19 Episode results for "Great Richard"

Ultra Violet

Fame is a Bitch

34:04 min | 1 year ago

Ultra Violet

"From workhouse connect in. Aj Benza vein. Walk on a leash and play really dirty kinky sex tapes. CBS is the guy. Put the cock in the peacock network. Okay Bitch Hey everybody. Aj Benzene here with fame bitch. This is your podcast for January. Twenty twenty twenty and the month is flying fallen keep beliefs ten eleven more days. Morehouse then we're up to February and I'll tell you right now. I can't stand march. It's always been a bad luck month for me. Benzes Shit goes off weird Hopefully this year we can break streak so I'll be on. I'll be on my toes making sure get through that month unscathed. In the meantime many of you saw what I posted on social media late Friday night I came home from my son. Rocco's football practice. I was beat. I was dead. We haven't haven't been to practice stillborn. I'm still feeling in my muscles and hamstrings from the first practice. And here we go for number two. Because I usually like doc to run with the kids and scrimmage with them for the last twenty minutes or so practice and when they were five six and seven spun the running with them was not too taxing now. The kids are coach at twelve. Thirteen years old and they're all starting to become ball breaks wise guys and also terrific athletes but thirteen. Is that intersection where kit could go. Either way and I put myself in that spot to help. Guide these kids. But I can't believe I'm here now. coaching them. In what is for a lot of them the final year before they're gonNA move on from this particular league and probably obviously play some travel leagues and then it's off to high school so I love this particular position but looking back on that day when I volunteered to coach Rocco when he it was six years old now I remember I was just a a fog who wanted to see his son become an athlete like me and my father before me. You know my father was a great track and football football athletes the Brooklyn Brooklyn new trick highschool. I never dreamed coaching. Because I know Mahat head and I take winning very seriously and I remember. My father was like when he watched my games in high school. When I had a coach that wasn't particularly into my style of play? I didn't want that headache. You know they won't embarrass embarrassed my son and you know I don't want my heart is in my heart this town. This league wasn't ready for my type of New York. New York. Passion put it. That way studio city is much more sedate calming you know Yoga Mom town lot of ladies walking around wearing Lululemon so GotTa be careful what you say in practice today. A little boys and girls but when we gathered around for tryouts Like two thousand fourteen. Maybe and the League director asked if any fathers would like to volunteer to coach. I found myself throwing my hand and he. It was very spontaneous. And I know we're comes from. It wasn't something I was thinking about doing it all but I guess it's true how we keep things buried and sometimes those things pop up or manifest themselves when you least expect it but you know you gotta listen because that's your heart talking to you you know and I raised my hand because as a kid my father. What let me play Little League anything? Not because he was a bad guy But from ages five to ten he just wouldn't allow it and his infinite wisdom and my father was everything to me his Uh he had this desire to protect my ego as much as maybe as much is not raise his but He was flying out against it. My father was a working stiff Rarely had time to go outside and show the football around with me. When he was off on Sundays it usually met? We went fishing all day on the boat which was great rate. Maybe a couple of shots at the hoop on the front driveway Some stick ball here and there but by the time I was ten my father was you know in in his in his fifties and was a different kind of fifties that I am now but he was looking at all these Literally parents most most of whom were in the thirties and my father's in his fifties and he knew he had no time or desire to mix with the younger parents and coaches and he felt that ever become back to hurt me and my playing time because he knew a lot about the politics and the cliques that form leagues like that. And that's true but I was a good athlete Athlete It wasn't as if he was keeping his awkward son from being made fun out fun at it was more about protecting me because He didn't want to see some kids and parents have attitudes because once that happened. There was no controlling my father but eventually my brother-in-law Jack stepped in and said Hey pop. Aj's AJ's got to play little league. This is you know he's GonNa miss a lot of years. We're all these kids around him are going further and getting to know coaches and stuff like that. He's gotta get involved all the else you know. These kids are GonNA pass them up and they're gonNA make relationships with the coaches and it's GonNa hurt him so my father was like okay as long as Jack could. It'd be there for me and throw the ball on the lawn and all that kind of stuff and then just like that. It ended it. You know I was allowed to play little league at ten years old and that meant a little league football and that's actually where I met my Gavino. We played for the same team way back then but the five years away definitely hurt me a little bit. I had some catching up to do. You have to prove to the coaches who nothing about me who I was what I could do but You know they still closer to the money to kids. They played the coach. The last five years so in the League director here in California asked for fathers the volunteer. My hand shot up because I suddenly realized Holy Shit. I'm my father's Aww is age now and I'm not GonNa let happen to Rocko would happen to me so I started coaching. And Rocco you know he's excelled. He's a gifted athlete. And I've loved. I'd say every minute of it except for a few that have nothing to do with him. Have to do with referees and Shit but here we are six years and maybe sixty football games in. Dan and I love seeing the kids improve. When I met them they were soft little boys most of them their parents speak for them? Some even cried if they didn't play enough and when the season ended I handed out awards not just because they participated. I hate that I gave each boy trophies in in and told them why they earned it. I gave them all superhero nicknames. That's what you're doing. They're five and six and seven now that they're twelve and thirteen two different story the no longer soft. They speak for themselves. They don't cry about playing time. They come up to me. And they state their case and Different kids they're young. Young boys almost young men but every season with the boys. I've made it a point to line them. All up erase them and at the end the practice and when I brought it up they all looked at me like I was crazy because you know when they got to be nine or ten. They laughed like no way. This whole man is GonNa be us you know. But so far I've always managed to nipped them at the tape in the fifty yard ish. They've been closing the gap every year. Don't get me wrong. And now that they're teenagers. I'm sure this season season I'll finish somewhere in the middle of the back. I saw a couple of these new kids come home my God last night at practice get down to we scrimmaged and I was beat to say the least I was supposed to catch Adam. Corolla do some comedy at the comedy. Store ten fifteen or drop down in bed a hamstring cramp in at back. It was killing me. It's no way I was going to head back out and go over the hill much. Adam I mean I'll I'll see him some of the time it couldn't do it instead. Land Down at an ice pack on my back I turn on Turner Classic Movies. And sometimes you just hit hit the mother lode and I landed on Who's afraid of Virginia Woolf classic film so you drop the remote? 'cause I knew I was going to be there for a while. I missed the first ten minutes while I was there for the next two hours for those of you haven't seen the Great Richard Burton and Elizabeth Taylor Classic Two story about a crazy couple who drink and verbally. Give each other shit in front of a younger couple played by George Seagal Segel and Sandy Dennis and also features Liz Taylor illustrating that. She has absolutely no discernible skills. A dance skills. I should say no discernible. Dan Skills whatsoever. You know I mean the sixties were a kind of a tough decade. If you love dancing you look good or sexy. If you like a Goldie Hawn type right you know tall and thin thanks to twiggy and some of the other chicks that were popular in modeling etc.. They look good on the DANCEFLOOR. Liz was a well. She was a bus the woman you know particularly in who's afraid of Virginia Woolf and there's a scene where she's dancing George Segal to get Richard Burton Jealous. It's a little weird to look at. You know you get you get the feeling. Maybe Elizabeth Taylor did our best work on her back because she was not a good dancer. But I tell you what she was thrust tits. That's mainly what she needed to do to keep the audience enthralled. I was much younger. I didn't get this film at all. I know the the adults stopped and watched it. I didn't get the oldest screaming and bickering. I tried to watch it but I got. I got nowhere with it. It wasn't until I got older and Ashley began to have relationships that were stormy that began to understand what this movie is about. And much of what you see in this movie is not acting at all. It's art imitating life as Burton and Taylor were married in this movie. When they made this film they were married? They were married two years earlier after meeting. Being on the set of others Patella sweeping epic Cleopatra the both of them left their spouses for each other. Liz told Poor Eddie Fisher to take a hike and and Burton left is sexy. Blonde wife Sybil Williams Williams was an actress but after the voice Burton gave her a million bucks and and she never acted on film again. She packed up her kids left. California moved to New York City opened up. A very popular nightclub was called Arthur and it was like the precursor to studio fifty four. You don't hear too much about this club because it was nineteen sixty five but it was a hot spot. You know Tennessee. Williams uh-huh Andy Warhol Wilt Chamberlain Truman Capote and it was named after George Harrison's hairstyle as he described it in the nineteen gene sixty four Beatles film a hard day's night when someone asked him what the name of his hairstyle was. He said it's the Arthur and civil like that name and name the club club Arthur. Listen Dick eventually divorced in seventy four. They got married again in seventy five and finally divorced for good the next year. Forget the shit you hear about. Oh you know beyond say a spin say sister salon snatch cheesy in the elevator. WHO gives a shit? That was nothing gene compared to what Liz and Dick went through all. Did you see J.. Lo and Ben Affleck on top of that yacht and the size of J.lo's rock on her finger. Big fucking deal listen. Dick invented the Glamorous Paparazzi shots of movie stars on yachts their stormy relationship definitely finally the most fiery crazy dangerous and over the top in all of Hollywood. Maybe the history of Hollywood. What am I saying? Maybe it has to be you know. I always stop on the movies. They act together because it makes for great action great chemistry you could read between the lines a lot but it makes you realize that whatever couple in Hollywood today is pretending to have the same passion completely full of Shit. I mean Brad and Angelina. Gaba talked about them incessantly. Angelina Angelina couldn't be more of a fucking bore. You know it it. Nowadays people have no idea what it was like to to to watch Liz and Dick and in their relationship and the ups and downs. It was insane. They had a lust for life that is unmatched and I can't believe will ever happen again. They literally kept the tabloids in business and launched new tabloids in the process and once they met on the set of Cleopatra in Italy mind you they began this vagabond ing jet setting lifestyle. One night. They'd have pork sausages flown in from some great restaurant in London or Paris or they'd be feasting on Elizabeth's homemade specialty of grilled chicken breasts with cream avocado and cognac sauce. You know just overindulgence Richard. Richard Burton kept diaries and when he died they were cracked open and he used to write shit like this both Ian. I went mad last night and started eating liquorice fingers I must've eaten a pound or so an e somewhat less. He's just giving me a graphic description of the delight of overeating tippers and the particular joy. They're repeating on her. She's the only woman who will tell you. Details of the internal workings of her body. She knows the Paul's me which is why perversely she enjoys telling me. That was a terrible Richard Burton. But you get the point but you know they were they were they were binging on something else they were. They were binging on copious amounts of boats votes. Elizabeth Taylor loved all types of boost. Jack Daniels mimosas bloody. Marys and she was never snobby about what she drank she. He drank The Best Shit of the worship. She didn't care she said the best drinks you ever taste was a combination of you. Ready Hershey's chocolate syrup. Vodka and Qaluwa. Lua donal rushed to try that drink. Tonight you'll miss work tomorrow. But not surprisingly the both of them impact on a lot of pounds towns and Elizabeth L.. Diaries she wrote Richard and I went on the drinking man's Diet. It worked for a while and then we dropped the Diet and just continued drinking yet. That's the kind of broad she was but let me take you back to Wendy's too. I got together on the set of Cleopatra with all the craziness that took place between them. It's a miracle this movie ever got me and even when it did get made it was such a fuck and flop. It nearly closed down a studio radio for good and it left tales career in ruins and by the way she was only twenty nine years old at the time. Cleopatra has remained. I'd say the gold standard of Hollywood excess. It was made in sixty three. It nearly sank twentieth century Fox it took two and a half years to shoot it. Burn and through two directors to regime changes at the studio. The budget began a two million and went to an unthinkable. Forty four million and probably most famously. It left the marriages of its two stars. Richard Burton Elizabeth Taylor in ashes nowadays in this age when celebrity breakups cups and their affairs are more or less routine stories which are bisected and dispatched by the tabloids or on podcast in the blink of an eye. Well not so easily bowled over by these stories but in the early sixties was a different time back then and the kind of gossip that was reported from the Roman set of Cleopatra kept everybody happy everybody was satiated because of the stories these to generate once they had a taste of Liz and addict and and what the Italian press called less scandal. The scandal celebrity would never be the same again. The studio knew they were in trouble with Cleopatra. By the time the production got to Chennai Cheetahs studios back in nineteen sixty one filming began a year earlier in England but it had to be scrapped after sixteen weeks. The first director on this film Rouben Mamoulian was only able to shoot ten minutes. It's of usable footage while burning through seven million dollars. I don't know what the fuck this guy did. But he was so in over his head he he he just quit. Then they brought in the famous all about Eve Director Joseph Mankiewicz so he takes over first thing he did he demanded. Hey we gotta all the hall all this script. It's reading like Shit next thing. He changed the cast. This is the big blue. He looked at the two male leads and said No. It's not gonNA work. So he fired via Stephen Boyd and Peter Finch and he cast Richard Burton and Rex Harrison as Anthony. And Caesar and then he got to work on Liz and when filming on this movie began. Liz was twenty nine and already on husband number four Eddie Fisher. Fisher left his wife Debbie Reynolds because he was seduced by big tits and violet is what can I tell you. And he wouldn't be the last one he was one of many guys that would fall victim. And you know that may seem like a dramatic description. Big tits inviolate is but Taylor was regarded by many at the time in dramatic terms. They used to call the home wrecker. The only other actress in Hollywood is have had the slightest comparison to her and that area is Angelina Jolie but because of Liz's dangerous rep a personality. She was a risky proposition to carry out a big budget. Hollywood film Cleopatra Another risk in hiring her was that and she was getting the million bucks a picture. The other big risk was A reputation for always coming down with illness. She was always getting sick on film sets in sixty one she had the Asian Asian flu even fell into a coma in London. They said she stopped breathing and they almost died. They counted her out toward the end of Cleopatra. It was reported that she he was hospitalized for food poisoning but before she died she admitted that the real story you know the PR people put out some bullshit. The real stories. She swallowed a handful of second second loss because she was hysterical over her relationship with Richard Burton and needed to get away for a while so she took an overdose. Just because I'll stay in the hospital for a few days and get from the madness so anyhow during the first part is shooting this movie in London she fell ill from Malta Fever and that brought production to a grinding halt later in February the same year she comes down with double pneumonia. She was sleeping in an oxygen content in a London clinic when she slipped into another coma. Some newspapers actually reported that she died. And by the way. Do you do you think Michael Jackson was at all interested in using his oxygen chamber. Because of Liz and hers. Trust me there's A. There's a parallel. I love air but shit really got interesting. When Richard Burton showed up on the set and even though he was married to Civil Williams that didn't cramp his style at aw actually Burton and Liz met years earlier at a Hollywood party? Any flirted with her quite a bit but Taylor walked away and she declined in saying that she didn't want to be the notch on his belt but now they're enrolled and a lot of things happen in real now Her health seemed to take could turn for the better and so did her like liking Richard Burton but by the beginning of sixty two the two people to stars were swept up in this scandal. onscreen chemistry was you know you could. Just you could feel it. You could see it off screen it was you know they were burning up every every second away from the set. They were often in a room in a hotel. Room is sweet GonNa town. They weren't just playing Cleopatra and Anthony they were basically basically living the movie and soon the word of this. You Know Taboo Romance. It spread like wildfire. Everybody heard about the world was reading the tabloids the we're always listening to radio reports the Italian press what the Paparazzi. Just in its infancy. There were bribing their way onto the set as extras and and they took this story of adultery and they went crazy with it and the day. That Eddie Fisher packed his bags and left Rome. That was is it. It confirmed what everybody was thinking that Liz and Dick are fucking. Can I say something you imagine not falling in love with your gorgeous oranges twenty nine year. Old Co Star in Rome get Outta here. It's impossible the fact that the two stars would be in their trailer all afternoon when they were due on set by the way at that didn't help Quiet speculation it was insane the way these two acted doll production is waiting to shoot. They're burning through money by the a minute. And if you walk by Liz trailer you could hear clinking High Ball. Glass is screaming fights giggling and sounds of sex this type type of mad love between the ball to them it made headlines around the world and it was a big thing back then people were more puritanical in the sixties a congresswoman woman from Georgia the Attorney General to block them from coming back into the country on the grounds of undesirability. The Vatican again newspaper printed an open letter taking tallow to task for erotic. Vagrancy scandal is so big. I can't believe but actually happened because this scandal so big that the tidbits from their affair knocked John Glenn's orbit of the Earth from the front pages is a lot of newspapers around the country. They're a long Lens. telephoto shots of these two cavorting on holiday all over the country. I I think the word cavorted wasn't even use much before. Liz and Dick began shooting Cleopatra so took two and a half years to finish the picture. Eminent eminent wrapped tailor-made Richard Burton husband number five and meanwhile the film's Director Banquets. He said if you want a text book on how not to make a film this is it because after all the drama Taylor refused to go to the film's Premiere she democracy. The picture I guess the years and all the fucking tabloid coverage it just wore out and the thought of talking about Cleopatra after working on a for two and and a half years being hospitalized a couple of times you know having the affair divorcing anything she wanted to throw up so the final humiliation she would tell oh people was having to see the film so she would watch it so even though Cleopatra was over the long tumultuous saga of Elizabeth Taylor and Richard Burton was just beginning. They married in sixty four set. Divorced in seventy four. That was a good run and they married again in seventy five and divorced once and for all the next year. And that's you know that's Hollywood nutshell. You know that. But you gotta understand where Taylor had been before. Cleopatra Patrick Really Digest how Big Star she was and was destined to become even bigger. It's not so much a rags to riches story Elizabeth tell the story is more like riches to more riches. Some people say she's the most beautiful person in the world. But if you if you wouldn't agree at the very least cheese definitely I would say the most iconic one of the most iconic Hollywood legends of all time you know I gotta put her in the top five maybe seven definitely top three of women but you know she had a film career that lasted five decades or charity raised hundreds of millions to combat combat AIDS. But you know she had a head start at a kid. Her Dad was an art dealer. Her mom was a stage actress. They had money so You know it was kind. I live in her blood to be upper crust and to be on on stage and in film she was riding horses at three years old. By the time World War Two hit parents left London and moved to Beverly Hills and our data opened up an art gallery. An success happened pretty quickly for And you need to know this. This is this is insane. She was born with a genetic mutation that actually made her more beautiful than the average kit. She was born with a double set of eyelashes. Che's and you take that and you combine it with those deep violet is and you know. Obviously she lands her first film at nine years old. But even that even despite that can you believe a casting director universal once famously said his kid has not been horizon too old. She doesn't have the face of a child. I always tell you know what he knows. A fucking thing in this town even the people who are in positions to no they don't know obviously look I can do so many shows on Elizabeth Taylor. I could do it on our health problems. I can do one on her fluctuating weight. Her friendship with Michael Jackson and bubbles Har- Har Eight marriages. I can do a week of shows before you even get to her film work but for the sake of wrapping this up to a degree. I'd say it really begins with National Velvet. When she was a child and rode that horse she loved named Pie? And as I've ask my father what it was about before sort and he told me what can I tell you. They should have called the movie glue. I know what that meant until I was few. Here's zolder. There was father of the bride with Spencer. Tracy a place in the sun with Montgomery clift. Who became one of her lovers and it started right right there on the set cliff plays a guy named George Eastman a poor relative so to speak who gets a job at his rich uncles uncles thriving enterprise and Montgomery clift is perfect in this movie? Plays lonely and disconnected and he begins an affair with the factory. Girl all played by shelley winters shelley winters. By the way everybody thought show they went this. I mean you've got to look at old Johnny Carson episodes where she wants to talk about sucking Johnny Carson Carson and. He's so uncomfortable. If the last thing he wants to talk about 'cause when Shelly with his young she was a real looker by the time she was doing Carson and the talk show circuit shit she had ballooned up. She was always loud and crass but now she's allowed crass kind of fat lady and Johnny Carson who took great pride and how he looked and dressed than sounded it enacted did not want shelley winters to talk about their affair. And that's all she wanted to talk about so I remember as a kid. I used to always wonder why they why she piggly. Why is he nervous? He was sweating. Go find those old. Those old shows. Man Shelly is a lot of men knew their way around around Shali but Montgomery clift has this affair with shelly as she's a factory worker and there's the scene where he meets the gorgeous socialite Angela joie vickers played by Elizabeth Taylor and a new world opens up for him obviously You've got to watch the scene where Montgomery clift shooting pool all alone and I I like pool is a tough game but I do dig it. Mrs. Schott where Montgomery clift as the pool stick around his back. I'm pretty sure it's around his back and he makes his three bumper shot shot a three bumper bank shot and sinks the ball in the far corner and it was not edited to do it. It was a one shot. Fantastic shot and you got to to see his face when Elizabeth L. Walks in and she says to do I make you nervous. Oh my God. They had undeniable chemistry and it crossed into real life. Even though Montgomery clift was more of a homosexual in real life. I mean he had affairs with women but he really liked men. More as in James Dean My acting coach when I was in my twenties in New York City Mirror. Aristo is Great acting coach she was also Montgomery Cliffs Acting Coach and Confidante and sometimes lover but she would tell me a lot about about he and Elizabeth Taylor Moore was double was a very small diminutive Russian stage actress. She taught a class in this loft and Chelsea right above Barney's fourteenth street no no sixteenth and seventh at. She'd sit in his big high backed chair. The chair only had three legs the fourth leg. Somebody put what a cinderblock under it. I mean she charged US ten bucks ten bucks for a four hour class and in that class. I've said this before. Alec Baldwin all were drop in Judith. Light Carrie Fisher. was there the first time I got I got. I got accepted into the class Jesse lying with pop over Richard Kiley insane saying it was amazing. I'm twenty two years old and I'm with these people unbelievable but Anyway Miroslava met Monty clift and he fell in love with her acting ability. It was. She's very different. She'd been doing checkoff on stage Russia and she wasn't like the girls in Hollywood Hollywood so they had a brief fling and he'd have her on any every movie said he worked on and it never mattered. What the director told Monte what to do in each scene he would look over at Mira who was off camera and she would then give him her direction? And naturally that's who Monte listen to Alfred Hitchcock couldn't stand it. He had mirror thrown off the set but she told me she was there the day Montgomery clift and Elizabeth Taylor had that scene while he shouldn't pull and she knew more about them before anyone could possibly know that he was all Elizabeth after that she told me he he didn't even have to say it. She said she felt that she said watching Elizabeth go after him was like watching a lion. Go after its prey. She made giant with James Dean. Hot cattle title Hodgson Roof with Paul Newman. And you know if you watch that movie how the fuck are you. Paul Newman. And you're playing a part. We've got a spurned. The advances of the Gorgeous Elizabeth Taylor probably his best work. How do you how do you turn that pcs down I don't think she's ever looked hotter than NFL? Suddenly last summer with Katherine Hepburn Whoa Katherine Hepburn and Lists Montgomery clift to lobotomize her crazy film. Finally who's afraid of Virginia Woolf which is what I was watching the other night and it reminded any me that I gotta do is Shell on Elizabeth Taylor. 'cause I really haven't touched on her much mean here and there. I've mentioned it but not not a whole show but I'm not gonNA lie watching Liz and Dick Argue economy. Think of my wife and ice fighting sometimes because we've we have a little bit of that obviously Especially usually when in the movie. She says to they're fighting and she says to to Dick Getting angry baby. Oh boy and if I'm being real honest I you you know I thought of Elizabeth Teller the very first time. I saw my wife because my wife will. She doesn't have that gene mutation of I'm having to Rosa via lashes but she does have a pair of is not men down and I was no different and the only reason why state at that nightclub that night on a night that I really want. I didn't want to go out. I just went out to get my friend into a club. A club called on the corner of Hollywood and Vine of all places crossroads the World Atlas. I was inside. I got a peak of my wife's is across the room and when I asked the mutual friend who that girl is he told me. Her name was Virginia then that I knew I could leave. I said Wait Virginia. As WHO's afraid of Virginia Woolf he said Yeah So. She had the eyes of Liz and Cleopatra and the name of her of character in one of her most defining film roles so I was hooked. Hooked like Monty clift like Richard Burton like Eddie Fisher. You're like Mike Todd like John Warner Michael Wilding Conrad Hilton Larry Four tenths Elizabeth. Taylor was one hell of a Beautiful Roy. She was a child. Star turned international superstar. She was a serial wife a survivor of over a hundred surgeries pronounced dead four-times. She was an addict a mother of fierce AIDS activists and even the first voice of Maggie. Simpson she lived the life of excess excess and drama but almost always with a wink and a smile and I always hope close to my chest. What she she told a close friend who confided in me that her favorite show in her inner final years was mysteries and scandal? Because she said that's what she could see all of our old pounds one more time I'm AJ. That was your fame bitch. January January twentieth. Two Thousand Twenty Thank you for listening famous. A bitch is an AJ Benza. As a workhouse connect production featuring the endless wisdom insightful commentary and sometimes fucked up perspective of a J Benza executive producer. Mike Agatha no technical producer Brian Vasquez.

Liz Taylor Richard Burton Richard Burton Elizabeth Taylo Hollywood Cleopatra director Montgomery clift Dick Eddie Fisher AJ Benza Virginia Woolf Rocco football London Paul Newman Jack Daniels New York peacock network CBS Mahat
Episode 158 - Richard Marx

Sodajerker On Songwriting

50:18 min | 11 months ago

Episode 158 - Richard Marx

"Hello and welcome to episode one hundred and Fifty Eight of Soda Jacker on Songwriting. This is Simon here with Brian. Joining us today is an American singer. Songwriter and musician. Who Today sold over thirty million albums worldwide? He was the first solo artist how his first seven singles reached the top five on the billboard. Hot One hundred and he also holds the distinction of having a song he wrote or Co wrote top the charts in four different decades in a long and distinguished career. He's worked with the likes of Lionel Ritchie Luther vandross share Kenny Rogers Barbara streisand and sink Keith urban when Houston Ringo Starr Backtrack and David Foster to name a few. Where the lights? It's welcomed the excellence. Richard marks the show. We've been after Ritchie for quite some time. Yes indeed since the early days of the show in fact eventually realized he couldn't run from US forever. Put up a good fight. The show did first time. We've had to resort to the Taser which added to Richard a couple of weeks ago just prior to the release of his brand new studio album limitless which is out now and he was terrific. Form Agile here in just a few minutes August born in Chicago Illinois in nineteen sixty three and grew up in a musical household. His Mother Ruth Sang and his dad. Dick Marx was respected jazz musician. Who also ran a successful at Jingle company? Richard even sang on some of them as a kid at the encouragement of his parents. Let's play guitar and piano. H become writing his own songs in earnest as a teenager attending highland park high school when he was around eighteen a demo tape of Richard Songs. It's none other than Lionel Richie. Who liked what he had and invites them to Los Angeles where he ended up singing backing vocals in the studio for Lionel he performed on all night long and really with the Nice amongst this shortly afterwards. He found himself in the studio with Kenny. Rogers and it was a pretty bold move of the gambler one of his songs to record. Julia impressed Kenney took him on. It and crazy became a number one on the US. Country Chart Richard continued to shop. His demo around dogged determination eventually paid off when he was signed to am records. His Palms debut album released in one thousand nine hundred seven made the billboard talk ten and yielded four hit singles including his first number one. Hold onto the nights the follow up nine hundred thousand. Nine hundred offender topped the album charts and went triple platinum within months. It also boasts perhaps richards best known song right here. Waiting Nine thousand nine hundred one rush street was another huge success and spawned another colossal. Hit in has it and one thousand nine hundred dollars. Paid vacation gave him his fourth consecutive platinum album as well as yielding a top ten hits with the evergreen ballot now forever or that noteworthy albums include flesh and bone released in one thousand nine hundred seven two thousand days in Avalon. Two thousand four's my own best enemy and twenty four beautiful goodbye. Outside of his own recording and performing career which it has of course written four and with an impressive array of artists he authored sinks top. Ten hits this. I promise ship with Keith. Ebony pen the Ozzy's twenty eleven chart topper long hot summer and on the two thousand and four grammy for Song of the year for the highly emotive dance with my father written with unperformed by the lake. Grace Luther Vandross you can check out those things along with the selection of tracks from across richards exemplary recording career including the new album limitless. If you check out spotify playlist for this episode. But you'll find on Richard Page at SFJAZZ DOT com slash podcast. You find all his latest news and tore dates at Richard Marx Dot Com and you can also follow him at facebook dot com slash Richard Marx Music at Richard Marx on twitter and at the Richard Marx on Instagram. Find Those. It's so dejected. Dot Com facebook dot com slash Soda Jerker an Ad Soda Jessica on twitter and Instagram. He joins the first time. Go check out back catalogue which contains interviews with the likes of Paul McCartney Back Keith. Urban Alicia keys Rosanne cash and many many more. Subscribe to the show and your favorite podcast platform so that you never miss an episode and leave us a five star rating and glowing review. While you're if you'd like to help us with the upkeep of this podcast which remains as it's being from day one hundred percent ad free and thoroughly independence endeavor please give whatever you can spare at so dejected com slash podcast. One final thing. Many thanks to grace for help and send up the interview and also to Ivan for his assistance right. That's an from us. Please enjoy our chats with the Great Richard Marcus. Ac- shoe on thought speed and land speech. Congratulations on the new album. Thank you so much. Yeah we've really enjoyed listening to thank you. It seems like the writing process started with. Let go on this for as I can tell. I think that that would be fair to say or safe to say but I can't really pinpoint when I started to consider it an album. It wasn't until I was four or five songs into it and listening back and thinking. Oh I don't WanNa pitch that song or A. Oh Wow these two songs actually sound pretty good together or you know. It's always in the back of my mind that I should be thinking about making a new album in knowing that. I don't really have any expectation for it. It's not like I have any delusions of grandeur about it. It's just I feel like it's important as songwriter to always keep writing songs and always have new. Wears you know so to speak. But yeah let go was Was definitely something that I held onto that I played you know my friends and some people close to me and people I work with but I I never considered trying to pitch it to another artist or send it out there because there was something about it that felt really personal and I guess I did think you know whenever I make a new album. This needs to be part of it. Speaking of people close to your wife is one of the Co writes songs that risk. Yeah Yeah and she's you know she's not A. She doesn't consider herself a songwriter. Although she's written now three songs force arms with me that you know I think she should be very proud of but she She never had that experience before me. And it was just sort of like a really fun thing for us to do together where I have great respect for her ideas and her thoughts about things and and she's very articulate and and so once the concept of the song which is really let go is really a song about detachment and the concept of detachment which took me a long time to come to grips with and understand. Because I always thought of it as being emotionally detached which is such a negative thing. And why would anybody want to be detached but when she finally did get it through my thick skull that the purest form of of love in any way. Whether it's a romantic love or love for your child or brother or parent or friend is a detached love in that. You're detached from the outcome. You love somebody purely because you do not because they need to love you back you know and if you can sort of come to that place emotionally. That's power and I'd never heard a song about it so one day daisy and I were just talking about the concept of it and and I had written this piece of music with A guy named Morgan page. Who's a DJ and EDM artists? That I really like a lot and we had this really cool track and by had already written the melody and I really wasn't sure what I wanted to say in the song and and then we just so we're sitting around having a couple glasses of white wine and next thing you knew we were scribbling words down hunting scratch paper and let go was born so you have thought musical phrase. I thought melody that starts on the piano now. The first thing I remember was Was the Acoustic Guitar Part. I was just playing these really simple chords. You know. It's a really simple progression. But it's the sort of a sixteenth note Kinky Kinky Kinky and that to a an idiom beat is always compelling to me. There's always something about it. I also really like the hybrid of Electronic Music with an Acoustic Guitar strumming along. So that was really the first thing that would no melody or anything And then it was Morgan. Who added the the Little Piano Motif? The bone bone bone and we sort of messed around without a little bit and refined it so I laid that down into the track and then like will happen. He just kept playing the track and I WOULD. Just get on the microphone just same and sing and sing. And whatever was the most instinctive whatever sort of flowed the most naturally was. What we knew was the best and move. It came together within an hour. You know we kind of zeroed in on the best bits of the melody and I just kept singing things until he went. Yeah that Yeah I love that. That's it that's the verse and then okay. Let's work on the chorus and I just kept singing different things and it was always the first thing that I sang that he would go. That's the best one so the music was really easy to write and then once days I cracked the code on what the song should be about. It was it was pretty effortless to ride as well. There's another family collaboration on there in the form of two songs you co wrote with Lucas. Isn't that yeah? How was that process of working with his son again? It's completely painless. And I would be thrilled with these songs and thrilled with this collaboration. If it was a total stranger. You know The fact that it's Lucas. I can't describe you know it's it's pride it's joy it's just the fact that we had the first single another one down you know. We had a decent run on the charts here and he'd never had a song on the charts before and he said to me he goes. You know I finally have a song on the charts and it's with you these at. How freaking cool is that? And I'm really proud of the song you know. I feel like what Lucas brought to. What I do was what I needed which was a real modern fresh approach and and not allowing me to sort of fall back on habits or things that I just would have no work musically like keeping me a little bit out of my comfort zone and pushing me to to sing things differently to legally approach things differently and to keep it as modern as possible which is the case with another one down with the other song that we wrote together called all along. It's hilarious because he said I wanNA write something really retro with you. I WANNA write something. That sounds like it's from your first album. And he's like what would the sequel to shitting on better and he said. I WanNa do that beat and I said really he said Yeah. All that shit is cool again. Okay so that one came together really quickly too so riding with him as was great. I mean we. We should have dabbled. We tried writing a few things over the last couple years that that never really just sort of took hold and and then these once. We had a real intention for these songs that going to write these songs from my new album. They came together easily and quickly but I was really thrilled with his production. You know. He's a great producer and we did all the stuff in the bedroom at his apartment. You know there was no studio involve. These records were all done in his bedroom. And and there's another track that he produced that he didn't go right that I wrote with my friend Matt Scandal Couple break my heart tonight and I think his production and arrangement on that is just stellar. It's it's not what Matt and I would have done with our song and we're thrilled that we handed over to Lucas. Because what he did with it was really cool and fresh. So cool isn't it? Yeah it's also really been Fun For me to have him. Produce my vocals. I have such great respect for him on every level but I particularly appreciate his singing and his phrasing and the way he sings and and he would line. Read me sometimes. I would be singing a verse. He on and on and I don't sing it like that. You know. Make that third note longer and don't use for Brcko on that note and and I just sing it for me. Sing it the way you want me to sing it. And he would line read me and I would just try to copy what he was doing and he'd go great and then we move onto the next one and I say sing that for me. How should I sing that one and I think I would do that with any producer? I respect I would be more than happy to try it their way. But again like you know when it's your your own spawn. It's it's pretty amazing. I was struck by the opening line of another one. Actually that line of looking through the last ten days of texts you sent. It gives you an opportunity to create story. Doesn't it could go anywhere from an really. Yeah and we can all kind of relate to that right. We can all relate to that line because like the first thing that a lot of people do whether they have a break up with a lover or they have a disagreement with somebody as you look through the tax. And you go. Where did this go wrong like? Where did this go left? And so when we came up with that line we knew that we had a story. You know really interesting storyline. That could be fleshed out and I really love that line too. It's not line the sole thing you might have in condom notes on your phone. You might have bits and pieces of memorable lines code sequences that sort of thing usually. Yeah but I find that in my experiences anyway and in case of that line I had a broader overall concept and then when we started to talk about it about what kind of break up it was kind of feeling I wanted the song to evoke. We just in conversation said you know it's like when you look at tax or like. What did she text you? That made you any. Yeah and I actually don't remember which one of US came up with that singular line. It was probably both of us. We were both feeding it. You know but it wasn't like I walked in. He walked in with this line about looking through the last ten days of texts you sent. It was a result of our conversation in the room yet. The video does a nice job of playing with the narrative as well as those. Yeah I think it's a good video on per I usually hate videos but I liked it and I liked nick. Director elect his idea of telling the story in reverse in having the video. Be In reverse. I think the only other time I've really seen that was that co play video Which was a totally different kind of story line but still really well done and so yeah. I thought was really good. It's rare that I make a video that I want anybody to see. You're proud of Another one when you sit down for a co writes say with someone can Matt Scandal. Will you typically go in with with something in mind to work on or profits? Just START FROM. Scratch both really. It's happened both ways Sometimes it's an assignment. It feels like an assignment like we'll get together and I'll say well. These three artists I hear are looking for songs so maybe we should try Taylor Song to one of these artists. And then you get into. What do we think that she would say that line which she sing that? Or Iowa's approach it like what haven't they done. What's something that fits with what they do? But that's different than what they've done so we definitely approach it that way and sometimes we'll come in with title or I wanNA write a song about topic a but in most cases it's all begun and this is pretty much the case with most of the people that I co write with Keith. Urban everybody is like it starts from a musical place. There are a lot of great songwriters that that decide what they want to write about before they sit down. And I generally do that when I'm writing by myself but when I'm co writing I let the music I I wanNA create music with someone and then let that music try to tell us what it's about lyrically so in the case of me and Matt a Lotta Times certainly mean Keith. It's you know. I WanNA groove like this. I want us on. That feels this way or I want a song that that pulses this way. So it's begun. The initial creation is all about music. It's about a beat in court changes in a feeling that you have without lyrics and then you start singing along you refine a melody. It's just Kinda like I did with the Morgan page song. Before I brought it you know it was completely fleshed out musically. I just didn't know what it was about and I needed to live with it and listen to it and sing different possibilities So that's usually the way it works is that it's it's begun with a piece of music With Matt you know. Sometimes he'll come up with a really killer guitar riff in what's funny is that you know mad is incredible bizarre player and I am not i. Am You know I play my own stuff fine but I'm not. I would not make a living as a as a session guitar player but because I am not as proficient I come up with these guitar. Riffs in my head as a singer that guitar players generally wouldn't think of and so one thing that's really awesome. Is that Matt will instead of dismiss an idea? I have for a guitar. Riff kill embrace it. Because he'll go. I would never have played out on the guitar but you came up with it in your head as a singer. So now lemme figure out how to play it so that it sounds like what you hear in your head and then usually you know we refine and then it becomes this guitar. Riff that is you know special. And I'm still a sucker for a great guitar. Ref You know I love I love those little motifs and whether it's piano riffs like you know that certainly people always play the piano. Riff from right here waiting but really just the melody of the chorus and yeah but it's always a a cool thing to have what. I call a second Third Fourth Fifth Sixth Hook which are these little pieces of ear candy. In Song I really like this one as well which I think he did with. Matt's really closes the album views. Flee I thought Yeah I love that one too. So here's the story with. That song was about maybe seven or eight years ago. I was still living in Chicago. I had a studio there in my house down the hall from my House and Matt and I spent a lot of time he would do frequent visits to me in Chicago. Because we record whatever we wrote in a great studio that I had built and so it was just a writing hang. You know. We're best friends so we would always end up writing something but a lot of times? It was just to spend a few days hanging out and catching up with each other. Because he lived in L. A. And so he came in hung out with me and I don't think we wrote anything else on that weekend thing. We were just kind of catching up and eating and talking and then we. We wondered down to the studio and and ended up writing that song at a time when I wasn't looking to make an album and vertical horizon was on a break in wasn't trying to make a record with them. Obviously we we liked the song because we we did a demo of it. We just played these guitar parts and I played the piano part and I sang vocal and and I remember liking it and then we both completely forgot about it. It was as if it did not exist and so over the past seven or eight years. There would be times when I would go into these folders on my computer if somebody said. Do you have a song for this person? Do you have a song for this movie or do you and I would go through and look through a bunch of my songs and I never see that song. I wouldn't look for it. I had completely forgotten about it and then just as finishing this album so this would have been like six months ago. I was doing this Laptop Clinton's we do you know like sometimes you go to your laptop and you just get rid of Shit. That's been on there that you know just making room giving myself more storage on my laptop and I was backing up. I was dragging files to An external drive so I could delete them off my computer and see this like sub folder of two or three MP threes. And I see this title this one on like what. I didn't even remember what it was and I clicked on it and it killed me. It crushed me. It was like I was listening to somebody else's song that they'd sent me and I immediately sent it The MP three to Matt. Do you even remember this. And he went. Holy Shit Man. I don't even remember US writing this. He said but it's amazing. It's so good said right. It's great so the next thought was okay. Well let's go in the studio and actually record it for real and then I just went. No it's perfect. It's perfect as it is. It's perfect in its imperfections. You know there's noises and there's like I was trying to play this sort of like sound backbeat town on the on the wood on the guitar and I missed a couple of those but we. It was just a demo. I wasn't GonNa get you know mental about it but when I listened to that I believe like I really feel it and it's I just thought it was a really beautiful song and I thought. Oh this'll be a really nice way to close the album. So that's why it's on the album but I have played that song live now about half a dozen times and it's as if I just played yesterday by the Beatles you know it's like people go crazy people like cheer got it's gotten standing ovations in. There's something about that song that most people can really relate to zero in on and I'm so proud of it just so happy. I was cleaning my laptop. It's GONNA harder this one. This one roach damage is already done so it's time to time to see after day. You're it's GONNA be on new of this this on and how does it work with math? Compared with someone like Sarah Paralysis. They two completely different. Pass when you're writing together. Oh yeah yeah everybody's unique. I don't think there are two people that I would associate with each other. That I would say oh yet riding with her as like riding with him. Everybody has their own sensibilities. Everybody has their own strengths quirks Ways of doing things I haven't written with Sarah much only written with her really over one weekend where she came to my house and we wrote two other songs that we were trying to channel into her what she was looking to do and they didn't really fit with what she was doing. There's one that's really beautiful song duet that. I think somebody just recorded in Australia. Actually so it should be out soon called end of days which I really love. I think it's a really really great song. And then we wrote this more artsy indie sounding song That has not really found a home but then I had been working on this ballad called not in love for a year. I had written all the music and I'd written most of the lyrics but I wasn't happy with the last verse and so I I showed it to Sarah really just a few hours before she was getting on a plane to leave and her first reaction when she first of all. I love the song she goes. It's gorgeous. She's a. You don't need any help it's done. It's I said no the last verse like these to be better and so let's just sit with it for a minute. And she wrote three or four lines of the last verse that to me took it completely over the top. That just made it so much better and she laughs and says you know. I don't even remember what I did. I didn't do anything but she did. She made that song really extra special. And that's another one that I've played live a few times and kind of breaks people's hearts so I am thrilled that it's on this album. Some of the little details and not one like that line recall of single funny thing she said. Yeah. It's such a damning line. Isn't it bridges slips by really easily. Yeah but there's this I can't really describe it the feeling of it when you as a songwriter really know what your mission is like. In the case of that song once I realized I wanNA write a song. That's the updated version of not in love. You know the old Tennessee Song was the same concept. But I hadn't heard that really in a long time so I wanted to write my own version of it and of course musically. It's night and day but I love that you single out that line. I'm really proud of that. I can't recall a single funny thing. You said you know to say that to someone who obviously made you laugh. And that everything she said was funny to you and everything was endearing to say that. I can't remember anything you've ever said I thought was funny. You know the picture that it paints of someone desperately trying to not love someone as it turned out to be a pretty fun song too right because the mission was so clear you know what I mean. I CAN'T RECALL. Give this excel and that Do you ever wake remotely with another right to send ideas back and forth via email to flight. Oh Yeah Yeah Yeah. Yeah absolutely. I've written oh I'd say half a dozen songs on facetime with Matt I've finished songs on facetime with I think even Lucas and I finished all along on facetime with I was on the road I've written with quite a few people where maybe somebody's sitting at a piano. But I'm sitting in a hotel room with my guitar or we're just sitting reading lyrics together. You know looking at each other which is hilarious. Because you know there's always these moments of very long pauses when you're writing lyrics with another person where minutes and minutes and minutes will go by where you're just sitting there and you're both staring at what you've already written and you're thinking about what needs to be done and when those pauses happen when there's just somebody on facetime on your laptop or on your phone it's so funny because wow this is just the same shit on. Wifi you know. But it's a great tool and nothing beats you know sort of being in the room together but there are also these really talented people that maybe don't live where I live and it's the next best thing and and it gets the job done and same thing with Keith. Urban finished long hot summer by email we wrote all the music except the bridge in the room together the day we got together so we wrote the riff and we wrote the verse and the Chorus and we were at the title and we wrote. I think we wrote some of the lines that we had. It's going to be a long hot summer. We should be together with your feet up on the dashboard now. We had that before we left the room but he was running to a rehearsals. We only had a few hours together. And then maybe a month later I met him on the road somewhere and we sat and wrote the rest of the lyrics in his tour bus but then he had to go do show and we still didn't have bridge and so I was leaving the next day to go play in South America so I was in Rio in this beautiful hotel kill room killer view and I don't know I just like you just came to me. The whole bridge came to me and I ran over and sang into my phone. And then I had my Tra manager bring me guitar over to the hotel and I. I just recorded a guitar. Vocal of the bridge and I emailed it to Keith. And then he emailed me back an hour later and said thank you. I'm cutting it tomorrow. That's how we finished it. We couldn't physically get together to finish it but luckily you know the advent of technology we get done. Come and old son. We used some great stories about how songs get written and how quick. Some of them offer for instance. We Are Jeff Lynne. On recently and he talked about writing evil woman in six minutes. That was the good yeah. I'm sure I mean look I wrote right here waiting and you know seventeen minutes. You know those ones that they write themselves. You know you can't stop it. It's an avalanche. It's an avalanche of ideas. You can't write the words down fast enough and when that happens it's such a gift. It's really truly the the proof of the idea that songs come through you and not necessarily from you man. I'm I I couldn't be less religious but I'm incredibly spiritual about that. I don't know how it works but I do believe that. The Universe is full of amazing and Shitty songs that comes through us. Is this story true? That right away and was originally off. It's Barbra streisand. But she felt. The lyric wasn't right for absolutely true. I still have the Recording of voicemail somewhere in a box where she said I you know I love love. Love this music. The melody so gorgeous. Thank you so much but I need you to rewrite the lyrics. 'cause I'm not going to be right here waiting for anybody that would quote and it was so hilarious and so- Apropos and I was actually We watched the grammys with her and her husband. Couple nights ago and we're still great friends and she lives five minutes from us and I haven't worked with her in a while but we've become friends over the years you know just socially and we have these great conversations and meals together and every once in awhile. I will thank her again for rejecting that song because it changed my life and a right. We've had fallen revisit. Some of the massive hits like hazards another this week. I was struck by how the some of the songs are not necessarily from your own experience but they contain quality characters. Different stories things has of course is one of the great story songs really for us. Thank you I appreciate that. I don't suppose I knew the ballot was when I was a kid but it was always on MTV. When I was growing yeah. And I'd never heard that expression before until I wrote that song and I was actually not was still am somewhat baffled by the success of that song because it was it was really just an experiment for me. It was I'd never written a story so I had never written a song with characters I grew up loving murder mysteries and you know whether they be films. Novels and begin. Music woke me up in the middle of the night. I was on tour on the repeat offender tour and I was in somewhere in the Midwest. I think at three thirty in the morning and it's one of the only times that I dreamed a piece of music where I woke up. It was all in my head. I make this joke on stage. Sometimes that I immediately then reached for my Panasonic Cassette Recorder Nineteen Ninety one or nineteen ninety and. I sang all the the bits into the tape machine. The Melody of course but I I heard the whole record in my head. I didn't hear any lyrics. I had no idea what the lyrics were but I heard the baseline I heard it as this sort of almost country. Western meats electronic vibe. Ty wanted these really cool synthesizers but I wanted the the meat of the music to be a country song. Dum Dum dum Ding Ding. Do you can't get more basic country than that and so I live with a piece of music for weeks. There was something about it in my head the music and there was something haunting and sad about it so I just up. I'm just trying to write a story song. And so I had the whole Eric except for the title which I knew was the name of the town and I knew that it was in Nebraska so after weeks of working on it I just I called the Chamber of Commerce State of Nebraska and I got this woman on the phone and I said If I give you a fax number because this pre Internet you know I said he was there any way that you could send me a list of every town in the state and she says it's going to be a lot of pages and I said. Yeah I know. So she She faxed me and all. These pages are spitting out of my fax machine and and I sort of shuffled them all together in the night through them up in the air and then I just sort of like just stuck my finger in the middle of the pile went down the list on that page and it just happened to be in the ages and I saw hazard. Oh that's it. I knew it needed to be two syllable. That was as simple as that and it really sort of fit. There is actually a town in Nebraska called hazard. Obviously but it's barely a town. It's just a it's basically appeal box good enough in there. It's really as simple as that. It was just an experiment for me. It was like as songwriter I wanted to grow. I wanted to try something different. And the last thing I ever thought was that that would be picked as a single let alone. Become a hit is one of the songs. I'm the most proud because of the success of the fact that people actually cared and got invested in that story I think we made a decent video for it. But it's still shocks me. You know I actually still have people that. Ask me seriously to my face if it's autobiographical. I just look at them like hang on we. Are you asking me? Did I kill some girl? Nebraska years ago right aside. Is that what you're asking home and your special way with ballot. Though haven't you you know I remember. I think it was Dave. I get and asked once about his ability to write kind of free moving ballads and he said that's just the way they come out. It wasn't something he'd so the Labor Dover seemingly do they come not easy for you to they did for years and you know I was always a sucker for a great ballot so even bands that I loved like journey. I loved any way you want it and I love separate ways. I love WHO's crying now. Faithfully AND OPEN ARMS. Like those songs killed me because they were just more emotional to me and I've always been somewhat of a romantic and so it's not that I don't love and appreciate great UPTEMPO. Jam like September is probably my favorite song of all time. You know and but I've always just found that there's more poetry in ballads and I've heard David say that like we like this is just what comes out when I said the piano. Prettiness comes out which is true and I've witnessed it you know it's just that's what he loves the most. I love so many different kinds of music that even though I'd say in the first eight or ten years of my career I worked harder at the up tempo songs than the balance. I would say that that's completely reversed over the years. It's interesting just mentioned this to my wife yesterday that I've become in the last I'd say five or six years someone who if I'm listening to someone's new album when the first ballot or slow song comes on. I'm immediately a little bored a better. Kill me it's better. Just be so amazing or else. I'm skip it because I I want to hear tempo and when I write a song my instinct now is to be mid Tempo. Uptempo and the ballads come much more sparsely. So asong not in love or this one. That's on this album. Those are the only two ballet I've written in the last five years probably or four years. You know I just tend to not think that way as much instinctively anymore but then I'll hear like there's a song I heard that you may or may not know You know the ban magic you know those guys. Yes sort of like a reggae pop band and the lead singer is getting nasty who I have actually worked with a little bit really talented guy and I love his voice but I've always liked put their music on when I'm having some Tequila and it's like it's chill Ni- it and it's so it's all fun and like you know it's Bob Marley. Twenty Nineteen Kinda thing right and I had done a little bit of work with Nazarene and I realized that I had not really checked out what they'd been up to his band for the last couple years they had that huge song called rude. That was the biggest song of the year if he has done that one yet and then I heard another song. Gloria that I thought was really fun was UPTEMPO but then I went in and I saw. They just put out an album. You know six months ago or three months ago whatever it was. I had never listened to it so I was driving stuck in traffic in La. And I so I was listening to it in the first came on and it was sort of a classic magic kind of Jam. Fun Really Cool. Second Song kind of a little different but still you know really great. Beat the track three comes on. It's this Acoustic Guitar. Ballad called more of you and by the second chorus and this is really really rare for me. I was crying. I was so moved by this song I love. The music is gorgeous but he wrote what I would say to daisy. That I haven't yet. It was as if he crawled inside of our brains and said what we say to each other in conversation that I had yet to right I have not written really that sentiment and this song absolutely correct me and it's just beautiful so the next time you want to play an incredible ballot put on more of you by Magic. I think is one of the greatest songs in the last decade. Check it out high praise. I'm sure all the people have the same experience with now forever or some of your own songs so economical melody. Yeah I mean I like to think that I try to. I try to be that way. That's the word I can't I can't better your word. I can't best your word. It's economical I. Try to be that as much as I can because I think serves the song will. I'm sure that your ability to do that must've come from not history with the father and the whole practice of Canada. Distilling an idea down to a seconds definitely even if it wasn't conscious it was Something that I never really thought about. It was just instinctive and growing up. Not just hearing the end product of what my dad would right who are Producing a range. But you know just even being in the room. Sometimes when he was sitting at his world's or electric piano writing the music for the following day's session he had a skill set that was unreal and his ability to write something really memorable. That was thirty seconds long or forty five seconds long was astounding and even though he was a classically trained pianist who had incredible career as a jazz pianist in Chicago and clubs before he became a jingle writer. He unlike most JASAR's who thumb their nose at pop music. My Dad loved pop music and he loved commercial music. He loved hit songs. He load songs that he could remember. That we're catchy. He was a rare breed and then he was this savant like musician in terms of knowledge and ability but he loved catchy tunes and I guess it was a bit dichotomies at the time but it really served him and you know he would play me. My Dad is the one that played me Hotel California. Got The record before I did you know I was I was twelve. I came home from school and he. It was a rare day that he was home early and he had picked up the album on the way home because he couldn't hear the eagles record and I walked in. He was like get in here. You got to hear this whole album but you got to hear this. Song Hotel California and we listened to it seven times in a row and then we listened to new kid in town which is on the same album and it was like you know. Sich an incredible thing and I've had the same experience with my son's. Yeah when we share music with each other in fact Lucas it to me just two nights ago. So we're way overdue to just get in the car and drive around for an hour and play each other music so we're going to do that soon. Yeah you've capture that father son relationship quite well avenue in songs like through my veins one to let out to us and of course touched my father classic. Now isn't it yeah. Well that's what my father was really more of Luther 's story in perspective you know and I really helped drive it more musically on that one because he really just wanted a vehicle to tell his story about his father which was markedly different than my relationship with my but I do know for a fact that he asked me to Co. write it with him. We had written before but he specifically wanted to write that song with me because of having lost my father a few years before Luther was one of the only people that when when my father died very unexpectedly and tragically. Luther was one of the only people that knew kind of what to say to me. So many people tried to be of comfort to me but he just sorta knew what to say and we had several really really long conversations. That were really helpful to me. That helped and we were great friends. Obviously but he was just wise in that way and he you know he had lost his father when he was twelve or something so it made total sense to him. He's like if I'm GonNa read about my father. I'm going to read it with Richard so I I'm just so grateful that I got that phone call But yeah and then through my veins that you mentioned is I don't know if it's my favorite song written but it's in the top three TOA. It's definitely a song that I would put an a time capsule as some of my best work. I think and again one of those songs. I couldn't keep up with once. I confronted. Okay I'm going to write about this. By ran from it for several years because the the emotion of it in the weight of it was too much for me to really deal with and then when it happened to thirty in the morning. I was cleaning up my studio and I was getting me to go to bed and then I just sat at the piano and the next thing you forty minutes later. That's almost done and I couldn't be more proud of now as well. You should be really. It's a beautiful song and I mean for us. We both lost our dads in recent years. So I'm sorry it really hits home with us you know. Yeah there's also very little written word about the father son dynamic. There's I think that there are quite a few books from my research is quite a few books about mothers and daughters. There's not a lot that's been written and studied about that dynamic between a father and a son and those relationships can be really complex and complicated mine was not mine was just love and like he was my best friend on top of everything else so. I still wrestle with it sometimes. and it's been twenty years but twenty three years actually but that makes it may be a little bit more difficult to write about. Because you don't have a lot of source material you know you gotta just feel it and write it. Absolutely one of the other ones is leaving years. The living years is It's a much bigger theme than just father son and losing your father but that verse always killed me. You know about his father. So yeah. There's some songs out there that really say well Richard. We catch you just about long enough. I think well it's been a pleasure guys. Thanks so much few times which is all right. Guys Take Care. Thanks for the chat. Okay you too. Bye-bye that was Richard Marx talking to us from the US where he was just about to go out and saw excellent shot site. Yeah gave us loads of good stuff. Didn't he both about his Co. process on about his big hits from the past those. It was very cool lack this album such a family affair. Yeah he's custom talented kids there as knee he has indeed must be so gratifying to have such a close musical relationship with kids and share in that. Chart Success Together. Yes but it doesn't happen often. Does it that. You have kids who are interested in music and then actually have success with them. Not Really Nice. Love Story About Hazard and Lindsey went through just to find that name with two syllables. I suppose you know Google Age was really hard. Work was yeah ler paperwork and faxing. The theme of family is so resonated through is life and his work. Yeah fast with his dad and his amazing skills as a musician. And then lastly writing songs like my father which is just such a moving piece of music isn't it and Luther just delivered so peacefully. You just owns that songs as he does it. Just destroys may not want pack such an emotional punch. Yeah it's great okay. Well thanks to rich of share and all those stories cheers to grace at your fire ants. Ivan for his help as well. Limitless is out now and Richard is currently on sword throughout the US and the shortly paying visits to Europe so check his website for dates. We'll be back soon with another great song. Right take it easy bye-bye.

