18 Burst results for "Great Richard"

"great richard" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

Bloomberg Radio New York

05:58 min | Last month

"great richard" Discussed on Bloomberg Radio New York

"Spending overall. And there are a lot of these high frequency indicators, including restaurants, including air travel that give us an idea of where we are with that. But since Tom brought up the late great Richard Yamarone, there is another. Category that he used to look at all the time, and here's where I'll save Lisa Women's clothing. Women, according to Rich, where the controllers of the family budget, and so they knew when there was extra money to go out and buy things, And if the women's clothings sales are rising significantly, you can think that people have decided things are getting a little bit better if they're stagnant or falling. Then you can assume that things have gotten worse. That's the Yamarone indicator. So that would be like the fame. Richard Yamarone, Prada monitor. I mean, is that what you're coming down to me, mate? Seriously, Mike right now. Big boxes, killing it. Amazons, killing it. I think everything else in retail is really, really struggling to find a place in luxuries just flat out flat on her back. What do you see in consumer spending some 69 70% of the American economy? Well, you pretty much now that dominates the I didn't get a bigger box people and the delivery people online sales have been strong and again, the bigger the company the better off. They seem to be grocery store sales. We're very strong. They've sort of leveled off now is people have gotten all the toilet paper they seem to need. So at this point we you do want to watch the optional spending, particularly at restaurants Last week, the open table indicator declined a little bit. Andi saw bar and restaurant spending in the retail sales report a little bit weaker than it had been. So you've got to be concerned about things like that. And then, of course, we can spend the day talking to Lisa about whether she's shopping. You don't want to do that. I just don't got to say right now. Mark McKay. You could bring up something really important. That was consumers Disengaging. You actually seem real evidence of that happening in the U. S economy. What we're seeing in a slowdown in spending in the fact that services spending doesn't pick up a lot. What we're concerned about now. Is that a lot of states because we're in the middle of this third wave of the pandemic that's really hitting and you're seeing states start to close the optional businesses that inside dining bars and restaurants that sort of thing. And if that's the case, then we're gonna have another crimp on spending. It's not going to be a total lockdowns like we saw, but it is going to be sort of a spigot. You got to get through a throttling back a little bit of economic growth, and that growth gets recycled through the economy. So things slow down overall. Michael Everywhere I look, I see new cars. It seems like everybody's out there. Buy new cars. They're we have 17 million unit economy or was something different? Something new. Or is there a new mix between expensive new cars and more reasonable used cars? Well, we went from about 11 million back in April to about 15 to 16 earlier. Now, I don't know that we get back to 17 million, but a lot of what people have been buying are used cars and there seems to be a feeling that a lot of people are doing that because they don't want to use public transportation. And they want to make sure they can get to work. Now does that fade as people feel better about the virus? And do we see car sales start to fade a little bit, because those who are going to go buy cars did buy cars that's going to be an interesting dynamic. The automakers were all preparing for a world where we were going to run out by electric cars. Now people have loaded up on used cars, and you wonder if that's going away. Ah, whole replacement cycle and John So what we could say is car sales of decelerated. You could say that you don't want to say anybody's tapping the brakes or think what was Okay, this old school. This is old school journalism. I think they said it was looking at the ground. Lauderdale reported much better than expected earnings. Look at that. Yeah. And they sell you a car, Katie cases so We'll see it tomorrow morning, Mike for initial jobless serious now. Yeah, Yeah. 8 78 170,000 is the estimate right now? The previous number Tom at 98 of 900. I'm so glad you bring this up because you've got a debate tomorrow and you know, you got to wrap it around the debate. We're all this happy talk about Apple and Amazon and making money trying to not lose money. You know what? There's a whole other economy out there off that statistic we see with Mike at 8 30 don't say there is and one of the themes to borrow will be American families and security and those kind of things. Tom won't just be about covered 19, but we know what the administration what this president. More specifically would like to make this debate about the campaign's been pretty clear foreign policy. And I think, Lisa, we already got a good idea of where things are heading tomorrow evening in Nashville, Tennessee. Yeah, I think the mute button will be deployed. I'm curious to hear About China, a key issue and, frankly, a market moving one with people expecting Joe Biden to come up with something and they think that he's not going to be a hard on China's president Trump would be, which is one reason that people give for the acceleration asset prices over there. Yeah, but debates don't look like that. I mean, to be honest guys, and this goes back to our interview or not interview with Mr Giuliani a few days ago. John, this is going to be a president, I believe wants to talk about the son of Vice President Biden versus Mr Biden, who just doesn't want to make a mistake. Am I right on that? I think we'll have that kind of moments. Who are anything you keep bringing up a conversation and interview We had a number of weeks ago trying to move that was no interview of Happy talk. Just trying to move on. I don't know if you can call those kind of moments interviews. I'm not sure if that's what that Wass With Tom Kane and Lacey just crushed it with the mayor coming up Calor Group co founder from London and New York, this is blown back..

