male> generation or more. <Speech_Male> The declared <Speech_Male> purpose of liberating <Speech_Male> the Greek subject <Speech_Male> cities of Athens <Speech_Male> became a mockery <Speech_Male> even before the <Speech_Male> war had ended. <Speech_Male> Because as we <Speech_Male> will see, the <Speech_Male> war did not solve <Speech_Male> the problems of <Speech_Male> power within Greece. <Speech_Male> The ultimate <Speech_Male> effect <SpeakerChange> of the war <Speech_Male> was the replacement <Speech_Male> of the Athenian empire <Silence> with a <Speech_Male> Spartan one. <Speech_Male> The members <Speech_Male> of the delian league <Speech_Male> found themselves <Speech_Male> not liberated, <Speech_Male> but taken over <Silence> by either Persia <Speech_Male> or Sparta. <Speech_Male> The Spartans were <Speech_Male> willing to sell out their fellow <Speech_Male> Greeks to the <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> Persians who recovered <Speech_Male> many Greek cities <Speech_Male> in Asia Minor. <Speech_Male> On the other <Speech_Male> hand, lie sander <Speech_Male> held many others <Speech_Male> by installing narrow <Speech_Male> oligarchies and <Speech_Male> Spartan garrisons <Speech_Male> in the city's <Speech_Male> formerly in the Athenian <Speech_Male> empire, and <Speech_Male> by reimposing <Speech_Male> tribute to Sparta. <Speech_Male> The Spartans <Speech_Male> actions here <Speech_Male> presided <Speech_Male> ill <SpeakerChange> for freedom, <Speech_Male> and the <Speech_Male> worst was yet to come <Speech_Male> . <Speech_Male> As thucydides <Speech_Male> has the Athenians <Speech_Male> predict before the <Speech_Male> war. The <Speech_Male> Spartans soon became <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> no less <Speech_Male> unpopular in the Aegean <Speech_Male> than they were. <Speech_Male> They would <Speech_Male> also become unpopular <Speech_Male> with their allies <Speech_Male> in mainland Greece, <Speech_Male> such as <Speech_Male> Thebes and Corinth, <Speech_Male> who saw their wishes <Speech_Male> ignored in the <Speech_Male> final settlement and <Speech_Male> who ultimately derived <Speech_Male> a little benefit <Speech_Male> from being on the winning <Speech_Male> side in the war. <Speech_Male> Therefore, <Speech_Male> Sparta's victory over <Speech_Male> Athens brought <Speech_Male> only a temporary <Speech_Male> rise in Spartan <Speech_Male> influence, far <Speech_Male> beyond its normal <Speech_Male> sphere. <Speech_Male> That's because the Spartans <Speech_Male> ultimately lacked <Speech_Male> the resources to <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> maintain the empire <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> that they had just <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> won or to <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> control events <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> outside the peloponnese <Speech_Male> for very long. <Speech_Male> Their attempts <Speech_Male> to do so only <Speech_Male> brought division and <Speech_Male> weakness to their own <Speech_Male> state and to the rest <Speech_Male> of Greece. <Speech_Male> As we will see, <Speech_Male> the Athenians <Speech_Male> had greater strength <Speech_Male> than was apparent <Speech_Male> at its moment of defeat. <Speech_Male> And in <Speech_Male> time, it would reassert <Speech_Male> itself. <Speech_Male> Ultimately, <Speech_Male> the Peloponnesian <Speech_Male> war did <Speech_Male> not destroy the Greek <Speech_Male> world, <Silence> <Silence> <Advertisement> it. <Speech_Male> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Male> In Athens in <Speech_Male> particular, the <Speech_Male> loss of population, <Speech_Male> the <Speech_Male> ravages of the plague, <Speech_Male> and the <Speech_Male> financial constraints, <Speech_Male> brought on by the <Speech_Male> war, caused <Speech_Male> particularly <Speech_Male> special difficulties. <Speech_Male> Not even <Speech_Male> the Amnesty that <Speech_Male> accompanied the restoration <Speech_Male> of their democracy <Speech_Male> could quell <Speech_Male> all the social <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> and political animosities <Speech_Male> that the <Speech_Male> war and the rule of <Speech_Male> the 30 tyrants <Speech_Male> had exacerbated. <Speech_Male> As is <Speech_Male> so often the case <Speech_Male> throughout history, <Speech_Male> when things are going <Speech_Male> bad, people <Speech_Male> like to turn to <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> escape goat to <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> absolve the blame <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> and ostensibly <Silence> <Advertisement> their problems. <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Male> Classical Athens <Speech_Male> would not be any different. <Speech_Male> And the most prominent casualty <Speech_Male> of this divisive <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> bitterness was <Speech_Male> arguably Greece's <Speech_Male> most famous <Speech_Male> philosopher. <Speech_Male> So join me next <Speech_Male> time on the history of ancient <Speech_Male> Greece. <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> Episode one O <Silence> <Advertisement> 9, <SpeakerChange> Socrates. <Silence> <Advertisement>