Matt Scandal Keith Lucas US Richard Chicago Richard Marx grammys Morgan Richard Page Barbara streisand Dick Marx Richard Songs Grace Luther Vandross Ivan Lionel Richie twitter Kenny Rogers Co
"Fueled by Anger and Hatred"

The Tony Kornheiser Show

1:06:24 hr | 3 months ago

"Fueled by Anger and Hatred"

"Previously on the Tony Kornheiser show. Got Eleven. In the first inning, they got fifteen overall. They could have had more but that was a close game they would have had more left twelve men on from the third inning on dodgers up twelve on they scored fifteen runs, and now they have per show pitching against a rookie. And the night before Carl Wright was a looking and he couldn't get out of the first inning, and now they have this guy apparently with a story I read they call lunchbox because it is shape it's not complimentary bryce Wilson could be Brian Wilson's grandson for all I know. The Tony, Kornheiser show is on now he ended up being great. He ended up being great and Atlanta took a three one lead. Atlanta lost the series I guess Doc rivers coached them for the last two games or through games or something like that. That was very exciting with the world series is set. We're going to have Richard Justice on. So we don't really have to talk about the world series at the top. We're GonNa Michael Wilbon on and that's just going to go all around the world. So I would say that we should talk about football. At. The top right Michael football the top because we're not going to. We don't have Jason on today and football. We were just talking amongst ourselves in terms of why Joe Buck might have ended up doing football yesterday and left the booth with John smoltz in taxes and did not do the baseball Joe Davis who I believe does play by play for the dodgers young man. He was doing it with John smoltz and and as long as established John smoltz's name. He's great. He's just simply great. You can look at any other baseball game with any other group of announcers. Nobody's as good as John John smoltz's. Great so what I was saying was if you're Fox and you have both events, you have the world series, you know Joe. Buck. Is going to do the world series and you have a football game on Sunday, and then you have the Monday game that starts I believe at four thirty today, which is why PTI will get no rating at all because it'll be up against Kansas. City Buffalo is that what it is Kansas City Buffalo. City somebody. Yeah. So why would you do that and you would do that because the rating is double and triple for foot. But this was Tampa Bay Green Bay in the Sunday afternoon four o'clock slot that gets more viewers than Sunday. Night Football, Sunday night football is the highest rated show of the week. But the Sunday afternoon game it's just much harder to break down as to what the ratings are gets more viewers than that. So that's I think if it's if I'm Joe Buck, I'd rather baseball but I understand that my profile is such Michael. That's why you football double and triple. The amount of people would watch that game very true needs to, and you still have what could be a seven game series again for the world series but I think based on last night's game. It's worth going into it for just a minute of your boy Blake China. All my God he almost gave up seven runs and didn't give up any. He had Mukhi bets for like the fifth game in a row go over the wall and Robs Bellenger and bets have robbed. All series long he also had two on non out situation and Marquess. It's a ground ball to third and dance. Be Swanson makes probably a mistake breaking for home they get him in a run down. Then Turner makes this great play to shortstop covering and they end up with a double play when they're supposed to comes in from the other room going pickle play still the most exciting thing for playing baseball. But you look at it for a short season, you get the two teams that you WanNa. See The world series best teams and the dodgers that mean it. It does feel like this should be their year. Every year should be there. You're the best of the best team in this is the perfect blend of homegrown players along with making the monkey bad decisions of move of mookie Betts and it comes down to. Austin doing by the way you're not doing now people criticized Roberts for not linkin urea sout when they had a hugely trying to put them down here in the series and looked at three days rest that ends up basically holding on to that lead as you get into the seventh eighth ninth. So I will I will revert back to the football now the Tampa Bay. Green. Bay game was terrible game Aaron Rodgers was bad. He was bad. He came in there as in my mind the. Leading candidate for MVP even ahead of Russell Wilson yet thirteen touchdowns and no picks and he was completing seventy percent of his passes and they were undefeated and he got picked for pick six got picked to passes. Later you know was bad play by his receiver but the Tampa Bay guy ran all the way down into the red zone Tampa Bay pulled away brady was very efficient. Wasn't great was very efficient. Tampa Bay's defense was spectacular. They destroyed Aaron Rodgers, they sacked him five or six times. And now now, what you see and we'll ask will be about this. Later we'll said I'll take Bella check over brady well, I don't know that you would still do that. The Patriots are two and three and Cam Newton looks like he can't throw. Cam does not look like a professional passer at the moment at the moment missed all of last year. So that's a factor in this patriots don't look particularly good. They don't look as bad as the jets the worst team in history, but they don't look particularly good and Tampa Bay Tampa. Bay looks like it's getting better but you're a better point of getting better. Is this the turning point for Gronkowski? Gets the first touchdown he's catching balls now and you get seventy eight yards. Yeah. He's catching some balls, which is important. The most exciting. There were two incredibly exciting games the most exciting game to me. The Indianapolis Game was very exciting Indianapolis in in the Washington game that was very exciting in Philadelphia very exciting to the level of play wasn't so I but Tennessee. Tennessee was tremendous Tannahill and Derrick Henry you who are you going to concentrate on both guys can kill you. They came all the way back and then they got they got the toss against Houston. They got the coin toss and they went right down the field. Boom they were right down the field they're really good team Tennessee. Now they're apparently there is rumoring that they are going to be punished for. They did while they were in. Toronto Virus Protocol whether it was intentional or not. There is going to be some sort of punishment. You see this on the crawl every moment on ESPN. You can punish him more. You want unless you forfeit a win just say. It gets harder and harder and they keep winning you're not hurting them. Lamar Jackson ran yesterday hadn't been doing that in a while they sprinted out to a big lead. Philadelphia. Supposedly bad team Carson wentz supposedly a bad quarterback having troubles this year they came back and they essentially tied the game they went for two title game. They did not get it Washington had the same thing Washington. Went for to win. Washington got an position where they could go to overtime. Now the rule is you go to win on the road and you and you go to tie at home but that's when there are a lot of fans in the stands is virtually no fans in the stands, Michael? What did you think of Ron Rivera going for the win? I keep watching it. I would have been I would have been less I would say surprised if it felt like the play actually had a chance of success, the play fizzled from the start who's yesterday to sniff out. You're playing an Owen five team. I mean, don't you have any trust in in your in your team to stop them and you don't have to win it right there so that that was my only issue. Yeah. Ron Bears. Decisions, and all is decisions are defended vigorously by Sally Jenkins in the Washington Post. Today I can defend going for two in that situation. You wish the play was a better play play on paper is a great play, but it didn't it didn't work out. So the Philadelphia had to go for to in order to tie the game right, they were not brought up he was going for the tie and but also For the WF T that that wind could have put them in first, right? Yeah. Well, he went to win. He went to win right at the moment. Yet that would give them to wins tied with Dallas. It's terrible. Terrible. Terrible Division is that Ryan. You know you WANNA do well fire your coach and general manager. Matt Ryan went out there and he was great and Atlanta One and and. I want to gloat although it's GonNa feel like gloating a little bit i. never thought Kirk cousins was as good as other people thought he was and Kirk cousins had three picks yesterday Minnesota's. Garbage at the moment and Kirk cousins is largely to blame and he said if I keep up like this I want him to get through the season twenty-eight. QBR. Yeah. But I mean he won't get through this season but the Czechs still up. So that's all guaranteed money and the checks from here cleared. Yeah. That's all guaranteed money. That's what Dak Prescott is looking at guaranteed money down the road I don't know I'm not a big fan of cousins as as some others are I'm really not big fan of Tannahill and Henry Big Fan of Mike Table at the moment. Mike. Fable seems to have learned everything there was to learn from Bill Belichick and he's not the guy you ever thought was going to be a coach. He's awfully good right away. Can I tell one small golf story? I played yesterday I was on the tenth Hole. and. I had a pretty good drive right hand side. But in the fairway I hit a pretty good for me probably got it to two hundred, which is just lower pin yesterday. Yeah. So I go to get my ball. I know where my ball is my balls on the fairway and it's pretty deep. And I think I can get there with a second shot if. You're like one ninety Yup I hit a four would well, I think can get there. And I look at my boss I, go to hit my ball and I realize it's not my ball. Some my ball, it's a pinnacle ball I was using a tailor-made ball that I had just bought just bought at the shop. And this is Pinnacle Ball and a group to groups in front of us. Were in that part of the fairway these two kids who were playing were in that I won't say who they were playing with. But. I didn't I don't know who these children are. They're not children. I mean they're in the twenties or thirties our they playing eleven and they've hit drives wide rights. Yes and this one guy hits a ball. And you know and then I get to mine and it's not my ball and I say, Hey, it's not my ball and I said well, hit it anyway. That's where you drive would have been maybe a little bit further. Your drive might have been a little bit better and in fact, the guy who hit from the fairway hit a ball that was a little bit deeper than the ball I ended up hitting. So when we finished ten. And a hit well I. I got close enough to the green on ten that I was able to but. There was no problem there. When we finished the whole, I went to the T. at twelve. which is where they were and I held up the ball and I said, did any you guys by any chance hit a tailor-made to hit my ball because this is not mine? And they were to people and they said, no, no, we didn't know and he said I, I've used in this ball and the guy said I'm using this ball. And I didn't I didn't know what to think. It might have been some random crazy act of God where i. ENDED UP I couldn't find my ball although I knew where my ball was. I was so angry, the rest of the round I was so incredibly angry the rest of the round. That I part eleven i. Twelve I lipped out on no I part eleven, ipod twelve I thirteen. Lipped out on fourteen and I part fifteen, and then I left because I wanted to get home for the witching hour. Everything is I. Want to get home by three fifteen and I don't mind not finishing. It was fun I. It was a Beautiful Day. I could not lose that anger I could not let us angry. What do you think about? You are fueled by anger and hate I am now you had a target. Yeah. It's clearly took your ball but be healthier waiting they were waiting for the entire front nine. When can we sub out this low rent pinnacle? He. was you know bruised there was a probe pinnacle. Golfers. This is like the Honda they used to be parked out here pinnacle carries a survey to it. It's not just a golf ball. It's a smack in the face. Yeah. You know and so. What are the chances that you actually played the wrong ball on say nine Putt it out your chances. You don't actually clean the ball zero chance because because as soon as I saw this ball, it had red and blue on it. They know my was a white ball. No, this is zero chance. He didn't have the Rickie Fowler teepee no no, no no I had the could you feel that? Could you feel the difference? Yes, this was A. Seven year old stone ball was terrible. It's terrible but I was great with certain players. You're describing they're not using that ball no, they're clear going shop credit so I don't know but I mean the point is without without denying the the tooth and what they did although I denied. But that doesn't even matter that doesn't even matter. I'll let me give them the benefit of the doubt saying that I got so angry and played well as a resigned I can't believe he played up. Is this your ball? That's? What I did did anybody you know hit it struck hit a head to tail made and this is yours the pinnacle and I was looking right at the guys is this yours course it's what I do when people walk by the House and you say that mean them can you walk the other side? Yeah. If you have a dog would come on be be smart walk on the other side and I try to say it nicely but you say I'm awful the Queen's number two handicapped on the course departed. Eleven. Yeah. I played from the gold tees. Okay it doesn't. Still Rolling. On the back of the Green Yeah Yeah, yeah when they. When when they? When they said it wasn't the ball. Did you ask him to manager or something like that? No. No. I didn't scream for representative and again there are two people in that group and they may have been related to them and these people I liked very much and I will not disclose their names but I like she. Then she ends kids. Anyone music. OUTTA here. Let me get Outta here Michael Wilbon when we return I'm Tony Kornheiser. Your listening to the Tony Kornheiser show. This is the simply safe Ed. Every twenty six seconds is a break in this country but simplisafe home security you can protect your whole home around the clock. It's serious lasting protection and all it takes is a simple thirty minutes setup which Nigel and Michael Done, they know how to do it. You'll even get a free security camera when you protect your home today. More, on that in a second, simply safe is an award winning arsenal of sensors and security cameras that blanket every inch of your home or your studio that you'll never get back to you know your home and family are always safe. You set simplisafe up yourself in a few minutes without any tools a wiring no technician or salesperson has to step foot in your home. Then simply safe will monitor your home around the clock would security professionals who were there in case of an emergency to send help to your home plus there's no contract no hidden fees no installation costs. It's why US News and World Report named simply safe quote best overall home security of twenty twenty right now visit simplisafe dot com slash Tony use the code and get a free security camera plus a sixty day risk-free trial with any new system order. There's to lose go to SIMPLISAFE DOT COM slash Tony simply spelled S. I m. p. l. simply safe dot com slash Tony. You're listening to the Tony, Kornheiser? Show. Think. This is good. This is sent to us by Michael Grand Arts and feature writer the Dally Dowse Morning News. This is a woman named Grace Pettus and he writes few years ago during a period of pre pandemic. Bliss. Grace Pettus was cruising played up a little bit. So we hear it was cruising a lonely stretch of highway just between the pitch black hours of two and three red lights flashed behind are the law was pulling her over just outside Abilene. Texas got for speeding. She was all alone in her Honda Accords told the man with a bad. She was a singer songwriter heading from one town to the next on tour. Well. He said peering in the window you're going to play a song. Well, she counted you're gonNA write me a ticket. pettus pulled or guitar from the car sat on the back bumper. Luckily, for her, she was able to pick the perfect tune. It's titles. Abilene happens to be one of the coolest entries from Repertoire in two thousand eleven propelled pedestal victory in the new folk competition at the Caravale Folk Festival award she shares with among others. While love it Robert, earl keen and her own Father Pierce Pettis. was written songs for such heavyweights as Garth Brooks. This a great story. She and her dad are the only parent child Combo of one, the new folk award on an earlier episode of the Tony. Kornheiser show you played her dad's terrific break-up Ballad just like Jim Brown she is history. Grace Pettus. This can sing. Playing in Michael Wilbon. Your back from Arizona, you took Thursday and Friday to play golf. How'd you do? You told me hitting it pretty good right. You know better than I have been in the last year play that much in the last year. So yeah. It was. It was stunningly beautiful weather and there was owner and You know it's hard to come back but I had a good time a couple of days off I hadn't really taken. Dates off you were time pandemic. That's right. I've taken about five. You know here and there you take one or two no, it's. It's the right thing to do but tell the people what you've done to land in the fairway all the time you have done a bryce into Shambo move. Where he kind of you start tinkering to when you get old and desperate and I had a driver and cut down by inch and a half inch and three quarters which may not sound like most people who don't play necessarily. But it for me, it makes the world because you're swinging something closer than. Three would. You know it's it's it's just longer than a three would, but you know still drive her head. So you're not getting the same distance. It's not forty six inches or whatever people are with these but I went into I W-. I went into the PG superstore in in. Scottsdale near me. And I just said to somebody's anybody do this. I didn't golf them here over the weekend. and. I said if anybody doing this and they say you crazy a lot of people are doing it pros are doing it. And so that was interesting to hear. So for anything that helps me at this stage Tony. I'm you know all four I didn't know your landing in the fairways during the fairway. Regularly Lethal? Arizona for like four rounds last week. So yeah. I'm happy for you. In that regard, let's get to. We're going to get to the football, but let's get to the baseball. Let's get to the baseball because the Houston Tampa series was every single game came down to the last inning in one form or another the dodgers series wasn't as good. But the last few games have been as good. What are your thoughts on the dodgers getting in one? It looked like they couldn't. Well I mean, three one isn't insurmountable three which has been done one time in a hundred and forty years of baseball two, thousand and four Red Sox Yankees. been done I think last night was the fourteenth time. It was like in the NBA whereas never been done three Oh but three one has been done thirteen or fourteen times Denver did it twice? the nuggets. So we saw this year the cubs just did it in two, thousand, sixteen in the world series down three one. and came back. So it's been. He's fall It's doable. So I I don't I don't count anybody out at three one it's just that'd be silly. And the dodgers have great personnel with their great team not is going to depend on whether they can win next series as well but they they have great personnel and I'm sorry I'm rooting for the dodgers. Because I am reasonably good friends with the owner of the dodgers mark, Walter? WHO's in North Western. Guy And and trustee as well as I am. I see markle timing I know him and his wife and he's he's he's the guy who supports. Stuff I mean a lot of it he didn't just supposed to be generates. Things, northwestern and involving sports and other things sports most notably like the big beautiful that you have seen and been in gorgeous campus studying. And of course, the per person who is still the in La. one of the faces of the executive team is is magic. and. So you know two weeks a couple of weeks there while I was in la working with. We were talking about the dodgers and just you know th the dodgers Tony. They haven't won in thirty two years, which is not the cubs, one hundred years and it's not. The Red Sox and whatever they had eighty six years six wiped out at eighty some years not that. But you know for franchise which grew accustomed to winning. In. The sixty seventies and eighties it's it's just an incredibly long time. And there's pressure on them. There is local pressure. Are. The team with all the pressure. because the the. The Lakers had one. and those are the two franchises as you know having spent some time in La that matter. Lakers, and the dodgers perhaps in that order. But but. You know the dodgers have such a history in La overall when back to Brooklyn. and so they you know for them to be down everyone like this in a year which everybody just decided they were the team. It is a lot like two, thousand, sixteen I mean that that that that had to be the cubs year right? They had the best team everybody said, they were GonNa win and then they were down three one of the Indians in the world series right and I don't think did not have the pressure that the dodgers have it seems to me having been in both those towns. At the time of those games being played but the dodgers did so I I I you know. I root for the dodgers now, I, do it for the dodgers I was thrilled to see them when that now home run out last night I mean he just Ruthie that was just clubbed. As so Loud moment for me at about midnight which people up at the beginning of the game when they put the red haired kid in and he can't find the plate for the first two batters. Are you saying what I'm saying like whoops WHO's decision? Is this what are we doing here? They'RE GONNA lose this game right here. Now they got with a double play but did not feel that same way like what is going the moment? I think WHO's Who's begin this decision I mean people have to perform. You gotTA roster the dodgers. The magic is not just in the talent of the big bopper, but the talent is in the depth. When you play days in a row That depth passing since willy, different. And the depth has to come out, it has to be shown on that means you've got to be able to count on just about everybody on that roster. So you gotta use them they gotta come true. I'M GONNA flip gears people know that we have debts, you and I. We have bets on everything nobody ever collects the winnings, but we have pets. One of our debts was this. You took Bella checking. I took Brady. You said that Bella check would have a better year this year with New England Brady would have with Tampa Bay, right. So now, how are you feeling about that? Bet Right now is a long season I mean you know the Patriots have lost a couple of the row. I did not have them losing yesterday right down to two and a half and his left when they had the ball. I didn't have them lose and I I was stunned by the way Tampa became back after looking pretty feeble against the bears. Ago. I did not have them beating I. Had I had you know my greenback? The packers Tony Maybe, it was the packers and with somebody else. Somebody's only beaten the NFC east who is. Los Angeles Rams four and all against the NFC's and they got and they look last night like a team that only beaten the redskins. Eagles cowboys in John. Look. You know like, okay they're nothing special and we'll see next week again they're in primetime on Monday night against the bears in Los Angeles. And So I, you know the the packers we went through the wins and I picked the packers that I said that it'd be a game matthew. Sedan. Why you picked the packers they hadn't beaten anybody and I think they've beaten New Orleans. But he's a damn beat. Anybody has the packers good. He's not old enough to have been scarred by the packers like I have right ill from fifty plus years. So with the packers. Wow. They just got hammered. Tom Brady and his boys just hammered now I don't believe in Tampa like everybody else does yet not yet. Not yet, I got to see more. It was an interesting thing that happens. There's an echo in your phone on my ear or something like that. But there's an interesting thing that happened you and I have gone back and forth about this. You have. Pilloried. Tom Brady for yelling at teammates right before the half yesterday and it's not like I called him and said, could you talk about this troy Aikman on his own said you know Tom Brady yells at teammates. There's nobody more respected and more loved on a team than Tom Brady. And his teammates are good with all of that because they know that he works this hard I mean Troy went on he went on about this and I told this to you and you had a very interesting answer about that. You made a distinction between New England and Tampa Bay, right? Yeah. These teammates are had been in a foxhole with him for years. Now that my my problem with Brady wasn't that he screamed at team as my problem was he screamed at teammates didn't own up to his own. Crap the four down snap my job. Not. That he screamed at teammates that he didn't he didn't own his own mistake publicly until he puts on Instagram, which is the way you know be even like Brady's headed to fifty years old the only way people under sixty seem to communicate. Social Media, and Brady. The really funny thing we put Lebron. James is head on his. Shoulders when he was congratulating Lebron last Sunday. And so I you know I'm not I'm not. It's not that I'm not sold on the talent they have with their ability to work through this I I'm not let me let me just give me a minute. Tampa. I'm not proud of them yet. Green I'm not proud of them just yet. If there's a team that you can't crown just yet. It's your team they're five and one, but you look at them and go wow, they're five and won they beat Carolina a team that had done very well in the last two or three weeks they beat Carolina they. Picked Bridgewater a couple of times they've gone to Nick foles. He hasn't set the world on fire but they're winning what is how do you feel about this? How do I five hundred? Let me ask you something. Do you know the history of Chicago bears? A little bit not as well as you. But I have some sense you've never had a quarterback. How many quarterbacks have gone to the hall of fame lighten it up leading them. Championships won lumping nut. said. Thank fourteen small-time. Right in the forties, right so I mean. So. This is what I'm sorry. We don't have the golden boy. We don't have Brett Farve. We don't have era. We win by having a quarterback have a good season, rex, Grossman, Jim, McMahon and then the defense and special teams. Gets you there. So how do I feel about it? That's all I. Know. I don't we don't have quarterback controversy every day like the risk like the Washington football team. So this is what they do. And this is what the franchise has done. This is what it continues to do it and Nagy who I was both infuriated with an impressed with yesterday infuriated with them because he had time to run the ball and we do know about that we know about running back. We knew about running back like no other franchise from red grains to gala more sayers to Peyton. We know about running back. and He seems to have a really good second year running back. He won't hand the ball to. And even trying to run up the clock he's not interested in running out the clock. He's throwing the ball in Chicago that will get you. That will that will get people to run you out physically. And every it was funny watching the post game which I do here. Now through the you know marvels of satellite, Watch all Chicago, Post game, and even the former players who went to the Super Bowl they're on TV and run the ball dude. You could run the clock out. Why are you throw it in Nagy came on his post game was long and he just said look. I understand I'm not going to be negative right now. I'm going to enjoy this five and one even though that stuff we gotta do better is if I gotTA DO BETTER Did. He did that for a while and foles came out and said, you know when we were not great offensively, we're trying to get there but we're five and one. We're going to enjoy this and it was. You know was interesting and I I, watch I, watch everything and and you know went from the Washington football team with your decision to go for two I I at the time I'd say go for it. Why not I'm okay with that I'm okay with it I was okay bat and and maybe I give more Rivera too much lease because he's a member of that one of those teams that had. For the. Partner quarterback and a defensive especially the that's how you know. That's how things one. When he played and so yeah, they're five and one, and by the way they didn't just be Carolina. What you want three straight they'd be Brady and Carolina intended. So they've got. So they got a couple of. Wins on the resume after looking really feeble and get lucky against Atlanta and Detroit. So I don't know I. Don't know where they are and the schedule is crazy. They've got the rams next week. This follow I think by Tennessee, Tennessee is good. The packers. I mean hey. We're going to find out whether or not. There any good starting with Sunday night I mean you know I don't know how the rams the rams are GonNa take it apart going to be the more desperate team next week when they went to face, it was an interesting week in the sense that like Denver Atlanta, the giants, and the Lions won this is like the bottom of the flower beds. Up I I was when I went to. I didn't look at the late Games in terms of my pool. I was aiding to yesterday going into games because I picked DETROIT DETROIT DETROIT head to win that game I, think the giants even though they had every chance to lose to Washington. I did not pick Denver against doing when all the fourteenth center Atlanta Minnesota. I did not pick that. Why is the Guy Wires Zimmer still employed? You, get tattooed at home by Atlanta. Why are you still? and Kirk cousins. Having read you. One in five. It was it was it was a fascinating Was An interesting lead. The gains went all that great but it was a fascinating week and now You know I'm I'M GONNA. Be. I've been promising to get locked into college football which I haven't done. And I'M GONNA get locked in now because big ten starts playing. Yeah. I'm excited about all that I will tell you what I wanna see as a result of yesterday. In which Baltimore almost gave the game back. And once was actually very good. In the second half I want to see Pittsburgh Baltimore I do think that won't be a good game right? Pittsburgh Baltimore deal. I mean, I didn't look. I'm not a believer in Cleveland but I thought Cleveland was I. Almost pick legal upset you gotta pick teams everything killed. They got the steelers took them out how about your boy benched about that? Yeah. Yeah. They said it was ribs but you know maybe he was just he was hurting going into the game I don't even know what the Cleveland but I mean, my feeling was that Pittsburgh had anger at myles Garrett and they were at home and they were going to win that game and they did. Yeah Home. All right. I'll see you later. I tell. Michael Wilbon Boys, and girls. We will take a break we will come back but you justice of MLB DOT com will break down the series force I'm Tony Kornheiser. This is the Tony Kornheiser show. This is the bespoke post add. This fall you can get back into the swing of things. bespoke post has brand new seasonal box of awesome collections for guys guaranteed upgrade your life what are you using now? Michael you've been using something. It's I what I want to use. Now that the the lights a little softer I'm looking at the bar for all of my indoor planet I've accumulated in or intense so they have that. Some cool grow bars accessories and along with the throwing axes whether it's geared, upgrade your autumn Craft Beers cozy threads for when the temperature dips bespoke post only sends guys the best up every month. No matter what you're into box of awesome has you covered from style and grooming goods to bar where cooking tools outdoor gear box of awesome has collection for for every part of your life to get. Started go take the quiz at box of Awesome Dot Com your answers will help them pick the right box of awesome for you. They released new boxes every month across a ton of different categories obviously, they have grow bars everything is different it's free to sign up you can skip a month or cancel anytime each box costs only forty five dollars but has over seventy dollars worth of gear inside. alchemy box There's an alchemy box alchemy. C can spin straw into gold fast. Hasn't does it come with a wizard's hat get twenty percent off your first monthly box when you sign up at box of awesome dot com and you enter the code Tony at checkout enter the code people use the code that's box bossom Dot Com Code Tony for twenty percent off your first box. You'll listening to the Tony Kornheiser show. Once again this is grace pettus. Bridge this is called drop another pin. Finale that story from from Michael Grand Berry, where we left it was that she began to sing a song as she was about to get ticketed for speeding and Michael GRANDBA- right says it turns out on the dark night in. Abilene. The COP so enjoyed grace's abilene. He did indeed refrain from writing her ticket not only that but his partner purchased her fifteen dollars CD with a twenty dollar bill in the admonition keep the change. Michael Graham Berry rights with my friend, grace. Pettus forefinger approval email below here are two of her original compositions Abilene and drop another pin, and at the end of this podcast, you can listen to Grace Pettus all the way through which is a lot better than listening to me. Michael people want to send their original music in how do they do emails music by it to Jingles at Tony Kornheiser show dot com. Richard. Justice. Houston's own joins us now from him LB DOT com. And I know at the beginning of the play offs when I asked You who was getting in you said the two best teams were Tampa and the dodgers and they both got in. So I assume you are happy with this matchup and that you think that you know that God is in his orbit and everything is good. I'm pretty excited about the Matchup Sixteen, team playoff. Ville and the two best teams made it to the end. So you know here we go and the the name you're going to hear a lot this week as Andrew. Friedman, he was a war guy that sue Sternberg brought the raise and brought him in to revolutionize the way teams construct rosters, evaluate players he ran the raise. Got Them to the world series. and. Connect the dodgers and his his protege air neander is running the race. So it's GonNa be a pretty fun week the differences between the dodgers and the raise is very simple. It's money dodgers. Money. So if you've got a guy that can construct a team on no money and then you give him money and he spends money for example on mookie Betts and mookie Betts goes over the wall four times in the series brings the ball back you say. I understand this. Let me get to the Tampa Bay series with Houston. Every single game came down to the ninth inning in one form or another that was a great series. Was it not it was a great series. It was a close series and It was two teams that pretty much did themselves. Proud it's pretty remarkable. When you play seven Games in seven days, it changes the game dramatically in that it becomes a war of attrition on the pitching and by the end both those teams were spent in terms of pitching same thing with the with the braves and the dodgers that that was the difference what we saw in the in the Tampa Bay Houston service was this kid randy arose arena who made Major League debut fifty, one days ago sometimes, a great player can can cover up the weaknesses in. Tampa Bay has some weaknesses. Well, yeah I he was great. You don't know if that's going to happen in the series is the series and I need to ask this. Is a series seven straight days or will there be off days. No. This is where we go back to traditional off-day account do off and you know what that means is now starters have a better chance, right but what it means is Tampa Bay canal lineup it's really Tampa Bay essentially has three closers and they can bring their will bring their guys. They will bring their closer Nick Anderson in in the third inning against the Yankees in the fourth inning. So it changes the game they are very tough match-up but the dodgers like I said before one of the best teams I've ever seen. So. Part of this is you can't escape this part of this is money for rights, fees and and ratings become important will anyone watch Tampa Bay or is that is the dodgers the name of the dodgers I mean I think baseball must be very happy that it's the dodgers and not Atlanta in that regard because I don't know the Tampa Bay brings in an audience except for real baseball guys. I catch right. But I also think if you watch this team if you like the sport and you watch this team, you're GonNa, you're going to love them and let me just say a word about money as it relates to the dodgers entered. Friedman got his butt roasted for a lot of the last. Five years as the dodgers couldn't finish the deal. This is their Third World News in four years eight straight division titles. He he was criticized for lowering the payroll every year, and he just couldn't find a place to spend a an explosive amount of money in what they did. They found guys on the street Chris Taylor Max Muncie that others did not want just when they signed Justin Turner nobody wanted him. In those guys were reclaimed when it was time to add he last off season. He said what we need is a free a hall of Famer to change the dynamic any found. Beds, he gave murky bedser under million dollars and it's I would say mookie Betts is the difference in this team in in the last couple of dodger teams. I'll go back to Tampa because I watch Kevin Cash A watch him during the game and he seems to be and I don't mean this in a bad way but he seems to be rigidly analytical Dave. Roberts does not seem to be quite the same way. Dusty Baker God knows is not rigidly analytical and had great success getting to a game seven what are your thoughts on cash and the way he manages that team if Kevin Cash is not the best manager in the game he's in the conversation. He's a people person and it's true all these guys. Now Dave Roberts Industy, they have to deal with front offices that are very powerful and very collaborative in lineups defensive alignments. What dusty went to the mound in one of those games in to take out that grinky and the catcher Martine Maldonado's just a just started berating in. Don't take him out. They'll take him out and That's he went again he went old school against the book Dave. Roberts did that and the twenty seventeen world series he left left a rich Elian one batter too long and. George Springer hit a ball six, hundred feet. It's a balancing act Kevin Cash. Once had a players go in and complain about the lineup and he said I, know you had nothing to do with and Kevin said, you know he said basically how I answer that is going to reflect my credibility in the organization in in he left the guy talk himself in into the lineup Idi. The managing today is so much complicated than managing in any other Arab because of all the information you have to deal with. Plus the fact you know players make a lot of money in have egos and all that it is really a balancing by the way Kevin cash is one of the funniest people you'll ever meet. He's Tito Francona protege. Him when John Giancarlo Giancarlo Stanton hit three homers against the raise in the in the previous round Tito Texted Kevin. Hey. He reminds me of you. You never hit three home runs in your career. This is the last time I'll ask this question goes into the dust bin of history is this justice that Houston is not in the world series? Yeah it is and I mean look. They disgraced themselves and you can't get away from that while I. Personally, I love George Springer and I I i. I want a good things for dusty Baker. I wanted dusty to get this last line on his resume. So he could go to the hall of fame but it didn't happen and You know locally in Houston now we have Jeff Luneau disgrace, general manager of the Astros, giving TV interviews and all that. No, you just want to say shut up, let them play the world series. Let the teams that didn't she play the world series and then you can run your mouth but yeah, I do think the baseball guys just said no, we're not. We're not letting you do it as much as we respect the way you guys play the way you roster's constructed. You did something that was an unforgivable thing. So when the dodgers throughout the red haired kid out there last night and can't find the plate for the first two batters. Are you like me going? How did this happen? You'RE GONNA lose it right here. You'RE GONNA lose it right here if you felt that way, but you know. What they thought that. The way they looked at it we're going to allow main inning Sky Gondola to face the heart of the order. One last time that's teams do it and you know. It works out sometimes and it doesn't work out sometimes they you know the the Yankees did put Qadhafi Garcia out there and the the the narrative after the game. Once you smart guys outsmarted yourself what the dodgers had at the end was a kidney, another kid named Julio Reas who basically was unhittable for the last three innings and In one won the won the pennant for them. So we're we're going to get now to like the largest story for people who like baseball, but don't get down into the weeds on baseball if it is a traditional world series with days off in between two and three and five and six if if that's the way it's going to be Clayton, Kershaw is in a position to have a very large role in this, he could even maybe pitched three games. There was a graphic that was put up the other day and it talked about the the greatest pitchers in post-season and smoltz's on it and Bumgarner is on it and Vera Lander is on it and Kershaw has not on it. I don't know Clayton Kershaw, but every time I see him talk, he seems so pleasant he doesn't seem to duck out. He seems to be a standup guy and his record is awful and as you know Richie, it gets worse each round each round gets worse like his. His world. Series. Era is over five. It's and he's a hall of fame pitcher. What do you make of this I don't think it's explainable and what you said about him is right I. I don't know that I've ever been around a better person. A better teammate. Than Clayton Kershaw and the thing about Clayton is he's totally accountable. He stands up and answers the questions when the Astros won and twenty seventeen, I was doing some stuff cameras steph over by the dodgers got incorrect Clayton and his family stood there and watched this I bet they did they were on, they were in the dugout thirty or forty five minutes to watch the Astros celebration and I thought man, can you imagine what is going on inside this guy he burns to do this and I mean there's so much respect for him. Everybody roots or him a crazed way a couple of years ago he was warming up in the bullpen and spring training. He went down to warm up and a guy that I know with the dodgers's come here want to show you something and he took me down to the bullpen and all Clayton's teammates lined up to watch him warm up before the game I mean and they just felt like he does everything with a purpose we can learn something before one of those world. Series Games it's late at night dodger stadium the sun is setting. Everybody's gone and a guy pokes. Goes. Look looking left field. It was Clayton Kershaw Alaska the field out there just doing some drills and stuff. Everybody wants this guy to be able to write a different ending for Israel Serie Story. It's an unbelievable era past sixth inning it seven, three one, it's the worst in history. He's a hundred games over five hundred in the regular season. You know there's every everyone looking for an out for for a way to smile would say check the workload some of those years you know because he's I mean, some of the workload is is huge and all that. But at the end of the day, the number say what they say and I don't think Clayton would even I don't think he has ever tried to duck that that. At this time of year I need to be better he has pitch great games in the postseason. But. That's not what people are gonNA remember. Who Do you like in the series Richie? Dodgers seven I think the dodgers good. A team is I've seen in you look at that. Now Tampa Bay has a great bullpen, a great bullpen. They have three really really good starting pitchers. But they don't have a lineup that scares you and maybe they can get a couple of guys go in the key for them probably law their young, the basement and all star. Hasn't hit in the post season hitting the postseason. The dodgers just have so much flexibility and so much depth. And you know what? If Clayton stumbles if his back is bad something like that but like last night, they just that was almost these last two games were almost bullpen games and they just had enough to get it done. They have so much talent. They've done a great job of developing players. Yeah and the thing I look for was in game six Janssen's back. Janssen's effect has that big decision for day Roberson. You're going. Okay. So you're going to do this is he gonNa do this and what he did was he stayed with the kid. Yeah. Yeah. Yeah I look forward to the series. I'm one of those people who not only do I believe that that the Astros cheated them I, believe the red sox cheated to do, and I, and I grew up as a giants fan hating the dodgers but I want the dodgers to win in that in that weird way you know what I mean just because I think. They're really good when you've finished I eight years in a row you've been to the world series three out of four years. You've done everything right in terms of finding these these players that nobody else wanted and turning them into stars in drafting kids like cody bellinger and Cory seager and will Smith. You deserve to have a different ending you know billy being always. The postseason is a crap shoot but if you keep going if you keep getting back up and dusting yourself off at some point it's GonNa work out and Dave. Roberts has earned this. He has earned this and the That that that that. That uniform means something in all of professional sports to people and. They they were the they forty three in seventeen. They've gotten to where they were supposed to be. Now they have a chance to finish deal. I understand about uniforms. I mean, I know what? The cowboys uniform means I know what the Yankee uniform means I know what the Gothic de on Detroit, what it means but for my money, the red numbers on the dodgers, no form are the number one thing in sports which are the number. One thing so much what do you think if you think of Jackie, Robinson take a Sandy Colfax i. mean you think a Kirk Gibson it yeah, it is. There are not many. I don't know how many iconic uniforms you immediately identify and you're filled with memories of of the past and the thing is you would go to dodger when they were trying to in Vero beach and there would be Colfax throwing batting practice there you know all the stars of the past we come back it was such a cool thing. Red Numbers just so great Richard Go to the world series. Enjoy it. We'll talk to you from there. Thank you. Thank you doing. What you just as poison girls, we will take a break. We'll have email and a jingle when we return I am Tony Kornheiser. You're listening to the Tony Kornheiser show. So, this is the the honey. I'm I guess I've done this before, but I blanked on my memory with it's all just read it these days it feels like online shopping is the only shopping. We really do unless you're old and stupid and you have to have. Nigel. Get your shoes for you. That's where today's sponsor honey comes in the free browser extension that scours the Internet for Promo Code and what a medically applies. The best one available at checkout honey is basically your online shopping best friend here's how it works. You get honey on your computer for free into easy clicks by going to. Join Honey O. ANYWAY DOT com slash Tony Kaye use the code people. Then when you're checking out on one of its over thirty thousand supported sites, honey pops up while you have to do is click apply coupons wait a few seconds as honey searches for coupons for that site. If honey fines working codes will apply the best one to your card you've done this I have two boys it's important sean uses this and I I don't I don't of course because I don't know how Internet, but this is good right better than good this. Okay good honey has found. Over seventeen million members over two billion dollars in savings. Honey supports all kinds of retailers from tech and gaming sites to fashion brands. Stephen Food delivery. It's simple if you have a computer honey should be on it. It's free and works with whatever browser you use. You can get honey for free today at join hunting dot com slash Tony. I think you should do this right I. think he should. I'm for this. That's join honey. com slash. Tony Kaye. This is the Tony Kornheiser show. This. That's University of Missouri Marching Band. That's thrilling. Every time we hear lovely Niger wants to do the Bethesda Bagel ed. Yes. Thank you. Mr Tony we love Bethesda. BAGELS. You will as well just go onto Google machine look up a BETHESDA BAGELS DOT COM location nearest you. We've got the BAGEL sandwiches again today, but there could also to treat three there just head on by and you will love it. Love. Cillizza once the Bagel Sandwich and he can't have because he's not here physically. We don't have enough I. Love Nigel Rights is things I guess that's just about it for us today. But before we get to the mail bag, I just want to say that I start on the series called what happened and every time something went wrong. I'd look at the camera and say, Hey, what happened with a lot of fun without another catch phrases like I got a wheel wet wagon I can't do my work and I believe I was the first when he used a phrase I don't think so but only a year and that's good because that's how you establish a call is Fred Willard. Still with US I don't think he's with us now. Freddie. Yay. Thanks to our guest today Michael. Wilbon Richard Justice of MLB DOT com. Thanks to our sponsors today bespoke post simply safe and honey. Remember you can listen to us on apple podcast spotify Google play and radio DOT COM. If you get the shelter I tunes please leave us a review Fred Willard great comic actor from Mike. O'Brien. In Boston formerly Rivera my friends Doug Dan who are playing in a scramble this weekend with myself. One of their friends I don't know I can't wait to. pull out the paydays at the turn and the new guys ask why are weeding days and I say Mr Tony Pay Days at the turn talks about it all the time on his podcast when the new guy what else says, Mr Tony Talk about I can say, well, he gives in-depth sports analysis like tyler who had long hair when he played for the wizards. But now he's the coach of the Clippers in the short here you'll hard hit him stuff that you can't get anywhere else. From Matt Pringle Whose Matt from the PEG The peg Winnipeg first time longtime little recently moved to Winnipeg Manitoba from Vancouver British Columbia to be more midwestern but I digress the multi pod discussions praising the payday candy bar was the audible version of a real page turner isn't it's perfect for the Gulf their designated come from the fact that it has San's chocolate lot. It's just a nut style, Granola Bar and there's no candy bar to me. Also, why did they change the name from one hundred thousand dollar bar to one hundred grand bar we are really going down the rabbit hole. Now PSI should've used gramley premium and boom it's. So Great David Morris and Mooresville North Carolina On a recent dry between Richmond and Charlotte I stopped for gas and was surprised to see chocolate pay day bars at the register. Can I get the official show position on the ingredient naturalists healthiness and golf worthiness of this New in August twenty twenty twist on payday legacy please I myself like to leave a pay day or two in the glovebox for emergencies and I felt gratified to hear. About your time-tested policy of back-nine pay as you might say, it's affirmation baby situation. I don't you know if you have chocolate, it's going to melt. It's not going to be. It's no. The Not only is payday great, but it doesn't melt and it doesn't get old. No I don't know I've never seen a chocolate payday what I would do that. Have you seen the my not? No. I'm from Anthony. Syrupy I had feeling. You did not know that sue bird was from my hometown of psoriasis. I was class of Nineteen seventy-nine although I'm way older and crushed you're his bird with personal attachment, a real knowledge athletic prowess. I've been bragging about sue bird since she was at uconn trustee rumor has said that on college break she would show up at Berry Hill elementary and play pick up needless to say she would whoop up all the guys who were stars on the High School Team and Alumni I've lived in Hilton for twenty. Six years I'm the girl soccer coach of May River Highschool Sharks Michael we got the May River Grill all the time. Love Fresh Shower Carolina I would request the honor of being named the official girls high school soccer team in the Tony Kornheiser show. Sure I, feel that my in is that I have players that live in the same community as Michael's in-laws hoping for more shows but grateful former jet after we miss Scott's meat market. Chip Robinson Mount Pleasant South Carolina's speaking of that on Friday show you read an email from the senior assistant director of admissions of my Agra University and you know did it was the Alma Mater of Ub Brown bag is also the Alma Mater my Stepdad Craig who attended same time as a slightly more famous classmate one Calvin Murphy my Stepdad Story to tell about Calvin Mercy Murphy was being in the gym at Niagara and seeing Murphy stand flat footed under the basket and dunk with two hands despite being only five nine and everybody knows this about Calvin Murphy incredible hops every single time. He told me that story immediately reminded me this is also True that in addition to being NBA Hall of Famer. Mr Murphy was also a world class baton twirler. He would light up both ends of the baton, flip them up in the air and never grown his hands from March Schaefer. The Reverend, Mark Schaefer. This is important I grew up in the Albany area, but I'm not going to weigh in on the Shannon whole Bethlehem central rivalry except to say you dropped a syllable out of Shannon Dojo and pronounced that like Shenandoah God knows pretentious folks at Chevron have enough sense of entitlement without feeling slighted that you drop the second hand from their name. Okay. I guess I am weighing in on that Rydell. Another one from Sara. Scherr PhD. Art. History Emerson College where my cousin Maryland graduated in Boston. A wise man once employed me to be true to my school. So I'm here to defend the honor of. Hsien and Dr Hoa Not Shenandoah Shenandoah from the slander levied at it by Steve McLean Virginia, I attended Shan. I. Guess. They all shed in the eighties and like Ferris Buehler's high school we had sport does motor heads, geeks slots can you say that blood's waste and? We even count a former United Nations war crimes crimes prosecutor is an alumnus, but we did not have any. Lewis Chafee School for the rich Wannabes I can only guess that Steve is envious of Shan Sports Prowess, five national, championships. Thank you very much. Bethlehem can be official section to Class A high school Tony Kornheiser show, but solicit and Steve can eat it Sarah sheer currently near Boston. Not? Rivera. On your tonight everyone is always do wear white we're not going to be. Still. The. Pays. All. On. Shows. Will. Then say even. Pay Checks. One. Albie go. Darry hit jury. Sometimes, he gives me. Almost. Always. Little. Send. Her My be. Texas he. The five. Abbas. Gasoline. In this. for. My mom loves. She. Have a baby sister. Call Her star. Shines. DARKIES please. Sean. She keeps. Jewelry. Extinct. CAN'T Sir. Texas. Bills. Yes. They're. In this. For a curly. My mom loves sir. She named me. apple. We're. In this. Four. Ma. She. Suddenly. Dairy Queen. Is Not. Not Renfro. Lay. Watching my grandparents. Your. Shot. Attacking. Johnson. Tom. Make a few. Talk. Big. Postcards. Get lost. Any bookstore in. Yup. Kim. Life. Job.