Greece delian league Athens Sparta Asia
"greece" Discussed on The History of Ancient Greece

The History of Ancient Greece

03:08 min | 1 year ago

"greece" Discussed on The History of Ancient Greece

"Consequences of the war were also grave. The Athenians obviously lost their empire, which put an end to the source of their great public wealth. But other city states, like Corinth, megara and ciki on, suffered immense economic death. As commerce by land and sea was disrupted for almost three decades. The Athenians had shut them out entirely from the Aegean, and at the very least, severely curtailed their trade with the west. Even more so, agricultural production suffered the most throughout Greece. Although not presumably in Sparta, or hell lots continued to till the land. The labor of women and slaves was not sufficient enough to compensate for the death of farmers or for their long campaigns away from home. But economic damage, even when it did not involve the loss of life with severe and other regards. Particularly in Attica and the mega rid. A good deal of territory was regularly ravished, including the economically important grapevines and olive trees and livestock and farming tools were also destroyed. Vines took several years of nurture before they once again could produce a rich crop of grapes. And damage brought by the destruction of olive trees was even longer lasting. As newly planet trees generally took about 15 years to produce their first olives. Some wealthier families who had stored up money and valuable goods could weather the crisis by using their savings. But most people had no financial cushion to fall back on. When their harvests were destroyed by the enemy, farmers who were used to toiling in their own fields, thus had to scrounge for work as day laborers in the city. But such jobs became increasingly scarce as the pool of men looking for them grew over time. Therefore, some erstwhile farmers were driven to take service as mercenary soldiers and foreign armies, which became an increasingly popular profession. In addition, throughout Greece, poverty caused by the restriction of trade or the degradation of farmland, pushed a significant number of men beneath the hoplite census. As they no longer had their requisite wealth to pay for their equipment. And what usually happens in wartime, the loss of thousands upon thousands of soldiers and sailors left many women without husbands and brothers. As a result, many of the moderately well off women, who had traditionally done weaving at home for their own families, and supervised the work of household slaves. We're now forced to work outside the home to support themselves and their children. They filled the only jobs open to them in such low paying occupations as wet nurses, weavers, or even vineyard laborers. In one anecdote, xenophon and his memorabilia records a conversation between Socrates and aristarchus who complained that as a result of the political turmoil produced by the political upheaval in Athens. An assortment of homeless female relatives, sisters nieces and cousins, presumably whose husbands had been murdered, had moved into his house, and as a result, he now had to support a total of 14 people,.

Athenians megara ciki Corinth Greece Aegean Sparta Attica Vines aristarchus xenophon Socrates Athens
"greece" Discussed on The History of Ancient Greece

The History of Ancient Greece

05:42 min | 1 year ago

"greece" Discussed on The History of Ancient Greece

"Despite the moderate measures enacted by the restored democracy, it was a struggle for Athens and their citizens to reconcile and rebuild. As it was easier to forgive than forget. And for many years after the reconciliation, a distinction was drawn, though not officially between the men of the city and the men of the piraeus. Furthermore, in this period of transition, citizenship was limited to the top three classes. But that quickly fell through and the full democracy was finally restored by four O one BC just two years later. At the same time, many continue to suspect the loyalty of the oligarch's old supporters and Athens. Therefore, and 401 BC when news reached Athens that the men at elusive were trying to hire mercenary soldiers to regain the city. It didn't take much difficulty to convince the entire Athenian citizen body to break the truce and to strike before they had the opportunity to strengthen their forces. As the entire Athenian army bore down on the city state of eleusis. The generals came out to meet with their Athenian counterparts..