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Rockets Officiating Beef, Celtics Roll, Kawhi Dominates and More

Jalen and Jacoby

00:00 sec | 1 year ago

Rockets Officiating Beef, Celtics Roll, Kawhi Dominates and More

"The plants capture c o two what if we could help industrial plants capture it to thank you. We could help lower emissions more and more scientists than carbon capture is key to reducing CO two emissions globally. It's one way. Exxon Mobil is helping industrial plants be more like plants, that's the unexpected energy of Exxon Mobil. This shows present about Hulu if you didn't know who has last bortz watch live games and all your favorite teams with Hulu. No cable required. Live TV plan required. Restrictions apply. Jalen and Jacoby on CNN. Shop. Strong. This week. Have you everybody huge weekend in the National Basketball Association, and in movie theaters on television screens all around the world in for Jalen rose. We have the pleasure tied the return of Richard Jefferson. Richard Jefferson coming in hot in the studio upset the people upset with him over his analysis. NBA analysis on get up this morning. Are you sensitive tweets negative sensitive? No, no, no. I'm not sensitive. I just you know, what I do. I like spirited conversations. Right. I don't like arguments spirit conversation and stuff via social media, which I'm new to and people are like, hey, look, Richard. This is BS vol you when I say that the series is over is not like our guy. Paul Pierce said. It was over. I think that's a little of afar. Read my reach here is I'm looking I'm looking at the champions, right? The two time champions that three out of four champions. And yes, Houston Rockets are the team that is kind of tailor made to beat them. But we're going to say now that we believe that there's a chance at the Houston Rockets can beat them for. Out of six games a chance. There's always a chance chance always a chance. But I just if you're betting man, if they had to say, which one are you betting, you know, your money or your life on there's no I am not a betting, man. Okay. But this is why they have odds. Odds are not one to one for right now if you put if you put money on the rockets dome. I I've only been on those on that car court would both of those teams not these current teams. When those players James harden, Chris Pau, right? We've seen you know, guys run out of steam, we see on the rockets we've seen them run out of steam. And now you're giving that was that's why I was so disappointed with our calls because I felt like this was a very very good chance for the rockets to get a win. Now, they need things that go their way. But now you take away that one opportunity you say, okay, guys, it's fine. We just go. Go win for out of six versus that Tam. It felt a little bit. Like the became one of the finals last year. JR gets that rebound. That was an opportune. Tell underdog to win game on them will question selves. He had the media cycle happen. The game to a must-win game at home like. And then you go home. It was one of those things where it's like once that opportunity is miss your psychologically, physically as the series progresses. You know, that James harden is not going to go for fifty in game seven, you know, Chris Paul as a series goes on his most likely gonna get worn down from playing so hard and chasing around staff and chasing around all of these guys. Putting K D exactly. So my entire frustration with the officials is that they took away a huge element of the game. Now, do I think that the officials cost in the game? No, it's a tie game. It's your down by three it comes down to these little moments. So that's my only issue with you know, the way it was a fishy because they took away an element of the game and us as fans of the sport. Yes, we don't want this to be a warriors sweep now. We wanna see seven I have no stake in the game warriors fan of racquet spam. I wanna see something happened dramatic. No one in basketball wants to see that. I wanna see game sevens across the board, everyone horse. That's what we need in the first one that. That's that's what makes it fun. And again joke had a great game. Seven triple dumb like. That's what makes it exciting. We had game one of the most anticipated NBA playoff series in a least a year since they did it last year, the rockets and the warriors the read side all nights got locked in watched every second. And it was a weird game. It was it was close. It came down to the end. Let's just take a look at how finished here we have Steph being guard by the nanna switch not the worst defense. Having love got that stop not the work. Kevin ticket. And then we have this after steal the final possession down three James hard for foul. Chris Paul kind of looking for Phalle there. Chris Paul will end up getting teed thrown out. And. It was close. But it was just an odd game all around. What did you take away from game one? Why I remember watching this game? And the rockets got off to very slow start from three right? And you know, there was some, you know, some of you. So all of a sudden you start thinking. Wow, this start and in the last series like they've missed a lot of consecutive threes. Like that was more of just kind of a funny spot the the kind of talk about, but no I thought both of these teams are playing good basketball. Saw a lot of turnovers by the warriors felt like there was an opportunity of if Houston Houston could've hit some shots earlier. Right. And I think they would have been a much better spot because the warriors are team you want to have a ten twelve point cushion, right? If you're up by six if you're up by eight. Gone in twelve that's gone. That's gone really really quickly. And all of a sudden the pressures back on you. So that was the opportunity for the I felt in that first quarter for the warriors, especially with all those turnovers in that first half for the war for the Houston Rockets. The kinda give himself a buffer, but it never came. It. Just the rockets didn't hit the shots when the when a needed to off of those turnovers in the first half and never had an opportunity to build a big lead. Like as you mentioned. They just didn't they didn't play that. Well, especially teams James harden nine for twenty eight didn't have the best game a lot of free throws. But the conversation about this game is just about the officiating and find now we all know what it's about. It's about what's hung the landing zone over calling it. We know what it is Zaza play that took. Wow. Out of the of the playoffs. They changed the rules. They enforce it. You played under these new rules. What did you take away from those first half calls? The officials didn't make well yes, there were some that were missed. I don't think that that last foul that that he was trying to get on. Ondre Draymond wasn't it. I will say this as a shooter as shooter the minute at a defender has you worried about anything other than your shot. Whether it's hitting my wrist or or landing where I'm at or getting contact than the defense that the Fender has one, right? The only thing as shooter has should have to worry about is getting the shot off coming down straight down the only thing. And so when they're worried about other things, that's where see my opinion is this when they weren't getting the calls were supposed to in the first half. Then they started exaggerating it in the second half to really show what was going on. But that actually hurt them. They should've just continued doing what they were doing. And but it's easy to say that behind Mike, of course, James harden was behind Mike after the game. And he had this to say about the officials called those. Man caught a game. How supposed to be called in. And that's it and live with the results. But when you especially we all know, what happened, you know, few years back with like that can change in tire series. Just call it a game. I was supposed to be called. And with the results in his plan of symbol. I we just talk about Chris Paul. He was wearing somebody else's like jacket. There was a religious store ninety everything was too big. And look this thing in this goes both ways. Like right there you saw like Steph curry someone go under this is not. Yes. This might have been more about some of the times that happened with the warriors. But we wanna protect all players rightly Stephan Klay both came into the series with with with her with her ankles. If if that were to be Steph with his surgically repaired ankle, if that would be Klay who's already banged up war, your fans would be ballistic James this call every single time. And then he goes up underneath staff now step and then look at then if let's say the Houston Rockets were to win because Steph were to miss two games with a bad ankle. That's the only reason why because James harden would underneath them very similar to what the Spurs fan say about the you know that series with you know, Leonard going out, right? So that the argument is more about the integrity of the series. I'm not talking about foul. I'm saying like we want everything to be clear because we want to protect these guys. So that we can see the. The best product in the best game possible. Unfortunately with those mis calls early on. You started affect the product. You started to these guys in their ability. Now works both ways. There wasn't is. Not like, they only miss calls on Houston. They got everything. Right. Golden state. That's not it. But we can at least be honest and say those first als- early on could affect how much Klay Thompson plays could affect like how much space they have to give James harden, all of these things go into it. So I don't wanna give like Houston excuses. And this is not an excuse. This is more about hey moving forward. This needs to be addressed. And make sure that it's handled properly rush watch a lot of tape and they prepare for the game. Just like the players. Do you know James harden has had ninety five three pointers this season, which he's drawn fouls on and I feel like the rest were didn't want to be manipulated by James harden? And also Chris Paul to their best players. Both of those players manipulate might not be the right word, but many do they played the referees to get call. I said I said. Earlier. I said James harden has mastered bathing the officials and a lot of people were offenders. Yeah. Yeah. Yeah. And so, and so this is the thing about Daryl Morey, right, which I did not know. And I'm not like I said, I'm not big on analogue. Right. I get it you on threes. You want to and people try and say the warriors they're analysts like no they just have three of the greatest shooters in the history of the game. And a guy like Steph changed it agai laid K do who we've never seen before in clay who a reincarnation of Ray Allen, right? But in today's world, I it's it's bananas. Daryl Morey with he was doing. He was tracking officials and knowing okay. This guy doesn't call three seconds. And this guy doesn't call you know landing zone. This guy doesn't call. He doesn't call reach Faouzi this got. So he was tracking all of this stuff. Then he would go on prep his players. He would go on prep his players on. Hey, this cruel right here. Together. They have the least amount of three seconds. All these guys have the least amount of reaching. In call in the NBA came in known. No, no, no, no. You can't do that. You can't track this data and give it to your guys. Because then all of a sudden it's actually affecting the integrity of the game. The officials are the officials in whatever they do is what they do. But I just found that amazing that you know, that analytics because I think that's more of a behavioral science because it's what an official pays attention to or what he's good at looking at. I think that's something. That was that. I was like okay now, I believe in that. And I understand why the NBA took that away. So when he said they've been working on this with two thousand six with they do when they shoot threes they work on shooting threes and moving forward because what does that do that increases your landing zones increases your landing zone. So they've been trying to manipulate this for a while. And this was opening up the conversation all of that being said those couple in that first ran on James harden. They can impact the resume were Klay. Thompson was already in foul. Trouble who would have been on the bench could have changed the outcome. But there's so much talk about the officials, but one thing that's kind of being overlooked. Kevin Durant still pretty much stoppable. Thirty five points clutch baskets. They would just put a given the ball in the mid post, and he would just shoot over people. And I said this I said that the the clippers we're going to be a great appetizer for the warriors because they were going to get them ready to play clay you have the guard. Lou Williams, you're going to have to guard mantras you're gonna have to guard. You can Patrick Beverley is going to wake Steph up. This is not a series. And they've proved it like those guys the way they play. So I think that put the Golden State Warriors, and a very aggressive mindset, very early on in the postseason, and when they were talking about look, Katie, you're just so much bigger. You could just go and slowly. But surely, that's what he started doing. He just like instead of being tough and trying to be aggressive and do it. He's like all right. I'm gonna get to my spot. And I'm gonna go up over top of raise up. The and I'm gonna turn around basically an uncontested shot with a defendant right in my face. Exactly. So that's what he learned in in that in that early series right against the clippers. And then now he's implemented that from game one and this. I'm just going to get to my spot and raise up, I'm not in this tough. I'm not trying to prove that I can bang. Trying to know what I'm gonna do get to my spot and raise up, and we see that he's unstoppable. Maybe like no other player. We and I'm glad you mentioned the clipper series because it was just Friday, although it seems like three weeks ago that the in that series and Pat Beverley and Lou Williams were asked about stopping Katie in the post game. And let's listen to what they had to say these Kevin Durant. Promise we try. We didn't roll over. You didn't say man, you know, what just come on give us fifty tonight. Of course, not we tried everything. So we we tried everything we had we have several different coverages, Katie and word. Sometimes sometimes you come across special people. I just love that. I promise we promised we try and I loved that. But let me say this is there a difference between that press conference in Russell's and Paul George question or it was a bad shot. I understand there was still some emotion there, and I get that. But but look there is grace in defeat if you gave everything you had and you came up short. Now, they knew that there is very slim chance they knew that. Right. And I respect that. But like they say we lay down, and that's the beautiful thing to me about basketball's at the end of the day for the most part were all brothers. Right. We're all competitors. We can look at a guy. That's different right. I'm gonna go out there and do my best when I was thirty six years old, and I was trying to guard. Kevin durant? And he was cooking me, right? No one out. There said those. Little. Lebron had so much that he had to do roars. And there wasn't that many other guys that had the size, and I was like I'll just go out there and just chase them around. He's going thirty five anyway. Yes. So I'll just stand there and just do that. So it wasn't like I was out there trying to stop, Katie. No. I was just being a different person that was just gonna take the lumps on my head. But that's the beautiful thing about it. Like, I remember guarding Michael Jordan when he came back. Right. And we had defenders we had Kerry Kittles. We had Jason Kidd Kenyon Martin. We had all world defenders on our team. I remember 'em J. He scored forty on us. Right. And he was forty years old when he did it. But I remember playing defense doing this. And I remember looking over at Jake normally if someone got going we put a different body on and Jake kid looked at me because he'd seen that look in Michael Jordan's. I before he looked at me, and we'll just young fellow. Sometimes you've gotta take your lumps going great. Someone else can tell somebody else. But I don't think they're going to do a better job of what you did right there. So just keep it going. And that's really what you get these great players likely. Kevin durant? And we tried. It was going to be what they want. It doesn't happen overnight. It happens slowly, but it's inevitable happens. Everybody you just kind of become more and more of an adult every day the responsibilities now wake of the morning got three kids family. That depends on my income. They need to protect ones you love with life insurance. I know if you're younger, you don't even thinking about life insurance right now. 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We have game one second round series in the Eastern Conference, the number one seed, Milwaukee home hosting the Celtics. They didn't look very good. We will get to how the Celtics limited Jaanus. But the first thing that jumped out from this game was Al Horford not just on defense. But also on offense. He would set screens and the bus would just leave him. I was leaving over and over. What you see this happened? So many times where they would sink down to be wide open. Kyrie's from from isn't so Mike, what was someone who's been in the locker is a strategy listening. One hundred percent look Al Horford knocking down threes. Now, we know he's Cape more than capable of knocking down. That's what he does. That's why he's a great complement to kyri. That's why he's a great, you know, complimentary player to everyone. But you know, what you're not doing. You're not throwing the ball to our Horford to go. Get a shot on the block. You're not throwing out Horford when you need a bucket. You know, when you throw in the ball to L Horford when you have great pick and roll players like read like Tatum, and they can, you know, Gordon Hayward and all of a sudden because those guys put so much pressure on you. He sets a really good screen, and then he gets open the screeners typically the person had opened and why he so dangerous because he can knock down those shot. So do you think this a strategy that we're your poison? Would you not want kyri going to the basket on us? And we're just gonna let Al Horford from seventeen feet hit that three of the game of basketball. How many little guys do you think have ever been able to finish kyri? Where would you rank him? Easily. Thomas tiny virtual Harker. We don't want them to beat us. So if it's between kyri the all world league rookie of the year all these other awards at this. And it's out Horford shooting jumpers, and that's what you're gonna live with. And the reason why they're so good. And why they underachieve quite a bit this year is because that is a very good weapon. If that's what you're going to use to try and beat you. Well, Al Horford allot in the defensive end to against German name John Kupa Janas finish seven for twenty one from the field. Four fifteen in the paint. He got three hits three threes in this game tutor. So he was to pretend when guarded by Baynes and Horford, what did the Celtics do defensively to limit Janas? Well, I just do a lot of bodies. And this is what I'll say where where I think the bucks will get better where disagree with Paul Pierce. It's because when you play against Detroit team that was the worst team in the postseason in. It's unfortunate Blake Blake Griffin. Like that was a really really tough team, but you play against there's no stress. There's no one anyone that could really even compete with you. There was four player. On the Milwaukee Bucks team that probably wouldn't have been the best player on that Detroit pissing. So they haven't this is their first postseason game to me. If you ask me their first postseason game. And you go against a look say what you will about Indiana and they've over cheap, but they play hard. They're gritty, and they're tough time of like, the clippers not not as talented, but point being this. This was their first postseason real game. So I think they'll get better. I think Yaish just you know, the intensity in these guys that were playing a high level basketball. And look you say this if you sit down at a table, and they say, you don't see a sucker then you're it. Right. You put on us. James harden? Kevin durant? Lebron James and Kawhi Leonard all at a table, which one do you think is this in their none? There's somebody is somebody is one guy's gonna sit there and play cars the game of basketball. One of those guys is a sucker who are you? Picking you go pick Hawaii. No little pig. Jay's aren't you will pay Bron off the Janas? League company. But that is but he's trying he's he's about to win the MVP. He's trying to win a championship and get to the finals. So you're saying all of those guys that are probably left in the postseason, including Steph, you're going to say this. They Janice is probably the weaker of all of those guys. So are we really surprised with this performance? He will get better. We're not saying that he's not going to continue to improve the guys is fifteen years old. But at the end of the day, he's still has a lot more to prove before he's that guy, and he needs to change again, if he calls you right now says RJ a saw, Jaylen Koby brilliant mind. Does this often? What should I do between game one and game two? I just do the every every everything that you've always done this year and everything in that game. But understand this is not the Detroit Pistons, which he knows this is a very good team. So if you think that you're going hard you need to go harder. If you think that you're jumping high go even harder because you know, this. How you play in the first round how you plan the second round. It's not the same as how you play in the NBA finals. It's not here's more on steak. You're running hard. You're going to exhaustion. So you just gotta continue to raise your level. And this is his first time winning a postseason series. So for him to get there the next it's like, every round becomes exponentially harder. And I would say do everything that you're doing, but do it harder. So the Celtics just so much drama this regular season. Yeah. Seemed like they were on the run down every single day. And it wasn't always a good thing. Now they've now got into the playoffs and they've won five straight games. Like have they figured it out? I think they have. But I'm still I need to see some adversity. Great teams. Great teams like when you want to accomplish that goal. You have to go through adversity. And I think we have yet to see them habit versity, and that's going to be the first moment in which we see who they really are. Like, they would've lost the first two games in Milwaukee. Right. And then you're like, okay. Well, we're going to find out about Boston in this game three now. Yeah, they came out. A punch a shot the ball. Well, which is always key you shoot the ball while the other team did. So I think that it's more about finding out who they are through adversity not through their success. So the five Windsor great if they win seven at they sweet Milwaukee. That's great. I still don't think we've really seen who they are until they have some adversity bounceback. Well, of course, we're gonna talk about the other game in the Eastern Conference round two. But first time for news. The matter news that matters. That's all. Fernando. Rodney is a forty two year old relief pitcher closer for the Oakland. A's? Tell me more and yours can be ready in the bullpen. Always the falcons bringing anytime you gotta get up and they start doing baseball. Well, there's a tweet onto show you about some of mR Rodney's behaviors. Oh. Comes from ace Baz at the Blue Jays game sitting behind the visitor. Bullpen just watch for Nando Roddy. Poor himself a coffee half full and then top office sugar free. Red bull asked him. What he calls that straight face without missing beat. He answered a wake me up. Richard jefferson. I always need a little wake me up during the show. So we've got a Cup of coffee here. We're gonna pour in some of that sugar free. Red bull. The smell the smell is already. There would you ever? Drink a wake me up. Not that bad. Not that bad. I'm try try. Third. Not that bad coffee. I don't put sugar cream in black coffee with that. And I'll say this guy, not bad. I. This is the biggest surprise of had on the show a month. Let me say this before you play in postseason games, rightly regular season games. You just get through them, but postseason like I would drink bulletproof coffees. I would have a five hour energy. I would do two cups of salt. I don't know. The Minoan assault is a thought is rework out drink that is literally feels like you can jump up and change the light bulbs in the in the Jumbotron if needed right? That's what you do. Oh, yeah. I've had I actually had to calm. I 'cause I got the jitters too much because. Jitters coffee. I wasn't doing all three. I'm do one of those three. So I would typically it would be a five hour energy. But then I got onto this salt. What I would do is porous salt in right before I will do my workout to get me amped up. And then because you would go onto the court and shoot then you go into a little bit of late. Wait, we call it activation. Then you come back, and you would chill you do your meeting and then right before you would run out. I would drink another thing of a salt and be ready to go for you was there ever one game or one time. And you're like, maybe I overdid it. This is nothing. Part is eating. You're like this can't be healthy. But it doesn't matter. Right. We just need to win this game. And you know, truth be told, and I did that when I was older starting either. No. Yes. So no. But I never did this when I was young. But once you're like, you're thirty five years old. You're thirty four years old and you're playing in the postseason against each young horses, and you're traveling to different time zones in your body is like a sleep you're just exhausted. And you're trying to wake the whatever up. That's when you do it. And boy when I tell you, it's amazing. It is amazing. His. This impressive game one. Let's go of the Sixers and the rector series was not nearly as competitive as I expected it wasn't that close. They had the raptors came out to lead. They maintained that lead. And a lot of it has to do with gentleman by the name of Leonard not only forty five points, but sixteen for twenty three from the field. What did you see from? Why in game one? He's a bad bad. Boy, we all know, he's a bad. Boy, it is very similar to like, Michael, Jordan. Right. Not calling him MJ. But he super-efficient. Yes. Right. He super he's not ninety dribbles. He's kind of within the system he gets to his spot. Whether it's a three pull up the key. So so efficient, but it was less about that. Because look what twelve or fifteen we see with co. I did what was Philly? Do it. Right. And this is my thing they got into all these little scuffles and slow conversations little talk back with the Brooklyn at all of that stuff was fine and dandy. Right. But they were picking on their little brother. They're they're picking on. Now, you've got some other grown men. Right. You guys mother grom in. And it was like let me see you laugh and joke at a podium now. Now, look they lost game one to Brooklyn, and they came back and they fought. So I don't know if they did a great job of preparing themselves for this series. Because I feel like they were just so so much more talented than than Brooklyn. But in a similar to the Milwaukee series. But now I wanna see something Philly Jimmy Butler, you consider yourself a bad. Boy, you cannot let co why NCI do that against you Jimmy because you're my God Jimmy is one of my favorite players. I think he's one of the most compelling NBA players. Do I love Jimmy? I love his competitiveness. I love it. How he's apologetic about his competitors. And more times than not he backs it up on the court four for twelve in this one exactly I need to see more from him. And the only thing what I always say when I came into this booth and always say this. I would never say anything here that I wouldn't say directly to your face. And so I just believe that Jimmy Butler knows he's a play better. I think he should be pissed off. And he probably is because you have to perimeter guys. This isn't one guy went off. And then Kyle Lowry. No, they're two and three destroyed them twelve for fifteen for who's a very good player. Most likely most improved collide, Leonard forty five and eleven you gave up a career high for a guy in the postseason. That's already won a championship and been in the finals. He's made a lot of postseason games to have a career has had a lot of postseason games in there. So much attention this year on Katie and on Dame Yoenis, but let's just take a look at what Coa Leonard has been doing in his postseason cooling year as you mentioned look at that. I mean look at these numbers the field goal percents. Look at three point percentage. That's five game six games. He's played in two thousand nine hundred fifty two percent from three. Yeah. I've never seen anything like. And the thing that's disappoint again. We're only talking about we're we're almost a six game sample. So my thing is Jimmy Butler is a much better defender Tobias Harris, you wanna max deal the buys here is looking for max or close to max. Both those players are gonna be free agent. Yes. So both of those guys are looking for max deals or close to max deals. Kawais one thing let's do that too. And this is not the same Siaka bad boy. But if you wanna tell me to buy his hair or Siaka, if you were to tell me Jimmy Butler or Siaka league, maybe Tobias Harris yakim are. Similar? I think the outcome has now put himself in a spa above Tobias. But they still need to dominate someone. Who was the focus of that Sixers net series of someone that we have not mentioned yet for good reason. Joel Embiid he was by for eighteen in this game. And he was over six when guarded by Mark Musallam. Oh now over six Marcus, motives, see from what I saw that that wasn't Jared Allen in front of him that he was in the face that he was laughing and joking that he wasn't doing all this stuff. And look I Joel Embiid and I'll give him credit. He says look I have to play better are there to best players came to play. And I need to play better, which is couldn't be any more true. So I have a ton of respect for Joel and saying that, but that's why the Eastern Conference became an arms race, right? Because they're like loot. They didn't pick up Marcus all to play against Vic Orlando they played against they brought him in to play against Joel Embiid rights. That's what he's on his team in you see why he's there. So I have a ton of respect from Arkansas. Former plant. Former defensive player of the year. We forget about all the great defensive teams that he's been on in Memphis L, the play-off experience. So now he doesn't need to be the guy in the focal point. So he can just come there. And not only not the guy. They're like, hey, man. Just hit a couple of threes play defense. And he's a great passer. Great great defensive guy, and he can do that. He could do that to Joel Embiid. Who's one of the top ten players in the NBA? Joel Embiid hasta bounceback Jimmy Butler hasta bounce back. Like there is a little bit of a hate this word, but like a little bit of wind feeling in game. Two in Toronto. It's more about you know, I just wanna see more from your whenever you have two guys that go out there and put up those two numbers against you. You should not sleep. You should be pissed off. Now, look I've had that put up against me against Kevin Durant in you're looking at the rest of the defense in the skiing's. But that's not Toronto. Right. Don't compare them to Kevin Durant. Don't compare them to Golden State look Kawais in that book as like a one of the most dominant players in the NBA, and that's fine. But he can't be that officiant. He's gotta miss them. More. Shot to get forty five. And then conversely, look at what's the outcome did twelve or fifteen so at the end of the day like you really weren't stopping anyone on that perimeter. And that's not good enough. We expect more from unions. Right. More from yourself. We'll that was a game one. There's interesting, but we also had over the weekend a game seven late Saturday night. I stayed up for this one. For this one tweeted, I said gimme gimme seven nuggets. Please. The nuggets one game seven, but it came down to a very funky finished ahead. The Spurs kind of came back at the end Bahir. They had the ball with twenty seconds left. And they're down by four points. What is happening Richard Jefferson? What is happening? There's a lot of mistakes here in a mean, my guy he said, look they lost in the most unspoiled way possible. They lost the most unserved way possible in LA I. In that situation is tough because like for your downpour. But you're not out of it down for like, we we we've seen them when a championship in weird situations like that where you're down. We've seen a lot of weird things. Right. So my thing is lamarcus Aldridge made a mistake. He should've taken a look at the bench, right and lamarcus Aldridge Markaz Aldred's. I hate to big fella. But this was mostly his fall right now. Look now, Patty mills has the ability to just growl and fat and foul when he's running around. There's we have an opportunity, but it's not his job. You're looking directly when you're looking straight. He was looking at anywhere is see the clock. It's time and score. Too long. Strange yoga, just standing straight up and down with the ball at his hip. In triple threat trying to make something could have pressured him. I don't think he fully knew the scored. Now, look, we're not saying that this is a this is a situation, but it's very very similar. If this would have happened game seven in the NBA finals late. They would have literally been burning his jersey in the streets of Texas. Right. So that's my thing. It was a huge mistake. And it's did it change anything. But nobody deputy it definitely took away opportunity of you Phalle. They missed both free. Throws. You come down. You hit a three again they hit. For another very unlikely. But it's possible. But in the in game seven if there's a possibility you have to explore that export D'amoto gets the ball. With like, what am I supposed to do? Let's say this. If this wasn't San Antonio. If this wasn't Gregg Popovich, if this was any other organization, they would be murdering them. We're talking about doing talking about the coach lane. His team healing earned that respect. And they've also done a very good job. Like, hey was mistake. May we're moving on the NBA. Is it really that hard to hear the bench? Yes. In that moment when when that crowd and a game seven Hughes. This is my this is my thing. Even anybody could have ran over there and found now you don't want to leave your defensive and put yourself in a position, but what was going on there? You didn't know for late even if he would have gone up further I forgot who was in the corner and could've. But it is so hard. It's still not an excuse don't give me a crowd noise. And it wasn't the reason that they lost wanna give the nuggets credit, and especially Yokich, you'll get. A little feast or famine so far in the playoffs. But he had a great game twenty one points, fifteen rebounds, Tennessee's this is the the best number zero turnovers. He so zero turnover see so good and not look, I I love the nuggets. But but but but they but they stumbled onto this guy on accident. A second round pick. They had. Already there. And then they like nets got hurt. And then all of a sudden this guy started planning, what do we have here? Hold on a second. And the guy has just been he's one of the most unique lay athletes in all of sports, not just basketball unique when you look at his body type what he can do what we've never seen before. The have a six eleven center that can do all Ben Simmons, shoot shoots. Three shoots all like Dirk from three like its cash money as the smidge lowest passes the ball. He's unathletic, but he rebounds the ball. Like he does so many bonus bonus. Bonus. And that's the thing. He is such a special player. So it's like as much as we wanna herald, you know, the Denver Nuggets, he'll you guys stumbled on the guy graduate. That's like twenty twenty two twenty four years old or enjoy this. But let's not make this into like always like no he's lost ton of weight since I came in. He's putting the work, but he is a special player that people need to enjoy. It is time for soft move or boss move. Richard. The eagles traded back in the draft to select northwestern quarterback Clayton Thorson when Clayton was drafted. He family that's brother on the right side of the screen there. Brother brother, stands up and wants the pound. Okay. We're go her first. Okay. That's fine. Then he goes from the hung leans in. And then gets gets again brushed off twice. This brother. Dissing your brother twice when you get drafted soft move or boss move. It would you know, what it was he so it's not his fault. He saw he stood up, and then he leans towards his brother and his girl just happened to be standing in between. So she stands up. So she would have literally been in the middle of the hug, that's. Girl. I'm sue girl like it. So then all of a sudden he gets that than the mom tap shoes. Like obeyed mom, you gotta hug mom. His brother. A boss move from Clayton in the brother needs to read the room better. And when you lock eyes of me, and you start to come towards me. That's when I'll start reaching for the hug. You did that if you go back and watch the video which I have broken down in my in my whole, I had the I pan out here for the show. When he went in the the the girl stood up. He goes in for his brother the girl stands up. Watches watch. Go see. Roman. But then here the brother commits too early. He's gonna put his. The flags of every team up there. They have no idea. Somewhere. One of these teams is going to be right. Yes. That was great sticking with the NFL draft combine star and wide receiver prospect TK Metcalf known for his physique. He had an interview with the Seahawks who would eventually draft him. And in the interview, he showed up to the interview wait for it. Absolutely shirtless, surely showing up to job interview without a shirt on soft move or boss move, all of this keeps me that's a boss move. I guys, and if you had that physique and no point time in my life. And like he has like a one point nine percent body even healthy, you can't even get pregnant. If you had that, right? Your cycle is completely off. It's just crazy with this man is going to. Well, it doesn't stop there. Now, tell me more because when Pete Carroll saw the decay met his shirt off Pete Carroll was fired about a slap in the table there. And he's like, you know, what I got a physique to on glasses off. I'm going. Sure. Let's see what about this. They did end up drafting him to love. So conducting the beginning or greeting potential employees with your shirt off soft over boss. My boss move, right? Because this is a little known fact p Carol, and I are neighbors lives about four houses from me really play volleyball in front of his house played volleyball with him. Oh wife is. Pekair? It's actually pretty good his wife played volleyball. So this is my unfortunately have seen him with his shirt off, right? No, it's great for his age. It takes it takes boss move to be like, oh, really. What your shirt off? I'm taking my shirt onto while. This is kind of uncomfortable. The guy shirt off like that. It's like how can I defuse the situation? Who wouldn't do that? Bella check. Andy Reid coda. Any reason taking off his shirt ventures? Endgame came out this weekend. I did not see seen it. I'm not see it. Yeah. You have seen it in one thing. You haven't done is tell everybody. What happens? Yes. Okay. Now, the Shawn McCoy what did he do on Friday night when we can't show you the tweet because it's a spoiler on Friday night Friday morning early Friday night late. He took to Twitter and spoiled the movie, that's awesome. Our producers feel like he should be suspended for the entire year. They should be suspended for the year. Soft over boss move spoiling avengers endgame on Friday. I know we can't pick both because I like it on both sides. Right. I like soften ally, boss. The soft part of it is kind of not cool the boss move of it is that you know, you're going to get a ton. To get a ton of heat. And you don't care you're doing it. Anyway. Yeah. So which. I mentioned I'm going. I've seen the got ten thousand more hours, and I'm Jay. What you do? So I'm not gonna see vendors game anytime soon how long you can get without. It's it's good. I'll say this. I decided last minute my wife, and I was like she was like, hey, do you want to go the movies? I was leaving on Saturdays. Like, let's see a couple of people, you know, wanna go. So let me Luke wall his wife like bunch of my friends, we decide to go see this movie, we get tickets late rights. We get tickets ten pm. We get right now. The hey before you guys complain it's Friday opening weekend. We're in the fourth row corner. So the whole time for three hours almost looking twenty second time ten pm start to infiltrate our Moody's. Wow. Yes. I was committed. Fernando wake me, Freddie. And this is what I said there were some express those at dinner. This is what I was like, hey, look before y'all start sending me because I was like six of us on. Yes before you all start, sending me the techs chain. Like, hey, it's late like this Friday of the opening movie. Just suck it up. Right. And then on top of it, we get there. Didn't tell him that. It was in the fourth row. We're already there. Oh, by the way, guys there in the fourth row side. So we're just next broke. And it was amazing. It was awesome. Everything that you wanted to be don't wait. I'm excited to see. Next James, Madison high school in Houston has imp- they've implemented address code. Okay. Tell me more not for the students. But we're. Aaron's heritz dropping off their kids know pajamas. No legs. No, sagging pants, no low rider shorts. No short dresses. No, low cut tops. You get it. Soft move is single moms. Implementing the dress code for the parents dropping off and picking up their kids. I'll tell you this my kid. I'd take him to a private school every morning. You know, thank you, Jason Kidd. Allowing me to be in this position. And they tell me not to park on the street and every day I park on the street. We're going to St. because it's in a neighborhood. So it's like if you're in streets, and if every. No it just like there's not enough space. So there's like a parking lot back around the corner and you're supposed to walk your kid, but we're black. So we're always late. This look I am not going to do that. But I'll be damned if you tell me what I'm aware pajamas. Tell me what I'm going to put pants. Tell me what I'm gonna wear to draw my kids special. What's? Go wherever I want. If I want to show, you know. So, you know, it's like the same thing your mom was show but rolling. Rollers rollers a male. Monosso? Massa in my thing about this is I if your parents are dropping you off at school one that's very fortunate, right? Because like I took the city bus to high school every single day for four straight years. Mcdonald's all American and I'm taking the city bus on there with not always the best. Look, if your parents can drop you off at school. Don't tell me what my mom's guy be dressed. Like, there is something you could say you could get into this. But where does this become the problem? See what was happening that made them have a meeting that made them write all this down together. Like, what was what was the drop off? Look like, James math. James, madison. Let me know what I need to wear to come drop off my kid, and I will wear the complete opposite. I only and I'll wear to drop my kids off which you do Richard Jefferson going through phone getting the hate online from his earlier on in the day and on this show. But now we look forward to tonight. The Sixers are in danger of going down oa-to against the raptors they need this win for the series heads back to Philadelphia. What does Joel Embiid need to do differently in this game that he didn't last game? Well, it you just gotta be more aggressive. What you're going against Marcus all is one of the best low post offenders in our league, right? And then you also got surge of Bacchus. Oh, they got bodies that. They can throw at him. You saw Marcus was exhausted. At that didn't even go for the rebound doing a great job against Joel right in. This is why they're going to win this series. He needs to dominate this matchup in in last game. Marcus all got the best of he really does end. We finally get the return of Dame Lillard last time Dame Lillard was on the floor of an NBA basketball court he shot from the logo over Paul George Nellie that he did the stare at the camera. Everything seems like Dame Lillard and the blazes are coming together at the right time even without their starting center. They faced the nuggets we played for last year. What you've specked from the series. I think the nuggets to me I think nuggets are the best team on this side of the bracket. It would have been I would've loved I'm also one of the people that thought that their season was going to be over once nurtured got hurt not not that he couldn't plant that. They couldn't do what they did. When it was just more of like, he was such a big part of. Yeah. Exactly and cantors play. Great. And then mostly that something that was a little unexpected good. But he's played great. Now, we have cancers gonna match against a gentleman by the name of Nikola Yogesh for him. Let's play this way. They traded Yokich ri- they traded at nurtured. So the so that Nikola place. So I'll just think that look I think the nuggets are going to be in the conference finals, I really do. And I think the trailblazers can fight. And I think that they could get an upset, but if I had to pick a team nuggets. Right now when we have podcasts -clusive. To TV. Let's goes I mean, we can cuss. Now. You know, listen, my podcast enough Alvin Kamara of the saints. Okay. According to black sports gossip, okay? One of our one of our. Yeah. Exactly. It's made a stripper by the name of just ace sign a nondisclosure. Yeah. So she can never speak his name or claim him. Yeah. How common is this in Alvin Kamara world, probably probably. But look at the end of the at the end of the day, we live in a very different world things that were common five years ago or ten years ago. Joe name it is not very common. Now, rightly look if that's what you wanna do like, I'm okay with this. You say then sign this off Bryson signed this saying that you're okay with G signed it as a favor some tells me that there was a mutually is is is a deal. What whatever is I give you this. There's a lot of deals that go on, you know. And I think it's okay, you're able at some port at some point in the world we'd need to have some anonymity. Right. Whether you pay for whether you get it whether you sign a contract for it. However, it is if that's how you wanna go about living your. Life than fine. How much do you get when you walk around Manhattan? I get enough. I'm bald in black and tall. So people kind of look at me. And then they recognize my ugly mug every now, but I'm not brawn Kobe Bryant, I'm not Kevin Durant. Like people to say. Hey are and keep it moving. Right. So is different. When you got guys that are constantly looking at you to try and take you down. That's what they learn about. Jalen is like if you're Tom Cruise biggest stars in the world, you can put sunglasses and a hat on and crew. And you're not really bothered. Yeah. You know what I mean? But when you're six and black back. Yeah. You stand out people just assume like when you have this body type. Hey, do you play sports say no now now now? Sure. I'm not lying right now. Like, no, you know, longtime ago, I played basketball. They're like, oh, you should play. Yeah. Or or you get the people that will come up to you. And I'm not that cool not that special. But you get people come up to you. They'll see one person taking pictures like who are you? Are you must you're famous here. Take a picture. It was like, you don't even know my name lady, whoever it is like now again if it's a little kid, it's different. But it's just one of those things that like, you know, if you're trying to get an entity, and you gotta get it through a non a non disclosure, so be it. DM question for you, are you. There's two types of retired athletes. The I'm not picking up a basketball, no chance or the. I'm still gonna stay ready. New. Gym and work out. The last time I shot a basketball with actual basketball close on was the eighty second game when I was with Denver for warm ups. So here's my question is like why this is very common amongst especially basketball players. That's normal talked very common to be like once I'm done. I am John. Well, I I love this game. I thought about taking a coaching position. I thought about doing tons of things like I was and I was considered considering playing eighteen season. So I'm not done with the sense of like, I don't enjoy the game is no I'm not one of those guys. It's like get me away. I don't wanna watch. I don't wanna talk. I don't wanna do anything bass. Well, I just look at it. As like, dude, I wanna keep my body in shape, and I wanna stay strong. But not because I wanna come back not for just in case moment, just because I like feeling and looking salsa. Class my yoga class. I got my soul big yoga guy. Big fat inside my SoHo yoga my trademark. I got the Sturt. This isn't good. This is D shirt. He'll be I looked at myself. And I'm probably like I enjoyed my first year. I felt like I enjoyed it. And like, I'm gearing back up, my workouts, myself, and my Richard. That is disgusting. Also also had a moment is like dude, you're about to turn thirty nine. If this is the worst you've ever looked Richard vote for you. For you, also certain yoga's, not fixed. It's a big mere there and there's certain posted they're just not flattering for the human body. No, they're not when you when you're like sitting when you're sitting on your your legs. Interesting to see all the bills. No, that's not cool that you like suck it in. You like move your shorts up a different way. Awkward sought man. Well, I've never done. How much jumbos there? This is my favorite thing. Right. So about Seoul's. I I like to do eight thirty class my girl Gillian at in Manhattan beach, cheap play not then. But Jillian, right? But really, it's it's just the energy that you get Riley you wake up at eight thirty. And and they're bumping Drake. Like, you're in a club. You know, like, she'll give you some nipsy. She'll give you some should give you some Busta. She'll she'll give you anything time for helping meal. Exactly. So at that point time, you got eight thirty look, I it's a lot of in shape, people in Manhattan beach, like that demographic is very fit people out of soccer. Moms get in there, and you go to work, and then all of a sudden you come out, and there's an energy. I'm not big on like this or that or soul cycle as far as the, you know, the the culture, and the what I like is really loud music at eight thirty in the morning and very very difficult glass. I'm bored. Okay. I'm a sign up for that. Okay. We go together. I got actually I'm taking one PM Trammell, you know in west village. That's where I'm going right after. This show up there. Argue somebody. They would not care care. Richard jefferson. We'll be back on Jalen and Jacoby tomorrow. Look forward to that. We'll have a lot of action to break down. Don't forget to call nine eight five eight zero Jalen ladies, we need your calls. Jalen rose will be back on Wednesday. So we need your calls nine eight five eight zero Jalen tomorrow, we're taking international calls excited about that. Which will be in studio. We are not done that. Why not? Speaking. Talk about LeBron James care about my nipples seriously.

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Richard E. Grant - 'Can You Ever Forgive Me?'

Awards Chatter

1:06:48 hr | 2 years ago

Richard E. Grant - 'Can You Ever Forgive Me?'