Athens Athenian army eleusis
"greece" Discussed on The History of Ancient Greece

The History of Ancient Greece

05:28 min | 1 year ago

"greece" Discussed on The History of Ancient Greece

"However, we know from lasius law court speech, titled against eratosthenes that at least two members of the 30 fight on an eratosthenes himself. Had not gone to a loss in the first place. Lysias is both the author and the speaker in the speech, which is considered to be among the most famous of his works. It is unclear whether the speech was delivered at eratosthenes as Athene, had a separate homicide trial, or if it was even actually delivered at all. Regardless of when or in what form, the speech took place. Lassis argument consists of two distinct sections. First, a general attack on eratosthenes and the other members of the 30, by pointing out their collective corruption before and after the pro Spartan regime was installed. And secondly, a cross examination of eratosthenes himself. As eratosthenes had overseen the rest of lasius, his brother pull a Marcus and their fellow medics on charges of general hostility and resistance to the 30. As we mentioned earlier, in the speech, he argues that these were trumped up charges, just as the 30 could have a reason to confiscate their substantial wealth and property. The subsequent execution of polar Marcus is one of the subjects of the speech. When he was questioned about it during his cross examination eratosthenes maintained that he was simply following the orders of his superiors, and that he personally did not command much authority. Unfortunately, no evidence exists for the outcome of the trial, or again, if whether the speech was ever actually delivered. But one thing is clear as a non citizen, lucius would not have been able to deliver the speech himself in court. Therefore, some scholars believe that lysias wrote the speech hypothetically and circulated in a pamphlet just to voice his opinions on the matter. Though it has been suggested that lysias may have been granted citizenship by the democracy. After the 30 were expelled, in which case he could have delivered his own speech in the court..

lysias lasius law court lasius Athene Marcus lucius
"greece" Discussed on The History of Ancient Greece

The History of Ancient Greece

03:18 min | 1 year ago

"greece" Discussed on The History of Ancient Greece

"The two most prominent members of this ten werena and phallus, who, even before the arrival of pausanias, had been in discussion with brassy bolus. As part of the agreement, both the men in the city and those in the pi reis were allowed to return to their own homes, and each side was required to pay back all of the money that they had borrowed during the war. Most importantly, a general Amnesty was agreed upon. The first such instance only historical record. The Athenians decided that this was the best way to govern their liberated city state and to reconcile the atrocities that had been committed by the 30. The Amnesty declared that all were compelled to renounce all of their bitter grievances, and that the general public was protected legally from prosecution for the acts that they committed before the democratic government was restored. Except in cases where they personally committed a murder. The only ones who could be brought to justice for their past crimes were those who were thought to be responsible for the nasty things that had happened in Athens. Including the 30 tyrants themselves, the ten that the 30 had put in charge of the piraeus. The 11 prison magistrates appointed by the 30 who acted as their police force, and the two boards of ten that had replaced the 30. But even then, these men were not necessarily executed. They were given ten days to submit their accounts at their, which was the normal process and Athenian democracy when government officials accounted for the actions that they made during their terms. And if they cleared at these tribunals, they could take up their position as citizens in the restored Athenian democracy. In fact, according to Aristotle, during the Athenian and his colleagues on the second board of ten, due to their role in bringing about the end of the oligarchy, not one complaint was brought against them. They were all allowed to remain in the city and renan was immediately elected general. But not everyone involved was so lucky. Those who were not acquitted essentially lost their citizenship rights. They were allowed to leave Athens freely without any harm, but had to return back to elusive. In addition, as part of the agreement, a loos was now recognized as a separate city state. No longer just a deem of Athens. And like Athens, it too was bound to Sparta by an inferior alliance. Since the eleusinians were now no longer Athenians, they also lost their privileges in the city of Athens. But the sanctuary of Demeter and Persephone eleusis would remain common ground for all, and under the influence of its two noble families. The yum all paid and carriage. Basically, those that elusive could not enter Athens, nor could the Athenians enter elusive, except for the time of the mysteries. When both parties could step foot in each for religious celebrations. So in effect, it was a relatively moderate conclusion to what had been a bloody reign of terror. After this P settlement was finalized, at some point in September a four O three BC pausanias led his army back to the peloponnese, where he dismissed them to return to their homes. At the same time, the RC bolus led his men on a post through Athens, up to the acropolis, where they sacrifice their weapons to Athena and prayed for.