"Each. Hi, everyone. Thank you for tuning into the two hundred sixty third Assode of wards chatter. The Hollywood reporter's awards podcasts. I'm the host Gothenburg, and my guest today is one of the greatest character actors in the history of the movies, a Swaziland born Brit who began his film career thirty two years ago as the title character in the nineteen eighty-seven cult classic with nail and die who subsequently saw scenes in dozens of other titles, and whose most recent role as Jack hawk another drunk who becomes the co-conspirator of Melissa McCarthy's Lee Israel in Morell Hellers two thousand eighteen drama. Can you ever forgive me has landed him the first Golden Globe, critics choice sag BAFTA spirit and Oscar nominations of his career all in the category of best supporting actor, the great Richard E grant over the course of our conversation at the offices of the Hollywood reporter, the sixty one year old and I discussed his off the wall childhood and how it shaped him the professional struggles that. Seeded and fed his breakout performance as with nail what he made of his subsequent years in Hollywood which included the nineteen Ninety-one bomb Hudson hawk but also led to collaborations with the likes of Robert Altman, Martin Scorsese and Francis Ford Coppola how after years of working mostly in Europe, he wound up on HBO's game of thrones and girls, then in the wolverine film Logan, and then in can you ever forgive me plus much more. So without further ado, let's go to that conversation. Richard. Thanks so much for joining us pre. She ate it. Good to have you here. Thank you very much. We always begin here with just a few basics. And I guess the most obvious question. I have to ask is where does the come from? And why do you keep it around because when I began working actor and joined the union in England, which is called equity their on screen on yield. Here. I come off to working for two years that there was another actor whose retired coal Richard grant, he'd had to change his name nineteen thousand four from Petah grown to Richard the walls pita and so- equity said you've got to do this. And there was an opioid on the phone who said. Am I begged her? And I said, please, I've no money my gossiping printed eight by tens icon to four to change my name. So she said, well, you can do speak to the actual person who sent in this complaint because he saw your name on a poster I called him up. He was incredibly gracious. He told me the story that he'd had to change his name. And after schmoozing about ten minutes. He said you could put another name in between my said, I think that sounds really pretentious, Richard Peter Richard grant, her could even just maybe put a letter. And he said, yes or right? I then phoned equity straight back got hold of the same very bullying, and she said both the letter, and I was going agr BG are DIGI. Are haven't got all day? And I said right har- he g that's that's how that happened. And then ironically on a chat show early morning breakfast chat show in England with Bob Geldof ex wife poli, it's who had a breakfast show imbed you've literally lane and there's a life own section. Most of the people on coke at the time. It was the eighties when this going on she phoned in and she said Hello. It's Richard grant's widow which had died six months ago, you cannot drop the by which time I set stabbed that was my professional name only, a very long Nell is your scrape. So one thing I read though, was what was your birth name? My birth. Name is Richard ground S to Houston. So it's just a coincidence at that was the absolutely happened. It could've been D got it stopped me before and be I could be by this time. So where were you born raised and what did your parents do for a living? I was born and raised in Boban swatted on which is now changes name to s what teeny which is the smallest country in the southern hemisphere. It's wedge between Mozambique and South Africa in south east Africa, the population of women people. My father was the directive education when it was still under British protect. Rule and my stepmother was a psychologist. My real mother was an accountant. Yes, talk a little bit about your childhood growing up there. It's during the last sort of gasp of the empire. It's a time when your father as you mentioned was a minister, but was keen on making you aware from things you've you've ridden? I understand about you know, you always wear aware that your guest in Africa, you should behave accordingly. Some of your classmates where the children of Nelson Mandela, it was pretty interesting way to grow up. I would imagine it was an it's one of those things that you only realize in retrospect that it was an unusual kind of childhood because when you're in the middle of it, it seems perfectly normal that there are monkeys at the Ingo and era cobras that come right in the summer when it's hot. And if you've got rid of one of them, you've got to be careful because it's made is going to become looking for it. And we'll be really angry. So all that stuff when you're living in. London. Then that is not what in urban landscape. You don't face the same way. And also what we were aware of. Lest you think I'm just being flippant is that Zinzi Mandela who Nelson Mandela's daughters. Who scoop plays with? They could only visit that father once a year on in Robbins, which was this prisoner of Cape Town to twelve hundred miles south of Swaziland. So knowing that they could only see their parents once a year affected everybody in our school, which is multi-ethnic multi-faith. Everybody was it was multi torrent. If you like so that really was kind of benchmark for the house of the school. That's you thought. Well, you have to fight injustice and being -clusive forevermore because it is the only way to be. Yeah. Well, speaking of interesting or unusual situations with with parents, you have written about and actually made a film about. The fact that or that dealt with the fact that at the age of just ten you're in the back seat of a car thought to be asleep and find out that your mother is having relations in the front with someone who is not your father, which was jarring for it would be jarring for anyone. And I guess it shouldn't come as surprise. Then that not long after your parents split up. How did that impact them in the way that they then became after that? And how did it impact you having to spend the remainder of your childhood growing up in those dynamics, well, Dr fro opening so forensically on. I had a breakdown was forty two and I had an absolutely brilliant. American psychoanalyst Christopher who now lives in Santa Barbara see next week who spent eighteen months unpicking, my very very dysfunctional adolescence. But you have just offering me exposed, you know, what happened is that? I couldn't tell my parents. I couldn't tell my friends. I tried go didn't get an answer. So I saw keeping a when I was eleven years old and kept one ever since as a way of trying to understand the world, I suppose witnessing that's cataclysmic moment. If you'd like, you know, you're seeing something that you're not supposed to see on the subsequent plunge of my father into real violent alcoholism by night, and charm and normalcy by day after my mother left meant that. I've. I said had a fast track into having an adult viewpoint on things. I was very aware that. Things that a child like or childish in your life completely in contrast to the sort of the cynical adult world that is out the so that divide has was very very clear. So I suppose that feeding of being forced into being an outsider on the inside of your own life has really characterized the way I view the world and my expensive it, and I suppose then emigrating edge of twenty five from Africa to coming to live in England meant that there. I can you are a kind of side looking in. And there's a great quote from the English writer Kipling who said how can he England know who only knows England which I think just very aptly describes what it is that even though you identify completely culture was somewhere. There's still a sense that you're a tourist in your own country in culture anyway. Well. For the record because they think it's in some ways. The the craziest moment of pretty crazy youth, childhood rather. What was it that happened at fourteen or fifteen that was sort of the low point, I would think? Okay. I have two answers to the K and one is very apposite to today when I was fourteen I wrote a letter family to Barbara Streisand. And I tweeted that today having gone to battle yesterday on my day off and I parked outside at house. I took a selfie with the permission of the securities said, it's a public space do not need permission. But thanks for and I posted this plus the letter tagging hurts and today. Yes. Completely to my utter and bewildering storage, -ment, she replied, and and didn't call security, which is Donna Schmidt to me. I'm not in jobs. I can speak do now, but similar tiny said that same year that I wrote that letter in order to try and stop my father who absolutely adored direly edge of fifty three century of a broken heart. He drank himself to death. I emptied a crate of scotch whisky down the sink in order to try and. Innocent trying to stop him drinking. He took a gun to my head and threatened to blow my brains out. And because he was so drunk. He wavered and the shot that went off. Miss me by maters us here today. He was trying to hit. Oh, he was he upset. He told me that that's what he's going to do. And then I ran away for a week and came back. And of course, he had no recollection having whatsoever. But my stepmother was shoop brands at golden once she Hodel his cacophony going on. So that was yeah. I mean, I can talk about now. But that was a sort of seminal moment. I thought this is I'm dating something that is completely out of control. Yeah. Now, I guess a question. I should ask is which of those two moments that you just described came first the incident with the gun proceed the letter to Barbara Streisand. I'll tell you there's a reason why I'm asking. But which which came I remember talk to Freud really the letter came first. Okay. So you were already thinking that performing how to certain alert to you even before the or. The idea of public performer had an alert and peel to you even Swaziland which have TV until the eighties. All of this just that that seemed appealing to be it wasn't like you got drawn to that. As just a way of getting out of the situation. I was I had shoebox this as that I made from shoebox with seen repaint on the back in a bedside lamp make a little hole in the toll and lollipop sticks with cutout figures on them. That was the first thing I did. And I seventy old that I progress glove puppets, which I made then string puppets marionettes, which then every Christmas and BUSTER is presence from our parents, and I had a full size puppeteer garage used to kid shows the holidays to on money for my record book collection as it wasn't as days. And then I was involved in school plays and I wrote plays and did the Sierra Club with adults. So it was very clear progression of wanting to pursue that. The notion that I could actually succeed or make a living out of it is what really concerned my father because he was in education. And he thought there was no precedent of that in my family and thought that. He's jokingly say you will live a life in destitution wearing makeup tights and avoiding being sort of is so. These three terrors with terrace for him over to come true. So as you can see right turn ruptured made up. As we speak. We talked about the fact when you were nice enough to do the af I fest panel that I do your back in November that you then went off to the university of Cape Town after stop you because you predicted to me to my face when I first met you with your mother that I would be coming back here probably until late February. And I thought that you were. Insane. And that I'm here now. And that all of those things have come true. You have the crystal balls, which I'm very grateful. Well, I'm I would feel horrible if I had been so I'm glad glad I've been proven, right? But that's a testament to you, and what will come to a little bit about your working forgive me. But I guess I want to ask you about UC because when I was talking with my mother at that thing in the universe university Capetown yet where she had also gone, my mom, and the thing that happened there for you was you actually studied drama. I think for the first time in any serious way as well as English what sort of feedback where you getting there? I know you were also doing things, I guess it would be extracurricular -ly with a theatre troupe. How important where the years at UC t. Absolutely. The kind of crucible of how to start a career because we had a brilliant teacher who the improvise -ation classes from then directly affected, my ability or confidence, or whatever you call it to work with Robert Altman who was the great improvise director in movies. And so I got to work with him three times. And I'd see Nashville twenty seven times literally bughouse repertory theater, which is across the road from the drama school, which you had to pay for and pre cable pre video anything you had to go and buy the tickets against is so absolutely obsessed with that. When I enrolled at the university in nineteen seventy six it was the year that within two weeks of being the university. Black Africans teenage students went on the rampage and in the streets to protest being taught in the oppressor language of Africans. So we literally felt that we I was eighteen years old that it was the crucible revolution. And history was was going. He made in that moment. And of course, it took another fourteen years before it actually happened. But just being that at that time felt incredibly momentus and exciting, and we were all after the charged up in a way that thought. Well, this is it. It's fine justices coming so to answer your question. I blamed on my final segment from the drama, professor. They means in a very caring and sharing where because they want to be as realistic about your prospects as possible he said, you clearly have shown talent as a writer and a director here. And I think that is what your career is going to be because I'd co-founder theater company. Call the troupe had a company with a group of drama students that I've been working with over four years. And he said, I don't think that you really cut out or going to make it as an actor. Because you looked too weird. Your face is like tombstone features and all just weird, and you're very pipe cleaners thin. So of course, when I was then cast in my first movie nine hundred. Eighty six with Nell. And I'm actor every single review that I can remember that came out said tombstone lantern-jawed bug-eyed undetake, his assistant all this stuff. And I thought well he was right about that if wrong, I wouldn't I wouldn't be able to crack career as funny, and I know that one of the things I came across pairing for this was that a great inspiration to you growing up even before becoming a professional actor was Donald Sutherland, it was that. Well, he was over six foot tall, right? He wasn't from Hollywood. He has a very very long face. And you you look for role models, and he had a very distinct -able voice, and I'd in Robert Albans mash in Kelly's heroes, and he didn't fit the mold of an actor in that. He didn't look like Robert Redford or Paul Newman who golds at that time. I thought well if he can get work as an actor, then maybe I can get. As an actor didn't really cross my mind that we possible to ever be in a movie because it was so beyond that, that's what happened overseas in America in Hollywood, which uses fabled land on the other side of the planet will so after graduating from having guess at that point resolve that this was in fact, it'd be what you're gonna pursue professionally. You did not come to Hollywood you went to London and backed I guess I want to ask you what it was like when you got there. But literally when you got there, I think on a fairly historically significant day just that and going forward, you know, life in England for those five years before getting a movie when when I got the on the twenty fifth of April in nineteen eighty two just as the then prime minister, Margaret Thatcher was sending troops to the south Atlantic to fight Argentina about the Auckland yet focused islands, which I had never heard of anybody in England that I knew had never heard of. But it was part of this. Chilean jingoism that she was she pursued in order to try and save her political skin. I want you try the same tactics. Eight years later for the Iraq war people. Yeah. We're not having that all over again, you're out and for you though. Now what you know coming into a waiter. I was awaiting in Bresser in common goal, which is still Tilton 's for seven months, and then I threw that in started life as an actor Rier two with mail, and I which I'll ask you a moment that came about four five years into being there. What was going on in the time between that are still getting to work and the most significant job I had when I was twenty seven was playing licensor in midsummer night's dream in the equivalent of the central park open Shakespeare Company that's one in Regent's park in London, which is. Nope. Enough fish was caused opposite Natasha Richardson who just turned twenty one and was very determined. Not to let anybody know that she was Tony Richardson, Vanessa Redgrave daughter, of course, of reasons, so we became great friends that was my professional proper break. And then I did a film for the BBC improvised film, called honest, decent and true about the advertising industry among. The cost also caused which included eight Edmonson who is coming in England, and Gary Oldman who already established himself as real comer on the call British stage that was made at the beginning of nineteen ninety-five followed by nine months of unemployment, and I thought I will never work again because you'll self esteem decimated because I found in my expense. That's there's a common denominator with actors of having this all combination of logic. Go coupled with low self esteem on the one hand, you're saying choose me or anybody else and then the mode you got the job you think I feel I'm not worth. And I see this inactive all the time with view except. So I know the contradiction the day that they screen this honesty's into on Sunday night in England in January nineteen Eighty-six like a new agent the following day who then introduced me to a legendary causing Marissa winning that who's now passed and she put me in front of a writer director Bruce Robinson. Let me stop you there. If I. Can just because I want to give the full background for a listener before we have you go further. He's a former actor at that point best known for Truffaut. The Adele h writer best known for the killing fields just before that. And at that point when his stock was probably at its hottest up to that point. They say what do you want to do any wanted to adapt? And for the first time direct his own novel fifteen years earlier with Nolan I and maids to go casting about for who's gonna who's gonna be in this. How did it I crush radar and what was the process to to playing this title character? What happened was Marissa were told me that they had been trying to cost part for two months. Daniel Day-Lewis open the state symbol tiny. Spill the same day in Rome of the view playing an enrolled in the and a gay punk south London with dyed blonde. Hair in my beautiful. Ondrej Stephen Frears film, those movies opened on the same day. And the critics literally couldn't believe that it was the same actor. So he was hot. As you could possibly get. So with nail massive me was one of the scripts that he turned down as a result, the director, then saw for two months every English actor possible, and I could name them. But I would they were they were all really well known people. We just say one Kenneth Branagh Brennan, but Bill Nye up down and sideways. None of them. According to Bruce Robinson, made him laugh or delivered any of the dialogue as he imagined it in his head by then arrived. I was wearing a nineteen forties. Secondhand raincoat that I go from charity shop, and I was carrying a leather bound copy of Robinson Crusoe, which I was reading on the subway to get the between the subway and the place where I was having the audition among soon deluge of rain Briquet. And so I ride literally like drowned out I said, I'm so Soysa sell the causing version Donohue. Absolutely. This is this is the perfect what you're supposed to look like. So then met Bruce. And he said what the fuck she's what what he looked like this? And they said what reading I said rubs and Crusoe. Just cheer ridiculous. I said it's an oval. My defoe. And he said, yeah, I'm familiar with that. What do you think of the script? I said it was really funny. He said we read. So I did I said two words folk it four forget. Yeah. And somehow the script and fly out of my hand my fingers, what missile towards his eyes. And he laughed. I didn't know at the time. This was the first time. He had laughter. Anybody doing scrip in two months? So as a result of those two words, I was then called back the next day. And then everyday for two weeks, I was auditioning with other actors, and I thought at this point having never been up for film addition in my life. That they were using me as a stupid because they'd cost my part, and I was being used to read in while the actual actor had got it was sunning himself Miami fan somewhere. So then got cast. And when that movie came out, it literally changed my professional life completely untidy, and Phil let's not get out of ourselves here. So you're playing a struggling actor act out of actor inspired by apparently, the real British actor, Vivian, MAC mccarroll. This struggling actor with his house Benz, basically all of his time, drinking, bitching and fighting array. I may not taking drugs just there's no plot. There's no plot. But had people just die laughing at the situations in the dialogue. And again, this is you in your first film role. The great irony, which we'll just get it out of the way. Now, because I know it's probably the thing you're about the most you're playing a absolute alcoholic and yet allergic to Elko, you yourself had had Oklahoma. What like once in your life? Yeah. The director of insisted that I drink on the night before the parental rehearsals before we started shooting in the lake district in the north of England that he said, you have to have a chemical memory of what it is like to be absolutely Bleda drunk. So I said why Henry need to do that? Because my father is now a wholly assumed in seventeen it was like a Matic that. I couldn't keep all down. I went to doctor who blood test. And he said, you have no enzyme in your system, you can never drink. It's completely toxic to you. So Bruce insisted and I. Then spent a whole night trying to get champagne down my face, I managed Kemp throwing up drinking throwing up three. So when I was driven to the student the next morning, I was almost paralytic drunk and managed to get through about half half. And is worth with the dialogue which Paul Mcgann who's yes. And Bruce Robinson were historically laughing at me. And then I passed out in my own bed twenty hours later. So that was your sense of what it is to be drunk. But I guess in other question, this film sort of stabbed you as a guy who is very funny. Did you have a comedic bent before? Would you have guessed that if you made it in the movies? It would be a comedic part. No. I had no no idea. What's whatsoever? No preparation for that at all. And you have said that during those going to spend my whole life doing checkoff in the really. Yeah. And you it said that even throughout the making of with now, and I didn't really even expect that it would. Be released much less become this Cole classic that still has people quoting it thirty two years later. Well, there was an American producer who worked handmade films, and he ran had made films that George Harrison founded and financed. And he said that this film is unreliable unfunny. The title is unpredictable. There are no women in there. No, call chases and in nineteen ninety six when we were shooting. It crocodile Dundee was the big big global hit and he said an crocodiles straight. So we thought we were absolutely snoot. There was no chance at the movie was ever gonna come out on the also said there's no plot. Right. And there's nobody will ever heard of the movie I thought we would unfor when it was actually released. I don't know that it was a commercial triumph or anything. But it still to this day, very popular. So sort of one of these things that overtime has endured. So what do you attribute that to? I got it came out in one thousand nine hundred ninety seven. And I think it showed in about three movie houses in New York. And maybe one in LA, I didn't didn't come to America for the release on a thing. And in England it played for about three weeks and a few cinemas, it got mediocre views and just disappeared it then with the advent of video students started watching it's late night. And because they followed the two couches drink and smcgaels amount of dope in the movie, they copy drink for drink drugs drug in the movie, and it became a kind of rights of passage thing that happened at colleges and high school. So from that, then got re released ten years after it was first released and got a proper audience, and what was so satisfying. Is that almost without exception? The reviewers that dismissed it or were lukewarm about it. Then re reviewed it and set otas improved like a fine wine new go. It's the same movie right enough. Not a frame of. It has changed but your perception of change. And so it's been one of the slows burns ever mazing. So one rate upset quote with nail became an anti hero for the angry youth of stature rain close quote. Do you think that's over analyzing it or you completely be as the bottom line is that more than anything? It is a right to passage movie. I think from what I've gleaned from what people told me people in the thesis because it's that cusp between being an adolescent and having to take responsibility of some sort as an adult, and the kind of nuclear fallout that happens to people that aren't able to do that, which is the titular character within unable to do that that's an experience that almost every person goes through, and because his about a friendship that then falls apart. You know, that's another thing come to nominate has very quotable. There's not a day that goes binding, the within about this is that it seems to be divided into the point point zero zero one percent of people in Britain who have seen the movie and completely obsessed with it. And the other ninety nine percent who've never. I heard an interesting whatsoever. So there's no there's no between the fanatical of couldn't care. It sort of seems to me like the closest parallel in in America would be the big lebowski. Yeah. Absolute right anyway. So you and Bruce then reunited, I think it was like two years later for another film had get ahead in advertising, you know, it's lesser known. And I know that you though wanted to keep working with them. It was a nice relationship. However has he made just one more film since then he made a thriller. Cool Jennifer rate for paramount studios with with them and Annika. And then there was a great long period where he rewrote or wrote screenplays that didn't get made reg, it's not uncommon. They were novel and then hit up to the room diary, hunters Thompsons with Johnny Depp thing. So so that I've never done the trio films with him because he's always set to me that I am the one actor that has said the dialogue as he imagines it and his head. So I've been kind of d'appel gang on screen, but and you guys are still in touch. Would you see each other all the time people have suggested over the air somewhat of a sequel or something to with now? And I, but what I did not realize is that a scene that I guess did not make the film. He says that with nail essentially blew his brains out right at the end of his novel road. Yeah. He did blaze brains out in the final page of awful and in real life that the ACTA that it was based on Vivian mckerrow never worked as an act. I think he did a small one movie in about ninety seventy three he died of throat cancer at the edge of forty nine and with so so committed to drinking and smoking, that's even though we had voice spokes. He's put. Cigarette in the whole on his throat and the also had a pipe that went into his stomach, which he would. Pour neat scotch whisky down. Oh, my. Two very bitter unfulfilled. Well, hopefully, you guys find something else. You can you can do again. But let's talk about what those years immediately after with now. And I were like for you because suddenly you are on the radar people in Hollywood and around the world, and I know you had a complicated relationship with Hollywood over the next few years. I guess it was a combination of European and American foams initially, it seems like it was Henry, June and LA story the latter of which was the beginning of your good friendship with Steve Martin, which it was kind of nice and full circle that he presented you with your New York Film Critics Circle award for best actor this year. But the big one that people do probably remember most was Hudson hawk also released in nineteen ninety one the record by Michael Lamond produced by Joel silver. And starring Bruce Willis, a big budget bomb in which you and Sandra Bernhardt played billion. Villains. You kept a diary actually three obviously, you've said for most of your life, but certainly through the making of that film. So I guess if you were to look back at that particular period and the diary, what's the gist of what you experienced? Well, thank you for bringing this moment of profound professional shame, which the plus side of it is that I've had three decades long friendship with Sandra Bernhard. We played husband and wife team out of that on the distaff. I've never ever been employed again by MRs and Mr. Willis dot com. So it was I think that it was an absolute classic case of the movie day halt to had taken a gazillion dollars at the box office. Why we shooting this movie, they were untouchable producer stall? It was BRUCE'S pet project in which he was he was basically living carte blanche to do whatever he wanted. And the problem was that is that you fly to. Close to the sun, you get burned just out of the ship pride and hubris of it. So he got very burnt famously went out of control and way of budget. Was it fun for you? Or was did you see it was a crashing? It was like a car crash Viseu an how the barometer of that is always when a script is one hundred five pages of white print. Right. Black typeface on white print and within a very short space of time. You've got a Craiova box color of rewrites inserts, and changes, you know, that you're up the creek any paddle rutta. So that's what happened and it really suffered from multiple directors trying to pull in all different directions. So I felt enormous sympathy for Michael Leeman because you know, here was a guy who'd had great success with Heather's, which already admired, you know. An indie movie that was. Success? And Dan who'd written such a great screenplay it then got rewritten on a daily basis by different hands. So it didn't it couldn't possibly succeed. I say this. I I met Bradley Cooper on the the sag the red competent. He he leaned into me. And he said I have to tell you I loved Hudson. So I said, well you on heavy mediation at this point. Not to say. Well. It was a good introduction to what the Hollywood machine can do to movies. It's very different than I thought I would never work again. And when I was at the premiere it was an extraordinary spins it, because we say movie theater in Brentwood where I'd been with all the cost and the production team for die hard to. That's just my deland got style honeymoon period. Right and people literally it was Mexican wave time at the end of that movie for diehard two people were climbing over that show overseas to get to Bruce Willis, Joel Silva, right? Same theater a year later, and I kid you not talk especially say by the time the lights came up. There was not a human be in the auditorium. They had just disappear and just to give you a real idea about it. They had a huge party with, you know, lobster, shrimp and all the half an alien of wealth and deliciousness that you could hope for and the only celebrity turned up. John Travolta, this John Travolta in the pre look who's talking when he was unimpressed -able as you can even imagine that point today. So that wasn't the before the screening started. I'd seen it with enemy bell. We'd been forced to watch. This thing agents came out almost suicide literally because we thought the NFL careers at a top on the shoulder. It was Tim Robbins and Bogan who had met on a movie that never got made a couple of years before about the composer Seaney which collapsed, and he said, what are you doing e grant? And I said hold on who's always coming eager. I said what are you doing here? He said we're about to watch this movie. I said you will not speak to me by the time the credits. Roll he said, we're here for research. And I said why he said because I'm doing movie called the player about Hollywood. And I want you to play one of the screenwriters who does this pitch are you free in a month's time. I said once you see this movie you. May change your mind having I'm free for the rest of my life. I'll be retired like dub in the donkey and he was true to his word. He did come through. There was say lease just a year later. That's the first of your three with him. I think you've called him. You're you're certainly at one point. He was your favorite director to work with the other two porter in one thousand nine hundred four gossip park in two thousand one. What was it about him that that cause you to hit it off? I mean, he'd always had great, quote, unquote character actors populating his films with overlapping dialogue, and all the improvisation things that you do so. Well, but what do you attribute it to first of all he loves that? Does right. Secondly, he likes people who of the pipe cleaner long-faced variety by this. I mean shuttered of all right. Keep counting settlement Elliott Gould up down as Jeff Goldblum. There are a lot of them, and he's also very loyal to actors. He uses them again, and again, and because he goes character actors. Throw the movies knows he knows it can get us cheap more than happy to work for him. So I think it was that. And we just we just got on instantaneously, and I fell in love with his wife, Catherine, and we stayed great friends up until both of them post. Right. Well, I believe it was while you were at a party for the player that you. I met wine on writer, which has to be something that led to a number of things all of all people. Why was Ryan why no writer the responsible for some of your other next big movies? Okay. There was a talent manager Keith Addis. I've never seen since. But I'm sure he's still here. He held a party. And the first time I've been to a party with had valet parking. That was a complete new concept of eve, I was coming up the sunset Jincheon. I went there and I walked into a room, and literally I felt like my head going up down inside because every single person was whippy go book, Warren Beatty, every person in the room was famous and when. A writer came up to me and said she was nineteen. And she said you've got to be Dracula. I'm about to do it Francis Ford Coppola, and she said, I know my boyfriend, and I who having to be Johnny Depp at that time. No every single line of a movie that you did call with Nelly at the at the very moment. She was fan fan at me, which I understand is a cul de sac because you denoting about this person's life. But they know a lot about your, right? So while she was telling me this stuff, and I was very flattered out of the right hand core of my I I see Barbara Streisand across the room which point as your appreciate from the beginning of this conversation. I almost levitated Ray skin. And I said to the hostess I said is it possible at all and resentful? Yes was standing with Dona. And she said, oh, I know her I know her because she's the guy with the guy that I knew Jesse. So she went to Spokane yada, yada, yada. So. I was introduced to her and I spoke to her for twenty two minutes, and basically did what were known had been doing to me just fan fan boy. But she was so smart, you Bob strikes did say to me are you stoned, and I said can Tamil cheesy line. I said, no, I just absolutely overwhelmed to meet you. Spoke to her for twenty two minutes. And she was of course, being who she is and being having famous all her life. She was very very smart at waylaying and getting me out of the fan stage. And I had told her that I just seen a preview of prince of tides a friend of mine Becky Johnston had written the screenplay for. So she had to ask me about. So I did find us over this out of body experience. Like, what do you think the scene here when I use the music with Nick nosy, and I said bre. So shame to say this to Barbara. I think that at this point in that scene. You don't need it to be underscored because the acting is doing it all she said, he thinks you're getting no cereals, I know that many people that are pains, but it was an out of body knows. The fact though that why no was such a fan of yours led to which subsequent projects because I was then on Coppola's Dracula again working with Gary Oldman since almost decent intruder ninety five nine hundred ninety. We're known said, I'm doing age of innocence, straight after this you have to meet mardi because essentially when a ride has been my quiz agent strike manager publicist twenty five years in the nineties, right? And actually age of innocence to just bring it full circle again. Now, it's you and Daniel Day-Lewis did you happen to mention anything about what may oh tell me about on the first. Day choosing New York it was freezing cold the generator broke down on the first day, which sent months as a complete tailspin. And I was summoned by an assistant to go to Donald when being so I went in. I prostrate myself in front of I said Daniel, thank you for giving me my career because you turned down with Nell. And he's very gracious it awry arise, and then we had about three or four hours literally talking nonstop because we found that we knew a whole lot of people in common friends in common across a pas never crossed, basically contemporaries, right? Yeah. Yeah. He's I think he's two days older than me or younger than me. So once the generators on the next day when we began working he didn't greet me. I greeted him. And I said to Michelle Pfeiffer and ride. I said, do, you know something that I don't know because twenty four hours that this man has gone from being so open sesame to literally I stations ever, they said, no, no. He's a method actor and you playing his. Enemy in the story. He will not speak to you. And he didn't for the next three months, and it was very discombobulating. Because if you've had that kind of real instant connection with somebody, and then you are blanked. It's very disconcerting. So I avoid it his island keeping out of his way the whole time. And then I finished using a week before he did with the late mccown. It was another English actor both of whom were his enemies in the story and Martin Scorsese said this last day of Alikhan, Richard Rhonda pause at the crew automatically give you more more of the not good riddance there to act as out of the way, we're closer to the rap and Daniel broke out of characters Archer and came over in front his arms around both of us and said what a privilege it was to work with us her thrilled. He was and we would just literally flab ago like we slept in the face by wet fish. And that's the last time I saw him. So really I had the full measurable ought to be with a method actor. Well, you never stopped cold Turkey appearing in Hollywood American productions, but it became less frequent over over the years as around the turn of the century. You were doing more in Europe thinking, and where you now live in London, I guess very much coincided with the fact that my daughter was going to full time school. So being able to just pick her up and say, we get to LA for two months or New York or whatever was no longer practice Shorto so subscribed by by school subsequent college. So that affected by decisions as well. Totally. And in fact, another decision she effect that I believe was Spice Girls movie. Yes, premium all let's hope the spice. Well, the movie you want me to try and sadly credible thespian. She was eight years old. She saw in those days. It was also machine message blinking saying your agents has off of you to spice skills manager and movie and she to set data if you if you get offered ten movies for Disney. I don't care you have to work with the spice of visit them. So I did an absolute great time with them. I got very very critically more by critics and fellow lofty thespians for saying, you know, how can you sell it to do that? But a generation later hotel dividends. Right. Pay dividends twenty later. Lena Dunham didn't know me from with male which had me practice over the job. She knew me from spice while the movie. So I ended up she wrote me into four episodes of girls. And then Adele with whom I show birthday same Bank accounts. She sent me tickets because she's a spice world found as well to go and see soda show in London. So so it was double win win one thing that did bring you back to LA was something in two thousand six and that was the first film that you personally wrote and directed called WaWa about your childhood. It was very well reviewed. I want to quote, what the LA times critic wrote quote in his writing grant makes use of the same keen sense of operation, the made his publish film diaries with nails and. Novel by design, so amusing, he also shows that his time on sets of directors. Bruce Robinson, Robert Altman Francis. Ford Coppola and Martin Scorsese and others was well spent the film's crisply directed and well pace close quote. So what was it like making this film where you're revisiting the dark childhood that we talked about earlier. And then also what was it like just actually doing what your college professor said, you should have been focusing on which was writing and directing feel so ought to have a one way conversation where you giving me. And I kinda you back. But I understand that. That's not how to do it. Just feels very old anyway writing the screenplay and revisiting all this stuff that was so dysfunctional was very painful because the opening scene the movie is my mother's Daltry and the shooting is the middle of the movie, and then my father is absolutely bizarre funeral is the end of it. But just give a little. There was there was a priest at school with Kobe humider. He was Swazi student who'd come to evangelical school America and had come back under the mistaken belief that he could raise people from the dead. So my father had no login whatsoever. He jumped Becky jumped into the grave after asking you to speak at his funeral. Yeah. He undid. My father's costs kits on your. He was weighed fifty years. Whatever was he was dead. And he tried to raise him from the dead in this great utilization. And then fell on top of him in terrible distress because he felt that he'd failed. So he had to be pulled out of the grave that then had to close the Vokes. So that was so surreal and Monty python S? Yeah. Anyway, put that there was the final scene in the movie, but when we saw the previous with test audiences. They said it is too weird to take. So I cut it. So that it was just a conventional funeral anyway, I had. Advantage of an extraordinary council by Gabriel Byrne. Emily Watson, Judy Walters. Miranda Richardson, Nicolas Hoult, play me when I was fourteen as painful as it was to write as joy filled was it's too then direct in the locations where all of this actually happened as a middle aged man having had analysis and going back and being in control of it as a writer director that was an extraordinarily healing and could create a price through unfortunate. It was marketed in America as a mother's day light comedy. Which begins with a c. Yeah. Which of a ten year old doesn't really it's not what it said on the to anyone who bought that Lyon. I'm sure they were immediately disabused of that. Anyway. So in the last few years, I think a whole new generation of people have discovered your work people who weren't even alive for with Nell or the Altman movies are other things and part of that. I guess you could call it the HBO era in a way because it's not only girls, but came thrones as well. Right. What has that been like you now have been doing this long enough that you can walk down the street, and probably a grandmother mother and daughter who all know you from different things what you're saying. Is that I'm so. Yes. No. Thank you know. It's true. Absolutely. Right. Up mean testament? You know, you have you've never claimed to be the guy in the Bruce Willis position who has certain finite number of years where the movie is built around him any better maintain his looks or else has value in the business. Sort of phase way, you are the thing that has always lasted the longest in terms of career in Hollywood, which is a great dependable character actor, and I think that you've embraced that after a certain number of years. It really is testament that you know, you're still doing such a high level. And I guess the question that I want to really get here is a lot of people who we read interviews with profiles over whatever, you know, they say, well, I was offered this role, and I was cast in this. And then I and it sort of just falls into place for them. And it's a for at least a short period of time. It goes, according to a certain plan they can. Map out there. And all of that as one of maybe the first people who come to mind when you say great character, actor, Richard grant. What does that actually look like for somebody? You know, auditions don't go away. Right. You still maybe not for a while. Now after can you ever forgive me? But for the last few years, even though everyone knows and likes your work. You're not necessarily getting called saying come on. We need you here on this day because we're giving you this part, right? It's always never saw petitioning. Right. That's your point. I accept that. That's just the way it is. So do you like that though? What do you make of that? Well, I met I met one my acting Donal Sullivan many years ago in LA because my wife was coaching him. She has coach an accent in a movie, and I said to him I think it was thirty four thirty five years old so half my lifetime ago. And I said don't code you that at what point do you not have to addition or fan don's to kind of get the gauge and he. Said, oh, no, no, no. You said you're thinking this all back to front. I said what do you mean? He said you got to go into an audition thinking, that's you are additioning them to find out if they are the kind of people that you actually wanted to work full. And he said if you go with that mindset, you're going to have a better time. And he said you have to accept that you never stop additioning that this should be something that you should be thrilled by role than resentful of and that literally changed my thinking about it completely. So whenever I meet actors or hear about to say no to grand to expense. I went read for this. I think you're saying because you're doing yourself out of opportunity and don't assume that because you've done X number work before that that somehow gives you a right to get another job because it doesn't because each person wants to know that you are right for that project. So I'm still fancy doing. Meeting so interesting, and this brings us basically up to two thousand eighteen and I wanna just what for you was probably two thousand seventeen in the making of with Kenya. Forgive me. This this great latest role Jack hawk to set that up. You are on a two stone. Feld set with the movie Logan when you then head from that to do this movie ridden by directed by and principally starring women. Can you forgive me? But just take us back even before that what was the first even awareness that this project existed, and what was the process to getting that particular role? It was November twenty sixteen. I got an Email from agent and phone call to say you have twenty four hours to read the script. And as I said before immediate equipped back and said his mission impossible is going to blow up in my face. No, you have to decide because they start shooting in six weeks time. I then said who dropped out who's dead. Gee, said leave the Panera signs is not the question to be asking and read it. So I recognize the writer the writers nico- Hosanna and Jeff Whitty from new Q the musical and what Nicole written before the director Mariel. Hello who I recognize immediately from the great work that you don't debut, film, dive teenage. And of course, Melissa McCarthy. I didn't not know the story of Lee Israel true story. Even though I had her biography of Lula Banca, the forties actress on my bookshelf. So it was very easy decision to make and six weeks later. I turned on Wednesday in January twentieth in twenty seventeen in Manhattan. And we started shooting four days later, I met Melissa for couple of hours on the one hand. Hand. This is coming back to the cyclical nature of the poetic nature of things your first role was as a alcoholic kind of bumbling guy. Here you are being asked once again to play an alcohol IQ the difference, though, is that this is a person literally who actually live not modeled after a person actually lived. And yet there's not that much that's anywhere on the record about this person photos by graphical stuff. So what was your thought process heading in that six weeks between getting the part in playing it as far as figuring out what made him tick? I always look for movie references soon as redistrict the office. The two of his ones were to sixties movies. One was the couple with Chuck lemon Awarta Mathur because I felt this is these are opposites who are in a platonic, but very very quasar marriage straight and very comical. And then the other one more this because it set in New York City was John's lesson just masterpiece which won best picture midnight. Come and this completely dissolute, you know, Retsag characters he was cool played by Dustin Hoffman Brantly, John voids Joe buck. So these again were to discipline cactus living in New York near destitute in a city that is so rich so populated very lonely. So that really formed I felt well, this is the kind of dynamic what these friendship is between these two people lease rail and and Jack oak, and then I drew from real life because I was great friends and worked with Scottish actor who died of aids in one thousand nine hundred forty called in Charleston who was the lead in a movie charts of fire. One best majority eighty one and he had his combination of boyish charm. Scape wit and an incredibly louche very openly promiscuous lifestyle. So that really it was the as much inspiration as I had from my personal life, and Jeff Whitty, Nicole script kind of gave it to you. But I guess there's also something to be said about obviously from reading the script, you know, that this character is aware of his fate even before the audience is HIV positive, right? And that that perhaps explains why he was as willing as he was to take the trip with the and do some of the crazy things they do. I mean, he was coke was bio cans, incredibly promiscuous, but he also was a hedonist. And I think that's. Because I knew that he was HIV positive, and and he dies at the end of the story in the movie. He that means that it gives you a great impetus and engine if you like for every scene that is involved in what he is going to live the day for the day in the day to the hilt because if he's got ten bucks in his pocket, he's gonna burn that just for the share enjoyment of it because there's no rainy day to be saved for because he doesn't have them. Right. So that gives you a kind of real energy and delight you knew that you would be sharing most you're seen with Melissa McCarthy. And I think originally they want you to just dive right into the deep end with her first day, you're gonna meet her was going to be day one of shooting. I thought a Monday. Yeah. You aren't thrilled about that. Right. What was the how did you get ahead of that sort of stablishment report with her and then from working with her after that what your conclusion about what makes her SOGA? I have I'm paranoid by to begin with. How many my profession and so when Mariel said that odor Minnesota coming on the Friday and you start shooting on the Monday, she's got costume make up and wardrobe test. You went even meter 'til Monday. I said this is not I will not sleep forty-eight have to be even if it's just for ten minutes. Right. So engage at what level is going to pitch the pilot or whether we'd even get on. So they very very generously carved out to us of Friday morning and Melissa had exact same impulse. And so we met and then had lunch and talk to each other. And it was it was instantaneous were you know, that you feel a trust with somebody. And it's almost like a platonic version of Kuda Fuda where you know, that you you just feel seen by another person in a profound way, and we became instant what mates and friends on that end. Which really helped the screen absolutely day on the set, and we stayed in contact. So that was something that I've never experienced in quite that way before so playing a real onscreen friendship, all the physicians of friendship that they go through from the loyalty to the love to the inevitable portrayal on the points of the reconciliation knowing that Jack hawks aids and his dying all of that is traversed in the film, and it really informed. And it was helped by the fact that we got on so well state friends ever since. So that's that's a bonus. That's you hope will happen. But it's a chemical reaction. Yeah. Couple other things. So I on why is she so great. I have to say that because Melissa McCarthy is incredibly emotionally present by that. I mean, there is no subterfuge. There is no you feel that there's no ulterior motive going on or somebody to psyhopathic -ly. Do you out of your moments on screen and believe me I've worked with actors? Who do that by instant few and far between but enough to know that you know, you can be left on the dust heap. She's also incredibly collaborative humane hilarious and heartbreaking. Once she manages to always walk that tightrope between the two which is how unique gift when you first saw I guess a rough cut of this movie through your most recent screening that whenever that may be your feelings about the movie have evolved. Not that basically that you you were not maybe this is wrong. But that when you first saw before it was before Toronto, even you were not necessarily as blown away as as you later became I'm I was completely. Plus because I think that when you see it a screening with your agent alone room. And there's nobody else there. There's no lofta. There's no tears that nothing nothing to support an commun- expensive watching movie, which is what I love about going to everything after all you see as an actor. This is not just meter. Talking here. All you see a your faults in your short coming. So I thought that I was a complete disaster in it. So when you get the reverse response from an audience and critical approbation, that's inevitably changes your mindset about. So you you're forced into kind of I suppose more objective understanding what you've done in. I was there at the national film festival where people I went nuts for this. And I've been following you ever since I think the one of the things that has really endeared you to a lot of people the season has been that you do something that a lot of other people pretend they're too cool to do which is knowledge that it's pretty neat to be invited to the party and to be winning things and to be nominated for things a lot of people are they wanna play like, it's doesn't phase them. You have been so fun to follow in person on social media most recently with Barbara Streisand, but with other things, and I think it's actually made. People, you know, root for you, even more and to some extent cool things happen results. But how did tell us about Chris Evans? There was just something that happened with Chris Evans. Chris Evans is not the avengers America. There's a there's a very very famous radio and television personality called Chris Evans in England has a Brady chat Show TV show. And when I went on its last week in London, he gifted me, the original shooting script of all my notes, and all my sketches on it that I had auctioned off twenty years ago to raise money for the bus refunds for the school that I went to swat. And so he also with nail coat so an auction that charity ocean that we had. So when he gave it back to me, I felt it was incredibly emotional because I really felt that this was the talisman of the thing that changed my professional and therefore personal life as well. So having that back was incredible. And to answer your your other kind smoke blowing is. If you are about to be sixty two years old, I've never been nominated or water things before. So to have this happen at my age is so extrordinary, and I can't be blase about it. I'm absolutely made up. So I'm incredibly grateful for it. And and you're doing it with the same daughter, of course, who had put you into spice world. It was called the movie what you were with her on a exactly two weeks ago from today prior to today, what was that morning like if you can share what how it all unfolded, twenty-second agenda? I will never forget it. It was one thirty English time. I was in a restaurant Notting hill in London, and she had a live feed of the Oscar nominations being read out on her iphone on the table after we just finish eating. And we each had a hip in. And I saw that. I think the first three names came up. And when I didn't see Timothy Shalam I thought well, that's it if he is not being named. There is no Chilton hell that I will even get a squeak in this. And then I saw my name come up, and we both looked at each other. And it was projectile tears, absolute instantaneously and. Where literally had two minutes to take it on board before brilliant for searchlight young publicist, Nicole Wilcox who's been literally my guide and mental throughout this incredible process of last five months, and she said there there's people in the US that you need to to live, and I did back to where I called minister immediately. We literally blubbering like embarrassing idiots each other in total disbelief and pleasure, of course, of being both being nominated for this at a place, though, literally physically that was meaning to you. I'd found that I parked just around the block from a bed sit studio apartment that I rented for fifty dollars a week in nineteen eighty two when I first got to London, and I was a waiter literally I could reach from each end to the other bed was about the kitchen at and it was absolutely minute. And I was around the corner of my daughter said you should do video. That'll twenty seconds of of what this feels like. Of course, I then put it online. And I think within two days it had three point four million hits. Which is inconceivable now again because like it now, and I looked like a completely insane. But this is the thing like that is for. Anyone it's got to be the most exciting thing that could happen. And yet some people are just oh, you know, shows cool unlucky for them. If they can think that's cool to get going after Oscar nomination and your life. Yeah. Go figure that one. I was just I'm still in a state of complete astonishment last question. So you are now and forever Oscar nominee, Richard E grant, okay, you go soon to be and maybe the nominee may the nominee part may change. But they can't take away Askar part. You are soon to appear in Star Wars are worse film. I would imagine that the phones may be ringing a little more after all of this than in the last few years, probably exciting hut time to be Richard E grant that's part one of the setup part too. Is that you wear to watches is looking at them right now. One of them on the right is LA time from what I've. Yeah. On the left is Swaziland time because that. Was a gift from your father who I guess literally on his on his deathbed. And this is all to set up the question. What would he make of this? If he could see what this has all turned out to be something that he was worried could go down the toilet. And you'd be doing all those things that you listed earlier, you know, as far as I know you you're you're not tight. Not ready make oh, that's it. Not I mean tact. Yeah. It was about to say. So if if he could see this, what would he say, I hope that he would be incredibly proud because you know, that's still that part of every kid in you Madam. You you watch me dad, watch me mile. You want the application of your parents? And the fact that I have made such a good living out of it is beyond anything that he could have imagined. So I'm I think he would have been I hope you've been Brad. Thank you so much for this. Congratulations. Thank you. Thanks. Thank you. Thanks very much for tuning into awards chatter. We really appreciate you taking the time to do that. And would really appreciate you taking a minute. More to subscribe to our podcast for free on I tunes or your podcast up and to leave us a rating as well. If you have any questions comments or concerns, you can reach me via Twitter at Twitter dot com slash stop fiber. And you can follow all of my coverage between episodes at HR dot com slash the race. Until next time. Thanks for joining us.

writer England Hollywood director London LA America Nell Richard Peter Richard grant Bruce Robinson Bruce Willis Francis Ford Coppola Bruce New York Swaziland Martin Scorsese Barbara Streisand Africa Cape Town Daniel Day-Lewis
Stats & Eggs, 10/22: 49ers acquire a LB named Willis...not that one

Niners Nation

04:38 min | 3 months ago

Stats & Eggs, 10/22: 49ers acquire a LB named Willis...not that one

"Support for this podcast comes from state farm with surprisingly great rates. State farm is the real deal when it comes to home and car insurance state farm agents are always ready to help you personalize your insurance plan. You can create a policy that fits your needs. You can manage your coverage, pay your bill or even file a claim right from your phone with the state farm mobile APP, and you can always call one of the state farm agents in neighborhoods across the country. Get a great rate without sacrificing great service when you want the real deal like a good neighbor state farm is there. Morning I'm Rob Stats Guerrero today's Thursday October Twenty second twenty twenty here's what's happening with your San Francisco Forty niners Wednesdays are injury update days and yesterday was no exception Rahima Search Whiskey Tart Kwan Alexander and Trent Williams did not practice due to their various injuries but in a welcome twist Kyle Shanahan said, the team did get some good news when it came to Trent Williams. Ankle. Kyle. What did the extra imaging on that ankle show you and show that nothing was broken and? That it wasn't a high ankle so that was good news but still too much pain to practice today and I know he'll be questionable throughout the week. So it'll get better each day but it's not there yet when it comes to some of the other guys on injured reserve, the news wasn't great Richard Sherman is in a walking boot while his calf heels both he and e Ford aren't expected to return until after the week ten by which is about a month away. Earlier in the week cow Shanahan told us it was unlikely. The forty niners would make any trade before the deadline in about two weeks yesterday of course, the forty niners made a trade according to the NFL Networks Tom Pell Sarah they acquired linebacker, Jordan Willis. And a seventh round pick this year from the jets for a sixth round pick in twenty twenty, two Willis was drafted in the third round in twenty seven team by the bengals he's appeared in two games this season for the jets and didn't watch a quarterback hit or a sack on twenty six pass rushes. One more clip I wanted to play for you and it comes from Mike mcglinchey last week I ripped mcglinchey to shreds for not acknowledging how terrible he had played up to that point last week against the rams however, he was much better. I. Admit here was mcglinchey Wednesday talking about how the fuel from the critics and the diversity that the team has gone through could help them going forward the only way that you can materialize that through hard work and and tough. The last two weeks has been really really hard. We got kicked by Miami. We didn't close against Philli we need and we should have done that and for us to go through that kind of hard hard stuff excuse me had misleading until that moment on Sunday and it was building it was building and you have to you have to experience adversity. You have to experience tough tough times in order for those kind. Of moments to rise into for everybody to grow together and I think that's what we went through those two weeks after the New York trip and Hopefully, we can continue building on this momentum that we've gained on Sunday night and continue to play the ball that we know we can play but the games coming up on the schedule they gotta keep that momentum going because they're going to need every advantage they can get. We always give you something to read something to watch and something you might have missed something to read on this Thursday comes from something that was inspired by NBC's Chris Collins Worth during the Sunday night broadcast against the Rams Chris was giving Robert saw in defense a lot of praise for their style play against the rams. But how good has the Defense Ben Check out jazz kings posts on niners nation dot com the too long didn't read version. Pretty Damn good. You can always had to niners nation dot com for all the latest news and notes after. Of course, you listen US something to watch keep your eye on George Kitto on Sunday. If he gets a hundred twelve receiving yards against the Patriots, he would pass Mike Ditka for the most receiving yards by a tight end in his first fifty games in NFL history. Something you might have missed superstar wide receiver. Antonio Brown will finish serving his latest suspension from the NFL in two weeks and according to ESPN's Adam Schefter. The seahawks are among the teams that are positioned to make a run at Antonio Brown just what the forty niners need. That's going to do it for this edition of stats and eggs lease rate review and subscribes the niners nation podcast network. You'll get this show you'll get all the great shows we offer including the gold standard podcast with myself and Levin. Black. Thin, a little different episode this week play a little true false with some questions facing the forty niners both this week and in the future. I'm ROB, Sets Guerrero we'll talk tomorrow.

rams Kyle Shanahan NFL Mike mcglinchey Rob Stats Guerrero Antonio Brown Jordan Willis Trent Williams jets cow Shanahan George Kitto Richard Sherman Kwan Alexander Philli San Francisco Tom Pell Sarah seahawks Kyle Chris Collins
Richard Hoagland 4-26-20

CATS Roundtable

11:14 min | 4 months ago

Richard Hoagland 4-26-20

"Hi. This is Jay Farner CEO rocket mortgage making the right financial decisions has never been more important. We can help guide you to those right decisions. Now when they matter most mortgage rates are near historic lows. So when you call eight three, three, eight rocket or visit us at rocket mortgage dot com to start your refinance, you'll be well on your way to saving money every month, the rate today and our thirty year fixed rate mortgage is three point three, seven, five percents APR three, point, five, nine percent right now could be a great time for you to take some positive financial steps forward with a cash-out refinance from. Rocket Mortgage, which could give you the boost that you're looking for. In addition, we may be able to help you refinance with little or no. Out of pocket costs at rocket mortgage were committed to every client every time no exceptions no excuses giving you the best mortgage experience call us today at eight three, three, eight rocket or go to rocketmortgage DOT COM to learn more rates subject to change one point eight, seven, five percents. This discounted rates call for cost information and conditions. Equal housing lender licensed in all fifty states in number. Thirty thirty Good Morning America, this is the cats round table trunk cats Matijas here. Sunday morning. Wait. Teams like this viruses going on forever and ever. With us this morning is a good friend. He's a four Richard Hoagland a former NASA consultant an advisor to warp a cronkite he had. His own radio talk show host an author, Electra, and. What's while? He tells us what really happened NASA Good Morning Richard Hoagland, how are you this morning? Good Morning. John. while. What's new I mean the world's coming to an end. And we're still looking at now spaces to see what's going on. But right now we're being invaded by viruses that are too small to fact. Viruses are always too small to fighters see hey, let me let me start with the NASA story while all this Kobe nineteen coverage twenty, four, seven going on NASA a couple of months ago put out a quiet press release which I and my colleagues sink really is a kind of a clandestine announcement. They've discovered current biological microscopic life on Mars. Let me tell you what. Hey. Over the last twenty years, we've sent all kinds of spacecraft to orbit Mars and a few years ago we sent a major you know car size, Volkswagen size, rover called curiosity to a place on Mars poll. Gale Crater. This is a very sophisticated rover. It's been climbing this very tall mountain called Mount Sharp for the last several years, and it carries in its belly all kinds of very sophisticated analytical equipment including. Capabilities of measuring the Martian atmosphere for atmospheric contents, you know atomic constituents, molecules, things like that. And they've noticed something very curious over the last several years. Methane is being released into the Martian atmosphere from some sources and methane on earth is indicative of biology. Now, you know that this is from biology until you actually land, you know men and women and have a manned expedition or have the right equipment. But what's very curious about the methane observations is that they appear to rise and fall with the seasons of Mars Mars because it's tilted on its axis just about like ears twenty five degrees has spring summer winter and fall. Well, the methane levels rise in the spring. That kind of Plateau during the summer and they decrease in the fall and winter, and then as a new Martian year begins the cycle begins all over again. Very interestingly, shall we say suspicious? Well, under this whole Kobe nineteen story, which of course is occupying everybody's attention. They issued another press release a couple of months ago saying they've got another mystery. They found that the oxygen levels and of course, terrestrial kind of life can't exist but free oxygen they found that the oxygen levels on Mars is sample by the curiosity rover are following the same pattern as the methane they're low in the winter they rise in this spring, they plateau in the summer and they decrease and go back to. Baseline in the fall and winter. Now I ran this by a very eminent astro biologists the other day on my show, the other side of midnight. His name is Dr Chandra Rick Missing. He was an old friend of my friend Arthur C. Clarke he's worked in Britain for decades looking at astro biology both and telescopic studies have interstellar clouds of dust as well as samples from you know obvious base including the weird biological life firms of rebound on the exterior of the International Space Station. You just co authored a paper with the head of the Russian investigation of that mystery and Dr Grandma's Singh when he looked at the NASA data's. We'll take us. Obvious. They've discovered life on Mars and they don't know how to tell us in fact, in the press release which I will send you the jeep investigator doctorate trae University of Michigan basically puts out a call to the general public, which is unprecedented for NASA to do basically saying we have a real mystery here. Can you help us figure out what it is? which to me, John like political double talk they know exactly what they've got because I. Know it Traya he's not a dummy. He's actually a genius and what they're doing is kind of political. You know in Washington it's called plausible deniability. They don't want to announce it themselves. They want exterior scientists and the public to basically tell them what they've got but I think. Already, outside NASA outside I will say that much that must be some kind of life. Exactly. It's called plausible deniability. You know the game and Washington I mean, this is not wash. that. Wonderful. When do you think we'll be landing. Well in terms of of funded human landings, men, women, that kind of thing probably not for another fifteen years at a minimum president trump very aggressively after you know I sent him that video briefing that we gave to. You He announced he wants to go back to the moon. In Twenty, twenty four, and of course, all the activities in terms of project Artemis. The American returned to the moon following Apollo are basically technological efforts that will go into creating a Martian expedition international expedition to send men women to Mars. So for the time being it's going to be robots remember this summer. This coming summer were sending a follow on to curiosity the person. Over, which will get there in February of twenty twenty one and that unmanned spacecraft kind of a duplicate of curiosity we'll carry instruments to actually detect life. In the soil microorganisms. So we can have confirmation of this extraordinarily announcement by NASA within a few months. It sounds Great Richard. Last time we talked we're talking about a system so was trying to use to go faster than then the rockets we have now how are they doing with that? Well, it's not nats is independent research in fact I'm pursuing. It's It's it's very exotic, very exciting. It involves the interaction of a superconducting rocket type nozzle with the ether, which is all pervading non electromagnetic medium throughout all space and time the ether exists michelson-morley experiment of a century ago did not disprove it and this technology, which of course is in its earliest primitive stage would allow you to send spacecraft all over the solar system and beyond not in years but literally months, for instance, a few weeks ago months ago. Sorry. NASA announced the new mission call dragonfly to send an unmanned spacecraft with helicopter blades to the Moon of Saturn big moon of Saturn call tighten. It won't get there for fourteen years because of the limitations of conventional rocket? Technology. If this new technology was properly developed, you could send that spacecraft to Saturn in four months. Wow. Why look forward to that I mean it's not warp speed yet but some day maybe. What else are you working on? Richard we have been a a minute or two left well, obviously, I'm totally co opted by this Kobe one, thousand, nine, hundred. And want to offer a ray of hope the big bottle Dick. Now, for the president being able to open up the economy is testing testing testing testing all the chemical tests, various fours, the scaling the supply chains, the proper regions you know swabs, stupid stuff like that. The national, institutes of health going back to nineteen ninety-one, set up a small division center called the Center for alternative and integrity of medicine which really looks totally different alternatives to pharmacology for doing mainstream medical diagnosis. One of those areas called energy medicine where you basically take a reading of the patient. Doing a voice print of their voice you just speak into a high quality microphone. A computer algorithm matches the frequencies in your voice to pre trial baseline measurements of various diseases, and you can get from simply voiceprint an accurate readout of what the patient is suffering from including covert nineteen. This needs to be trialed. It needs to be scaled up it needs to be mainstream streamline. It's the key. I think a breakthrough to noninvasive testing millions and millions of Americans and other people around the world in a noninvasive procedure, which already has remarkable information and I will send you the studies after we finish the show. I look forward to seeing them and Richard Hoagland. Anything. Else you wanNA tell American people. Yes keep up hope Americans of the best in a crisis. We can macgyver our way out of the situation we've done it before and we're GonNa do it again Richard Hoagland. Enough woman, NASA advisor, and author lecturer. Thank you so much for coming on our show and we'll catch up again real soon. Stay Safe Justice Pacu this is the cats round table. We'll be right back.

NASA Richard Hoagland Rocket Mortgage John. Kobe president America Jay Farner Washington advisor Volkswagen CEO twenty twenty Kobe radio talk show host Arthur C. Clarke Gale Crater
Robot Revolution - Best of Coast to Coast AM - 9/18/20

The Best of Coast to Coast AM

10:55 min | 4 months ago

Robot Revolution - Best of Coast to Coast AM - 9/18/20

"We can't make progress because too many of our countries rules and institutions were designed to exclude black people. We need real change. It's time to eliminate the Filibuster Makdissi Estate seriously fixed the Supreme Court and Abolish. The electoral. College. We must go in November but we need a pen of action. Now it's time to finally bill a true equal and just democracy. Paid for by just democracy support for this podcast comes from at and T. throughout history switching to new technology wasn't complicated ancient Roman. Akwa ducks made water fast, reliable, secure, and nationwide electricity made candles fast reliable, secure and nationwide. Today we have a t and t five G.. It's fast reliable, secure and nationwide put into a historical context. Yet Scott of a no-brainer at and T. Five G. It's not complicated. Five requires compatible plan may not be in your area see att dot com slash five G. for you for details Mel. Here's a highlight. From coast to coast am on iheartradio, Dennis combines is recognized as a leader in robotics education. His approach to teaching robotics has helped thousands of students and he's also trained hundreds of teachers helping them understand best practices for teaching robotics. He's frequently invited to present at educational conferences and his presentation preparing students for a robotic future has been described as transformational and something. Every educator needs to hear Dennis's innovative approach strategies have helped educators of all levels, deliver inspiring world-class robotics, and programming education. Hey, Dennis. Welcome to coast to coast. Am How are you? I'm doing really great. Richard Harrow. Terrific. Thank you. First of all I have to ask how can I be certain that I'm not talking to some artificial intelligence or an intelligent robot? That that's a tough one. Now, they pass the turing test so. You know just you'll just have to judge me as we go along. All right. All right. I'm guessing probably amendment we we interact with technology that may not look like robots but but perhaps they qualify as robots for example I'm thinking of things like Siri or Google or a self driving car. or all those things they would they count as robots I mean, what makes a robot a robot? I would say those are our robots or at least mostly you know in in the same spirit as robots. and to me. The Litmus test is you know robotics is really how your computer interacts. With the physical world around it. and. So a robot has to have a processor like a computer. It has to have sensors, we can sense its environment. And it has to have the ability to physically interact. And when we think about robotics under. That framework. There's robots all around us even simple things as simple as. Doors that open for you at the mall when you walk up. He's a sensor it. You know it sees motion. That gets registered by the process or the processor says, okay. Well, when there's motion, I opened the doors. So that would be a very, very basic robotic application. But then we get to the point where. You know a car would be a robot and I think that that's kind of changing the way people. View robotics. We've always viewed a role as A. Thing you know a giant machine that's making a car or You know even a humanoid robot we don't think about larger things like vehicles or buildings as being robots. But there are buildings where the whole building will be a smart building and would really be you know could be defined as a robotic application itself. Right. Now you you're an educator. So you you meet and you speak with teachers across North America I'm guessing also political leaders. and what is what is your pitch to them? What are you? What is your call to action to these to these individuals? There are some really. Troubling misconceptions about the changes that are coming. You know a lot of times when we think about artificial intelligence. People are concerned about the singularity or you know robots and artificial intelligence intelligence becoming self aware. But the truth is. That we have reached a level of sophistication in our artificial intelligence now. Where we are already going to start to see. Significant societal impacts. And so a lot of times people are thinking about. As some fantastical science fiction thing. The. Real world consequences for what we already have out there. Are Dramatic we're talking about. Massive job loss. And we're talking about. the social challenges that come with that. You know massive new opportunity as well. We can get into those statistics but. It's really a scenario where the you know we're on the brink of. The largest workforce and societal transition in the history of mankind. And by and large people don't understand what's coming. So people aren't preparing for it. and. What kind of reaction are you getting to people get angry when when you deliver this rather ominous news? Some do you know some some some respond? Really really badly I can recall I was talking with a teacher at a conference. In New Jersey and I was explaining these changes that are coming you know the forecast for job loss and She got so angry at me she started the physically shake. And then she said to me, you are the worst form of person profiteering off the demise of mankind and she walked away. And that was the first. kind of really bad interaction had. And it really it really jolted me. But the next day. She came back and found me. And she said, I just want to apologize for. You know what I said and how I had reacted. The things you were telling me all true, and it was really impacting me badly and. So I apologize for what I said and thank you for having the fortitude. To stand in there and keep delivering this message because this is a message. Everybody needs to understand. So let's talk a little bit about the numbers here. We've got a few minutes before the break. We'll continue after the break as well on this tugging at this threat but the. You talked about this massive job displacement. That's coming our way. Let's talk about north. America. So Canada the United States, how many? How many people? How many of us will be replaced by a robot? So. The the quick and easy number is there a forecast that show up to forty percent? Which represents sixty million people losing their employment? And there's a real critical distinction that we have to understand. We talk about losing your employment to a robot. This is not job loss to a recession. Either jobs that are be eliminated. permanently. This isn't something that the government can go. You know we'll do a stimulus package and Help the truckers to get back to work. We have to understand that if you're A, you know a truck driver bus driver cabdriver, you're working in retail or the hospitality industry. These changes will eliminate your jobs. And then we have to think about what the societal cost is of all these people losing their jobs, the societal cost of retraining them. And there's another big staff that is really important. It's not just about the jobs that are going away. The World Economic Forum is also forecasting I guess they're released a report in two thousand eighteen. That forecast by the year twenty, twenty two. So, we're two years away from that now a year and a half away. By, the year twenty, twenty, two, a minimum of fifty, four percent of adults we're going to need significant, retraining and upskilling. To remain competitive. Now the cost in the US to do that is been pegged at about thirty four, billion close to twenty, five, thousand, two person. And so we start to think about these numbers. And they're. They're almost incomprehensibly large. So. We have to think about what that looks like for the individual people. And know not trying to pick on people in the transportation industry but. Let's just distill this down for second because a Lotta Times people hear statistics. And they can't comprehend it. So if you're a trucker bus driver cabdriver and you lose your employment. You know, let's forecast five years out you lose your employment. You, come home on a Tuesday afternoon you're on the couch like Oh okay. Now what am I gonNA do? Well. So you start going. Okay. I don't you know if you've been a truck driver for twenty years, you probably don't have any high tech skills to take the new world jobs are also coming. So you start going. Okay. What could I do? Well, maybe I'll get a job in retail but retail is being hammered like technology. You can't get a job there when to get a job in hospitality hospitality is getting hammered by this technology. Significant job loss waiters, waitresses, chef, and so. You start to recognize that this person is going to quickly go I'm in a lot of trouble. and. That's what we have to understand is going to happen not once not ten times. Sixty million times. And we have to start preparing for this right. Now, listen to more coast to coast. AM every weeknight at one am eastern and go to coast to coast am dot com for more high coast-to-coast listeners. It's eleven eleven pm in an underground bunker somewhere in Los Angeles and we're the hosts of night call a Colin show for our dystopia. In reality, we're three friends who every Monday to take your calls and emails about new conspiracies, Internet weirdness, and the increasingly sci-fi world we live in having a strange day or a lonely night. Give tonight call at one to four, zero, four, six night you can listen to night call on the iheartradio APP apple podcasts or wherever you get your podcasts.

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Nobel Perspectives: Can people be nudged into better behaviour?

Monocle 24: The Bulletin with UBS

14:21 min | 1 year ago

Nobel Perspectives: Can people be nudged into better behaviour?

"Uh. This is the latest in a series of documentaries, from the bulletin with UBS monocle twenty four in this very special episode of the program. We once again, gathering Nobel perspectives from some of those brilliant, laureates and economic sciences with whom UBS works to shine a light on the complexities and challenges fast changing world today, we're asking can people be nudged into better behavior? We'll hear from to extraordinary laureates Daniel Carmen and Richard failure each of whom can leverage, a wealth of experience, expertise, and intellectual rigor to drive the discourse on behavioral economics. Now, I'm like classical economic theory behavioral economics. Studies the decisions of individuals not based on the assumption of rationality, but on the basis of cultural and social factors as well as psychological insights, Daniel common was awarded the Nobel prize in twenty two because he was among the first to integrate psychological research. Search on decision-making into economic science common author of the twenty seven bestseller thinking fast and slow remembers when behavioral economics started in its modern form. It began in a bar they must use an eye, and Eric Wanner. We met in a bar and Eric Wanner told us that he wanted to bring psychology and economics together. I remember gave him two comments. The first one was that there was no way could spend a lot of money on that project. Honestly, and the second piece of advice with that he should look for economists who were interested in psychology, and he should support then. That's what he did. Eric Wanner became the president of the Russell sage foundation, and the first grand, they gave was to dick failure to spend a year with me in some ways that was the beginning of behavioral economics, despite some skepticism from traditional economics. A success story. Began. Conman says it was not so much down to him in his colleague and partner in crime amasis risky, although they were certainly involved. There were other people, equally important quite likely without even realizing the importance of their actions, conham, again, we get a think more credit than we deserve. There's somebody else deserves credit for behavior economics. Although I'm sure he doesn't mention it does one of his major. Chievements stroz Stiglitz, Joe Stiglitz with the editor of the journal, economic perspectives, and Joe Stiglitz invited. Dick failure to write the regular column. In that journal and failed chose the would anomalies. That is challenges, the theory, it was always funny. It was always easy to read, and it was in some way, devastating to some piece of theory that had enormous impact on the acceptance of behavioral economics. So what Richard failure, the twenty seventeen warriors voice from whom. We've heard on this program discussing his focus on decision making and his wider work in behavioral economics. He's circumspect about the role. He played despite his innovations in space, and condoms, belief, I always say that. I don't think I changed anybody's mind people. Don't change their minds about nothing. So I took this strategy of corrupting the youth and trying to get young communists, excited and interested. I'm sure lots of graduate students and new assistant professors were reading these and say, oh, that's cool. Maybe. Work on that. The tune behavior economics as this now, understood it's primarily because of nudges. You're trying to make it easier for people to decide what they would decide is they were thinking broadly. That is really the key Richard Taylor has a good example to share when it comes to the overall principle of nudging, it's the cafeteria at the university, where he teaches the Chicago booth school of business. If we went downstairs to our cafeteria there, several stations that you can get food, and you have to walk around the salad bar to get to the burgers, and fries, this is an example of how something that seemingly is in very important may influence, what people eat nudge, people to eat something healthy. If you. Discover that, that cinnamon roll you were about to buy as thousand calories, you might say, oh, well, maybe that banana looks good within. And without the profession, people arguing that everyone should be able to act as a free agent and should be left to make his or her own decisions. They explains, however, this is no contradiction to the concept of nudging. There has to be a menu. There has to be a design of that cafeteria. Why make it a good? One people say were bossing people around which we're not there's always opt out in the policies. We designed the analogy with, like is to GPS. I have the world's worst sense of direction. So wandering around in a strange city, I'm doomed now, think about GPS the user chooses the destination. And the map helps you get there and allows you to take a detour. If you're driving in, you see. Nice view, pullover GPS never yells at you. Right. It's not a backseat driver. So imagine that we can have GPS for life that just made getting where you want to go easier, without ever commanding that you must do something. That'd be great, Richard Thaler. The first so-called nudge, unit was founded by Fulmer prime Minister David Cameron here in the UK in twenty ten hundreds of others followed around the world today. It's difficult for phthalates keep track of all the studies that have been conducted. But he remembers one in particular that shows the impact nudging can have people's health. I'll tell you one study. I saw recently that. I liked quite a lot. There's an opioid crisis in the United States, people get addicted to painkilling drugs. There have been many deaths. There are lots of things one can do one simple change is to take one of our usual tricks, change the default, suppose you had some surgery, and you'd get a prescription for these painkillers just changing the default size of the first prescription can help. Maybe just give them ten and say they can call and renew if they're having a lot of pain, a recent study, did something clever, which is anytime. A patient died of a drug overdose. They sent a note to the doctor who had originally prescribed the pain medicine, and what they found is those doctors started reducing their use of these drugs. So this is giving feedback the nudge, feedback faily explains, that there are many Everyday Health examples that also use modern technology to nudge people into behavior. Take, for instance, the smartwatch, it will keep track of the steps you've taken if the end of the day, it looks like you've barely gotten out of your chair than the. Watch will say time to stand up. It's just the beginning. It can measure your heartbeat and do a primitive EKG. If we try to imagine what this technology will be ten years from now, even five years from now likely for many people, there will be chip somewhere inside their body that communicating with the watch or whatever their technology already exists to monitor blood sugar for people with diabetes, and to administer the blood sugar. So that's going beyond djing. Right. That's just taking over. But in many cases that's just what we want just like self driving cars. If we can have self-driving medications the easiest way that we. We could save money on healthcare would be if we could get people to just take their medicines until the time that we add minister that drug automatically your watch good. Remind you that, hey, you forgot to take your heart meds this morning. The notion of Moton economics, helping to combat climate change has become more important, especially after last year's Nobel prize was awarded to William note house for his work on integrating climate change into economic analysis failure shares. The view expressed by many of his fellow economists. There's no one silver bullet. The closest thing we have comes from completely traditionally, conomic, most places tax alcohol and cigarettes. We should be taxing carbon carbon Texas are a good idea because there are lots of things that we. I need money for in our country. We have bridges that are ready to fall into rivers if we raise gasoline, taxes and use that to build better roads and bridges. That would be good. The same is true for congestion taxes, and New York seems now ready to do this London has been doing it for quite a while. Singapore was the pioneer, and they're sensually is no traffic in Singapore. So that's step one. Let's raise the price of using the thing that's causing harm. But there's technology and behavioral enhancements that can work well around the edges fairly easy, an example, that almost anyone could probably relate to especially on a hot summer day thermostats, modern thermostats, no-one you're there when you're not, and they reduce utilize. You could imagine a thermostat that on a hot day when you turn the thermostat down a degree or two, it's as this is going to cost, you ten dollars, you know, some to you. Go for it. These are all little things. But the only way we're going to deal with climate change is get the price, right? And then a lot of little things fail. It uses the endowment effect which described his work to further illustrate how to lead people into green behavior. The domino effect refers to the fact that once we have something we're reluctant to give it up with the use of proper framing. We could remind people how glorious our planet is. And they'd like to keep it look advertising works. And so the same strategies that firms use to get you to buy their products could be employed to nudge people to keep the planet going a little bit longer images of ice. Bergs the size of small countries falling off the Antarctica and. Arctic may help Daniel Komen picks up on this point, the assumption of rationality means that you should not into the in people's lies and people's decisions. But it's more complicated than that. The who point of numbers that people do decide for themselves. You always have true socket. There's no way that you can allow people to choose without structuring their choice. People are not opposed to the idea of others helping them structure their choices in, in their own interest. And that's Daniel, conman concluding another special Nobel perspectives edition of the bulletin with UBS on, Monaco, twenty four to read more from and about the laureates anti-disorder, how Nobel perspectives shape, the UBS worldview, head to UBS dot com slash Nobel. Keep an eye and an on this program in the months ahead as we enjoy more access to the brilliant insight. It's the Nobel laureates we've more specials and documentaries install. But if that's to, to wait dip into mix videos and articles at UBS Nobel hop the bulletin with UBS monocle twenty four. Are you interested in learning? More about female leaders in economics, UBS, Impala ship with independent, nonprofit network the center for economic policy research brings you women in echo makes an expansion of the bank's ongoing Nobel perspectives program. We'll be featuring women in economics on future editions of this show. Be you can find out more right now. Head to UBS dot com food slash. W. I A.

UBS Eric Wanner Nobel prize UBS Nobel Daniel Richard Joe Stiglitz UBS Daniel Carmen Richard Thaler Richard Taylor drug overdose Chievements stroz Stiglitz Russell sage foundation Texas Dick Nobel
Short Stuff: Black Cowboys

Stuff You Should Know

15:40 min | 4 months ago

Short Stuff: Black Cowboys

"Hey and welcome to the short stuff I'm Josh and there's shock who knows where Jerry is but this is short stuff. So it doesn't matter because we can handle it ourselves with a little assist by our friend. Dave couse. Stain. Yeah. I don't think do we. We don't shout out Dave enough. Not Nearly enough as a matter of fact, just make this episode US talking about how Great Davis. Right the original black cowboy. That's right. But totally wrong. But it was a it was a decent attempt at a segue. Yes because we all know the original black cowboy was sheriff bartend blazing saddles. Yeah. I forgot about that movie that's a is that a good one I mean it's a classic it couldn't be made today. Sure. But you know written by Mel Brooks and the Great Richard. Pryor and think those one other writer. But yeah, they played that for comedy in that movie. But as it turns out, there were a lot of black cowboys in the United States in just don't see a bunch of movies and TV shows where they're represented Shaq Shaq but they I, mean there are some statistics that say. Twenty five percent or more of Al all cowboys. After the civil war in the wild west where these black men out there like how he stuff working hard roping cattle doing all the things that you see in the movies. Yeah like the idea from what I can tell from the research, is that the popular conception of cowboys and cowboy life and what cowboys did is fairly accurate but the the race of them in off that that the the just the fact that black people were not all represented among cowboys in the popularization of cowboy life. Back East is just that's the historical misunderstanding that apparently even before the civil war most black cowboys according to one historian of the American West, most of them most of the cowboys were black in that it was a job that was open to enslaved people basically and that if you were white, you didn't want to be known as a cowboy that. That job was potentially beneath you or whatever. Even though it was all about Bronco Busting, you know herding cattle and Lhasa Wing and stuff like that. All the stuff we think of with with cowboys today But that the that transition between being from something that may that was like beneath a a white guy out west to something that was a coveted title among white guys was when back East people started here about cowboys and say those that's cool. What a cool life, and then all of a sudden white guys were like Oh actually I I'm a cowboy now you can count me in. Yeah. I mean I think that that name at least according to this historian as racist in nature. because the the white workers wanted to be called cal punches or Callahan's. and. The black men were called cowboys and like you said once they once lor hit back east they they jumped on that cowboy train 'cause I guess that word took in it sounded cool. Yeah. The thing is I went and tried to corroborate that elsewhere because it makes sense if you take it from that standpoint that is actually cowboy actually has like a denigrating origin but I did not see that anywhere else and I couldn't find the difference between a cowhand and a cowboy. The are completely interchangeable from what I can tell definition wise. But I don't know maybe that just that at a molly got lost a history you know well, Larry Kelly's runs the Black Cowboy Museum Texas and Rosenberg. And we want to credit him with saying that since he's He's where we got it. Yep here. Larry here's the limb. Go out on. So the idea of by cowboys. Cowboys in general really kind of came out of this migration of southerners especially southern whites moving out West Texas for the chance for cheap land wide open spaces the promise of a new chance for a fortune because the south had had really become industrialized as far as agrarianism is concerned in Texas had a lot of opportunity especially if you're willing to push Spanish settlers and indigenous people from Mexico off of their land, you could really make make a name. For yourself in Texas, a lot of those white settlers brought enslaved people with them and they were the earliest black cowboys out there. Yeah. Because what happened was you know you're in Texas, you get roped into the confederacy and then these white people who moved out west co- back east to fight in the civil war they left the people that they enslave behind to keep the ranch going basically right and those that was sort of the beginning of the black cowboy movement. It really was what's interesting is that it was triggered by the civil war that that the civil war created that kind of niche and require in need sorry that need for cowboys of all stripes. But that they that typically fell to African Americans who who were doing this work while the whites were off fighting the war and then when the the war was over when. The the white confederates came back to Texas. They're like, Hey, I don't know if you heard or not, but we're free now. So you have to pay us for this work and because a lot of herds had been broken up loss, there was a lot of work to be done getting these herds back in order and getting Texas back up and running economy wise especially with cattle hurting. Yes. So maybe let's take a break and we'll talk about some of the more famous of these black cowboys right after this. Hey. Everybody. Today's episode is sponsored by the new Mazda C X thirty. So lately, we've been trying to do our part to be cautious and do what we can for public health. So we've been cooped up in the house a lot not a getting out a lot Robert. Is there anything you kind of miss about the about the road trip or going? On long drives. Well, I have to say there is something really cool about having a long drive. Hopefully, you know like driving through the mountains or something and you get to really dive into a particular album you know just really experience it beginning to end while taking in the scenery also a great time for the children to learn about metal machine music. So. When Miles Gray and I drove the Mazda C X thirty from Palm Desert San Diego I really enjoyed the scenery along the way and I feel like the car itself helped a lot with that like the interior of the car is crafted with what they call an essential EST approach. So well, it's got a lot of features like in Car Wifi, vehicle status navigation displays, etc. It really doesn't feel crammed with distracting lights in visual. Decoy. And speaking of features, the six thirty also has a really good factory soundsystem. They loaded the car up with some high definition sample tracks for us to try like we listen to Daft punk and that sounded great for everybody else if you want more information on Mazda and the first ever Mazda C X Thirty, you can find it online at Mazda USA dot com slash Iheart, or better yet see it in person at a Mazda dealership near you. Six bought the sixty second hand but get this. They're only using twenty seconds because that's was citric does it creates technology that gives you time back. So you can focus on what matters that's right. There's a new world of work being built. Citric can't wait to show you just visit citric dot com slash stuff. All right. So if you look at the history books in TV shows and movies, you hear a lot about. Wild Bill Hickok and any Oakley and all these sort of legendary wild west figures You don't hear as much about the black cowboys who were also legendary figures just in the same way like they would. You know some of them were bad guys who would shoot up a saloon and have a gunfight in the middle of the street at high noon. many of them obviously were just regular cowboys. He did hard work day and night rustling cattle some of them also chuck or even lawman to there was a guy named Bass Reeves who was the first? african-american Marshall US Marshal West of the Mississippi, and he had a thirty two year career and apparently was so morally unimpeachable that some people insists he was the the model for the. Lone. Ranger. Net. Crazy. It is. I have to tell you. I grew up on the lone ranger, the nineteen, eighty, two or three movie. Oh, the movie. Okay. Yeah. It inform my childhood is the TV show to a place that and everything that was a big time into the lone ranger. I. Watched that movie within the last couple of months it is one of the most boring movies I've ever seen in my life. Hold up does it I was like my parents must have been like what is wrong with this kid? This movie is just like watching paint dry. Five parts that are that are. Interesting and the rest is like just slowly stream together those parts is really weird and the the chemistry is like, Baking Soda and Baking Soda. Like, nobody has any. Like my it means that there's nothing hang. There's no reaction I. Tell You what I love about that movie is that that Color Blue of his outfit? It's The star of the movie basically. Yeah. Color of his hat to because it was white but it wasn't stark White House for this. White Yeah he had a tinge of badness to him. But I, guess not another famous black cowboy from back in the day was a man named bows I card He is in the hall of fame at the National Multicultural Western Heritage Museum, and Hall of Fame, God bless the people who founded that know and he was the right hand man to one Colonel Charles Goodnight. He was a big super successful cattleman in Texas and apparently if you've ever read or seen lonesome dove Larry mcmurtry. So sort of classic Western I never have the The character of Joshua defeats was based on him played by none other than Danny Glover who was not too old for that death. Who is what? He was not too old for that S. that's the big. Too Old for this s o those great joke. I'm sorry. Repeat it. That's all right. So there's another one named, Bill Pickett. who was a very famous Rodeo he he was one of the first african-american Rodeo men I guess and he invented the the sport of steer wrestling, which is where you ride up alongside a st year and growing by the horns and drag him to the ground us at least here it's really awful especially when you on you understand what he came up with just it's called bulldogging where is a technique that he would? Feel, the steer with pain by biting its lip and he was inspired by watching dogs, herd cattle. So he tried it himself. He's like this really works but. He was a genuine trailblazer in the Rodeo world and despite the fact that he was barred from competing in Rodeos even though he was among the best that Rodeos were segregated for very long time, and if you were an African American, Rodeo Cowboy you had to compete either late at night or early in the morning before the actual Rodeo started or else you might have your own rodeo altogether I mentioned outlaws. There was a man name I summer Isam Dart. he was an enslaved person who who went the other way and he was a horse thief like so many other horse thieves he would steal horses and cattle in Mexico drive across that big old Rio Grande River Selam off in Texas and like so many outlaws he was he was shot down by a hired gun in this case. Tom Horn. And I'm thinking of movies I think there have been a couple of movies where they. Did represent these black cowboys, but it always seemed like these movies were sort of A. Not, a trick but just kind of like a like stunt casting like you're GonNa make a movie with black cowboys how different instead of wealth is just like any other western because this is how it was exactly and I'm sure that they were all just left out of the history books because some oversight but I'm glad we're here correcting today. We're trying our best. There's also we would be very terribly remissed if we didn't mention the most famous black cowboy of all time one nate love known as Deadwood Dick and he's nat no, it's not I. SP- specifically saw in a couple of places in fight. Yeah. His name was he was born Daniel and I guess they just didn't feel like adding the which is significant because he was. taught to read and write despite being born enslaved has father taught him to read and write. So he was educated enough that he actually wrote his autobiography in one thousand, nine, hundred, nineteen, seven. I. I should have just kept it as nineteen seven that sounded kind of old timey but chuck I think you need to read everybody the the title and know that there is not single Colin founded. Yeah. It's life and adventures of Nat love and it's spelled NATO, in his. Autobiography Titus where it's nate. Well, I'm looking at the book cover. I. Know I'm telling you pronounced nate. Okay. But. There is no. I just want to point out to people. Live in adventures. Of Blank love better known in the cattle country as deadwood. Dick by himself colon a true history of slavery days life on the great cattle ranges and on the planes of the wild and Willey West based on facts and personal experiences by the author. There is a coal and I thought that was a semi colon. There's always a colon isn't there seems to be, but he was like you were describing like he would get in shootouts and he was kind of known as a abandoned her an outlaw in some circles but from what I can tell us just legitimate bona fide cowboy and he led a cowboy life like any other cowboy would fantastic. It really is fantastic. Very, very big self promoter like so many of those cowboys back then yeah for sure they say that they're not entirely certain where fact. Departs from fiction in his autobiography, but it's apparently a heck of a read. So go check it out. and I guess I said check it out, which means that that short stuff is out. It's out. Stuff you should know is production of iheartradio's how stuff works for more podcasts from iheartradio visit, the iheartradio APP apple podcasts, or wherever you listen to your favorite shows.

Texas Mazda Black Cowboy Museum Texas Dave couse Great Davis Mexico American West Josh Mel Brooks United States Bill Hickok Jerry iheartradio West Texas Lhasa Wing Bass Reeves White House Larry nate
The Trump Impeachment Story Is Unfolding

Trumpcast

22:51 min | 1 year ago

The Trump Impeachment Story Is Unfolding

"On Thursday the Inspector General testified before the House Intelligence Committee stating that the Acting Director of national intelligence box him from I'm disclosing the whistleblower complaint. This is a violation of law. We're supporting a country. We WanNa make make sure that countries honest. It's very important to talk about corruption though agree reputable publications looked at the charge that has been and made against me. I found the basis on true without merit. That's not about to stop him. Hello and welcome to trump cast. I'm Virginia Heffernan. WH- nothing happened today says another sleepy day waiting for wait data's second that's right. She announced an impeachment inquiry to begin post haste very exciting and I can't suppress sir my enthusiasm and also my I don't know how quite to describe it in something offended very poignant also to see the Senate vote all together in one invoice for a resolution to have this whistle blower information released it may not mean anything but it had some symbolic power to it to see Republicans and Democrats voting for something sane at the same time very powerful so to talk about this extraordinary breaking news. We have a great breaking guest the founder of trump cast Jacob Weisberg. I'm going to give Jacob a call. We're GONNA talk this out. We haven't talked about trump in months so this this is a great time for us to come together and figure out where things stand and Jacobs getting us his incredibly good strategic mind figure out where things go from here. I'll we'll be back with breaking news with Jacob in just a minute but first the breaking tweets Pelosi shifts. FBI maxine waters. Can you believe this set good journey pump received permission from Ukraine government drill release the transcript of the telephone call. I add with their president. They don't know either with the big dailies a total scam scam by the Democrats such an important day at the U N so much work and so much success and the Democrats scratch perk ruin and the main it with some breaking news a witch hunt garbage so bad for and the Democrats are so focused on hurting the Republican Party and the president that they are unable to get anything done because of it including legislation on good safety lory prescription drug praises infrastructure intact so for country I'm currently at the United Nations representing our country but have authorized release tomorrow of the complete fully addict classified n unredacted transcript of my phone governor session with President Dolinsky of Ukraine. You'll see it was a very friendly and donnelly appropriate. Call no pressure and I like Joe Biden and his son no quid rope okay well. This is nothing more than a continuation of the greatest and most destructive which I'm a Jacob pay worker. TRUMP CAST IS FIDDLE AL Virginia. I think trump castle started talking about impeachment in about March twenty seventeen back in the day Virginia. We did a lot of shows on impeachment. Remember not no question of what the real grounds are and It's interesting how quickly this Ukraine thing has turned into the leading case. I think it's partly because it's a neat little package. It's comprehensible you know sort of looks like it might be the open and shut case and it's also kind of a wonderful irony that the reality star President would be undone by his outrageous request to another reality be star President of another. Yes that's right. The irony is compound. It must be up to some kind of exponential level of irony that not even Jacques Derrida could've could've imagined so go back to some of those early conversations and shows you did about impeachment in March of twenty seventeen and thereafter. I remember that there was a discussion discussion what high crimes and misdemeanors really are remind me of what you concluded in those days yeah well. I think high crime misdemeanors are not the same as Timbo bowl criminal offenses in the there are criminal offenses that are not impeachable offenses and there are presidential abuses that aren't crimes but that are digital and I think fundamentally what high crimes and misdemeanors means in the constitutional context is the abuse of official power so for example if you know the president got drunk in punch somebody might be a crime of assault but it likely wouldn't be an impeachable offense dance because it's not a it's not an abuse of his office whereas taking advantage of his office to enrich himself might not be technically a crime of bribery or corruption but would I think be an impeachable offense and you know this. I think is probably well based on what we know about but at this the newest incidents I'm fall clearly falls into the category of abuse of power whether would be a separate criminal l'offensive is a kind of different question but isn't essential for to be an impeachable offense so it partly he couldn't have made these calls on this deal with you purse and thus could deprive Ukraine of American support and he he had to be able to get the president on the phone which comes with his office so those are in two ways that this was very much related to his office. Yeah it seems to me that just asking for criminal investigation of someone in the family of a political lupone ed whether he threatened or conditioned aid. I mean he did any of that. It takes it to just the next level of outrage but so I mean we're so inured with trump to you know things that would be inconceivable when that with any other President I mean thank you if Nixon who we've ignition would be capable of a lot even if you find out that Nixon had called another world leader and asked for the investigation of Musky or one of his probable opponents in nineteen seventy two forget any frats forget any bribes forget any inducements shortly that would have been an article of impeachment and it would have been article of impeachment on par with others about it using the CIA the FBI and the IRS and other organs of government to harass investigate has his political opponents. I mean just satis shocking and you know it's amazing how quickly with we're looking for a smoking gun. That goes beyond that. I don't think we need a smoking gun biggest beyond that I mean I think backfired fell is a extreme and also cut and dried abuse of residents power. Yes absolutely at one of the things that comes up the when we think well what if Obama or what if Richard Nixon had done. XYZ It makes us imagine that that that this other other hypothetical crime happened sort of out of nowhere but part of the reason that it's taken until now I think for an impeachment inquiry creative formerly begin is that we've blown past so many other crimes I mean how far back was it that we've sort of hit the Whitewater water standard for corruption with this president and as you say that has endured us so much that something and it wasn't the mole report had had to somehow cut through the noise and make us you know all the better I are pile up but make us crossed the Rubicon or cross the red line or the other shoe due to drop or whatever and somehow it was this so you say it's especially graphic for the public and we know that Pelosi wanted a good story for the people so we can all understand what was happening but I don't quite get the motor report had plenty of good stories for the people but somehow that became too complex or too easily obscured by bar. You and I haven't even talk since the mother apart drops so I guess I'll make the question more specific. Why do you think the Miller report didn't do it and this did will the strongest evidence. The report was about the obstruction of justice but the evidence about the underlying crime with short of cotton dried up the president's people and his son took the meeting with the Russian agent but it's you know there was no it wasn't clear I mean there was not evidence direct evidence evidence that they conspired with Russia to intervene in the election what the what they did was acted like they were guilty a- and add something to cover up and you know. I think the sort of cover up around them big. US crime is always is always a little dubious. It's not clear clear that in the criminal analogy prosecutor does charge that person so. I don't know it was complex. I mean I'm not sure that the mother report yielded clarity clarity about impeachment impeachable offenses. I think there were other cholera impeachable offenses going back to earlier in the President Sake but Speaker Pelosi has until now made the political judge bed that it was not in the Democrats interest to move ahead with impeachment of trump and and maybe that's because trump himself seems to think that impeachment is in his political interest I mean he was he was trying to cord provoke it for awhile very actively not really seemed if you were filing tweets a few months back he was really daring the Democrats to impeach him seemingly because he believes it would help you know in Pelosi sort of agreed right at now earth plus. He's changed her view on that or if she simply can't fight it anymore. The evidence is too powerful join Jay Street for their National Conference taking place October Twenty Six th through the twenty nineth in Washington Winton D. C. J. Street is the political home for pro Israel Pro Peace Americans. The organization is redefining. What it means to be pro Israel at the conference you'll join thousands of activists who are standing up to trump and Netanyahu fighting for democratic values and working toward a better future for both Israelis and Palestinians and you'll see the host of Pod. Save the world interviewing twenty twenty candidates about their foreign policy visions. You can lend more and register for the conference inference at J Street Dot Org Slash Conference use code slate for twenty percent off what she used to say that he was self impeaching shing and to some extent it seems like given his full-throated Confront Confession around this phone call following his is what looks like obstruction of justice with deny in the whistle blower. It looks like she may have been right in that reading that he was. He was somehow impeaching himself off now. Whether whether or not trump is doing that because it's shrewdly in his complex interest is counterintuitive as it may seem for him to come under impeachment and thus maybe motivators Base I. I'm not sure I think self impeaching is probably closer to you know self-destruction self deporting awarding that's right self deporting. Let me do this favor. I'll help you out here in any case. What do you think of these committees that are all going to be part of this. I mean there's having the how seeming so divided for so long about impeachment and seeming to equivocate and temporizing now she's got. Pelosi has all the committees on board. She thanked everyone one by name. The allstars comings and chef and so forth. What is this going to look like well. I think you consolidated impeachment in at least based on on previous precedent president so you'll have one committee that leads the angry they have to draft articles of impeachment and I think one question is do want a shorter bill of impeachment impeachment at trying to move it through faster or does this now become a way to open up. The question of a full rage trump's trump's potential impeachable offenses. You're not quite as like chops licking as I am but what would you like to see a short and sweet and devastating articles the articles of impeachment or would you like to see every single thing in there like some intern has every receipt and you know there's not going to be a day that doesn't come under scrutiny. Do you WanNa see an omnibus or you want to see something that is guaranteed to get you know a quick vote and register with the people and probably a little more on the omnibus omnibus side. I mean in the question of sort of impeachment is political act persons impeachment as a civic responsibility by the Congress recites the responsibility side I mean I I generally take view that if the president is abused his power Congress needs to impeach him whether or not it serves the political interests of the Democrats I sort of thanks think loves the chips fall where they may not it's partly because I don't buy into the the dancy policy the conventional wisdom about the risks that impeachable backfire Michigan Backfire it arguably backfired with Clinton at arguably didn't backfire as much as some people think it did but I think that's fighting last war would just now. I have to thank him impeachment in great that goes on into the election election season. I can't see how that helps trump. It's the front you know lead story. Every day is the is the testimony. The state of the inquiry trump doesn't doesn't have a primary challenge. I mean I think this is. I don't think it helps trump. We don't know exactly how it plays out but I'd say we're doing it. Let's do it right leads really consider what impeachable offenses he's committed and have a full articles of impeachment that include all of the convincing issues. I absolutely really feel that way too because having smashed to smithereens so many of the president's here we need to reestablish those presidents around emoluments around a smaller kind of violations around hatchback violations. I mean just to just to have in the record that these things that are somewhere between ethical professional and criminal violations at least have been noticed because I don't know the gas lighting of this presidency has partly been just as they say trample on all the norms that it would it'd be nice to see that this thing formerly reported yeah and you know I think there's some ones that are a little more theoretical too but no no less important I mean the president's words the constitution which includes the First Amendment delineating the role of the of the free press. I think arguably the president attacks on the press constitute an abusive authority and violation of his oath to the constitution weather whether you know the legal scholars will fully support that I'm not sure but I think when you come back to the fundamental question that impeachment is meant to address that is the constitutional responsibility of the Chief Executive and the abuse about authority those a lot that you can get into that goes beyond petty corruption option that goes beyond her ask of political opponents about those those are obviously central you know. Senator Michael Bennet was saying this exact thing on TV today day that as a kind of side of this we just got the news last night that to reporters Egypt including your friend and Mine David Kirkpatrick the US the US government trump turned his back on them when they were in trouble for writing like bad things about the Egyptian government and ultimately one of them had to be bailed out by his of the Irish government and so you know the the abuses of the press and violations of First Amendment that I know are really important to you are are in increasingly graphic detail. I think that's on a lot of people's minds and you know everyone has an issue here. There's obviously you know war crimes at the border human rights violations so as you say I hope it makes it in in there because it is our civic responsibility and I agree politics be damned. I mean I almost wanted. I had someone to say like Justin Amash. I don't care if I get reelected. At this point. We need to stop this president and he will be very much slowed down with an impeachment inquiry. He'll have to respond to subpoenas. There'll be much more pressure on him and his people to respond to subpoenas. It'll be as you say above the fold every day and he will also not be getting on the phone with the head Ukraine to dig dirt on Joe Biden Anytime soon but it's you know but it is crucial Virginia that it'd be a legal legal process and not political process in a lot of things you could that were furious at trump about that you know Democrats might be tempted to sort sort of throw in the mix some of the stuff around the border but I think you just have to focus very clearly on the question of what is an impeachable offense dance and impeccable indictment of the president impact will in the sense that it will be shameful for Republicans not to vote for it even even though none of them will vote for it because you don't want to give them the legitimate argument that the political indictment legal indictment that seems right and I'm glad one of us is capable of keeping our head clear on making that distinction thing the Senate unanimous vote on this resolution listen to have the turnover this reports from the whistle blower that brought all this to our attention and then and then yielded all this reporting about the call to Ukraine. I found that incredibly moving today. I didn't think for a second but there would be Republicans sport much less. Republicans were from McConnell Senate for for anything to do with this. I expected to see obstruction style moves again. Don't look to close at this. Let's move on and then we have that vote today. I I found that very moving. Did you yeah but it's like the Congress having to pass the resolution to tell the president to give the State of Union address or path or submit a budget well. Actually that's not the aren't great examples because I'm not sure those are legal responsibilities in the same way the president but this is a this is the executive branch is legally obligated negated to do this. I think where trump does reclosing some republicans for his where he so clearly defies the the institutional prerogatives and authority of Congress because the Republicans are are deferential trump in women's about trump but but they still they don't want Congress to lose power in relation to the presidency in general because the next president could be a Democrat yeah. That's that's right and also someone brought up that if indeed there was were negotiations. Are there something hinky about trump withholding aid from Ukraine around this that even McConnell is not gonna like money decisions being made by Fiat by the president when the this is a congressionally the was voted on by the Congress and and that I think is interesting too that if they see their power usurped too much that might break the loyalty loyalty of some in the in the Senate and I still think it's symbolically really powerful to see both sides of the Senate vote in in sync doc I just I i. It's something we never. I don't know there's something symbolically powerful about it. Yeah I mean the Nixon line was when the president does it. It's not a crime you know. Trump goes not even further than that and says essentially a president can do whatever he walks itself exonerating the takeaway spurred is the CEO of Pushkin Industries with Malcolm glad well and he is the founder of trump cast. Thank you so much for coming Union for an emergency trump cast it pretty good news that we haven't seen the scale of in a while at least some kind of congressional action and I hope you'll come back for a full show will of course thank you for taking care of trump cast. I've been listening and it's been terrific stuff. Miss being on with you so it's nice to come back. That's it for today's emergency show. What did you think this is a day to get up and say something come. Find US on twitter. I'm at age eighty eight. The show is at the old trump cast and hey. If you're still here go to slate dot com slash trump cast plus bs slate plus member if you're not today it fuels and supports awards all our breaking news broadcasts and everything else we do trump cast. There is no daylight today. Our show was produced by Melissa Kaplan with Special Special House special engineering help from the Great Richard Staff. John De Dominica is as always our voice of Donald Trump. I'm Virginia Heffernan. Thanks for listening to trump castle. Why in the world would they base amateur Menendez president the greatest president in the history of presidents. I I A- been very good. This is total bullshit. This phone calls. I do business with people okay. Hold things you sweeten the deal. Will you add things on your take things away. Don't people know how I do business. Can you believe I'm getting a beached over a fucking not phone. Call I give a porn star one hundred thirty thousand dollars nothing but a stupid fucking car. That's what trips we have Jesus Christ on a cracker.

president Donald Trump Democrats Ukraine TRUMP trump castle Speaker Pelosi Senate Jacob Richard Nixon Virginia Heffernan Virginia President Jacob Weisberg Joe Biden Congress President Dolinsky FBI US
Concerns In Florida?

The Jump

22:45 min | 7 months ago

Concerns In Florida?