brassy bolus Athens Athenians democratic government renan Sparta army bolus
"greece" Discussed on The History of Ancient Greece

The History of Ancient Greece

04:14 min | 1 year ago

"greece" Discussed on The History of Ancient Greece

"On the next day, he took some Spartan hop lights and some Athenian cavalrymen down to the so called quiet harbor, which is thought to be a small bay lying just to the west of the great harbor. He wanted to examine where and how the piraeus could most easily be walled off. As he was departing, some men attacked and harassed his troops. Pausanias became annoyed and gave orders to his cavalry and the youngest and quickest Spartan soldiers to chase after them while he followed behind with the rest of the forces that he had brought along. The advance force killed about 30 lightly armed troops and pursued the rest to the theater of dionysus in the piraeus. It just so happened though that all of the peltasts and hoplites of thrasybulus army were arming themselves in the theater. And so the lightly armed troops were able to immediately run out and hurl their javelins, spears, arrows and slings. Their missiles wounded many Spartans, forcing them to retreat slowly backwards. But their withdrawal encouraged the acidosis forces to attack them with more vigor, and in the process. Both Spartan polar, charon and fibrillar killed, as well as several other sparty aids. Xenophon says that these men were later all buried in the Kara myos. In fact, archeological evidence has revealed the so called tomb of the lacca demos and the burial grounds of the caramels outside the walls of Athens. First excavated in 1930, this polyandrion or communal tomb shows evidence of xenophon's account of the Spartan soldiers who died in the battle. An inscription that ran along the top of the tomb. Now in the caramels museum, was carved with the Greek letters, lambda alpha for lac Ida ammonia, as well as the names of the two polar Marcos. Charon and fiber kiss. It was written in the Doric rather than the attic dialect, with the letters running from right to left. So the inscriptions could be read by those approaching a city. 14 skeletons with spear and arrow wounds were found carefully laid out in three chambers. Accommodating Spartan tradition, the warriors were buried without grave goods. Returning back to the action, when thrasybulus saw the Spartan soldiers fall..

great harbor Pausanias thrasybulus army xenophon piraeus caramels museum aids Athens Charon warriors thrasybulus
"greece" Discussed on The History of Ancient Greece

The History of Ancient Greece

05:57 min | 1 year ago

"greece" Discussed on The History of Ancient Greece

"Whether in the form of a limited democracy or a broadly based oligarchy. The constitution of the 5000 is seen as his political masterpiece. And he believed that this would unite the merits of both democracy and oligarchy and avoid their defects. But the very nature of this middle policy brought an appearance of insincerity and gave rise to suspicion. As it led him to oscillate between the democratic and oligarchical parties. With one foot in each, as he sought to gain influence and support in both of you to the ultimate realization of his middle plan. And so, like many a person following a middle course, he was hated by both political extremes. As the Democrats suspected him as actually being an oligarch, and the oligarchs distrusted him as a Democrat in disguise. With the death of ceremonies and the elimination of their biggest internal menace, the 30 then turned their attention to the external thread that was Ebola. First, they sent ambassadors to him about the return of some prisoners. But diodorus reports that their true intention was to advise him to dissolve his band of exiled followers and to take their menes his place as one of the 30. They further promised that if he did, as they commanded, he could restore any ten exiles that he chose. He replied that he preferred to be an exile rather than join them, and that he would not end the war until all citizens, not just he could return and the people got back their democratic government. Therefore, the Civil War resumed. As winter came to an end, aware that the men at fili would plunder their country estates until they were guarded. The 30 then sent the 700 Spartan hoplites and their 1000 Athenian cavalrymen to the border. About a mile and a half from phylai, they camped in rough terrain near Carney, where they kept watch and planned for a second attack on the rebel camp. But thrasybulus would beat them to the punch. One evening, an early May, a four O three BC. He led his 700 troops down from Lyle to a position about 1500 feet from the enemy, where they halted and waited..

diodorus Ebola fili thrasybulus Carney Lyle
"greece" Discussed on The History of Ancient Greece