"Today. Answers matter more than ever before. That's why IBM is helping. Businesses manage customer questions with Watson Assistant It's conversational. Ai Designed to work for any industry. Let's put smart to work. Visit IBM DOT COM Slash Watson Assistant. Welcome to the jump I am Rachel, Nichols and today I'm joined by a couple of NBA. Chance Mr Richard Jefferson Mr Kendrick Perkins coming up, guys. We're GONNA. Talk About Zion Williamson because he is generated. No Lot of as we continue to march toward the return of the NBA. How much pressure is he under to perform in Orlando? We will discuss that I though. The NBA said to resume on July. Thirtieth, in Orlando Florida now while there are plans to keep the players confined to a campus. The State of Florida continues to see a significant surge in corona virus cases, which is relevant since some of the Disney employees working on the campus will be going back and forth to their homes, missing with public each night now the NBA does have protocols setup for that. Workers who aren't staying on the campus are not supposed to ever be. Be In the same room at the same time as any player, and they'll be wearing masks and gloves, but still it is raising eyebrows in some front offices. Here's what one anonymous GM told the athletic in a story released yesterday quote if the cases keeps spiking in Florida, things are going to happen. I'm really really concerned for the league big picture in many many ways on quote all right Richard if you were headed down there, would you be concerned with what's in Florida? Yeah I think the entire country should be concerned, not just within Florida, but what's going on a cross? But I, still stand by this I feel like in Florida that still probably the safest place to be You know you're talking about food delivery. You're talking about quarantine. You're talking about hundreds of thousands of tests that they will have access to is still fill like being in that bubble. Being quarantined is safer, probably any other place other than being in your home. If you're going to be going to a gym going to grocery store going out to restaurants and all that stuff, you are more at risk than if you were in the bubble, so in that sense I don't think that there with goes up, but it is still something that entire countries should be concerned about. That listen. They only disagree with you. On one point, the point is is that they're going to be more safe in the bubble than they are in their own homes here is. We're talking about the BUBBLE BUBBLE OF BILLION DOLLAR BUBBLE, at The only concern that I would have is leaving my family behind to after deal with this on their own, while I'm getting pampered and being protected and being safe in the billion dollar bubble. Who writes without the only thing is is that the players got to make sure that they do. They do their part by a bout. Abide by the rules you. You know and making sure they follow the guidelines, but I don't know. I'm with Richard on this. No way on my concern, going down to a billion dollars bubble by billion dollar business that got you know probably have crossed all teasers dotted. All the is so we wouldn't be concerned for me. I'll just be just telling win. The flight is taken off. A good point about some guys, not everyone, but some guys being safer on the Atlanta campus than in their own homes, because there's some guys have kids going back and forth other kids, houses and stuff like that. You don't have that in the bubble on the campus. We'll have to see I i. do like your pampering point. I will say in the NBA manual. They said they were GonNa have both manicures and pedicures and I really think that could be combined into one job. That could make it a little bit safer. I'm just saying I. have suggestions their. Turn to play near. Guys will also be on John Williamson in an article from our Tim. Bontemps than Andrew Lopez David. Griffin raved about science health. One PELICANS team stores also told the pair. That sign is quote. Gunness shock people and there are numerous votes about what a great television drama he will be. One play resumes perk. Those are some pretty high expectations for one of the youngest players in the League. What kind of pressure WILL THERE BE ON ZION? Is No person and by the way Zion handles Presa better than anyone has i. think since Lebron, James. When you talk about even the sample size that we got him Nisshin Nineteen Games that he played. He's exceeded expectations. He is box office must see TV and every time he delivers, and he delivers in great fashion, so he's built for the pressure. He's been that way since high school. When you know an AU tournaments when the line has been wrapped around the corner, even going to Duke and exceeded expectations, mobs end, you know. Coverage on a college kid that we'd never seen before. We were covering this more than somebody NBA team, so there's no Chris also yawning. If it is pressure, he's built for. No, I, agree with perk. But what more pressure can the number one pick have right so like when I look at again? If they're talking about pressure, an unnamed source from the why why are name sources given as you've got? Guy Grits the head guy and he's saying look. He's going to do a great job. And then you have an unnamed source which could be a ballboy it could be. It could be a training staff it could be. This summer. I'm not besmirching anyone. Saying Joe Richard Jefferson I am not I'm. Involved in New Orleans. Pelicans organization that could be one of two hundred people, and so it's like I don't. I don't view that and I. Don't think there's any more added pressure when you're the number one pick and we knew he was going to be the number. One pick and he's had this much attention. Someone coming out saying he's going to shock the world. He's not the number. One pick doesn't shock the world. In a twenty game, two months ban that comes over five ten twelve years of dominating the league. That's when you get the shock the world. I think can stop would unnamed sources like the unknown? You. Just comment so even it's I. Don't want unnamed sources giving me negative information I don't want unnamed sources giving me positive information the. Let your game behind. Your statement that I don't want to hear from you. Don't WanNa hear that the Jews then we're not. After the show I'm going to put you in contact with some of our ESPN editors, and you guys can all discuss out the journalism I will say on the Zion Front. I thought it was really interesting. I sat down with Zion at the All Star game and asked him sort of where he was feeling the most pressure that outside expectation, and he said it was just strange. She's nineteen and he said grown men were like following him around a restaurant, trying to get his autograph where picture, even after he had asked to be left alone to eat with his family, so in some ways I kinda think we'll be less pressure on Diane in the bubble. Bubble he doesn't have to watch sports center a TV if he doesn't want to. He doesn't have to log onto instagram if he doesn't want to. And no one's following them around to a restaurant. So I do think it's Kinda going to be up to him. How much he? He's sort of gets in and get those expectations in his head. We will have to see coming up in addition to perk and Richard Giving you their takes journalism at large, we will have three time NBA champion John has little joining me talking about the more than a vote initiative. He talks about being the oldest player in the League now. Vince Carter has officially retired and how? Will the downtime in the bubble I though with thirty five days left until the season resumes our countdown of the top. Please of this season, so far continues, and is number thirty five starting well. Yeah, GOTTA GO BACK TO ZION. Gone by the second quarter group. Big. Did that. For Williamson. What the? Behind the fast he switched it to his right hand to finish. What you? Have Goddamn back. His Merson. The. Is Run by Disney, plus all of your favorites, all in one place sign up today. Did, you know GEICO's now offering an extra fifteen percent credit on car and motorcycle policies. That's fifteen percent on top of what Gyco could already save you. So, what are you waiting for your teenager to help around the house? Okay, mom, I empty the dishwasher vacuum the Baseman and folded the sheets out of the dryer. What oh? And next I'm going to clean Mittens litterbox, are we in some kind of prank, show or something? That's a camera is an there's never been a better time to switch to GEICO. Save an extra fifteen percent when you switch by October seventh limitations. Apply Visit GEICO DOT COM for details. Coming up after I take extra twenty minutes of Jalen and Jacoby followed by highly questionable and around the foreign sportscenter begins at five eastern with the PTO guys joining at five thirty I though I'm joined by a heat lifer. Welcome, back to the jump, and welcome into you done as has lung where the captain for anyone down in Miami, in his seventieth year with the heat, and I don't know if you even know this, but with this Carter retiring you are now officially the oldest player in the NBA my friend. I was hoping this changes his mind. I'M GONNA. Give him a car. It's not it's not to give them a call. It's not over yet. It's not. There you go. I! Want to get some basketball questions in a minute you d but You are now also working with your former teammate Lebron James on his more than a vote initiative, which is designed to educate people on their rights, combat, booger, suppression, and look you're in the state of Florida which has played a key role in so many elections. What is the most important thing you think you can do as an athlete as a respected voice in the community to help with organization? I think you understand we're not politician. We're not policy experts. But. We're real people in this community investing. And we have a platform to to protect the rights of these people. They can trust, and they don't always trust the people that voting with, but they can get behind athletes. They can get behind entertainers. Listen still trust us, so we have that platform. We're going to take advantage of it now. Look, there's some people who are citizens and don't regularly vote and one of the things you hear them saying is they don't really feel like any of the candidates represent them where they don't feel like. Voting is going to help with the day to day issues in their lives as someone who is trying to get those people to the polls. What will you say to them? I was one of those people just said. Educate myself so to those people say I was one of those people I understand process a lot more than absentee process. I understand the process of voting. I understand not even just the presidential process I understand that the governor's the mayor's everything that I'll you know educate myself politically, but that is such an important part of it, right? People don't know necessarily that. That voting for their states, secretary of state is important, because that's the person who runs the next election and decide how many voting booth there are, in which neighborhoods or city council might decide how much money the police yet versus how much the schools get i. assume that something that you're going to be talking to people about this extremely important indefinitely with me starting here in my city of Miami. You know something you brought the city council in the schools, the police department. That's very important. That's why this platform that we have to branch off and everybody take a piece of their city and starry there, and now you surround the whole world, and you make that kind of impact, and that's why software for me, specifically to start at Mar, city and all other athletes entertainers to starting there as well. The work you're doing is so meaningful. Basketball really pales in comparison, but you are basketball player. I know that you take that job very seriously. Your Miami Heat team is in fourth place in the Eastern Conference standings first of all. Do you yourself plant onto the Orlando campus and be part of things? Of course I do I am the captain I am the captain I my guys follow me. It's not the most ideal situation is nothing that we could have been anybody to prepare for? We've seen nothing like this sports at my lifetime. Sit around and complain about it. It doesn't do any good and can't speak for everybody else. Ready to? What do you think the biggest challenges that veterans like you Jimmy Butler? Andre dollar going to have to look out for help young guys with. Oh Man I think once they got the video games in wildfire so I think they'll be all right. As they get listen as long as they got the fourth night a fortnight spell in the two K.. They'll be I like I I don't understand infatuation of plan which yourself on video game plan with somebody else, but they do it all the time, so. I feel idea. Be Five more so a guy like myself. To figure it out that I'm going to be the guy that has figured out Jimmy where Jimmy doesn't play much golf. And there's no you know. No country salons around from to go dancing. Yeah, so I'll know if they got that on the campus. So you know guys like myself, Jimmy US boring playing. We've got to fix up. By the way the fortnight I know you're forty years old but kind. Had No my kids playing with their phones. They played with Pez. They play with Nintendo switch. They play with their peers force. They played with I. Mean Play with everything is literally accessible every gadget mouse. I'm sure that you'll figure out something to do with your time. I'M NOT GONNA. Ask you to predict the future because no one can predict anything in the year twenty twenty. But how do you think the Miami Heat will do fourth in the east going into this crazy bubble situation? It's going to be survival of the fittest. How do you like your chances? Are Chances Just as good as anybody or better I think. We probably have a better chance as anybody you know now. Now it's mental when you talk about mentally team. I don't think the. Team relations. So I'd like. More than just feel is more than. Fighting words and I would expect nothing less from the captain. Ud, thank you so much for joining us and if you Vince Carter to come back, we will you let us know I? He's a Florida legend man. He got to come back Mallory shots. I love it. Thank you so much for joining us. Thank you wrote you. Coming up bucks coach Mike, Putin holder says Yom sensitive Kudos knee is fully healthy after a scare back in March with the healthy honest. Should everyone feared of deer? Discuss that I, though here are a couple of distant replays from this date an NBA his. Knicks fans you. You might want to turn away. Got About three past double team Elliott on top. Drives picks favorite. Clearly. Knocked out. To. Seventy seven forty seven seconds ago timeout. On ESPN, radio. Seven th pick in the two thousand nine NBA draft. The Golden State Warriors Select. Stephon Curry from Davidson College. Taxes, they reaction shows at all. Nothing gets state, but these knick fans, Wanted Steph Curry. Be Consistent because every night. You're going to be playing the best. Position. You can't have any off nice either be friends off the court, but once you're on the core. It's all about business and taking care of. The Joan is brought to you by the last of us are two available now rated M. for mature. This whole thing is about power. This is about who has the power. Who Truly has the power? The real backstory was we were uncharted ground. We actually went up the chain. ESPN and said please don't do this became off really looking egotistical, arrogant and foolish. The reaction was so visceral. Why would they so upset about? He was upsetting the natural or yeah, he was and in upsetting the natural order. There had to be held to pay. The fact that he's like I can make this whole world. Stop and revolve around me. No, no, no, not at all. I mean Lebron was turned into a villain. Well few you. Know your world! I'm taking my talents to south. mind. Saturday night Sunday night ESPN premiering backstory the decision one hour special that looks at the consequences and legacy of Lebron's infamous decision to join the Miami Heat ten years ago, check it out at nine eastern eight Pacific on ESPN and the F. are at guys. It is crunch time here on the jump on this date. In the year nineteen, ninety nine Tim Duncan led the Spurs to win the NBA Finals over the Knicks today one the finals of the Trophy while averaging twenty seven points, fourteen rebounds two blocks per game. Both too young to have played in this series, but overall you can tell me. What was it like to play against him Dunkin Richard You. Go first because you also played with it. Honestly the. Going back to Karl Malone Carl Malone this is random, said I wasn't just playing against Michael. Jordan was playing against. Chicago Bulls. That was the thing about Tim Duncan. You weren't just playing against Tim Duncan. You were playing against the San Antonio Spurs, and they had David Robinson and that first group then they had so many other talented players, so Tim Duncan was always a focal point, but you could never truly focus on him. That's that's of the benchmark for a great organization is when you have a great player like that that you can't key on, and he's able to dominate you, and that's what makes him and that organization so great. Richard RJ. We're not talking about. The spurs brother woods about Tim Duncan. What we're talking about the greatest no. I! Don't WANNA I don't WanNa hear about the system. Tim Duncan made this system. Okay, we're talking about. The greatest power ford the volatile. Way Sorry Cagey. You're number two on my list. My brother still look at number two on my list, but when you talk about Tim, Doug and he was a salad killer. You can never rather. He had hot sauce running through his veins. I tried so many times during those battles with with Oklahoma City Spurs to try to you know ill, boy, Tim Donkey, he would never get rattled. Always give me that work number one time in the game six in the Western Conference finals I went to the extreme IGA, pushing Tim Duncan. He didn't get rabbit. He gave me twenty eight fifteen to five with the wind and centers home, so the Greater Doug all the greatest power for a tiny, he was a silent killer I'm sorry Cagey you number two on Donald. K D. knows where he ranks. The most Luke warm endorsement of a hall of Famer Famer and atop I play riots. The first ballot hall of Famer, so I'm still on the fringe do that Oh. My Lord, all right. Let's talk about the bucks because Mike, Loopholes are recently spoke with our Jackie macmullan and said quote, it's huge advantage for us. The youngest will be completely and totally healthy. He's in great place both mentally and physically remember guys last week. He had injured his knee against Lakers and but told Jackie might have been out for longer than some had expected, which would have been heading into the playoffs, but now perfect is fully healthy. How much shit teams here? The deer in this new delayed postseason? This Rachel Tames. Yon Is in the Milwaukee Bucks. But do they fear them. No, no, no one fears them. They don't feel like no way. avs Echo they don't because Rachel. We seen this before we watch. The bugs dominate the regular season and we watch them. Get beat two years ago by the Boston Celtics last year Toronto literally you know four to beat them last year and had John discombobulated where he was second guessing themselves, so we seen this before the bug's gone is great, regular season right and do their thing. And then all of a sudden when his time in the in the playoffs, teams are ready for the Celtics did not afraid of the Bucks Toronto not afraid of the bugs in the Miami Heat are not afraid to the books, so no one fears the deal. They respect them, but they don't fear them. Free Box Richard Yellow. Day Landau Magic. Yeah, okay, well. This is what I will say, though like Janas healthy. Obviously, he's probably going to be the two time MVP if he's healthy. That makes team better, but to perks point no one fears them. No one fears that. Do they respect them? Yes, do you respect that team, but fear only come from true true dominance in the postseason? That's when you start to fear someone right? That's why Lebron. James that's why when you look at the clippers and what the team that they assembled. That's fear because you're like. Like we don't want to meet these guys. We want to make sure that we're playing them. In the conference finals. We WanNA. Make sure that we're not playing them in the second round. That's fear I. Don't think anyone feels that way about the bucks, but they do have a tremendous amount of respect. Fear only comes from the postseason success all right before we go. We gotta say huge congratulations to Vince Carter. He made it official this morning. His down to outstanding careers over it's over, plus they dealt with Richard Jefferson for four or five years so.

NBA Miami Joe Richard Jefferson Lebron James Florida Tim Duncan Vince Carter ZION ESPN League John Williamson Orlando Florida Basketball Disney Rachel Tames Milwaukee Bucks Zion Williamson IBM San Antonio Spurs Stephon Curry
A Major Watergate Vote (1974) w/ Leon Neyfakh

This Day In Esoteric Political History

15:30 min | 6 months ago

A Major Watergate Vote (1974) w/ Leon Neyfakh

"Hello Walk to this day in Esoteric political history from Radio PM, my name is jody advocates. This date, twenty, eighth, nineteen, seventy, four, the House Judiciary Committee voted twenty seven to eleven to recommend the impeachment of President Nixon on a charge that he personally engaged in the course of conduct designed to obstruct justice. The Watergate case in the next few days they would vote to recommend several other articles of impeachment abuse of power contempt of Congress, I will point out that this official inquiry started way back in February. And of course, the larger Watergate scandal had been brewing and building for years. Years, but this vote was in many ways, the beginning of the end for Nixon He'd lost the support of Congress. He resigned a few weeks later. They were twisted. Turn still to to happen along the way we'll get into those. I will say this kind of caught me off guard, but this is the first time that we're talking about Watergate on this show, so let's do it with a Nikki Hammer as always from Columbia Nikki Watergate first time. Yeah, it's actually really surprising as somebody. Likely on his spent a lot of time, in Watergate, country it is. Surprising to me that we haven't haven't done a lot of chatting and that Leon is Leon Maitha of fiasco podcast, and also the host of the first two seasons of slow burn, and of course, the first season of slow burn was a long look at Watergate the twists and turns and everything in between so Leon welcome back to the show and thanks for doing this banks. Jody copy here. Yeah, well as you were saying Jodi This is a story that goes back. We before this vote in fact. You know much of the summer of Nineteen seventy-three was spent with people glued to their televisions watching these Watergate hearings. This is something Leon that comes up in in your show that they're all of these people just watching along. How big of a media phenomenon were these hearings? Yeah, people are obsessed with them. There was the thing that was on TV. Instead of the soap operas and people I think just got really invested in some of the characters like. The Chair, who is the sort of conscience of the country? As this ugly thing was being explored, and and sort of excavated in public servant kind of became this folk, hero and I think just people wanted to know. The answer to this is my modest theory about Watergate was like the march towards the resolution was fueled by curiosity like everyone just wanted to know what had happened in the more Nixon hid stuff, and tried to fight Congress on on what he was disclosing, and what recordings and transcripts he was releasing like the more he tried to conceal. The more people wanted to know, and that's like a very powerful force so offering this question to you then along those lines. You know this vote twenty seven. Seven to eleven to recommend impeachment. What question is that answering for? People give us some context for this particular. Vote what it meant. How big of a moment it was kind of what what set the stage for. Yeah, so it followed months of investigation on the part of the House Judiciary Committee. This was an inquiry that was funded to the tune of like a million dollars, and that was the first concrete step that Congress took towards impeachment was allocating a million dollars to staff impeachment and Only mentioned because I. It's reassuring to me to think of it in concrete terms like they needed to hire. Lawyers and investigators figure out what happened, and they needed money for that, and that's the process, and so they spent months poring through all the evidence including you know transcripts of the White House tapes that that Nixon had been forced to hand over and the House Judiciary Committee. WHO DID SOME LIBERALS? I it included some conservatives who were dead set on voting against impeachment. They were Nixon loyalists, and there are also these sort of more ambivalent members of the committee, who maybe they were kind of conservative Democrats who came from district where Nixon was really popular, or maybe they were moderate. Republicans who came from districts where people are a little bit split on whether Nixon deserve to be. Be Impeached, and they were like in a really tough spot in terms of their constituents and so they kind of became known like retroactively as these block of ambivalent people who are expending these months leading up to the vote. We're talking about thinking through and trying to figure out what they what they were going to do, but what's most interesting to me? Is that they? They didn't really know each other you know they. They ended up as I said like eventually became called the fragile coalition, but that was only after they realized that they were a coalition, and for a while they were just sort of individually reckoning with this and I. Don't know I find that very moving almost because the the standard that Putera Dino is setting for this exercise. Exercise was it had to be bipartisan that he didn't think it would be taken seriously if it was a purely party line vote and so the the these ambivalent seven I think it was seven ended up being absolutely key that being the case. Yeah, I think this is a really important part of that twenty seven to eleven. I think it was actually six Republicans. Who? Finally side with the the Democrats and vote for this impeachment, and so it's a very clarifying moment in a way, 'cause we tend to think of Watergate as kind of an open and shut case in retrospect in a way like everybody got that. This is a really bad thing that was happening, but Nixon had a lot of supporters, and he had a lot of supporters in the Republican. Party, and a lot of people who supported Nixon Conservatives and Republicans were saying that this was just a democratic witch hunt, and that they were just trying to overturn the nineteen seventy two. Two election which Nixon had won in a landslide and what you see in this moment is Republicans crossing that line and saying yes, there's something here. That is impeachment worthy. Yeah, and I've had a lot of time to think about what was it? People responded to about slogan so much, and I think part of it was like hearing Republicans during Watergate sound like Republicans during the molar investigation where they were clearly just not interested. In what do we happened? They were interested in rhetoric and trying to defend Nixon against his enemies and I think part of why that was. Refresher why that felt revelatory. was that we all kind of think of Watergate? Is that different kind of era where there where people were interested in fighting and in bipartisanship, and they were in the end, it was bipartisan in in many ways, but it, but it didn't start there like I. Think what's shocking is like or what shouldn't be shocking. Is that the impulse to be? A loyalist is always going to be there, and so I think Watergate, Kansas be, both it can be both a reminder that we've never been better than we are now, but also that we can't be. Curious kind of how much this vote really does. Set the stage for resignation I. Mean You know you look at the time line and it's just these. This vote happens in the subsequent votes and you know what is eight days later. Nixon gives his speech announcing that he's going to step down, so is it the case that he sees these votes and he starts right pending his resignation speech. I mean it certainly wasn't. Good. But I think it has. It it is definitely hard to disentangle causing effect when you look at this period, because are a lot of things happening at the same time, and it's important to realize that as the committee is going through this process, you know different branch of government is dealing with Nixon on another front, which is that he has been refusing to release tapes that these Special Prosecutor requested. This refusal ends up going to court where Nixon and. And on an eight zero ruling, he is forced to handover this of material that he had previously been holding back and as soon as that happens he. I think that's that's really when he knows that it's over because he knows that among the material that he's not in handing over his something, really really damning, which is you know conversation you had with HR Haldeman where he basically says almost immediately after the burglary like let's. Sandbag this basically in its contradicts, everything has been saying about how he wasn't involved. Cover up, and I think it's the combination of that supreme. Court vote and Nixon's needs to that inform members of Congress that this tape is going to come out. That really destroys. You could see this. Even among the members of the House Judiciary Committee that had voted on on impeachment. Charles wiggins is good example like he was adamantly against impeachment he had he'd made a comment. During public hearings about how these liberals would impeach Nixon for spitting on the street or something like that, and as soon as he is informed of this smoking gun tape he goes on TV and and in tears, says afraid that the Great Richard Nixon's. Nixon's political career is over. That's an exact quote, but it changes his mind, or at least forces his hand, and so again it's like this combination of events happening at the same time that really create the pressure that I think ultimately convinced Nixon. There was no. There is no fighting this yeah. I mean think of it. As a series of firewalls that Nixon had erected to protect himself and his hold on office and them had to do with. With these tapes right once, the taping system was known his days were numbered, but he was doing all kinds of things to make sure that nobody ever got that smoking gun tape. He issue transcripts, but he had like a guy who's hard of hearing. Do the transcripts they back tapes? They left things out of those transcripts. What he knew he had to do was make sure that nobody ever heard his voice giving that order and when that smoking. Smoking, gun, tape surfaces, and when he realizes that people are going to hear it. He knows that he's losing. All of these firewalls from the last firewall was Republicans in the Senate Barry Goldwater a very conservative Republican senator and other Republicans in the Senate. Come to Nixon and they're like you don't have the numbers anymore, and that's the point at which he's like. My last firewall is gone. I can either get kicked out or I can resign. But. Let me ask you. Are Either of you about that? That point of you said you don't have the numbers anymore is that there's a preponderance of evidence that has led me to to start to believe that you are guilty of what you're being accused of, or is it more like you don't have the numbers anymore? As in like politically this getting untenable for me to continue to support my imprint. Obviously, those are related impression was like the revelation of the smoking gun tape were Nixon, can be heard giving the the order. I, think that convinced. Convinced people like Goldwater that there was no way to defend us. Yeah. I mean that's right and impeachment is always about politics, always political right? You need to have a certain number of senators say this is no longer tenable, and that's what the smoking gun tape does it? They know they're not going to get support from their constituents there too high of a price for them to pay to continue to support Nixon and principals come into play, too, but politics is always always in play here and I think it's important to also say that like. You know the vote we're talking about. That happened on this day. That was just like. Jody step one on a long process like what had to happen. Next was at the house. Judiciary Committee had to convince the rest of the House to vote to impeach, and there was a question is like whether the Republicans in the house would go along with it, and after that they have to go to the Senate and there'd be a trial as we now know, and the Republicans in order. For that to go anywhere would have to go along with it and I think the smoking gun tape was necessary to kind of give teeth to threat implied by the House Judiciary Committee. Vote right like now. This vote to impeach or recommend impeachment to the broader house. Now now is dangerous. Nixon suddenly, whereas before if all these Republicans were willing to continue defending him, it was going to be symbolic at best so. So, we can start to appear when I want to just flag one interesting thing that I noticed. which is you know you look? We're talking about July, twenty seventh and twenty eighth, those two days I noticed were a weekend and I wanNA. Point out. You know that like. There was a time I guess during you know really important. Chrissy moments of crises. Where are our elected officials and worked on the weekend? Even months and months or years and years into this they I guess they felt this was important enough to be there. took it really seriously I mean they. You know the thing. I was most struck by and talking to like Elizabeth. Holtzman, who is a young member of the committee at the time, was it? You know even as a liberal who presumably didn't want Nixon to be an office. She took it really hard and I don't know. Maybe that's just like bs like that's what a politician says but if If I'm very persuaded when she was kind of describing herself during that month long process of learning the facts of the case, he was just like it felt like being in quicksand, like these guys just like didn't quit being manipulative and craven, and just like there was never a moment during these tapes when Nixon would say, but what does the right thing to do? It was always what can we get away with? And she just really like she she she took it hard and to your point Peter Rudeina the chairman like. A liberal wept after this after the vote was taken, and I think that's not just pr think impeachment meant something different at this time than it does now. Yeah, I mean I think that there is just such a stark contrast between this and the next impeachment like this is something where they're following regular order. They're going through this for years and years and years of the Clinton impeachment which is the second season of slow-burn The approaches. Let's say very different all right. Let's start to wrap up you WANNA. Do give couple also on this days. Yeah, let's do it in eighteen sixty eight US secretary of state, William H seward who we weirdly keep talking about. He was talked about a more than we've talked about Richard. seward of seward's folly seward, who was almost often the coup when Lincoln was assassinated, he announces the Fourteenth Amendment ratified by the States, which grants citizenship to all black Americans black Americans had been stripped of the right to citizenship back in eighteen, fifty seven, and the fourteenth amendment puts that back in place, and I will flag that in two thousand seventeen couple years ago, this was the date in which skinny repeal of Obamacare fell fifty, one, forty, nine, when John. McCain cast his deciding vote against it very memorable thumbs-down. Yeah, very memorable thumbs down I. Don't know how much we else do. Either of you remember two years ago, I. Remember one day ago I will say in its defense. It was actually three years ago. Oh sorry. That shows you. How much time is a? Catch, I will say I remember in part because I think I was in Boise Idaho at a at A. Festival redoing alive fivethirtyeight show, but I will also say like that was a big moment, and that was a moment that hurt Donald. Trump and I think like as we start to. You know I think this is something we we kind of do a fair amount. It's sort of like make a list of the things that tend to that seem to actually hurt trump and the things that that don't and I would say that the you know spending a lot of political capital. Going back after obamacare was genuinely one of those things that I think dinged this. President Right. Right that brings us to the end of the show Nicole. Hammer thank you as always. Thank you and Leon Fuck. Thanks, thank you. Leon will be back for another episode. We said we're going to do a bussing episode at some point down the line, so we will do that with Leon again and the new season of fiascos coming out a lien, Wednesday. When's it coming out August thirteenth? Episode Okay few weeks from now, so keep your ears out for that This Day unnecessary political history is a proud member of Radio Tokyo from P. R. Researcher and producer is Jacob Feldman. Follow us on social media were posting a bunch of stuff on twitter and instagram every day posting about big moments and small moments way more than we get to on this podcast. Follow at this late party can email us this. They fought at shemale dot com. My name is Jody Avirgan. Thanks for listening and we'll see suit. Radio.

President Nixon House Judiciary Committee Congress Leon Nikki Watergate Jody Avirgan Jodi This Nikki Hammer Barry Goldwater Senate obamacare Leon Fuck official Leon Maitha Charles wiggins Judiciary Committee White House Putera Dino
Professor Chris French - Anomalistic Psychology and Conspiracy Theories in Politics

Point of Inquiry

33:36 min | 1 year ago

Professor Chris French - Anomalistic Psychology and Conspiracy Theories in Politics

"The single best predictor of whether you believe in conspiracy acts is do you believe in conspiracy. Why even if a totally unrelated so if your next door neighbor doesn't believe we have landed on the moon? They're also more lightly. Suddenly correlation is not optically. Strong Bridge this there. The more likely to also believes is that you shouldn't vaccinate your kids. Pop hello everybody. Welcome to another edition the point of inquiry. I'm your host Jim underdown for today's episode. I went all the way to London England to talk to a couple of big names in the world of of skepticism and critical thinking. I was over there for the presentation of the Richard Dawkins award to Ricky Vase this year. The Center for inquiry in the Richard Dawkins Foundation splashed out for a big event at a theater in East London. I jumped jumped on the tube and went cross town to Greenwich. Yes that Greenwich the home of Greenwich Meantime these zero point in the Longitudinal Longitudinal lines on the globe. That's where Chris French lives actually speaking of where he lives. He lives in this fantastic house. That's basically basically right on the Thames. A Little Bit east of downtown Greenwich in this centuries old house. That's feet from the water. But Chris's much more than the interesting house. He and his wife live in is a psychologist had of the university. -versity of London's Anomalous Studies Research Unit. People have weird experiences all the time and the question is why do they have the weird good experience. And that's where people like Chris come into play. He knows a lot about how the brain works and why people have these experiences and wall. Statistically weird things happen every now and then and on and on and on is another giant and great ally and the war or to bring critical thinking to the people so I bring you now to the waterfront on the Thames. A five minute walk from where King Henry. The eighth got got knocked off his horse in jousting tournament and began his road to six marriages and an ever expanding waistline ladies and gentlemen. Chris French We are here with Chris French and actually we're not in London. Are we still London. Let's technical wrenches Bob. London and this is the harbormasters house. Alice was somewhere which was the center of all the shipping about back in the day. A you know it's in guidebooks and now we're very lucky to live. So he was just in charge of all shipping matters. So we believe that the half of house we're in was the actual office and next door was the residential half. Yeah we as say we do count out lessons living part. The resentment town is because a couple of days ago. We gave the Center for quieted. Gave the Richard Dawkins award to Ricky Gervais Ace and and You helped organize as dry. I know thing I thought remarkably smoothly and everybody seemed to have a great time Richard Wiseman was kind of emcee for the evening to kind of keep the interview Rolling along 'cause he's brilliant at that kind of thing so it was. It was such a an interesting and unique events we had Two of my personal heroes will not include Richard as well. We'll be upset. You know very good friend of mine but the down half just flew by you know. There was a lot of discussion but also lots of laughs. So it was great Richard Dawkins of course great heroes of the skeptic in science movement and Ricky's of great advocate of critical thinking. And you know so. So it's a their approaches are different but it was a lot of fun to see him on stage. Yeah now we would again. Just I'm not gonNA give a shout out to the the venue that we were as well which was kind of beautiful beautiful art deco building listed building staff there was just incredibly credibly efficient and the whole thing run nightclub so we were delighted that whole neighborhoods. Got Some history to of of organizing and there was a anti-fascist Australia thirty the navy. Some more in the near future the way the things going in Britain. You never know you thought you were done with some of that excite. Yeah okay. Well let's talk about you worry from originally I'm from the North West of England from a town called Rome cone in Chechnya thinking about them I found is still less. I love seeing them but I wouldn't wanNA live there again. I've moved around at it. My first degree in Psychology Manchester University work for Year Bangor University in North Wales than my PhD. Leicester University Tapie did a a year. The Hatfield Polytechnic University of half. It show where Richard is now based before finally coming to goldsmiths and not was a long time ago usually when people say. When did you start? Say Sixty Ninety five in nineteen eighty five just feels like sixty eighty five and I've been there ever since the yeah When when I first started my kind of interest in why now referred to as a nominalistic psychology eight was companionship? Sign need interest and and then gradually just grew over the years and I I kind of just found it fascinating on there was definitely a period. Where my the kind of interest was tolerated notting orig- I don't think we've seen as being quite respectable and just got to a point where I audio? Let's the stuff that I'm I'm really most interested in twin tracks of mall kind of conventional research of your light the other track well at an atom in various who are PhD was on Hemisphere differences your brain function using e. e. g. and so on so very much an neuropsychological stuff then had a period very early days of computers of Been Research in the area of automated assessment. Looking at whether you've got the same results if you administered a psychological test on computers the more conventional ways of doing it then. There was a period where I collaborated with my wife. Who's he's also a psychologist Back professor on Richards in the area of cognition and emotion and of the effects of anxiety and depression things like memory and perception actions so on running gag. All those years was we knew we'd never spits up because we didn't know who get custody of the data it's As is a long time I kind of kept that more conventional research going but really what fascinated me the most that can weird experiences that people report and trying to understand all that stuff and I think I think it's fair to say that it has it has become kind. What about safety data totally legitimate area research there are always some very big names in psychology? That totally got it. I mean Elizabeth Loftus. His name comes to mind do you now and various others Richard McNally and love the people. I've got huge amounts respectful but there was also still a kind of sense occasionally in those early early days of you know why. Why are you doing this stuff you know we all well know that ghosts don't exist we all know that people are not really being alliens but that was kind of missing the point you you lots and lots of people do believe in this stuff? Very sizable minority claimed direct personal experience. So there's something there to be. Explained explained by psychology absolutely huge numbers of people and do include yourself and the number of people. Have you ever had a weird. I've had to experience. I kind of as as many people now have. I believe around like sue blackmail. You know she was a passionate believer. I think I probably wasn't as strong believer. She was but I certainly generally believed in a lot of this stuff and I can even look back and remember when I was doing my lester. I do due adult education classes at local colleges to unabated extra cash unconnected if they asked for a lecture on parapsychology outgoing. Prepare One and and it would be totally on critic and that they're probably saying nothing. Well you must have no. I have no it again. Kind of told this story It was reading one particular book by Jim. Oh Kok parapsychology science so magic somebody who said hey you should read this these like it and I read it and I looked at as a kind of basically. It's quite rare with the possible exception of the Bible and Kuranda for one single boat was such an influence on somebody's life but that determined the my future career and in my time doing food down the fact that I note Jim GonNa Postal friend you know neck and kept so not a blame. Hey we can all Jim alka great ally. Why in the in the skeptical world and he's really an excellent teacher of this stuff? So a nominalistic psychology. Are there other people in this field. Yeah there are amazing is still very much obviously a very specialist. So vary or psychology. There is a kind of an increasing number. Two plotted you find. The number of publications per year has gone up number kind of conferences success rate cetera on. Because I'm not supposed what's happened as well as obviously I was what I was kind of into all this stuff and then as part of the kind of skeptical movement. If you like because at Brown about the same time roundabout nineteen ninety-five ebbs skeptics in the pub started operating in the UK. And I was GONNA keen on that and a skeptic founded by Wendy Grossman which now for awhile I actually attitude for ten years. We've all passing Kirk. Deborah hide. Things were kind of happy. Look back now and you can kind of trace it in plotted because while it's happening happening you not really aware that this is going to grow but the skepticism as a as a movement if you like as kind of grown become more organized denies various reasons for that and you have people in the United States like Paul Kurds and Ray Hyman James Randi all aw adding to that yeah you know in some ways I mean they lead the way but the British when we're not too fall behind in terms of getting organize with support from the people spoke about And yes you can kind of look back now and now. We have something like the last time I checked it was kind of forty or fifty different branches of skeptics in the pub and down the country I run the Greenwich Brunch. We had a meeting being guest last night. I must admit I was still kind of recovery from my hangover from the night before the event but but it went very well particularly like it. He's got a very grassroots thing. It's not it's not kind of hierarchical bureaucratic it's getting people who might not otherwise really really kind of understand. I mean for a long time my friends and neighbors going to new. I did this skeptic stuff but they didn't really know out now come to these talks and they and they get eh. It gets people an opportunity to specifically discuss this sort of thing and unaccustomed has administrated agree that it it's widened whereas back in the seventies and eighties tend to be the focus very much on the paranormal. which is still mine primary interest but now I mean maybe particularly today lire fake news and conspiracy theories and all this stuff? What we've been doing? The decades has suddenly become much more kind of relevance in the mainstream. Yeah so we'll paint that picture. What was in the in the eighties when you first got heavily into this? What sort of things were you looking into kind of was a very much a kind of gradual process so as reg gyms book in the early Eighties stilted at Goldsmiths in the ninety eighty five and initially I was just doing kind of some lectures on a theoretical issues? Kohl's so I did a couple of hours. Criticizing Karolyi tollways fund a couple of hours artificial intelligence and a couple of hours on parapsychologist paranormal. This time very skeptical gun at perspective that it was ask. It will probably about ten years later. I realized now I know enough about this stuff now that I could really interesting module as part of our Ese. Goldsmiths Goldsmiths. Which I did and it was kind of very popular? The students you know I mean things about the witch stuff is is a great hook to get people interested and then you can kind of get across all kinds of messages about critical thinking and how to evaluate evidence in the problems with the most people post hosts next Talks everything but a psychologist we know will no actually. We've very capable of fooling ourselves in kinds of weight memory perception. The whole works So yeah so then that him the now beginning to do just the occasional little publication on topic and presents. It was a very very slow process. I rather wish made the decision to just all my efforts into this. Somalia is people like Suwat. You bought more in Richard. Wiseman I think they they. They did do that and I kind of felt was playing. Catch up a little bit but having said that as I say it is it kind of grew kind of quite slowly until probably the kind of start of this century where Nikon's of Took the decision that I'm all my office into this stuff. Because it's interest me the most and is at the point where you start the media and other people we'll start asking you to get involved in a very kind of it was started off as a kind of just. Just didn't those things occasion. I think it was not from quite quite early on as I recall. Because one of the aspects of being interested in this stuff is is very media friendly the media love it in so minutes brings out a study on that alien abductees or a crystal energy or any of these kind of wit tongue. SPA sure yet. They then it gets a lawmaker with so I think people probably end up with a bit of a misguided view as to how much research activity there actually is because there is a huge amount of attention whereas you know as we all know the money the funding for this kind of area. It's not gonna be he's great and it's quite right that it shouldn't be put the money into cancer research. Joe Climate Change out whatever you know. That's perfectly legit well and a lot of the research to who is being done by believers. There's a lot of information bias happening. There is at least one of the interesting things for me. I'm going to have written about the. I think I went from those early days. I think I I kind of talk about time on in type two skeptics. You know there are different types of skeptics and in the early days when I discovered the joys of skepticism and I was reading kind of stuff by James Randi. I've always licked white people I probably rabidly have some of you and I'm not blaming those people having those views interpretation of what was reading I the various things I believe then which I do not believe anymore so for example I kind of got the impression. The old parapsychologists were nincompoops. They didn't have that he's study success. Ask an obviously Meet them and interact with them. You realize now actually the some really intelligent people there and I do appreciate what the problems out confirmation bias on on sometimes even more so than the people look in Imo conventional areas where it's not such an issue in now also a kind of probably probably tended to think of all people who claim to have psychic powers are astrologers are all these practitioners as being deliberate frauds and of course at Nash true anymore fooling themselves as much as anybody else but they are genuinely sincere people. There are other comic artists out there. We all know who they are in that regard yes guard. I'm concerned but also the idea that all paranormal beliefs are and of damaging actually not psychologically benefits Uffizi believing in some of this stuff even isn't true. Yeah so he had the. The analogy is belief in God. Especially if you're dying or something they're going to be so sulfur. Yeah and I think most people believe all skeptics kind of anxious about the prospect of their own death on the death of people that they love and so being able to Kind of believe something. Afterwards is of course. Confirmation bias is such that we'll find it very easy to believing stuff if we want to be true anyway. The evidence doesn't have that great when we were at the events. One of the things that Ricky mentions attorney event made me think of an episode from for my own life where when my daughter's with younger one night I found myself. I was in the bottom bunk in his bedroom with my middle daughter. Kathryn on the top bunk should be about six seven time. I think mayhem my youngest alice. must've I've been ill and sleeping with my wife that night but I just Discount really heart rending. Saab does not say Shit. Aw to die kind of had six. We'll even young life ahead of you just put a will. I won't talk. This is from from me. Some people believe that when you die you come to heaven But you don't do as she tried his. Wow is at about the age when can start understanding. Yeah I remember as a kid you know particularly kind of think about your own parents dying most important people in your life at that age and the idea hi did not gonNa be around forever deeply deeply or setting you know and I can see the emotional side a lot of the research we do into to psychology. Believe is Kinda focused on cognitive biases. And so on and I think again the perfectly valid very useful research search to do but the emotional side competent elected either. I mean we've got the such kind of power of a pressure to hugh some of these things to to be true driving force and yeah I mean we were the only animals no well in advance that we're going to expire an have the brain power to really think about it quite a bit as you will be aware means if he's not contributed a skipped his wide chirs. You know they're they're kind of some. I'm kind of very good quite militant aggressive kind of skeptics has its place in certain contexts Out East I would go in guns blazing on those they. I know what you're doing. And they're exploiting vulnerable. People no time for them until the vast majority of people who believe in this stuff that decent people you know in the coming from a good place ice and they they genuinely believe the now oleck onto new age woo is for real you know and and sometimes awesome again. You find yourself in the same situation that I don't WanNa take a strong skeptic line if somebody's taken great comfort from believing that a loved one is it's still around in some sense. Why would I want to take that away from them? You can ask me my view as a scientist of whether I believe in an afterlife and I'll give you an honest straight ends the but I'm not gonNA go out there deliberately trying to just take these comforting believes away from people especially in my mind. It's it's a little living age related thing like if there's a lady Diana on on the bed and she's she's GonNa go see. Jesus it's you know knock yourself You know maybe little younger we could try to gently tall. Yeah I mean and again I mean some people I think a genuinely Adam intellectually strong enough of your life that they can cope with down the irrational level. We all know that. Actually if if you don't even have to life well what's it's GonNa be like when you dial is the same as it was before you were born. You don't worry on. That is so so why. Why do we get so stressed about but there is still for most people the kind of emotional? Hugh grant the Stan. It's very very real. What about this notion that I'm GonNa take the hard skeptical view. Now that underlying all these belise is this nefarious worldview that will seep into whether whether or not you believe in climate change and other things that are more important to our society as a whole I think this yeah. There is an important point that does need to be considered dealt with anecdote. Think it's very easy Recent years is one of our main areas of research has been the content of psychology of believe in conspiracies and again one of the interesting aspects of that. Is the most most conspiracies homeless. Does it really matter of your next door. Neighbor doesn't believe we landed on the moon on in the great scheme of things it doesn't vote. I mean said at that what we do know. Is that the single best predictor of whether you believe in conspiracy acts is. Do you believe in conspiracy. Why even if totally unrelated so so if your next door neighbor doesn't believe we have landed on the moon? They're also more lately. Some correlation is not optically strong numbers. There's definitely see that the more likely to also believe that you shouldn't vaccinate your kids a Climate change isn't real because it kind of is it just a general distrust talk of the establishment and the official stories that were told and and so it can then kind of become a dangerous thing. I mean it's interesting looking at the kind of apparent increase in kind of belief flatter. Something we all thought was just I was just GONNA say I. I've met these flat authors authors. Who are basically of the opinion that science lies to us about everything and nothing? Sciences can entrusted which in our our minds is just the opposite sciences. The lutely more should be more trusted than most. I mean an and this is the thing that goes to believe in conspiracy affair is if you have that kind of general tendency well it's a non falsifiable belief because any evidence of Against it was obviously plummeted that by the conspirators Veritas and the conspirators are believed to be these amazingly powerful people you know. The kind of top government officials military royal family. Everybody now in the in the words of a flatter I met The the compile heads running all these conspiracies are the I don't even know if he thought it was an individual or whoever but he said magnitudes of power more powerful than the president of the United States magnitude into APP on. I mean you look at the Q.. On on conspiracy in the states. It's well it's crazy stuff. I'm totally totally crazy. But it's catchy. She young and is catching Is there a speaking of the United States you see is there any sort of generalizations you can make about the differences and beliefs chiefs or people between the UK. Yeah I think I as as a generalization. None of that was worried that you just simplify things but certainly only in the UK eight not such a big deal to be an atheist whereas obviously in the states. It's certainly many parts the states. You would keep out very quiet. You could really be putting yourself in Dania. Uganda opened their expressed atheism. And so I think Paul is consequence that some of the kind of a theism in America is kind of somewhat more kind of in your face because it needs to be whereas over here. You are dente penalty with with a bunch of Christians. And you said your atheists they wouldn't also leak on a turn on you wrong wrong but in a so again. It's just a kind of historical. Oh thing but I think that's a big difference that I think he's very noticeable In the paranormal world is your think. Sometimes the kind of American skepticism is again a little bit more kind of Prone to talking about kind of the woolworth irrationality analogy and kind of making these metals getting battle. And so on maybe is over here. I think it's a bit. They kind of bit more gentleman more tolerance now again and not you know going back to the point you made earlier. Maybe that's a mistake you know. Maybe Y- Sam Harris for example accuse the by Like what kind of putting up with more moderate religious beliefs making space for the more extreme ones. And that's an interesting point tonight and consider but I think there is a a a general feeling amongst a lot of British skeptics the way quite happy to try. And it's a toll to the he'll decide and try and understand the minute that level rather than just kind of point out whether wrong all the time and that baby a partially Eh from generations you know the James Randi era skeptics and Randy had pitched I battles with Geller who I know and others that you know if there was a real fire behind it where I think maybe maybe kids coming up today. Kids being in their twenties thirties now are in no. Maybe they're curious about it but it doesn't seem to be this war. Yeah yeah again. You'd you'd have people inside the US situations it has how he feels the things are moving in the US. Well Yeah that's I think you may well be right. I just thought about mentioning to a retailer. Active when gala first appeared on I was totally believing leaving it if I so wanted to be true and there was no scientists say that they thought he was the real deal an incredibly exciting A now lots of friends friends who Who Can Kinda bend spoons and just the same way that it looks like action and they say well if he's doing easing psychic policies? Do the hallway. Yeah right that was that was randy resulting in the seventies and Yeah I met Gallagher. I did a TV show with Geller in the Ukraine rain and he was the host of this show called battle the psychics which was a take between psychics. And hours the token skeptic on the show Joe and I can see is a charming guy. He's very personable and you could see why people along with their cognitive Aug. Biases would would get in line now. I won't even met him once and that was an interesting county is a radio show on a Aradio to read about half an hour Jeremy Vine show we have the raw usual culminates. We will let a chance to get down to some nitty gritty poins joins and during this conversation. I've made references and Richard Wiseman research and monitor all finished. We can go down the stairs in Broadcasting House and returns to to me says. I'll I'll tell you account stand about that Richard is. When was that Areso? He's just such such publicity. Sika got cattle black. Do Sprints early even though you live in a really fantastic house this. This kind of work doesn't normally make people millionaires not on our side anyway. So why did he do. This again is just purely. I find the area fascinating. I have toyed with the idea but many many years of basically pretending the I've seen the lines are now unrealized Renewable steps true might the whole series of bestsellers. Then writing and find wants a nasty. I was lying in all those notion that I really have kind kind of enjoy the ride. I mean about to meet some amazing people. I mean the the Thrill I get from the fact that on hugging with James Randi they you know and I I was reading all that stuff. Never a mini thing. You're not ever probably meet the guy let alone get to a point where I thought it was a friend. It doesn't it doesn't really good kind of community. Say that this law people sitting in this country and in America as well obviously but but doing really important work in this area. I mean the the good thinking society springs to mind. The campaigns have been organized regard raising awareness of the true nature of homeopathy invasive. To a point where Yup held me up with these is pretty longer available in the National Health Service now mcvay should be evidence face teach finding people spend their own money on it real free to do not money. That can be used to better not as badly because I know we all think this whole thing with the good guys and then I title but I think in these situations yet we actually are. You know we're trying to kind of fire on a law causes which are important anti-tax anti-tax movement. You know people lose lives. It's actually that serious so we've got to kind of keep on trying. It's an uphill struggle. FM What's laxed for Chris French. Well I'm I'm in a very fortunate position monies to Finally obtained some kind of fairly substantial funding. That will buy me out of university duties for year and I'M GONNA use that time to try and write a popular science book on the novel. Listrik psychology wanted to do for many many years in the day. Job just gets in the way. There's too much text too much time. So that's the the next big project for me and just carry on. I very much enjoyed kind of public engagement side. I like going out and doing tolls to people and You okay the research taking over as well so but it's the it's the book project is the big a sign me up for a free copy will be first in line Chris Spreads. Thank you for so much for having me and you'll hear thank you for listening. Point of inquiry is production of the Center for inquiry the Center for inquiry five. Oh One C.. Three charitable nonprofit organization and whose vision is a world in which evidence signed into compassion rather than superstition pseudoscience or prejudice guide public policy. You can visit us at point of inquiry quiry dot. Org there you can listen to. All of PEO is archived. Episodes were available on itunes Google. Play spotify and your favorite podcast App of choice choice special thanks to Pamela Costlo of costly law located in the Miracle Mile in Los Angeles she does business and Intellectual Property Law and and helped us out with some of the valuable intellectual property information for this program. Thank you and see you again. Two weeks

London United States Richard Chris French Richard Wiseman James Randi Richard Dawkins Greenwich Richard Dawkins Foundation Chris Ricky America hugh UK scientist Paul Kurds Strong Bridge Jim underdown England King Henry
Jay on Human behavior and the future.