The History of Ancient Greece

03:36 min | 1 year ago

"greece" Discussed on The History of Ancient Greece

"When critias finished his speech, he sat down. Then there are many arose, and an impassioned response. He answered the charges of critias one by one, and then attacked him as the instigator of policies that were alienating Athens friends and strengthening their enemies. He denied that his politics had ever been inconsistent. He insisted that he always had favor to moderate policy. Neither extreme democracy, nor extreme oligarchy. And he has held true to the ideal form of a government composed of men of hoplite status or higher, who would be able to effectively serve the state. He finished by saying, quote, I always do battle with extremists, critias, whether they are men who think that a good democracy must allow slaves, and though so poor that they would betray the state for a drachma to have a share in the government. Or whether they are men who think you can not have a good oligarchy unless you bring the state under the tyranny of a few men. When there are many finished speaking, it was clear that his speech had a substantial effect on the audience. As there were many shouts of support, likely because the council of 3000 were more sympathetic to his moderate cause than the narrower, harsher one of critias. And so seeing this, critias knew that if the case were brought to a vote, there are many would be acquitted. Accordingly, after conferring with the rest of the 30, courteous went outside in order to those young men with concealed daggers to come into the bulletin and to line themselves around the stage in front of the audience in full view of everyone. He then came back in himself and ordered ceremony's name to be struck from the roster the 3000. An act that would deny him his right to a trial, since he would no longer be a citizen. An appearance of legality seems to have been given to this act. As a law was then passed, presumably on the spot that those who had opposed the 400 previously were taken part in destroying the Ford at Etienne, as there are many had should be excluded from the constitution. Regardless, the 30 then immediately voted to condemn him to death. Upon hearing this, there are many ran for sanctuary to the chambers hearth, sacred to hestia, where he calls only counsel for justice. In order to protect himself from critias. He exclaims, quote, I am aware that this alter will not help me in any way. But I come to it to demonstrate that the 30 here are not only the most unjust in their dealings with men, but also the most impious in their respect for the gods. I'm amazed that most of you who are noble men are not defending yourselves. For you most surely know that my name is not more easily erased than any of yours. His appeal for protection from the council, not to permit his murder, was to no avail though. As the onlookers were stupefied and terror by the sight of the bulletin, filled with young Athenian men armed with daggers. Also, by now, some of the Spartan soldiers from the garrison had made an appearance. According to diodorus, only Socrates and two of his friends came forward for his protection. But there are many begged them to spare themselves. While he appreciated their friendship and bravery, he did not want to be the cause of their deaths. Since nobody else stepped forward to help, Socrates and his friends were forced to step aside. Meanwhile, the 30 had sent a Herald to the 11, who are the officials responsible for the incarceration of condemned prisoners..

critias Athens Ford Socrates Herald
"greece" Discussed on The History of Ancient Greece

The History of Ancient Greece

03:37 min | 1 year ago

"greece" Discussed on The History of Ancient Greece

"For their cruel and oppressive tactics and instituting a narrow oligarchic regime and abolishing the organs of democratic government. However, the 30 were not unanimous in their intentions and actions. At least one of them, there are many, had no taste for our pure oligarchy, but was still genuinely intent on framing a constitution with both oligarchic and democratic elements. This dissension would lead to their relatively quick decision in. As the 30 would only be able to maintain power for 8 months from September 404 BC until May a four O three BC. Still, the first measures of the 30 and establishing their control over the city were carried out with cordial agreement. They began to revise, if not erase, the democratic laws inscribed on the wall next to the Stowe basileos in the Athenian Agora. They removed the walls of effie altes in orchestras from the areopagus. Canceled the sovereignty of the popular courts, the dice area. Established a new boule of 500 with members sympathetic to their oligarchic cause. And appointed a new archon, pythodorus, to serve their new government judicial functions. They established a new board of the 11 who were the guardians of the prison and placed them under the command of a violent, unscrupulous man named satyros. As well as a new board of ten to watch over the population of piraeus, which was rightly considered a hotbed of democratic radicalism. The 30 also moved swiftly to eliminate every trace of the democratic navy. The ship sheds of the piraeus built at the cost of 1000 talents and among the architectural wonders of the Greek world, were demolished. And the wood was sold to salvagers for three talents each. Finally, on the Peninsula, where the speakers platform for meetings of the ecclesia had always faced out to the sea. The 30 ordered that it should be reversed to look in line instead. Turning it away from the dangerous element that fostered the Athenian maritime empire. In the opening portion of a 7th letter, the philosopher Plato, or someone using Plato's name as a pseudonym, recounts the rule of the 30 during his youth, which corroborates the general consensus found in other sources. The letter in particular describes the philosopher's joy at the Ascension of thoughtful intellectuals who wanted to reform the constitution a long Spartan lines. An Aristotle, or someone using Aristotle's a pseudonym. In a tree is called the constitution of the Athenians, echoes the view that the beginning of the new regime seemed full of promise. Quote, at the outset, they were engaged in removing the blackmailers and the persons who consorted undesirably with the people to curry favor, and were evildoers and scoundrels. And the state was delighted at these measures, thinking that they were acting with the best intentions. Included in this removal of all criminals and unsavory characters. The 30 executed all of the known sycophants, who were men that made money out of denouncing people on false charges in the courts. Winning payments as a result, and thus were very widely unpopular among the upper classes. The regular people were also not sorry to see them go. So far, there was relative agreement in the 30s actions, but at this point, there are many likely would have stopped because soon afterwards, the 30 began to scheme about which steps that they might take to permit them to run the city, however they liked..

Stowe basileos effie altes democratic navy Plato piraeus Peninsula Aristotle
"greece" Discussed on The History of Ancient Greece

The History of Ancient Greece

04:38 min | 1 year ago

"greece" Discussed on The History of Ancient Greece

"Hi I'm Ryan state, and welcome back to the history of ancient Greece, episode one O 8, the 30 tyrants. At the close of the last episode, Samos was the lone holdout among Athenian allies in the eastern Aegean. As they refused to turn against the Athenians and capitulate to lysander in the Spartans. Therefore, the Spartan fleet placed the island of Samos under blockade and besiegement before sailing into Athens and doing the same there. By April of 404 BC, the Athenians finally agreed to surrender, and lysander oversaw the enforcement of the peace terms. In exchange for Athens being left intact, and its people alive and free. All of their exiles were to return home. These were mostly oligarchical minded men, friendly to Sparta. Athens was to be governed by its ancestral constitution. What this meant was unclear, and it soon would become a point of contention. They were to give up their claim to all of the cities that they held in their empire, though they would maintain possession of their territory in Attica. And finally, they were to make the port of piraeus tax free. Defensively, they would agree to the destruction of their long walls, and the fortifications around piraeus. They would disband their army, and they would surrender all but a dozen ships. These were to be designated for commercial use only, and were probably the sacred ships paralysis and salaminia. And the ten ships dedicated to the ten addict tribes. Athens also had become Sparta's ally and followed the Spartans as their leaders on land and sea. On whatever campaign they should order them to join, which in effect turned Athenian foreign policy over to Spartan control. According to xenophon, lie sander decided to make a holiday of this historic event. He brought out flute girls, like the ones who performed symposia and Sparta's allies, covered with wreaths of flowers, danced and rejoiced. As Athens walls started to be torn down. At the same time, agis army tore down their camp a decade. And then he dispersed his various detachments back to their own cities. Then, why sader instructed the Athenians to finish the destruction of their long walls and the walls of piraeus, while he returned to Samos, the lone holed out in order to complete its besiegement and.

Athens eastern Aegean Sparta Spartans piraeus Samos Athenians lysander Greece Ryan sailing Attica paralysis army agis army sander sader
"greece" Discussed on POLITICO Dispatch