Hermit_Radio

28:16 min | 1 year ago

Jay on Human behavior and the future.

"<music> welcome back to hermit radio. This is your host cameron. I'm going to be interviewing. A friend of mine named jay lavalle and he's going to be talking talking about neuroscience. It's going to be kind of a free flowing conversation a little bit different than the last interview. You guys heard so listen and enjoy my friend jay. He's going to be introducing himself jay. Go ahead first of all cameron. Thanks for having me on the show. Buddy had another interview prior. That must be one of the first if you are indeed sweet. I hope everybody can hear us. I first of all congratulations on the show congratulations on doing this. You've been thinking about this and i encourage you to do it and i meant that i still think it's a great great outlet for you personally but also maybe we can have some interesting conversations and get some cool thoughts into people's heads. I'm sure there are already there but we'll hash out some things. That's exactly what i was thinking that that's the whole reasoning for these interviews the way that we're going about it. I just want people to start thinking and not be afraid to have their own ideas. I feel like we live in a time where people are not necessarily comfortable with saying saying what they think out loud and honestly there are people out there who don't like that and they'll put you down for having an idea that might seem a little bit out there or outside of the box but all the best ideas all the greatest things that were ever made in had had to start with an idea certainly and my opinion is pre mainstream science in general and so i may we may have conflicting thoughts about lots of things i'm pretty extreme in terms of my acceptance and obsession with with science and what the scientific method can do for us as a species and so that's really my focus these days strangely ainsley. I don't have much of a background on this subject so take everything i say with a grain of salt however i encourage the listener if <hes> how many we got today but i encourage all of you due to to fact check what i'm saying. Don't take anything. I say <hes> you know without some reasonable skepticism but i i think i'm reporting what the scientific community believes about these issues and i think that <hes> we need meaning system as a species species that is not counterfactual we are going to have to we're going to have to create a a a a global meeting system that is congruent with scientific fact in my estimation <hes> so anyway that maybe be a little bit off topic but but my background is pretty pretty bland pretty boring. I went to prep school and then i went to university college to study deep theater. Actually it was an actor in college and then i went back after that to get a masters in business which i <hes> did reluctantly and we can talk about that some too but anyway the floor is yours cameron. I uh we talk about a lot of really deep things and so that's the reason i bring up this this conversation about meaning systems. I've listened to some of the prior your prior podcasts and another we think about that kathy. I think a lot because that's what really care about is as a group in his a species we our brains make meaning and they insist on in it and <hes> so meaning i think is is really paramount to all of us. <hes> in any conversation we have about any topic i agree to the fullest extent of that and the biggest thing he said in my opinion there was purpose. We're all looking for it. Everybody has stack the debt question in them. It's almost like it's in your d._n._a. Like what are we doing here. Why are we doing this. Where do we go from here and i feel like we spent a lotta time asking that question. Question instead of acting on the question needs to stop being so much about this wandering game that we're doing whether or not you come from the spiritual side of the things or the scientific side of things i agree with him and that's why this conversation is also important because he i love that he comes from the scientific point of view because it helps clear up anything i say that might not sound all that scientific and i do feel like there is a middle ground and that's the point of these interviews is to find the middle ground on so everybody listening can understand what we're talking about. In hopefully have an impact on the community that you live in because that's really the baseline for all of these conversations nations finding happiness figuring out where your purposes and then how do we live in a community together and getting rid of some of these things like bullying or more unequal ratios of pay for people. You know getting rid of homelessness in figuring that out. That's all huge. Mess in the problem is were busy trying to. I forgot how to do it instead of just acting on doing it but the conversation jane i are going to have today. We're going to start by talking about neuroscience because in my i personal opinion. He's a very smart man and that's why i wanted him on the show and i think you guys will enjoy some of his insights on this topic jay. Go ahead so you know. I don't another. I have any insights but i do have some some information and i can tell you kind of what the leading one of my favorite theories <hes> said euroscience. I think the big question about neurosciences so what we mean by consciousness and i bring that up as it's that's very lots of people mean different things by that word but <hes> we can talk about that more specifically but let me ask you. What what are your yeah. We took we can talk about things in terms of business. We can talk about things in terms of good <hes> sort of a moral landscape for <hes>. I'm for humanity and count away. We ought to behave. We can get really specific about technical questions. What are you released it in karen. What what <hes>. What questions do you have for me or or for science in general. Maybe i can provide some all. I can do is say here's what i know about that topic. Here's what the science says. Here's how we can perhaps and then we can. Maybe have a dialogue about how we can deal with that scientific fact in a in a productive way or you came up with something l. Let's start with i one of the first conversations i ever had was talking about the prison system and how maybe the blame shouldn't be pushed so hard on some people aw it's not necessarily their fault their product of their environment and they're human beings in that in and of itself is conflicted and that causes conflict so so that was one of the first ones that we ever talked about and i really liked your insights on it and so maybe you can share that with everybody about how you feel about the prison system so let's this past those to this. Impasse the mike camera. This is cool this way. We can really kind of makes them. I contact and do some eye tracking. I got some interesting things about back to say about. I tracking by the way but i think your question again. I hate to jump into such a deep topic <hes> and kind of make assumptions about what what you're asking me but at the same time for sake of time i'll sort of interpret your question the way i interpreted which is to say what is the scientific basis for free will perhaps and what what should we do and how how should we think given the reality of the neuroscience behind this notion of free will and the biology general and i would say is a really difficult topic because it's counter intuitive and it's not the way we feel given our brains ability and ability and to construct what we recall. I think consciousness. This ideal of a free will <hes> but i'm afraid skeptic. I'll just go out and say that that means that. I'm i'm i'm to be diplomatic about it. I am skeptical of the existence of free will and a lot of people <hes> take offense to that and they say a this is ridiculous and of course i have free will and all these sort of visceral knee jerk reactions to that comment which i totally understand and so i hope i'm not offending the listener's however i do think that the that the the literature you know that we could talk about liberty experiments in the eighties you guys may or may not be interested or familiar with those experiments but you're in general i think that the that the acceptance or the ability to to doubt our free will and the free will of others is important because because it allows us to inspires tolerance it certainly just i in fact the notion of forgiveness kind of goes away because as we recognize having looked at the data that in a sense we are <hes> brain puppets i hate to i hate to put it in those terms so early on but <hes> i think there's this may not be the case. Jason and science may uncover some mysterious force that i'm unaware of physicists are unaware of but at this point <hes> the neuroscience looked pretty clear that if we do have free will <hes> it is it is limited at best and it might it involves degrees of freedom that certainly have some basis in in <hes> that are based on the laws of physics and a prior say the universe verse in our jeans and what we mean by jeans technically is the specific sequence of nucleotides and so these things things are <hes> they're given to us at birth and we interact socially with people and you might call those interactions chaotic and so <hes> perhaps that <hes> that ignorance of the of the privacy of the universe and future outcomes could carve out a place for free will but but in that case it would really be a case of ignorance rather than rather than knowledge and understanding it and my position has always cameron is to is is to try to understand things as a phrase from the enlightenment era a dare to understand and i'm a i'm a guy who says let's try to understand this in mechanistic terms and an let's try to deal with with reality as we know it rather than invoking what i call magical thinking were mysterious forces so anyway. I've said a lot there in. I've covered a lot <hes>. What do you think about that camera. This is exactly why i wanted him on the show because has anybody listening to this knows that that's completely the opposite of what i think now the difference is this is where it comes to be important in this is why i wanted him here factual data which is what he's talking about versus almost the nonsensical notion that there is free will or that there is a a greater consciousness. I have no argument to which is the reality. The only thing i can say is that i believe that reality reality is an individual experience and that we all have different perceptions of the reality that we live. I think that's what causes this is the confusion and people my personal opinion. Is that whatever you believe to be true for you in that moment as the one person having that thought it probably is true or it is not true you you ultimately have to make that decision or lack of decision on your own what matters to you and how do you decipher it. Look at all the different religions they're all trying to get to the same place bad saying a different name or tweaking the practices a little differently not to offend anybody in the religious community but everything i mean you could. I'd say science religion. It's all a matter of perspective what you choose to believe in in how it gets you to the end point which is an understanding of how the universe works whether it's through religious aspect or spiritual aspect or a scientific aspect really what everybody's looking for or trying to get to is some form of happiness whether it's through wisdom now that you know how the universe works you're now you feel this sense of happiness because you can not worry about it anymore anymore or you're trying to find happiness through multiple partners right you're cheating on the partners you have because they're getting boring and tiring and looking for something else but at baseline which looking for is happiness and ultimately only you or lack of you whatever you is can produce that happiness and that's ultimately for you to decide in figure out for yourself. The conversation jay and i are having is merely to get the juices flowing so that you can pick which one of those routes and start that journey to trying to figure out what that is because that's the only way as a human race. We're we're gonna get together and start to figure these things out like the beginning of the conversation instead of pondering about it. Take action about it so i think we can move on from there jay in your opinion in your mind in from the conversations we've had what does the future need need to start working towards a better tomorrow whether that's a one world government or governments that just operate in the peaceful way can can there be a peaceful world without war or a system that has rich people in poor people. How do you see that what kind of changes would need to be made to have of a successful future everyone. I just wanted take a minute to talk about the app. Anchor anchor is easiest way to make a podcast anchor gives you everything you need in one place which allows you to make a podcast just using your phone or your computer and they have creation tools that allow you to record and edit your podcasts so that it sounds great. They'll distribute your podcast for you so it can be we heard everywhere spotify apple google podcasts in many more you can easily make money from your podcast with no minimum listenership. Thanks for listening and check out the app anchor yikes <hes> difficult question. I don't know how many people are listening to this. I hope a bunch <hes> you're asking questions chairman and i i am nobody special but so i'll just have thanked buddy appreciate that you as well and that's that's a good point to make is that i'm special you your special me we form. You might call it to social bonds. This species is hyper social social. You might say given the research done by <hes> some pretty cool biologists you guys may or may not follow but i think the question is <hes> so let me skip my opinion on this matter and just talk about one idea in particular and that is <hes> since since i like to bring my since i like to sort of base all this stuff and sciences we alluded to there is a a an interpretation. You might call it a theory. You might call it. <hes> of <hes> of of darwin's natural selection that of course the hope you guys are aware of that concept hope maybe some of you have read origins species <hes> and maybe even descent a man and innocent a man he alludes to a a a <hes> an idea that we call now group selection or maybe at its base form kin selection and the word kind <hes> you guys may or may not know comes from the word kin and the <hes> the the big insight of darwin was that we all evolved from a common i ancestor and that means in a sense we are all kin and so we have the ability to be kind to each other and <hes> this notion of group selection is is a long long conversation but <hes> essentially says that as we all know intuitively <hes> between individuals if there are not selective forces between groups we say that selfishness beats unselfishness officious within groups but when this elective force of group selection you might call it is present the the the tables turn an unselfish groups beat selfish groups so so like in physics you can always take the world from another point of you quote the great richard feynman <hes> it's possible to rotate the frame of reference is that that was really the key insight of einstein <hes> if you compare his his theory of relativity to anything prior but certainly to newton <hes> <hes> so you can't is it possible for all to cooperate. Yes it's possible. <hes> what i like that of course is it probable. I don't know but again back to your question gammon. What is the mechanism. I think what you're asking how interpret u._s. Question i interpreted differently and that's what our brains do <hes> because we're not it <hes> linked up by the internet yet however i think that may be coming and that may be another episode certainly dr species is hyper social hyper cooperate hyper cooperative and that's what led us to this present point in time <hes> <hes> what is the mechanism for cooperation. I think it's group selection and so if you guys are interested in that topic encourage you to to research this notion of group selection. Maybe read a book by davidson wilson called this view of life or any of e o wilson's later work paper by <hes> yo wilson martin novak <hes> who is a austrian or german mathematician. It's he's really insightful. <hes> so do think the mechanism for cooperation the operation is group selection and for that to be possible <hes> you need between group selective pressure and so we talk about something thing in the real world today. Maybe that's climate change may be. Maybe the <hes> unfortunate event. <hes> process of of climate change will inspire us all to to cooperate and to do things we otherwise wouldn't have done because of this pressure pressure selective group or the selective pressure between let's call it the human race and <hes> and the scary the rate of increase the c o two in the atmosphere and the resulting he transferred so anyway long answer but <hes> i'm as hopeful as you are that we can all get along and and but this is gonna take a long time i'm to be clear you know to be realistic and i'm a realist is gonna take a long long time but that doesn't mean that <hes> you know it's it shouldn't be a goal and it's certainly a the possibility no question about that you know i agree and i've i've thought about that question so many times myself especially on on this journey and during the process of making this podcast and everything believe <hes> ronald reagan said it best back in the eighties or early early ninety s he said that what wouldn't it be interesting. If the world was faced with an outside threat maybe even like alien right. That would force us to work together and that's exactly kind of what you you would. <hes> insinuated is that the pressure would force us to come together and i really believe that that may be the only way to either get the ball rolling or order to make it actually happen i would i would like to believe in what i think definitely needs to happen is that it starts on the individual all if enough individuals change and agree to what we all want as a better tomorrow than that's how i would have to start it has to start with the individual learning to be a human being in society in learning relearning the rules we it's the only way we're going to have a future together is when we stop being dicks to each other. I had to put it so boldly like that but that's the truth until we can learn to actually we get along with each other on this planet to stop blowing each other up and cut each other off in traffic or what have you stabbed somebody for money. I don't blame any of that stuff. That's not those things are not the problem. The root problem is people in general and i think that it's just a matter of relearning how we should treat each other. The golden rule is the golden rule for a reason you treat others the way that you want to be treated if everybody on a fundamental level could understand that and work with that. I really feel like that is the beginning process of change. It's either that or some great cataclysm or threat of cataclysm. They were snap us into shape. I'd rather do it the other way but inevitably. I think that that is ultimately what we will face a human race to get us to that point <hes> i think this is a good spot to go ahead and wrap it up but as he had said earlier i think we're going to have a few more episodes soad's with him on the show some topics that we discussed you can let me know in the comments whether or not you'd like to hear about this but we discuss talking about a._i. Okay i and the threat over the crate advantage that could possess to the human race and we were also talking about business. Organizations shins coming from a standpoint of are they corrupt is are they all just a ponzi scheme or is there a way that we could do it. That is equal for everybody so those kind kind of things that john. We'll be talking about the future. If you guys really enjoyed this podcast. Let me know on the twitter page for hermit radio or the instagram page for whom radio can let me know in any of the comments or sending a message. Let me know what you'd like to hear in c. j. Thanks for coming on man. I really appreciate you being here. Anything you want to the crap crap before you go sure again. I don't know how many people i'm talking to but <hes> cameron let me know that things australia's stray in in germany picked up the podcast or or record at some listeners there <hes> so yeah. I want to wrap up by saying for solve cameras a good friend of mine. We worked together for some months <hes> he he had my back several times all the cheesy stuff so he and i are good buddies and hope podcast continues to do well hope he has me on again. We do have <hes> we see the world slightly differently that's fine at the same time i think as i mentioned i'm pretty pretty little technical guy and so i think in actual fact really there is no difference <hes> but i'd be really interested in to to hear about <hes> comments or questions or or anything that happens as a consequence of this podcast. If people like it and zack said prior and i hope i should have been really clear <hes> with with with with my disclaimer. I hope i'm not offending anybody. At the same time i encourage everybody to to to do some research into fact check and to investigate it <hes> some of the conclusions some of the <hes> mainstream conclusions made as a consequence of modern neuroscience and physics and and <hes> maybe that'll force forced moves objects addicts in science and physics and maybe that will force some change. I mean that literally not <hes> not in a pejorative way <hes> so anyway wake camera. Thanks for having me on buddy and really appreciate it congratulations to you again for for doing this. I think it will help you personally <hes>. I hope it helps them other individuals on our planet do some cool stuff talk about <hes> last thing i'll say is that <hes> this could be a butterfly effect moment for us. I talk about chaos a lot and chaos means in science and mathematics something different than it means to layperson or <hes>. I shouldn't say that i'm a lay person but it has a very tactical meaning and in science and it means sensitivity to initial conditions doesn't mean complexity so perhaps this conversation will spark <hes> again. Somebody's positive behavior we we call that a- as opposed to direct reciprocity where i help you and you helped me. This may be indirect reciprocity. Somebody somebody gets a an idea from his pod. Gassing goes out and does something great made a movie about that called it. Pay it forward. Pay it forward so anyway. Hope hope this <hes> inspired some people to do some cool things some pro social things so finally thanks cameron very much hope. I sees him rather all right. Everybody thanks for tuning into hermit radio. Stay tuned for more stuff coming. I've got interviews lined up and i'll be sharing during that information on twitter and instagram. If you guys want to know what's coming up in the future. Thanks everybody for listening <music>.

cameron jay lavalle twitter google kathy mike camera chairman ponzi scheme Jason davidson wilson c. j richard feynman australia zack ronald reagan einstein germany
Building a Life, Not Just a Business with Ian Sanders

The Business Builders Show with Marty Wolff

26:15 min | 1 year ago

Building a Life, Not Just a Business with Ian Sanders

"Entrepreneurs business owners professionals who seek excellence bringing them business classroom to you. It's the business builders show. Here's Marty wolf. Welcome to the business builders show with Martin wolf and today with our guest host Jay Kelley along with Kellyanne our executive producer DC Taylor. We will be your guys on this learning journey. Learn more about Kelly checkout her website at Jay Kelley, holy dot CO. That's Jay Kelley, holy dot CO. Okay. Kelly. Let's get the conversation going. Thanks marty. This is Kelly guest host of the business builders show. I am thrilled today. This is like mardi direct me if I'm wrong, I think this is our first international show. This is used Kelly. This is. We have creative consultant coach and storyteller in sunders here from outside of London. Welcome. Thank you very much right to great being waving across the Atlantic right now. Cross the pond, right? I'm gonna read ins bio he is on a mission to shake up the world through his workshops presentation, storytelling one to one session in brings fresh impassioned approach to spark change and inspire organizations teams and individuals. And we're going to talk about how does that he has run sessions for organizations, including the BBC, Microsoft Thomas, Cook money, which is a case study. I particularly want to dive into today in he's the author of four books. He's written about how to work smarter for the fended financial times. And that is how we met back at that T innovate conference in London as you sat there in the lobby. Of that hotel with your you know, dictaphone in my face. We talked about women in tech. So again in welcome to the show for, you know, given this little bit of an intro, but talk to people, but your journey to where you are today. Starting with the decision to quit your job back in nineteen ninety nine. Yeah. Good question Kelly. You know, these always interesting reflecting on our journeys to worry on. Now, always Husni, you know. So I started my career in a conventional way on spos- working for nine years in a in a media organization. I was running a pot of it. I guess these days would call a startup. So I had quite a entrepreneurial stocks in my career in a traditional way building a business that was part of a media group that was about to float on on which are London stop monk as a as a as a publicly quoted company. So it was an incredible journey me Kelly a naughty at at at at an early age. So by the age of. You know, twenty nine I was managing director of this broadcasting company, and it was all going, so well, you know, what's coming next. That's the thing about story. It's that is that you know on the surface. It was going so well, I learned a lot as a as a rookie management manage directly, you know. I'd never gone to business school. I'm very grateful to very good friends when pizzas and his wonderful books for kind of fuelling may through that decade of lending I win. But you know, I found myself in one thousand nine hundred nine having on the surf surface all this success. But underneath the cracks were starting to show. And I didn't think I'd realize the quiet time. But you know, looking back is very clear to see the eye hits out. I had a crash, you know, I was I was working too hard. I was out of my depth. I had much my plate. And that was the catalyst. I full going independent in nineteen ninety nine to thousands. And you know, it's interesting, isn't it because I know you have quite a few people on this show who talk about, you know, launching that side project making that business idea happen, and and having choosing to that I guess for me, my real on story is the irate the point in my in my career at early age while I so I can't do this anymore. And that is what critics. While well awhile, and you chucked it. I want you to reflect for moment. Fifteen years of freelancing, British some I wanna say insights, you have to share from other people who may not have hit that. Maybe maybe they're seeing the cracks or maybe they're intimidating a layoff or something else. But fifteen years of freelancing. You know, some insights you can share including something I've heard you say before getting comfortable with shifting positions. Gonna become too. That is funny. You say fifty years it's nearly while. I mean, it's nearly twenty years of being independent actually, and I've learned so much on that journey. But you know, what's funny, I was reflecting on just a couple of days ago is the. You know, I started my career in traditionally entrepreneurial, white growing a business. Okay. You know, I didn't own the business a chestnut growing business. Hiring staff, you know, developing appreciative, and I quit that but actually my life as an independent. I mean, I I hate that freedoms tiger that we will use it. But you know, I kept son second independent. My life isn't independent has also been very entrepeneurship. But actually, it's about the very agile and inability of business of one on I know that's not entrepeneurship with a biggie. The paps slowly automated, a real entrepeneurship spirit to survive and thrive in this new world of work in this crazy world that we will nominate him in twenty nine scene. That that really interesting use Zunes on that Kelly about the been comfortable shifted positions. Because if I was to look at my poff as an independent twenty years, I've done so many different things. A started little marketing agency what with brands like Benetton EM TV I did seventy different things Wrexham blokes, I wrote for the financial times. And it's been a journey of never really standing still on that is what suits may pass knee. I know that's not for everyone. So I love to shake things up. I love to reinvent it. I guess inevitably what I've learned along the way kind of having having belief in yourself being comfortable with uncertainty because you know, I mean for most of us, including the people listening to this show. You know, we do live in precarious world in whatever we do. You know, stability job security is not what it used to be a few decades ago. So I think a lot of. Goal come to win on sense. He and I guess what? Some of the key things for me kind of experimenting innovating trying try my hand things and just constantly constantly kind of staying at ya. Really? I love the any use the word independent instead of freelancer that so much more. I wanna say empowering as opposed to like freelance soon as you said that I was like freelance has the connotation of employees like at somebody else's Beck and call as opposed to a pro active decision to pursue an idea. I love that distinction. I think that's really interesting to reflect back on that. I think I, you know, I know some people some of them have been my clients on the coaching sessions people that have freelance who might be a freelance web developer refrain, Luntz copyright at that. That fails a lot more commodity is they have five days a week to sell to a client a month. So I'm going to a big organization to do that. They might be sitting on a co working space sitting at home or whatever. Whereas. Yeah, I mean, I suppose I've had a different spirit and a different. Yeah. Different different motivation. I suppose for what I do which is being about building this portfolio of stuff that I do, and it's very hard to tag or curious about how I get introduced those kind of things. I know you'll need she'll hand we only show half of what we do about perhaps a bit. Let you Kelly. We have both multidimensional that makes us more interesting. But it does make it like you just give one line at to describe you know, what we respectively doing the me the Julius. I'm I wrote a book about this mash up the joy is about being multidimensional about doing more than one thing. Again. No firm everyone. But the people that you may Kelly we thrive on that. Right. We thrive on the relationships between those different parts of what we do. When stuck in silos? We kind of got us saying professionally promiscuous overhead whatever they could feed in different worlds and for clients in when I go with big. Corporations. They love the lessons that I'm able to bring that teams from all his time in the trenches as an independent. That's how I'm going to introduce you the professionally promiscuous insiders. Aren't today on the business builders show in where and you mentioned one of your four books. We're just to remind everyone in centers is our guest in. Where is the best place for people to find you online? So it's Ian, Santa's dot com is the website and on on social media. I'm at Ian, Santa's on on Twitter, Instagram and all the rest of them. So yet insanity comes a good place to actually, okay. So being an independent isn't always, you know, sunshine and roses, and, you know, well, paying clients tell us about the good times experiment that you you launched. Yet. You know? It's funny, isn't it? We live in a world where often we tend to measure career success by very obvious metrics like status, all you know, what we're learning, and you know, for might from certain if might my father's generation. That's what success was it's like have you had a promotion yet? What are you awning? Do you have Shera options? Drove a company on all those things in that wasn't my fault. My father's note to meticulous up that was that world is that will for a lot of people and one went independent. I'll be honest. I had years when my commercial my earnings really fluctuated found that ridiyad off the being in a young go getting well paid successful executive in his late twenties. Suddenly to this will the fluctuating revenues in my first few years of being independent. And then I started to think well, hang on a minute. Why why you just measuring you'll success? Bess as an independent just by the fact, just by spreadsheet alleged, right? Why am I just measuring by an excel sheet? What about all the wonderful experiences are have, you know, going to different gonna different cities around the world during the run what shop here in that. Missing. Interesting people having that freedom that I enjoy a live here by the coast, just forty forty miles from London the edge of the Thames street on this morning. I dope for eight sets down on the beach ninety seconds my front dill at it's like all those things important as well. So I developed this this framework, which I call the good times, which I called good times. And I love the people do similar things, you know, someone get to proprietorial about what I do some people at gratitude journal, but I just write list every week. I headed good times. I started on a Monday morning. I ended on the Sunday night. I'm just. Down a list of all those experiences that really can't be fine up ri- fail. Most may so technically for woke token to Nazi and Kelly on the business builders podcasts having great, Kathy. And you know, this all those things we do in life that we might do pro Bono. Some those things matter as well. And it's given me all the states for kind of what makes me tick. And is just another way of looking at success. Rob the what did you Bill this month? What did you invoice? And like I said when I was talking to someone about this on Twitter a couple years ago. You know, I said this is my life not a business model. Right. You know, this this is my life. This is how I choose to measure the life. I've created myself of what life the business life credit myself. And of course, I'm not to be naive. Of course, money matters. Of course, it does have to have a financially viable business at the end of the day. But when it comes to thinking. About that S word success. You know, it goes beyond the spreadsheet for me. It goes on freedom experiences. And that really matters and tracking that 'cause I call an experiment is an experiment will five six years ago. But I still everyday now is really great habit for shooting into what makes me take excuse me. I love love love that. I think entrepreneur independent who is questioning what they're doing should keep that good times list. And I think it will someone who's in a job, you may be someone who's thinking about an encore career not knowing what you know, what's next in until you sort of analyze yourself. And what makes you enthusiastic what makes you tick as you say in wanna ask you that is keep this list. And then see what the patterns are afterwards. So what makes you take in? What makes me? Take Welby being Ian, let me unpack that freedom being physically independent getting people to look at the world of work differently being multidimensional. I, you know, I I do I do quite a lot of work from the attic of workspace from two d from now, but I, but I'm very nomadic. So I don't have a single desk. What space what from I from the lay of the place. So in walking round being curious maximal, those things together, which could have made may me is is is is really what makes me sick. And I guess Univer flexing on where we started this conversation about leaving my Cooper, Joel when it was co leaving my proper job, I suppose even back then Kellyanne knew what may be. But I guess there was some friction alike a disconnect between how I wanted to run. My what life and how employees wanted. Wanted wanted me to what my what life now, I guess, you know, the world of work has changed. I could walk in organizations twenty nine teen and be very agile do dual controls I'm work at a coffee shops. No lows thing. But back then it was quite different time. So shooting into what makes me take us being real like a compass a regret compass made a navigate Mike day today. What life my day-to-day choices? That's awesome. Okay. I got a couple more questions, and Marty you know, until you're sitting there quietly, and, you know, Proctor in the exam, you figure out when you're going to dive in my friend. I'm ready to go on called upon got notes. All right. I'm going to jump on this and then jump in before I asked my last question of Ian, ENY, storytelling important, and what the heck does it have to do with, you know, business and nine to five job. Well, you know, I'm I'm passionate about how stories can be used to kind of humanize business overnight. Now what lies because we're all sociable animals on. We wish even things we we sit around in offices in coffee shop, some BAAs talking about mathematical data, we sit around, and we shed stories. That's what we're doing right now. And I think they can be really, humanizing fools. It at careers. You know, if we wanna get highest we wanna get noticed. We wanna get promoted. You know is not enough just to have an awesome resume or an awesome Lincoln career trajectory to wave in front of an employer. He what are your stories that are actually gonna make people care about you and the journey wrong. And and you know, I love working within organizations where I help them on the stand up power story because when you talk to some business leaders and team leaders and Cicely people like, oh, yes, storytelling. That's like a mum to communications brand communications will Yair. It is but actually has real potential inside an organization as a humanizing fools. Celebrity passionate about about the power of store is what happens when we when we will stand up and tell pestle story, but like I have on the puck custoday. Well, can you share the Thomas Cook, money example? Yes. Hi ness. That was an example of something where I was asked to run an off site to running away. It's almost cook money, which is the financial services division of Thomas group one hundred seventy year old travel company, and it was like that that kinda fintech startup. We have sixty people in a in a country hotel about at an hour out of London. And I spent the off the noon in breakouts. With with fifteen people at a time teaching them the framework for telling a story, and then moving to the end of the day was we got all the sixty people in done full groups. We all the sixty people together in an amazing setting such a lovely room. It was a it was like a Jakobsen library in this kind of country house. And we go everyone. Standing up. By the crackling fire. It was November. I'm telling the story of how they got to hear bit. Like, I did a few minutes ago on this podcast. And I got it was amazing the stories that tumbled out people talking about a guy who came out how he'd been really belived school and how horrifying that had been fan. But how the ad given him such a strong spirit as an adult of on will will not the faded. I will I will really really have a varying spirit on woman to about thing must by roadside when she'd gone to visit some distant family in in in west Africa, and all these stories came out. And you know, what I think they were stories the may have tumbled out overtime in a walks can seen or in drinks or in a in a around the world cooler, but perhaps know what we did together at that weight. It was we created an opportunity, Anna. An platform if you like what people could tell those stories in in what we call kind of psychological safety that was they won't being recorded. You know, they went being videoed. It was private. I was there any outside of that. But what happened was as a result of those human stories that was shed in that room the next day when I went back to their office in December. That was a real bummed between those co workers that wasn't that full because stories connect to stent night, especially when we know about people's struggles on people's adversity. I'm when you understand that about each other. It's a real FOSS track to getting to know each other better to better team spirit, and you can't contrive to for it. We will what where have some you know, that doesn't come naturally. But I think using the power of personal stories to Bill team spirit, and build empathy and emotionally gauge -ment really powerful. And I I'll be honest. You know, I get off to run away a few times a year. But even the even results that really surprised me like it's all about it's all about leveraging the Poundstone about people being prepared to be vulnerable. It's about struggles. You know, there's a great you might not as. Great Richard Branson, quote that says a long list of successes does not make for good story. Or does not make any story. Let a good story being a one way when will open vulnerable about what we've been through to get to where we are now than you can build real emotional engagement. So you know, it was it was powerful while while while I'm just thinking of hearing situation where heard Richard Branson speak. And he was asked the question. What do you owe your success to and it was a room full of business leaders? And you know, they were all waiting for like the formula and spot responded with I came from a loving household. The the deflation and they exhaust like he's off in the room. And I'm like, well, there, you go folks, it's not all about, you know, some formula mardi what you got first of all while what a great story of you have my complete attention just comment. I guess you mentioned two things. Building a business of one. This is my life not a business model. I think that is so important for business builders show audience in and Kelly there is too much pressure in my opinion on people to scale I had a business coach several years ago, I stopped paying him because he said Moore, you can't scale your business. But wait a minute. I'm doing what I wanna do. I like doing it, but mardi you'll never scale. So after I told him, I don't give a shit about scale. And I want to do what I wanna do. I think those the way you told that story and the insights, you you share or so powerful for audience. Thank you for sharing that information, man. Well, thank you. And I mean that's fascinating your own experience because we had done we we hit a lot. And you know, I mean, I've got a lot of respect for onto preneurs that in one a scale and grind pay. But you know, we we all have to be Gary Chuck, and I love Gary, and I love average world. We don't all have to, you know, have a multiple office huge operation to be to to to two basic sensible. If we continue something that's viable, and we could do something sustainable. I mean, do something that makes us happy and healthy. And we pay the bills than Heli woman. More is probably familiar with the Jason freed, David Heinemann, a handsome that round the vice campout Chicago was being advocates full, you know, what success looks like. And then never want to build a business bigger than fifty people. That is enough. They have they have a product that people love that that turns I've, you know, very healthy tonight. And that's enough for them IGA. You acqui- software company hit. I this is good for us. We to a week in the some of their famous full, you know, when no when not burning our a employees into the ground and us to them. So yeah, great. Hey, your story. 'cause 'cause I think we will go kind of experience. This is our lives not a business model. Say I think people should check their motivation and check their what what's that spark for needing to scale. And is it someone else's expectations? Or is it the fact that you have that broader audience. Visit you just always feel so many times with entrepreneurs that the prospect of scaling is will. And then I'm gonna find my life as opposed to as you've said in this is my life, not a business model. So like, yeah, we wanna live our lives. We wanna live them. Now. Not at some point in the future in it is beyond a pleasure to have you on the show. Thanks for being our first international guests, and you have to admit mardi having someone with an English accent makes us just sound that much more intelligent on the business builders show. Does he come back? Jury research Pell my lawyer hat there is Jerry research on British accents or perceived as more intelligent. So we're just in that glow. In that halo in remind folks one more time where they can find you online. She'll by the way, thank you mostly on Kelly. I've really enjoyed this is fascinating to to get quizzed on my my own story. So my stoney so yeah, I'm on a on Ian, Santa's dot com incentives on Twitter on June reach out. And if you'll you'll listeners wanna wanna chat twin is a good place memos that some stage every day. So at the insanity you can find that. Thank you. Thank you. Thank you so much for listening to the business builder show to learn more about me, and I'm Marty wolf Goto, mardi Wolfram business solutions dot com. That's mardi wolf business solutions dot com. To learn more about Kelly ho go to her website. What's Jay Kelley, holy dot CO? That's Jake Kelly. Holy dot CO. And of course, you can find Kellyanne mardi. I'm lincoln. And Twitter remind you can find all our business builders shows on item Spotify and on your favorite podcast app. Bringing them business classroom to you. It's the business builders show with Martin wolf.

Jake Kelly Marty wolf Kelly ho Twitter London Jay Kelley Ian Martin wolf Santa Bill Husni consultant Beck Richard Branson BBC Microsoft sunders Kellyanne mardi London
Print lessons

Monocle 24: The Stack

29:35 min | 2 years ago

Print lessons

"Today, Monaco's editor and chief toddler lay gives us his top five print lessons for twenty nineteen. Plus, we speak to the editor of publication with an appeal tailored specifically to the oldies amongst us and also Nin Brazilian erotic. Art magazine, stay tuned for what shorter be steamy edition of the stock. From dory. House in London. This is stack thirty minutes of print industry assist with me. Tom Edwards coming up on the show. We have the editor of the oldie joining us to talk about the magazines oldie of the year awards. I wonder if I'm in contention and Brazilian title dealing with all things related to sexuality. But first let's hear from Monaco editor in chief. And chairman Tyler Belay who was back in London this past week. I sat down with him here in the studio to ask him about what he's expecting for the world of print in two thousand nineteen Tahoe back in London eve been exceptionally busy, of course. And well, I thought it'd be nice to Zurich LA in Paris. But I would love to get a quick sort of holiday season new year recap of news in terms of we know some of your regular whole around that time of year. Whether it's in Moreno in summer, it's pretty mentioned you've been on the west coast you'd been in Paris as well. What's the general sense? I mean, we spoke about great optimism looking into twenty nine thousand from the end of last year has that been born out by what you've seen or been beaten down already within the first four weeks. If I have my top five for twenty nineteen and I don't wanna start a negative note. But I do have this fear. Thome we've talked about it many times on this program. But there is a real crisis. The new Senate was heading back dessert from San Francisco airport, and I saw this new concept this new outfit which presented itself as a newsstand. But of course, as ever there were there were plenty of big thermoses to drink five liters coffee at why you'd wanna have five liters of coffee on the plane, anyway, and of course, neck pillows, and all the things that you get I'd ever and then. There was the news section. And it was I think it was sixteen titles through sick. There's sixteen boxes which were there for magazines, and because it was nicely designed shop ends you. Okay. Is this going to be upheld? As a new vision for news. Dan, leads to look like which was mostly the likes of people and popular magazines. I think they did have the New Yorker there. But it was just this is this is awful. And in this is in many ways the direction that the news trade is heading. So I think we need to I think there will be a positive component to this. But we're reaching a critical point right now where people do onto read they do want to read off of page, but it's becoming increasingly difficult to find a great selection of news. I think one of the problems certainly in this country and many airports elsewhere, there are major chains, which we know them as as places to go and buy print, but they're more focused on coke zero and selling Toby Laurent's and kit Coutts. And whatever your choices is in chocolate. I think there's a great layer of travelers interested readers who just think I don't want to go in there. This is not an environment that I wanna spend time in. So I do feel we have a crisis on the news stands. And it's a new stand issue. That's not the people don't wanna read magazines. I think the second thing when we look around. I think you know, the market right now, there's a positive sign. We always talk very, positively of Germany. I see a lot of interesting things still happening the German market. We've a friend special coming up finishing. So we talk about of course, intellectual leadership. We talk about brand leadership. We talk about the notion of premium, and I think we really have to look to both France and Germany as countries which still launch magazines and not just on a niche, of course, on this program were always presenting titles up and down the scale. But the big publishers are still interested in bringing out great title show. Give you my other three, please do the other things that I think are interesting this you're gonna come to something in a moment. There is of course, shakedown happening. We talk about being up and down the. Gail? And I think that that's going to present opportunities. You see, of course, some big publishers are blinking have blinked. And what does that mean? And I think that actually does throw up a little bit of of opportunity for the marketplace sitting again in this country. I think Brexit is going to be very interesting to watch how that plays out for just for media companies and not just print. We just made an interesting announcement. So I think maybe this is the first time people be hearing Trump's microphone, we're moving all of our print operations to Germany. So this all remains, but we are taking all of our print out of the southwest of the UK and moving to a very good facility outside of Hamburg, and partly that is a huge part of it is, of course, is exit and the logistic challenges that come with it. But I think also the readers will notice that it is going to be vastly improved magazine as well. Because also we're moving to a printer which is invested in print. They've got amazing new machines into that's that's exciting. And I think that that's going to offer it if shakeup in terms of quality, and maybe where people are base. Moving hearing that the likes of the BBC Thome are thinking that, you know, should they be putting some offices some divisions, especially for IT reasons outside of the UK on my last point. I think this exciting thing I had a very interesting meeting with the people from Piaggio. I don't know if you've ever sort of spun around London onto wheels. I'm a full wheels. I trust my three wheels an ABA, I'm we're thinking of a Ave newsstand. Of course, you know, people are not without be. That's that little three Wheeler that of course, you often see driving through the Tuscan countryside's pull yo whatever with a known a- at the wheel. And we're thinking how about we have a nice little bay with maybe a coffee setup. And and of course, the great newsstand that sort of taught as long the meditating for the summer, but up to July. I'll give that a go. We can imagine not show flip flops. Absolutely. Jumping booed lovely stuff. What we shall await that with great of interest. I wanted to pick your brain till a one you hear about another story. I guess speaks his big media picture about the. Balancing between print and digital. If indeed it is one that publishes should even be thinking about attempting to strike, and that wasn't announcement out of Conde nast into nationals that specific division about this vogue business digital only came out of their in house hub of some sort lots of exciting sort of rhetoric around the announcement. But I wonder is there a questionnaire about adhering to a brand or coming from a position of coherence. What did you make of it? I think it's interesting and or Mets called a curious move because the vote business brand has existed in one form or another for some time. We've seen it in Germany as this sort of spin off titles had a print life. And now it's clear that that vogue sees and opportunity to of course, be in their territory, and that is the world of fashion accessories, and luxury and to use voice of thority. Well, I would say they've had that chance they had that chance at acquired or announced a rooms where daily they spun women's wear daily off. Off. So if they wanted to have that trade voice, if they're feeling twitchy because business a fashion has done is done. So well, and they want to weigh in this territory. I think that ship has sailed for them the other big component and Andrew Tucker editor we were chatting about this Android with a good point. He said the other thing is, you know, vogue because they're so heavily reliant on advertising because they generally have to be quite nice to the brands at fill the front of the magazine the outside back cover. They can't go to town. And quite the same way that business a fashion can and all vastly vastly different business models is the room. Tom for vogue to say. That vogue business is I Notre preneurs magazine for women is there to encourage startup culture. Whether you want to launch a fashion up or whether you launch your own sandal collection. That's a possibility. I think that there could be scope to do that or in a very broad sense. Is it just a a women's focus title, which is okay? Entrepreneurship in general may. But that's not what I'm reading. I think what I've looked at sort of the releases and what we know about the title so far that doesn't seem to be quite where they're heading. And again, you have to sustain it. I think even vogue was going down that route. Would you want to build it up as a call them with in your existing franchise rather than saying this is going to be a spin off albeit digital do you want to be in that game day in day out nothing? Then if if I'm women mysterious entreprer will. Yeah. I'm getting my morning news from Bloomberg and lots of other very very focused niece sources and trades for the I'm not sure I need the the vote brand for it. That was Todd relying Monaco's editor in chief. And chairman talking to me and Atlanta this week here in London. Now, the distinguished slightly cheeky title, the ODI caters for an audience that's often ignored in the world of magazines every year, they also host their own award show, the oldie of the year award celebrating incredible figures such as this year the ninety year old Lionel blab, Monaco's filled Netto Gustav, shake, oh, spoke to the ody's editor Harry mount about the awards and the latest issue celebrating all Louis. They were held the awards on Tuesday this Tuesday in Simpson's in the strand lovely Victorian restaurant, and they'll set up in two thousand and one by the founder editor Ville de the great, Richard Ingram's. Also, of course, edited private life twenty three years, and they're to reward older people. I must stress that the magazine is for people of all ages despite his name, but the awards are very much to celebrate old people not just for being old Alan Bennett famously said that in Britain if you reach the age of ninety. Eat your own age your hero. But actually, it's the people who are reaching later life. But a still doing extraordinary things. So winna is the great law and old Blair who your international listeners you have heard of him, but he's just turned ninety. He's an extraordinary figure, but people like me born in the seventies is brought up on him being on every single panel show going I didn't realize then it is an extremely distinguished corio. Grefell who'd worked with Fred Astaire and had been Danzig ever since the war when he used to don'ts with his sister. Just like Fred a stay at Danzig sister. They would don't on the underground entertain people who sheltering from the bombs so he's been in business will show business for seventy five years, and he's still appearing on television on the best exotic marigold hotel and constantly on chat shows. And so it's about people who in Richard Ingram's terms. Still have snap in this celery. That's. Perfect. And he's an Kover of the latest issue will have lived the order award winners wound that I like about the auditors cheeky side to it as well. You know, it seems to me that you guys don't take yourself too seriously, which is a great thing that's crucial part of the outlook. Which actually by accident has become much more crucial in the last couple of years. I didn't know what you think. But I think we all more since informally than at any time in my lifetime forty seven because of various different movements and actually in the oldie. We celebrate the right to offend people while being funny and not gratuitously, but you should be able to say things that are funny. And if you if you on the way, I don't think that matters so much an older people a much less easily offended. We have these literally lunches once a month as well. With the old. We have some really quite outspoken speaker says I'm glad extraordinary things, and I've never in my two years in the job ever had anyone complain about being offended. I've had people complain about the noise or the volume levels not being loud enough, but never about being offending Harry. I agree. I just came back from a holiday in my home country talking to my grandma's, for example, if you so much more liberating talking some of my friends, it is very interesting. What you discuss NFL has an editorial probably also have to keep the balance because you know, today. I mean, even there's an article in the odium sure say, oh this author roads. And in the old controversial, I guess, you also have to create like a little no, you're right. I'm not completely free in there. Sometimes I suddenly wake up in the middle of the night. We were going to press, and I go, oh, God, you really can't say that anymore wouldn't bother me so much much, but somebody might suddenly become part of a Twitter storm, and as we know from somebody people the sort of destroyed. Well, let's talk about some of the older wieners for the story of lady Aven, the OD who has seen it all before. And worse. I mean, she's someone used during the church, whoever they won't and much more as well. We'll she's Uttley extreme. Ordinary. She's ninety eight and to those of your listeners haven't heard of lady on shoe is the widow of Anthony Eden who is the prime minister of Britain in nineteen fifty six during the Suez crisis and Eden who is a lot older than the died in ninety seventy seven, but she's still alive and extremely spry. Having said that sides, you couldn't make award she suddenly taken ill, but she was going to come. So here is somebody who has seen absolutely everything and everybody she knew crus- Schiff Millan. Well, she talked interviewed by Hugo Vickers in this new issue. She talks about the Suez crisis in nineteen fifty six and the reason why we awarded her the prize is not just a distinguished life. But also during this very very difficult time over Brexit. It's good to have reminded that we've been through worse times. And so the oldest definitely not an stole. Jim. I gue- Zine. But is there to show how much the post can shed light on today? One of other windows with somebody. Who very few people have heard of. But everyone you would have seen her art work this morning, all your listeners in Britain would have seen her artwork this morning. She's cooled. Margaret culverts listens assault thinking who the buddy hell is that. And she designed almost sixty years ago all the road signs in Britain. And that white on blue motorway font that was invented by her. So here is a woman now in early eighties that her creation is around us today, the whole time, and I think that's pod. What the only celebrates the post within the Morton, and Harry, you mentioned before, of course, to magazine for wages, and I have to agree. I mean, you know, when I read, you know, I do by the time to time for his by lived as your story. You wrote the king of the Dorset falsehood enters. I mean, those are kind of stories, let's be honest. Also ages would be interested in that as well while he is an extraordinary, man. He's a man called Charlie Newman who left school when he was fifteen and his pub landlord. Auden Dorset wonderful pub the square and compass on the perfect coast in Dorset, and his father was an amateur fossil hunter and took him out looking for fossils when he was a child. And now he was a world recognize Fussell finder. And in fact, the man's earliest ancestor was discovered a few years ago, and it was named after Charlie Newman this public could he'd helped found specimens this little creature, which is like a tiny rat. And it's called the deals to theorem new money new money as in Charlie Newman, and it's man's earliest ancestor hundred forty five million years old, and it was given the name because he'd done so much help to find specimens. And so I think anyone of any age with any curiosity would be interested in this figure who took me into friends across the rain lashed sea coast. Finding fossils is extraordinarily with tips from him. I found an incredible amanite hundred forty five million years old. It even had its own kind of flat stern on night rushed up to. I said, Charlie. This must be an extraordinary find and he went. Yeah. You could make clock out of that. It's made lovely story. Another curious about the ody's about the advertising, of course, this different. Of course, you are catering as well for, you know, some older people there's a lot of kind of cruise ads, and the, you know, I lived as one one to do you have a story commensurate from company six interesting real life stories to bring to the screen, which is so interesting because sometimes even my neighbor, she's she's eighty five and stories, you tell them like I should be recording this so yes, well, there is this massive market for older people as so much of the media advertising market goes online the print ads in the oldie do very well. And there's a very good point made by the late Auburn war. The terrific satirical, journalist who would've been eighty this year, sadly died almost twenty years ago when the oldie was set up by Richard Ingram's in nineteen ninety two. Helped by over more and others or remorse in the first issue article saying just like today advertises manufacturers TV companies not monocle radio, but lots of radio companies a falling over themselves to appeal to the young. There's nothing wrong in doing that. But this shouldn't do that at the expense of the old of which there are many more in this country. At also, they've got all the money so to appeal to older people with ads like the ones you've been referring to make sense, and you can still make money out of print ads with an older population as well and fun. Harry. Harry feeding which dozen nineteen therms of the the world of print feeling to mystic you can talk even about your own tight show diction show. Well, I am too mystic used to work in newspapers for a long time on the Daily Telegraph and the standard in the mail, and they've been having a very very rough time. And I think it's gonna get rough for them. But for I would say this tonight, but for good. D- magazines with proper reads in them that doing very well. We are up a very small bit over the last year, but magazines, the oldie private eye spectator, smaller magazines prospect and literally review doing incredibly well. And I think the prediction of the death of print has been wildly exaggerated. People still want to read that may want to read in digital format. That's fine. But they still want to read interesting amusing well written pieces, so I'm very optimistic the two thousand nineteen and beyond Harry mount the editor of the OD talking to Fernando and the latest issue of the ODI is out now. Finally on the program. Let's talk about Nin a Brazilian in Roddick art magazine founded by Alice Gaddafi and Letitia Zico varsity the bilingual title discusses body nudity sexuality, and it also looks beautiful on every page Monaco's Felton hundred Jayco caught up with Allison Letitia about how the magazine was conceived and indeed perceived when it first came out so Nin is because our biggest inspiration comes from an is name the French writer, which was one of the first woman to write about rats and sexuality, and I think she was never recognized as shoot was always seen like a mine or writer what's absurd, and we went to somehow bring attention to woman right in leaving. And thinking about the Rudd SISMI, you know, nowadays. So yeah, this is on a non er to. To an is name. When did it started? I mean, did you knew each other? And then you decided to do a magazine tell us about the project, we didn't know each other, but I- published lettuces sisters book have a publishing company called guate- shoe. We met through friends and her sister lychees came to a meeting of the publishing company fool of magazines, and lots of ideas. And I was like, wow, I love you. Let's do this. She wanted to magazine, and I was like, yeah. Really wanted to magazine as well as through this, and she had so many references, and I instantly fell in love. We started doing lots of meetings and thinking how we could do this. It was also a love story between us because we became like really big friends in the process of makings magazine, because we were like quite very connected with the same ideas and interests, and the will to make a publication with issues and subjects that we wanted to know when read and see in this type of public -ation thinks fairly unique worldwide and special in Brazil. So how did you think the starter was going to be received when you publish that? Well, in general, the whole magazine with thought no one would read it or we even like did everything after work. We went to my house and worked on the magazine because with wasn't like work. We only. Published six hundred fifty in the first issue, and when we saw in the week, we had none left. So we had to reprint and was really surprised and for us to see how people wanted to read though, it's an English name many people that can talk more about it. They don't know what Niimi's or where he comes from. I don't know. We were really surprised of how people enjoyed it. And they wanted a second one the third one we kept doing and actually that we were a bit naive as well because that people would do with nudity and sexuality in a more open way. Even though everybody things that preserves quite an open place. We can say that Brazilians are a bit conservative. So people wanted to read the magazine to sit the magazine. But in the first moment, it was hard some places much of south magazine because it was an erotic art publication. Yes. The space is open for. Is and the second issue was much easier to sell and to distribute in Brazil because people really wanted to see what we were producing like and logistics funny that you mention about Brazilians that can be quote -servative because people I'm sure in the world is say, oh, isn't a royalty. Call to magazine. I'm sure nobody will blink an eye. Brazil about that. But actually, it is true. You at the same time that is quite a sexual country many ways, you know, if they see like nudity in such a magazine that extra doesn't, you know, he's not Playboy's, not g magazines. You know what I mean? It's so we can see how it comes as a surprise to some people. Yes, everybody has the resume both carnival and naked people in tweets is not the reality. I mean, it's very impressive. Not everybody knows. But you cannot do top plas on the beaches in Brazil. So it's like, very contributary. We wanted to bring this the nets relative the nudity, you know, to show sexuality normal and natural thing and with that it could edgy. Kate somehow people in Brazil, you know, and to to show that you can leave a sexual life, and you can like nudity and sex, you know, and be a mom, and the parents and the have a normal life as we are as we do, you know, and it's funny because the publishing company also published child's books, and so the Instagram has some Nain pictures and children's books and people get really confused because you're not supposed to have them both in the same place. But I'm like I have a kid. I wanna see children's books I'm gonna see nudity like how we function being this woman. You know? So it's it's an interesting place to have just dialogue and and just talk openly about sex because no one ever talked to me about it. When those growing up, even though my parents are super open in general, what you said about this mixture kind of that yours published children's book because you have the main photo shoot here on the latest issue. With presenting actress Deborah into and she said, you know to give birth it's part of a sexual act. Also, that's an interesting quote, great Kover, by the way, can you? Tell us a bit more about the design, and how did you meet Deb unassuming to she came to us because she was a fan of the magazine, and then she made this booth hood Theriault, she was pregnant in the first month of the pregnancy. The photographer came to us saying that you had this photo shooting with Deborah and that she loved name, but it wasn't very in the beginning of the pregnancy. And then we decided to do it later when she was like, eight months and then with did the photo shooting exclusively. If she did it for us, you know, it was a non there because like great actor and relent woman, and she shows everything that we want to show as to our readers about being a woman a mum about having a life and been sexual and having other interests is in leaving the sexual. -ality and the natural way, you know, as we all should leave. Yeah. I was really impressed with her and how she had such similar ideas and the whole thing about giving birth and being sexual because it's a necked of life death altogether. So people really scared about it. And they don't talk much about it as well. So to break those boundaries and talk about it, and and courage woman to just be normal and great expectations. And it was also a process for the two of hers because when mistitled the first issue of name, we want to talk about about Billy and about the beauty of each body to show some things that people think that might may be odds are ugly or disturbing and who wanted to show how beauty it is. Because it's natural. It's a real bud is and to talk about sexuality in open way. And then the second issue can say that it was like we were having like our teenager moment. No. We went to shock, and we went to to talk about fluid gender. And we wanted to talk about things that were in top of the conversations by the time in two thousand sixteen and the third one both of us are more mature, I'm I'm a mother, I least became a mother in the middle of the process, and then I can say that Nin grew up as we did we did it together. You know, how these days because of us and is been and others in Nottingham in the UK, so speak a lot on line or do you meet for people in London now? So you kind of enjoyed his moments to perhaps think about the next issue or what you're going to do next. Right thirty. We did as we were saying on the phone being moms breastfeeding. Token about cooking the line. It was stressful. But it worked its favorite that we should like. Let's have a trip. Let's go eight till he can spend among good do for a lot. Okay. Yeah. Okay. Be the best issue coup. No star is. Pissed. The trouble issue like many magazines, do what about for the listeners of the stack that they might be curious about the magazine where are you guys selling or when how can they get in touch because I know what was in some policy as a few places there. You have one place loans toes a bit more about how to find Nin in Brazil. We are in all the main bookstores and here we starting to distribution which is doing a really good job in the UK. We you can find in Berlin, Huzzah, wove shop and Paris at all of our. It's like very good place. We're here in SoHo at the good news Nutting Hon with my friend, Alex and ideas on paper, and we are having good conversations about having a big distribution here in London and in UK and Portugal in Lisbon and the Dakota shop that was on a skeleton and Letitia equality from. In talking to finance earlier, you can find out more on their Instagram page named magazine. And that's it for this week's program. Thanks as always to fit and enter the producer and editors Cassie Galvin and Kenya scholar. It Komen square is suggestions of titles. We should be checking out all welcome drop line to finance on f p at Monaco dot com. And get join us at the same time next week before we go a little song for you. I know we already talked about the theme earlier in the program, but I see no problems in discussing it again, let's talk about sex from Stilton pepper. Thanks for listening.

London Harry mount editor Brazil Monaco UK Richard Ingram Charlie Newman Nin Germany Britain Paris Tom Edwards editor in chief chairman Art magazine Moreno Senate Monaco Thome
Our 15 Favorite Things Of 2019

Pop Culture Happy Hour

31:31 min | 1 year ago

Our 15 Favorite Things Of 2019

"Stephen Denote I like best about sitting down every week to do show told me Linda. Well in addition to knowing I'll get to see you and Glenn and our producers I get to see so many fantastic people bull who come and do the show with US people inside. NPR Your audie Cornish Sheer Sam Sanders. Your Berry Hardiman. Your Marisa Larusso but also so lots of people outside. NPR Brittany loose. Eric Adams from the nod Tobin Lo and Kathy from Nancy Aisha Harris from the New York Times and we added a bunch of New People this year and it takes time to reach out to those people find places for them to record if they're out here in DC takes time to keep track of what they're interested in what they might want to talk about And that's one of the many things that we ask our producers do and it's one of the many things that you can support by going to donate dot. NPR Dot org slash happy and supporting your local station that also pays as for our producers to cut the show and post show and keep our increasingly complicated calendar up to date. It's a ton of logistics and donating pays for all of our production and which is a good amount of work. Even just goofing around. Maybe especially when we're just goofing around So head over to donate dot. NPR DOT org slash. Happy and help us keep inviting inviting new voices to share this show with us and so we can share them with you. We loved a a lot of things in two thousand nineteen and now as the year comes to a close. It's time to give you just a taste of some of our favorite things of the year. We've got movies music television division theater and an instantly conic pair of plaid pants. I'm Stephen Thompson and I'm Linda Holmes we're talking about fifteen favorite things of the year on pop culture happy our from NPR. So don't go away support for pop. Culture happy hour and the following message come from green from Amex always on the lookout Out For the latest trends from your local bubble tea joints off the beaten path. Brewery tours green from AMEX can help you discover more with three times points on restaurants Toronto and travel including transit like taxis ride shares very rides and subway swipes. It's built around your lifestyle so you can keep doing you with an an extra boost of confidence. Learn more at American Express Dot com slash green from AMEX terms apply. Welcome back you just met. NPR Music Stephen Thompson. Also with us of course is Gone Weld and the NPR desk. Glenn Linda all right. I want to get right to it. It's our nineteen favorite things show. Let's get started. Glenn Glenn Gimme something A very specific scene from avengers endgame talking about Mark Ruffalo Hulk in the diner. This particular version of the hulk has been called many things depending on your frame of reference on call Cardigan Hawk. Some call him professor hoax call him scruff hulk some call him Daddy Hook what he is what he represents is kind of apotheosis every hero in the marvel universe the cinematic university. He's got a chance over the last forty eight movies to To grow and change except for black widow of course but that's another story most of them got a chance to do that Marcus Hook was the exception. Because he didn't have movie on his own and every time he was in the movie he was either moping or raging with the assistance sense of some CGI and it seems like when the brothers came to end game. They said look We've got one of the best actors of his generation. One that we give him a little bit more to do so they allowed him them to vote to play a real character and it was funny. It happened kind of suddenly and that was the joke of it but it was just a fun scene and you know not not for nothing The Mark Ruffalo Vulcan sweater. Yeah 'cause he's got he's sort of if you haven't seen it. He's a sort of an in-between banner and hulk that's the idea. So He's the green guy with the big Sweater filling out but he has sort of banners calmness and Californian affect. Yeah absolutely all right That's a good start. Thank you for that one Stephen Thompson what do you WANNA go with I. Twenty nineteen was in many ways the year of Liz and I think that is an unalloyed. Good I I think Lonzo is a joy her album because I love. You is one of my favorite albums of the year. She had a string of songs that I have absolutely loved over the course of the year. The moment that I want to pick out is a remix. She released late in two thousand nineteen of her son. Good as hell featuring Arianna `Grande Now that song brings up a couple of things for me. One is is such a wonderful foale joy of a song all year. Long Lizard just fed the pop music marketplace this long string of joy and affirmation. That album is is full of among other things laughter which is so incredibly refreshing but one thing that good as hell also represents is a larger theme in Pop music that I think is really interesting. which is that as the news cycles get shorter? The lifespan of a pop song keeps getting longer and I think that was really one of the stories of of the year and pop. Music is truth hurts was a huge hit for Lulu. That's from twenty seventeen. It was on top of the pop charts two years after it came out. What did she she follow it with a reworking of good as Hell Asong that one of you guys was talking about? What's making us happy on this show in two thousand sixteen? Yeah that's from twenty sixteen and now it's a hit in twenty nineteen and so I find it sort of fascinating how these songs find a way to live longer and longer and longer and in the case ace of Lonzo I think that is an absolute good. Absolutely I agree. Thank you very much Stephen Thompson. my first When I want to talk about is a little bit tricky because I I can't say too much about it but as you may know one of the big buzzed about TV shows this year was succession on HBO? Its second season had a lot of moments. It's that kind of have become instantly me mable and talk about a ball but what I want to talk about is the very end of of the season because what happened The very end of the season without giving too much away is that the show managed to make a hard turn in just the kind by the closing moments and I think that it reinforced to me. How satisfying it is to be so invested in something? You're so drawn into it that when something really happens. It's so thrilling to feel yourself being manipulated related. And that's what I really loved about it. I felt so manipulated by that final episode. That it's kind of perfect and I love that show. Oh I think the performances are so great and the way they put turns in that finale was so satisfying to me so final Final episode of the Second Season of succession is the first thing that I wanted to pick on my list of favorites Glenn. What's your next pick of the other two comedy central from the premise Which is that that to adult? Siblings are striving to make it in New York City in show business and they're kind of blindsided by the fact that they're very much younger sibling. teenager becomes an overnight youtube sensation Asian so a lot of shows out there about striving to make it in New York City in show business but they all kind of feel like they're written in a smoke filled room with a bunch of cigar-chomping Gen. xers there's going you know what these millennials love is their phones. Let's let's do an episode about that. The other two never felt that way so knowing and it's not forced and it's just funny and in this clip carry. The character played by drew. Tarver is for example trying to catch followers of this group of Vapid but beautiful beautiful instagram gays Kerry. We thought he likes us for who we are on our work. You call when you do work. All you do is get naked in post pictures that have sex with with each other. We don't have sex with each other. Why don't you we're version and I'm straight and he used to be? I have two nieces. That's not a thing. Drake AAC really not a thing. But now hit two zero. You add to that a great performance Shannon and a better than average runner involving Justin theroux. And it's just a great show. That's the other on comedy central. It is a great show. I enjoyed that show. Also all right. Thanks Glenn Steven. What's your next pack? The movie hustlers Hustler's is a stripper heist. Movie in which a group of women decide to start ripping off Wall Street de bags and but ultimately what unfolds within. That movie movie. Is this wonderful story of friendship. Among these women particularly the friendship between Constance Wu and Oscar contender Jennifer Lopez. It was so fantastic in the movie and the moment of it that I want to call attention to it at the end of this This long and punishing year is where constance blue comes up to a rooftop. Where Jennifer Lopez is is lounging in a for resplendent on the roof? And they're talking and it's chilly up. There and Jennifer Lopez purrs to Constance Wu. Climb into my car and it is. It is an instantly iconic and memorable moment in a film that I found really delightful thing. We have a clip of it. Should climbing the minute that I heard it in the screening of this that I went to the minute that you hear that line everybody sort of like giggles. Because it's so it's sort of like so blatantly dirty that it that it comes all the way back around to just being this sweet sweet but that line delivery she. She should get an Oscar for that line plumbing my for climbing. I'm with you on that one steven thank you very much in an hope. Everybody will find Hustler's if they haven't already One of my favorite movies of the year was us. which Jordan appeals A horror movie about these people who are are kind of d'appel gang of this nice family. That's on vacation and they are confronted by people who look just like them except they are wearing all red and and they're extremely creepy and this sort of the head of the group of Dabo Ganger is is the woman played by Lupita Yongbo. Who is the Dabo Ganger of the MOM? I'm in family and the character they call her read. And she's wearing this kind of red jumpsuit and the voice that she has and the way particularly this is what I picked as my actual favorite thing the way she walks the way that character walks is so unsettling because it is so oh not human it is so kind of not normal. It's not like you don't already know that something is very very wrong when these horrible monsters show up but it is so creepy and spidery and kind of clicking clicking across the floor it's just upsetting and what I love about horror movies. Movies is not just kind of the big. You know gruesome whatever scenes. They may have but the things that are just. Oh that's unsettling yeah. I'm GonNa think about that for a long time because it is upsetting. I ended up seeing that movie a second time because I got an opportunity to take my fifteen year old horror loving daughter to that movie. She is ob- obsessed with it. Just the visuals in that movie alone are so stunning. One of the best horror movies I've seen in years all right Glenn issue. What is next? I talked previously about the Broadway musical. The problem which is about these two young women who wanted to go to the prom together in a small town. The town doesn't want them to. And so these obnoxious th-they people from Broadway common and try to become activists and things go humorously awry The sweetest moment in the musical is one that happens but midway when all the straight kids at the school are doing their prom puzzles and the two young women that the plays about kind of find a corner of the stage and get their one chance. I chance to really sing a love song to each other while all this hurly burly is happening around them. I was not honest with myself. Breath hopelessness novel. That's Caitlyn communion and Isabel McCullough Just blowing the roof dump from wonderful. Thank you very much Glen. Stephen Have I. I'll stick with the theater. I thought about talking about be more chill a production. I absolutely loved and brought to the tiny desk this year. But I really wanted to talk about why we build the wall. which is the kind of big show stopping number in the Tony bedecked musical Haiti's town Haiti's town is adapted from an album by an. As Mitchell that it came out about ten years ago and why we build the wall in particular manages to be this really intense and incredible feat of stagecraft for a song that you would think was written for this cultural moment. Let's hear a little bit of it. How does the wall my children the children how the wall was in the Call I could swim around in the Voice of Patrick Page that dude's it's like tectonic plates shifted shifted because you saw eighty thousand. I didn't just in case people aren't familiar since obviously the context is not this cultural moment. What is the context of that song in Haiti so so Haiti's town is an adaptation of the Greek myth of orpheus and Eurydice they are lovers ritzy leaves this plane for the afterlife Basically you to find protection and orpheus ventures basically into hell to try to bring her back and hades presides over Haiti's town with his lover Pursue Stephanie and they are just the grandest characters. That particular song comes in as like he is the ruler of this world. That is walled off. The song song in the in the musical is kind of speaking of this authoritarian figure and kind of what he represents in that world but obviously the song has has multiple meanings. Right sure All right thank you very much Stephen Thompson. I am also going to stay tangentially in the world of musical theater and more specifically in the world of the movie marriage story when as we tape this has an outcome to net flicks. So you can watch it on. Netflix stars Adam driver and Scarlett Johansson Anson as a couple going through a very difficult and painful divorce and and there is a moment late in the film. When Adam driver sings the The song being alive from the Stephen Sondheim musical company. It's a series of vignettes about a man a single man with a bunch of married friends who are always hassling him to get married although they also all seem somewhat unhappy at times and being alive is kind of the climactic moment in which he accepts except that marriage and emotional intimacy in general maybe worth pursuing even though they're also kind of awful and he begins to to to accept that there's a push-and-pull to that transplanting VAT into this show in which he's not someone who's never are tried to be married. He's someone who's been married and seen it be awful was very very moving to me. I want to play a little bit of Adam drivers singing this. Someone's in need you too much someone to know you too. Well someone to blow you up short and to put you through. Hell you see what you look for. You know. Not Kidding be So Oh he's doing this basically in a piano bar So we just kind of getting up during a dinner with his friends and in addition to the fact that I think it's such a clever and unexpected use of this song in this context. I love it as a character. Beat because he is a theater guy and and when you hear him doing those little he's doing other voices of the people on the cast album who are throwing in their two cents while the guy is singing. He's you'll never be a kid again. That's Elaine in stringent album. And what I love about it is that it's so establishes him as a theater person who has listened to this cast album four hundred times. I had never ever really heard Adam drivers sing before. He sings Sort of in in inside Lou and Davis. But I was so I. I was so impressed and moved by this performance. Boy Do I think this is a smart smart seen I encourage you to seek out the movie and this scene in particular. I you just fell in love with instantly all right. So that's my pick Glenn ear pick is is related. Yeah this plucky young upstart named Stephen Sondheim kind of having having a year. There's a blinking. You'll miss it sometime song in knives out the morning. Show the politician. He's he's he's having a day So my pick is the episode of documentary now called Coop original cast album. Now documentary now is not you can't call it a mockumentary series because narrowly mocking. It is what they are series of loving modules deeply attentive loving images to various documentaries. And this one is a riff on the nineteen seventy eight penny. Baker documentary called company original cast album on which Elaine stritch famously Sings and the most memorable scene in that documentary Own Stretch in a little Sarah hat trying and trying and trying to do ladies who lunch over and over again and not quite getting it right. Look this is incredibly well done. Ah such attention to detail. There is a character. WHO's playing Elaine? Stritch riff in this Fake musical called co OP She's played by Paula. Pell Great Powell arrate Paula. Pell who it turns out has some chops God breakfast crosswords and see Z.. In this room isn't now it's good delivery. Okay so if that was enough that was Dino that would be enough but the thing about it is that there is a riff on you know. This is a John Lady not playing Stephen Sante But clearly and this is the this is the iconic plaid pants hance mentioned. Oh my God in the intro. He's he is in this kind of black turtleneck enemies plaid band with these pass this and so the capture the brunt of the bays as the capture everything about that documentary so John Lady. Who plays this riff on Stephen Sondheim has clearly watched those youtube clips were Stevenson? Time is passive aggressively aggressively instructing a performer on how to sing his damn very specifically in that documentary. Yes goes through a whole even weirder weirder than this but this one is but this one he goes up to two of the actresses one of them played by renee. Elise Gold's Berry. Who by the way was the original Angelica Schuyler on in Hamilton and just has some thoughts? It's a New York walk soap opera and Philip State to wound. Its New York soap opera and my heart is hard is what ruined ruined. Ruined ruined are you. I any D- There's only one way to say. It ruined ruined. Okay supposing I asked you in the past tense killer. Whale is not so simple question. How killer whale intimidated? Harpoon it right say that in the past harpooned right take off the ancient a and the R.. You are you got it now. It's it's shocking. How similar it is so precise? And that's the thing about that's went went documentary now is firing on all cylinders and it is totally here when the jokes are this specific and and precise they hit only a very narrow subset of the population but they hit that subset deeply yeah and it fills you with a very specific vic form of delight which is oh I have just been seen. I'm among my people I have been seen. And that's when it does it right. That's that's what documentary now is all about. Yeah so many things. That are the Great Richard Kind. Such good I tell you the allegra all right. Thank you very much Glen. Well than as you could tell that one brought. Let me a great deal of Joy Myself Stephen Thompson. What is your next back? One of my favorite new TV shows of two thousand Nineteen was shrill on Hulu starring the great eight and good eighty Bryant Kind of a loose adaptation of the book of the same name by Lindy West where the eighty bryant character goes through life and love with a boyfriend friend who is just redeemable enough to keep around and you only six episodes of the show. I want more. We're getting more but I want more more more. There's one one particular scene and I think anyone who has watched the show knows what I'm about to talk about which is episode four. She goes to the FAT Babe Pool. Party and Where's the swimsuit and his out in the world and she starts dancing? I don't think my feelings have been hit harder by a scene in the TV show this year. The sense of watching this character feel welcome in the world for maybe the first time is really deeply powerful and God that is such a gorgeous performance by Bryant. I really hope that show starts to pick up some awards attention because I think it is just terrific. Yeah if you think about it in a meadow way those actresses who are in that scene are also you know plus size women in swimsuits. MM suits being seen and being joyful and all that stuff so I agree. I think that was very good. Seen thank you very much steven my next pick is the year that CAITLAND Eland deavere had into projects that I really enjoyed that are very very different. one is book smart. The comedy in which a diverse starred opposite being Feldstein and. It's this great kind of out all night comedy with these two best friends and we talked about that on the show you can go back and listen to our episode about it but it was a very funny but also very warm hearted film Caitlyn deaver was also in unbelievable which is the mini series that aired on net flicks about a young woman who is sexually assaulted and then persuaded by the police. Essentially Angelique to falsely recant. And then years later these two Women detectives come back and kind of wind up solving. What actually happened? Happened to her and deavere playing up playing version of a real person in that miniseries is doing such different thing because her work there is so tender tender and so vulnerable and so sad much of the time. I was just really impressed to see her in those two projects doing such different things in such different ways. She's one of those actresses who I'm now just always happy to see in things and very impressed very impressive here ear so that is my pick Glenn. What's your next one? We're an Oscar season right now a lot a lot of movies trenice. Soak up that Oscar Buzz but only one film that came out this year asked the question that's on everybody's lips. The only question that matters the question of our time shish okay. What is he saying for the people who may not be able to understand it? I'll say this in non sea-captain from the free safety. Why did you spill your being all? I guess I'd just speedier be. This is from the lighthouse. A film that is just made for me And maybe not as many people from our uh-huh but holy crap. This film is just gorgeous from the first frame and it is weird from the get-go and just keeps getting weirder and of course the White House is about about hold your breath the lighthouse about a lighthouse in these two lighthouse keepers. Who are holed up there? A storm comes weirdness happens and they go gradually an not so gradually insane and both actors Willem Dafoe and Robert Pattinson are taken up big swing and both just knocked out of the park. I think maybe Pattinson is doing work. That I haven't seen him do before Willem. dafoe was always guy but Robert Pattinson is really risking stuff here and it's just so funny and brutal and wonderful and gorgeous So yes why did you spill your beans. I don't know if I've ever seen anything vibrate on the frequency of Glen quite as much. This is like when Stephen has a favorite band This lighthouse Glenn Favorite Band. Yup All right. Thank you very much Glen Stephen Thompson. What is your next pick? Well speaking of Steven's favourite band. My album of the year here is by a supergroup called the high women. Brandi Carlile Merrin Morris. Amanda shires Natalie can be they formed this kind of Americana Country supergroup supergroup. And you've got you know four songwriters and you think okay four songwriters. They're coming in. They're gonNA bring their extra stuff stuff. They didn't want to put on their albums you know. And it'll be a light and frothy and fun romp with these four great voices. This album is an absolute wire to wire. Powerhouse led by a song I cannot believe exists. It is their theme song. It is a mission statement. It is a tone setter is a showcase for all these incredible voices This is high women beyond the daughter sent to die alone and the marriage was still will back. Glad now if you recognize the tune that is Jimmy. Webb's nineteen and seventy seven classic the Highwayman rewritten for these women and it follows the same conceit. The original song popularized by the highwaymen away. Win Willie Nelson Waylon Jennings Johnny cash and Kris Kristofferson has each of those singers embodying a different character through time kind of laborers and people who died over the course of the great continuum of the universe and this performance recasts that song with women who have died amid persecution and each verse verse. A different woman is voiced by a different singer. Their voice by Actually Brandi carlile showers. Natalie Hamby and the singer Yola who is a fantastic discovery in twenty nineteen by the way and it is such a gorgeous song that does so much work in the span of just three minutes. It is an absolute knockout from an album. That has just nourished nourish me for months and months. I love it. The high women fantastic. Thank you Steven. My final pick. You know what I love. I love free stuff. I love a bonus. I love when when you get something that you're completely not expecting. That is on top of an experience that you already enjoyed The net flicks romantic comedy. Always be my. Maybe he which starred Randall Park and Allie Wong was a straight up romantic comedy. I don't know that I thought it was perfect but I thought it was very enjoyable. It obviously obviously is a contributor to more people of color in romantic comedies. which is something? Netflix is really. I think doing a good job with and I think it is so successful that when you get to the end of our romantic comedy you're like and they play like the little love song also. This movie should know before I play the song song features a cameo an ex servant extended cameo from an extraordinarily funny Keanu reeves playing himself if view Miss Goofy Keanu Reeves. This is where he went and you can kind of tell what eventually ensues by what you hear as you're listening into the credits of you know kind of this love song all of a sudden you hear something else entirely reason it was better than any seen you could Zia speed. I'm telling you for real. I punched decode bullets. He couldn't succeed so that is Randall. Park who in the film is a rapper. who has a band called? Hello Peril which is very funny joke And this is a song called. I punched Cana- Reeves and they actually have an extended rap up over the second half of the credits where he sings about he punching Keanu reeves and it has a whole bunch of different Keanu Reeves Jokes folks as well as then weaving back in kind of the story of the movie and If you are interested in hearing it it is available on your streaming services is again. It's called I punched Kiani Reuse and you will find it credited to hello payroll so that is A. That is the fifth thing that I wanted to pick As one of my a favorite things and of course we want to know about your favorite things of the year find us as always at facebook dot com slash p. c. h. h and on twitter a pch. That that brings us to the end of our show. Thanks so much to both of you guys for being here. You are two of my favorite things and of course thank you for listening to pop culture happy or from NPR as a reminder. Please remember to donate to your local station at donate dot. NPR DOT org slash. Happy and we will see you all. On Friday. Four Star Wars the rise of Skywalk the NBC. Sitcom friends turned twenty five this year. And it's still so here right now it's one of net flicks biggest shows but does it hold up the greatest failure I think of the show is that it's not funny. What are enduring hiring relationship with friends says about US next time on? It's been a minute from N._p._R..

Glenn Glenn Glen Stephen Thompson Stephen Thompson NPR Stephen Sondheim Glenn Steven Mark Ruffalo Amex Adam US Keanu Reeves Hustler Haiti Netflix Glenn Linda Oscar Richard Kind Elaine stritch Jennifer Lopez
Motivating Employees

Dear HBR:

29:36 min | 1 year ago

Motivating Employees

"Welcome to tear each biard from Harvard. Business Review I'm Dan Mcginn Alison Beard. It can be frustrating. But it doesn't have to. We don't need to let the conflicts get us down. That's where deer H. B. R. comes. We we take your questions. Look at the research. Talk to the experts and help you move forward Today we're talking about motivating employees with Richard Boyatzis. He's a professor at Case Western Reserve University and the author of Helping People People Change Richard. Thanks for being here thank you. How often is it? That people are coming to work completely unmotivated to do their jobs. Well sadly sadly the engagement numbers suggested that we're suffering with the motivation crisis. I mean if seventy six percent of the people full time jobs in the. US Don't feel engaged aged in their work in Europe. I think the last one I saw was eighty three percent in Japan. Eighty one. That's a huge number of people who aren't bringing their talent to work and end responsibility for that lies with the managers and leaders are the people who are supposed to be energizing people and engaging them and you think that bosses can effectively shift someone from being completely d motivated to a go-getter who wants to outperform. I think it's the only way to do it. And I think the immediate supervisor has the most impact I question dear. H PR are. I'm a young female founder director of a not for profit student program. I find it hard to motivate and manage my team to get into the group and get volunteering an experience for university. They always promised to achieve something but they end up doing nothing. They say they have to balance their own study and out of school activities. One in student on my executive team even tells people that she's the Co founder of our program. That's a lie. She doesn't even contribute effort equivalent to her position. She wants is to be a leader and always argues with me about her role. I really struggle to have her on the team but she wants to stay for the title experience. no-one has paid to do these jobs. So I can't really force them to do anything but I really WanNa make this program a success what should I do. This is a great example in a dilemma. That's all too typical because we don't really help people learn how to manage your motivate others even management schools. We're not good at that. We teach people how to do analysis and one of the great predictors of people who develop important competencies for life. Jobs are being in extracurricular activities clubs community organizations and sports teams. So she's in the right place to not just help add value but she's also in the right place to help develop herself more holistically but the big problem is that she is managing this team. Volunteers who don't want to be there aren't paid to be there. And who seem sort of apathetic static. I think the challenge if you will for her leadership right now is to think about. How do we build engagement? And the the single most powerful way to do it is to have people talk about and arrive at and then reaffirm their sense of purpose their shared vision. Yeah I mean there's always a challenge in managing volunteers. You know you have to use off power. You can't quite Boston around the same way. As if they're paid employees purpose I think has to be part of it. Relationships have to be part of it even if somebody joins because their girlfriend dragged them in if the person gets in there and gets energized and becomes believer and likes the relationships they're forming or they can be me a great volunteer presumably. These people are interested in the cause. So how does she get them more energized about about the cost it is likely alison that people did sign on because it sounded good now. What they have to do is think of and be a part of AH dialogue? What's our purpose? What our values? Why do we exist? How are we contributing? And then she reminds people about that along the way that no meeting goes by without saying something about why they're there the more it can have meaning to people in the less instrumental tremendous. That feels the more passionate people are and the more we see what's called organizational citizenship. People doing more than their jobs. Yeah and especially in volunteer volunteer settings like this one. I also think a leader needs to sort of program certain amount of fun into it. Yes that's something we see in organizations like this that are successful the having have engaged people and again going back to medical research. We know that playfulness is one of the four. Major things that activates the body's. He's own kind of healing and renewal process plus they. You know they're in college so it's now it's not a time in which you're supposed to be you know doing ninety ninety hour workweeks like you're in you associated law firm. Yeah I think also. This can't be a top down endeavor. She needs to have just more more one on one conversations group conversations again in a really fun way to get people more invested and feeling as if it's their organization to not just terse terse. Have you seen a leader who found an innovative way to get people to remember or recognize the purpose the organization on a daily or weekly basis. An example of that Tom Strauss was brilliant. CEO of Suma Health System started out as one hospital by the time he retired by forty five years ago they they had nine hospitals and seven outpatient clinics. He would have a meeting of the heads of every one of the hospitals and clinics. Once a week in his office for sixty minutes as they left he would pick two of them and say bring me back. A story for next week's meeting of some patient helped in your unit this week. The next week it opened the meeting. He'd give five to ten minutes of his sixty minutes to them telling two stories and the guy is brilliant because is what he's doing. He's reminding everybody their that. Their real purposes healing our listeners struggling to get the overall organization engaged but she really seems to be struggling troubling with this one person on her team. The person who's lied about being a CO founder. The person who is not contributing equivalent to her position and is really really just there for the title and the resume line. How should she deal with this one dynamic which seems really at the heart of what? She's struggling with my sense. Is that if the shared vision purpose. Discussion doesn't awaken her. Then I would suggest talking to her and it really comes down to. Who does she know why this person she's inferring? Why this person wants to be there? But she should ask her. She might be surprised and then once she hears from her. How do we design a role for this person? And what should she do about this issue that everyone seems to be struggling with time time management. You know just feeling that. They don't have enough time to give to this volunteer not for profit organization in the midst of their busy schedules. If it's it's fun it's engaging I think people will be drawn to it. I think they would give more time. Elsinore you any school paper in college I was. Did you spend wartime the paper than he did on classes at points near career. I spent every night when Thursday night there the entire night ours was Sunday night. And is that one of your best memories of college. Yes well and the important point that you raised most of the actual learning that helps people be better at work and better citizens listens and family members. They're learning in the non-core S- related activities at school. Yes you each found something that you're using today right awesome. What's her stomach? So I we want our letter writer to realize that this is a really good opportunity for her to learn how to manage. We want her to start up by finding the why. What is driving her? How can she find the why of the people that she's working with? What is bringing everyone to this organization? We think that that she should involve her people in these discussions about what the organization should be and do and what its goals are meals winter to make sure that everyone's having fun. playfulness with purpose is key to engagement in terms of the problematic executive team member. If this shared purpose conversation doesn't didn't change her behavior. It's definitely worth a one on one conversation about her personal motivations and maybe there's a special project or something different. She should do in her role. We think that if she does all of this well people are going to stop worrying about their busy schedules and really want to come work for this mission that she has set out we are net flicks goes behind the streams into net flicks. Its work culture and all of the exciting and innovative projects. What's happening hosted by LYLE? boxall a senior software engineer at net flex episodes feature executives who talk about their journey to net flix exciting challenges and the advice on how to get a job at net. Flex we also have a special guests including Rene Brown Interviewing Vernay Myers Net flicks vice president of inclusion strategy new episodes of we are. Netflix are released every month. Subscribe now on Apple podcasts. SPOTIFY stitcher pocket casts or wherever else. You listen to podcasts. All right next question. Dear H. B. R.. I work at one. One of Canada's top fifty employers to work for but we struggle to retain talent. We started losing our top performers to other companies due to a lack of growth and development opportunities to counter this trend the companies decided to identify and focus on rising stars. Were hoping this new program will control the talent drain. Here's the the dilemma. How do we prevent the employees who aren't selected? Join this program from feeling discouraged if confidentiality is needed. How do we maintain it? How do we ensure that? We achieve the goal of nurturing our best people while still sending a positive message to everyone. This is a brilliant question and a very common dilemma. That people face this person is talking about a classic retention brain-drain issue and whether we're talking about countries losing their talent or accompanies. This is a major issue. The problem is they're answer is a bit simplistic. So what are they doing wrong. It's dangerous to focus on the few people. What do HYPO programs do? They make the people selected into them feel special in elite beat and they make every buddy else feel like chopped liver and we also know that some percentage of the people the non high potentials actually are in all they need is something to wake up to so what you WanNa do is approach a lot of the folks with the opportunities for for job shifting for adding to their activities look at the issue of. What's engaging what's exciting? What's it's novel? What can people do and learn on the job? So you're arguing. And I think we agree with you. That there are downsides to high potential programs and and if a company is going to go down this path and have a high po program it should have alternate tracks and alternate opportunities for development for the people who are not select and I would say they should talk about the larger engagement and motivational program. That they're doing for learning opportunities the a novelty and then if they WANNA high potential program within that they might Do it as a subset. I'M GONNA say my two favorite Argentines sometimes too much more prosaic who talks about looking not just for ability for social skills and drive and cloudy. Oh Fernandez arouse who talks about about having the right values curiosity insight engagement and determination and all of those things aren't typically what leaders look for when they think. Oh who's is my star here so I think it's very important. If this company does a hypo program to have our letter writer exerts some influence silence on who is going into it and why she asked very specifically if the company goes ahead with hypo program which it seems like it's going to how does is it maintain confidentiality so that they don't get into this situation where there's the haves and the have nots. That's the dilemma. With these programs. So on this issue do I might make an argument for transparency. Because I think when people are chosen it will get out I. I think it's sort of impossible to maintain confidentiality and I would rather know. Well what do I need to do to get into that. Why do they select? What are the performance metrics that I need to hit? And if the organization Allison also offers some options for you to explore these other capabilities or deliverables us. Then you end up feeling okay. I'm disappointed but it's a fair process. Also if there's sort of either a rotational or a cohort or a cadence to it where there will be chances in the future to be selected at right. I think one of the problems with the secret of approach is that one gets the impression that because is it secret. You don't know when it started how long it is and and you assume that it's unfair. That's where the human mind will go our letter writer. Peter is smart to recognize that. You can't anger all of these people who you haven't tapped. You need to make sure that they feel valued that there are still growth and development opportunities eighties for them as you said return and in professional or professional service organizations which by their very nature are more egalitarian. This becomes a serious sustainability ability issue. Because if like at a university or a hospital or a consulting firm or an engineering firm if Somebody knows that somebody is picked in this high potential program the peers feel a little bit of resentment. Yeah I know people who are cynical. Who would look at the people who'd be put in a High Po program view like that's try hard thing my teenagers use the term disparagingly of that persons try hard To sort of ambitious and corporate in a negative way so I can see how like culturally that could the like the program could be seen as a turnoff by certain group people title. And are there other downsides even for the people who are selected for them. I think that it is possible. That people might rest on their laurels. If you will and that backfires or they ended up generalizing the impact. While I'm good at these things. They must be good at all these things. I think the high potential programs. There's a basic notion that you want to spend time with the people that you think are really the water walkers but it scutt downsides for the water walkers as well because all of a sudden they think they can walk on water just to wrap this up on a practical note. What exactly should she do now should she? She go to the leaders who are planning this hypo program and give them suggestions for how to change it. I think that if she frames it in terms of what they're trying to do and the resource constraint environment that she describes she may say you know. There's a way. Hey we can push this. That might help a lot of people and we can do a HYPO program. But let's not put everything into that. Let's make that a little lower key but includes something and then in terms of the people on her own team as an individual manager she. She can just work to make sure that anyone who hasn't been included feels as if they have room to grow you bet sedan. What are we telling our letter writer? We're telling you there are a lot of downsides these high potential programs they do you know create resentment they create a have and have not kind of environment armant. We think our listeners should speak up to management and point out that these programs have downsides and suggest alternatives among the alternatives would be to make sure that people who are not selected for the program also have other kinds of developmental opportunities. That there's something there to keep those people engaged to to make it a more rotational program that make it clear that people that if they weren't selected this year for the program. There's a chance they can be selected next year and try to make it clear what they have to do to get into the program at the end of the day. We wished that companies didn't do this sorting in such a visible way Because of the downsides but it sounds like the train may have left the station on this one and she just needs to try to to speak up so that the program is executed in a way that minimizes the downside. Risks for the people not selected dear H. B. R.. I'm one year into my role is a manager of a team of five that I inherited after joining my company. I have ten years experience and a masters degree in my field but I'm struggling to manage one employee a remote worker in case that matters since day one. She's given me extreme resistance. When asked her to share information or perform minor tasks? She always provides long winded responses for why she shouldn't have to or or how that's not how we do things. For example I asked to see draft agendas before their circulated and she baulked. When I joined the team I made a point of not immediately introducing major changes even though I saw tremendous room for improvement specific to her? I've identified major knowledge gaps. And done what I think. A good manager should by providing training opportunities. I tell her all the time. She's a star performer thinker for contributions. And give her public praise. Despite being remote she has great relationships at the main office. US As always chatty with colleagues during her quarterly visits she seems to behave badly. Only toward me. I'm not a micromanager. Although I suspect she assumes I am because surpassed managers were one hundred percent hands off. I've explained that my job is to connect the day-to-day back to the bigger picture strategy. And I can't do that if she's cutting me out and treating me coldly all I can make of it is that she simply doesn't like to be managed or doesn't like me at one point she went over my head to complain about me to my boss who shut it down and told her that getting less I was doing something illegal or unethical. Badmouthing me would not be tolerated after learning about this. I scheduled a call with a report to hear her out. She asked for more time time which I granted while also mentioning that we couldn't simply brush these issues under the rug. We did discuss later. Her chief complaint was that she does not have full autonomy I. I asked her to improve her team spirit and understand that at times I will ask her to do things. She may not agree with since then. She shifted from over to settle hostility. I see her taking credit for my ideas and work which we usually hear about managers doing to their directs. Not The other way around quite frankly could never imagine saying or doing any of these things to my boss us. What more can I do here to strike harmony with this report? Wow this is a complex situation and it's is one that a lot of new managers run into I bet you and and this could be an action step for her to go talk to the person who was the predecessor. Yes Sir her role and say I just need a little bit of perspective when you were running the unit. How did people do whether whether any buddy not who you thought was I- potential and doing really well was there? Anybody who you thought was very distraught or dissatisfied or a pain in the rear. My prediction in is if the predecessor is still around. They will identify. This person is having had these problems. The boss could decide to reassign this this person. It's interesting that you immediately jumped to having a conversation with the boss basically about how to get rid of this woman because normally in these situations we would say. Try to figure out what this employees motivations are. And what's really going on. Give her direct feedback. But I do think that it. Our letter writer has done a lot of those things already. She's already had the direct conversation. She's already patrolman. Not which is why didn't go there. I think this is too far down the road. Plus the letter writer is giving off very strong mixed signals. So she says. She thinks she's doing a great job and praises raises a lot in public. Meanwhile she thinks she has major technical deficiencies and she's told her about training. She needs right. And the dilemma is. It's con- so far. I'm not sure that conversation with this remote person is going to bring her back to the light. I was really impressed with the way the listener laid out the problem. She seemed like she was doing all the right things without a lot of success so empathize with her at the same time. I empathize with the problem problem employees Alison I have a lot of autonomy in our jobs and I think if tomorrow you and I had a new boss who was a lot more supervisory Sirri and was a lot more involved in day-to-day decision-making than we've become accustomed to. I don't think we would become problem employs but I think We would bristle and it would take aac some adaptation that there would probably be some tension around that. I agree so I do applaud. The person who's written in for everything that she's done but I think both of you are right in that. She hasn't fully taken her employees feelings to heart. And also Richard to your point. She hasn't coached her in the right way so before she has that conversation with the boss maybe she could hit a reset reset button on this whole relationship and just start over and try to coach with compassion. So do that excellent point and I think that's the all the concrete alternative alternative to try to engage this person. Here's my fear because this has gone on for a while and I suspect even with the prior manager species that going to trust her so what can pull her around if somebody can which is possible. I I'm not sure it could be this manager so essentially you're you're seeing. This relationship is too far. Gone to fix at asserted. Sounds like that I to me. Especially when she's done these things and the person's now gone passive aggressive about it. That's a lot. That's a lot for this a lot of healing one technique. I've seen used well is one. There is a toxic relationship. The manager finds somebody else appear of hers. That's it's also a manager but in a different unit who has a good relationship with this person and encourage them to have the engagement conversation. I mean it's kind of like third party. Conflict Resolution and that third party should probably be the boss. It could be but it doesn't have to be again. It depends on whether or not the boss is afraid of this person to and that's why he in a sense kick the can down the road. Why shouldn't we just fire her if she's done well in the past in if she has some commitment to the organization you know to pick up on the theme of the prior question? You don't want the brain drain but the question is she. You might not be in the right job so if this manager meets with the boss says. Look so-and-so is good at these things she makes an important contribution into the firm but in this role as a part of this team it just doesn't work it's really trying to say. How do I find another job that she can do find some opportunity that she might find more engaging if that doesn't work then as I say sometimes I'm jeff get divorced one of the things about this employee that is unique in the letter writer says this start? This is a remote worker in case that matters. I wonder if it does matter whether the letter writer might have a subtle bias that she needs to more closely supervised somebody somebody who's remote. Because she can't see her every day and I wonder whether they need to take a look at that aspect of the relationship and see whether the person is being treated a little bit different for because she's out of sight and whether the employee is more sensitive because she isn't around her colleagues and her boss every day. That's all possible. It's also possible that a year into the role as a manager. The person this letter writer hasn't had sufficient training or coaching coaching herself. To be able to think through these things or the because of the remoteness of the relationship they just haven't they don't have the everyday social interaction. Interaction Water Cooler things that people typically have in an office setting so that while letter writer has probably bonded the way. You'd WanNa bond with your other for employees on the team this this fifth one is the outlier not just because performance but also has. They haven't had the daily interaction that you have being an office together and clearly a lot of things in in our work situations are based on the quality of our relationships and if the letter writer has not interacted with this person or the rest of the team they don't have a prior relationship so I think working with remote workers to pick up on your point is is more challenging yes. We did an entire entire show on remote work in the unique challenges that it presents for managers so listeners please go check it out the one thing that I also wanna add as a piece of advice. Ace is to make sure that this toxic situation with one employee is in diminishing her management of the entire team. Excellent point excellent point. We do not managers. Tend to get fixated on a problem person. When they should be spending all their time thinking about the good performers and if she lets it get to her? She's going to be so preoccupied preoccupied that she won't do things that she knows she should do. All Right Alison. What's our advice so I? We applaud this letter writer for the the things that she's done so far to try to better manage this employee but we do worry about a few things. I think she needs to take a little bit more time to understand where the employee employee is coming from. She had a lot of autonomy before and she doesn't now the fact that she's a remote worker is certainly a factor Because the two of them haven't had a chance chance to develop a any kind of personal relationship. We also worry that she sent mixed signals. You know she sees major deficiencies but she's telling her she's a star and praising her are which probably doesn't sit right with the employees. It's possible that she could just hit the reset button and try to coach and motivate her in a better way asking about you know what her dreams and aspirations are in trying to develop a path forward collaboratively but it does seem like the situation has become too toxic at this point. We think it's probably wise to bring in a third party. It could be the boss and you could have a conversation about what to do with this woman. Perhaps it's a different role different manager. If that doesn't work it might be time to consider letting her go but ultimately we don't want this letter writer lose focus on the big picture. She needs to make sure that this one problem doesn't diminish the way. She manages her entire team as the new manager. Great Richard thanks for joining us. It's been delightful. Thank you Richard Boyatzis. He's a professor at Case Western Reserve University and the author author of helping people change thanks to the listeners. Who wrote us with their questions? Now we WANNA I know your questions. Send us an email with your workplace challenge and how we can help the email addresses dear. HP are at H. B. R. Dot. Org We also want to thank Louis. Weeks and Nick deprave composing our theme music. We hope you like today's episode. And if you WANNA get the next one automatically adequately please go to your podcast up and hit subscribe and if you like the show please give us a five star review. I'm Dan Mcginn and I'm alison beard. Thanks for listening to dear the. HBO

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