POLITICO Dispatch

08:11 min | 1 year ago

"greece" Discussed on POLITICO Dispatch

"Day to another. I'm jeremy siegel this is politico. Dispatch and today victoria. Stu me on how a country still reeling from economic crisis and previous disasters couldn't have been hit by wildfires at a worse time on the greek island area distort. Pnc tourists and residents rescued by boat from the beaches as wildfires rage out to control breezes battling welfare for the last several weeks. It all started in august after an extended heatwave and wildfires. The were basically raging through attica close to the center of athens. Greece's prime minister says the country is experiencing what he calls a nightmare. Summer as a record breaking heat wave fans dozens of wildfires even evian greece's second largest island and they were burning for like the days and they basically brought down one third of the island the got the stuff is in our voice and that the moment there's another wildfire lex six kilometers away from and it's it's human area that has suffered from wildfires also earlier this month and there is another fire in innovia. Is that started today. They're strong winds in the area. And the situation is really tough indulge done during the last weeks more than one point. Two million square meters of land of with burned. Thousands of finals died. Hundreds of houses in properties have been destroyed while so this is just massive and it sort of sounds like it. It's all over the place in a way You're in athens. You live in greece. I know you can't speak for an entire country by any means but what is the mood there like the way people are feeling with all this going on the areas that have been affected that basically filled with anger and they are in shock because the catastrophic enormous. They can't realize phil what has happened. Project on the balance of law. It basically change their lives. Sam have lost basically. They lost the forest of them especially netherworld living from the forest. Now there is no forest to have to to reorganize their lives firms kratz that are businesses. That have been destroyed. That are houses that have been burned. There's a little finger into despair about what happened that and there's a lot of criticism about the weather. The fires have been contained very easily. And why the situation turned down this way. What is that criticism like. What makes people say that that this could have turned out different. What the government is facing criticism over the weight modifiers. They're accused that the situation. Where out of control really fast. At the moment when the winds weren't strong enough to explain the extent of the fires the other criticism as that the locals are complaining about lack of resources to tackle the blazes they described but lack of organization planning when it comes to firefighters and they accuse the government of focusing exclusively almost on vibrations. Which of course saved lives. But they basically left the houses of properties of the baby unprotected. Because there were no firefighters there so lester houses than found them. Burn down and two main criticism from experts looking at the broader perspective. Is that the again. Little was done in the months before the summer in terms of prevention with the end of the dates the most important in order to tackle the wildfires in what's happening so you're talking about frustration with the government and you have a new story for politico europe looking at how these fires are already coming at a point of major frustration for people living in greece. How they're essentially hitting at at like the worst moment imaginable for the country with them already dealing with several other crises. Can you explain that to me yet. Greece sep. We'll know this has been in the headlines for years about the decades long financial crisis overseas now to greece a country on the brink of collapse banks shuttered. Atm's running out of cash. And now in greeks have not bounce back from these third financial crisis and thank years thirty and then the pandemic struck the rapid increase in new cove. Nineteen cases in greece is putting medical professionals under intense pressure. Them keep greece particularly hard. Because is a total dependent country and there was no reason basically or very reality show. The economy has suffered a huge blow again. That's the moment when it was starting to recover on top of that. The greek authorities are now on alert at the borders of the greek islands because they fear that the new wave of migration could. I've shown from afghanistan so we see several crisis happening at the same time. You mentioned the tourism element here and it sort of reminded me of california where i covered wildfires for a few years. 'cause it's similarly a beautiful place to place people come to for its natural beauty but then you have fires hitting these beautiful places. At times making them seem to be unlivable in california. It's made people reconsider where they're living. Are you seeing anything similar in greece. Exactly there is the segment that the way they describe it to me the locals and the local authorities. They say that people every day gathering tried to consider what their future will be how way they be able to stay. They wanted to stay. The we want to stay in their villages. Basically greece has very few baby even the villages and it's very important for for the country to keep them there so people are trying to find solutions. They the locals are in contact with the government. This about the finding ways to employ the locus in order to do their forestation and there are the job that needs to be done in the forest the next day as so. This is a very big bet for the next day of these areas. These fires come just weeks after the. Un released a major new climate report warning that extreme weather and disasters like this will probably worsen in the coming decades. How are you personally and greece more. Broadly how are you thinking about. What's ahead and bracing for potentially more of this. It's it's thinking about the future. It's very tough because basically we see what is unprecedented environmental incidents like a heatwave that lasts for ten days. that's what happened here in greece and led to the the wildfires or the wildfires followed. But we see these unprecedented events happening more and more often so it's real views that the lives of locals in greece and everywhere will be affected. It will be much more difficult stories. We affected. I mean the absence were basically or half of the population in grace's leaving in the summer it has begun bear because of the heat wave so more solutions need to be found in other for the maker the life of the viable on show in terms of fair fire-prevention. Dead this disaster prevention. There are a lot of things that should be done and should have been done decades ago in greece. It's not the discussion that has started. There were wildfires after place in two thousand seven in two thousand eight team that gives basically conduct of paper and there were several reports from experts. One east in two thousand eighteen and it was basically ignored. It was adopted by all.

greece jeremy siegel kratz athens greek island attica Pnc Stu new cove victoria phil lester Sam california europe afghanistan Un