Tom Kane Lisa Women Richard Yamarone Mike Joe Biden president John Rich China Mr Giuliani Mark McKay Vice President Michael Tennessee Katie Nashville
Joker dominates this year’s Oscar nominations

iHeartRadio Podcast Premiere

01:41 min | 11 months ago

Joker dominates this year’s Oscar nominations

"We're talking a Washington post film critic and horn today about the twenty twenty Oscar nominations let me ask you this going back to the joker for a second how does Joaquin Phoenix's portrayal of the joker compared to heap ledgers who won an academy award for different category but he did win an Oscar for his portrayal of the joke really good question I think it's almost you know if if not we're now at a point where these comic book franchises and these comic book art properties are almost like our Shakespeare where you can have different actors interpreting Richard the third and say he's a great Richard the third yeah or I love his Richard the third and it takes nothing away from the other guys you know a livia is Richard the third and or you know versus gilded Richard the third and I I think that's almost where we're at with these interpretations which is fascinating to me so yeah I think they're kind of their their distinctive that to that movies are very different although they're both very very dark and I do think that there is a danger or a kind of a habit with these movies to think that dark is better and dark is more sophisticated their darkest deeper and I don't think that's true but but there is no doubt that this Joaquin Phoenix performance is it's almost frightening how far he goes to inhabit this this persona and there is no doubt that the hundred percent commitment on his part and and it's really admirable I mean it it's almost more akin to the Johnny Cash performance manager just thoroughly inhabiting a character and and just just putting yourself into it a

Washington Joaquin Phoenix Oscar Richard Heap Johnny Cash
"great richard" Discussed on Bulletproof Radio

Bulletproof Radio

03:32 min | 1 year ago

"great richard" Discussed on Bulletproof Radio

"In other words, the laws of physics are independent of the time parameters positive or negative sign and that implies that there's a symmetry and that going back in time. Could in fact be possible. What I'm connected to in. My research is the ultimate origin of the universe, which seems to be in one class of models. The ultimate stopping point. In other words. There's a time before which you could not return. So if time travel is possible, it would it would beggar, you know, a lot of questions, for example, what if you tried to teleport back to before there was a universe teleport into that's a question. And so the the main focus to answer questions. I don't know. I don't think anybody knows when time travel will be possible. But I will say that it's not believed to be fundamentally forbidden by the laws of physics. And as the late. Great Richard Feynman said and others have said anything, that's not forbidden is mandatory are right. I I actually really liked that as one of those people with oppositional defiant disorder. Just resonates with me. So you're you're saying, I maybe it's possible. It certainly hasn't been proven impossible that we'll have time travel at some point. But you're looking at the beginning of the universe. And certainly you'd want understand that. So what's your current theory? Are you a big bang guy? I remember my son's like daddy. I'm grateful for the big bang because without it. There wouldn't be anything like that's pretty cool gratitude, but I'm not sure that's true. The right so throughout human history and even back to the, you know, biblical days. So, you know, not taking a position on religiosity. If you think about it the the bible begins with basically, the big bang. You know, how did the universe begin? And why is that the rest of the books about, you know, like different kinds of food. You can't eat with other types of food, or you know, ways that you do this or that for a tribe of nomadic Semites in the bronze age, so why did it begin with the big bag? And I think the big bang is a story. It says it's built into our consciousness as human beings. This quest that must have an origin. Human beings are very uncomfortable with there not being with their with them not being in the middle of a story and media, raise it's called almost everything your life. I mean, you'll only know who your dad was. Because your mom told you and you trust your mom, right? So he's twenty three meter verify. That's that's true eating and. But if you go back in time far enough, you might reach a time where there was no you're not in the middle of anything here at the beginning of it. So what's so interesting to me is that throughout human history from the ancient Greeks as I said from the bible to the ancient Greeks to modern day. Einstein himself believed the universe was static unchanging any terminal and the bible was sort of sending an opposition to that with the with could be read into it that there was a beginning time equals zero. What's so interesting to me is throughout the last hundred years, the more that we learn about the conditions that prevailed at the earliest epoch that we can measure, which is my field of study. We are learning that it's a potentially impossible to know not only if there was a big bang. In other words, if there was a single big bang, but we may not be able to ever to know if there are other universes with their own big Bang's of called the multi verse and similarly Wieman up the L to know if our own universe is just one cycle out of a potentially infinite number of. Bangs and collapses and big banks and big and big crunches throughout eternity truly eternity and the human brain is, you know, even with all the octane oil in the world..

Richard Feynman Einstein Bangs twenty three meter hundred years
"great richard" Discussed on KTOK

KTOK

15:15 min | 1 year ago

"great richard" Discussed on KTOK

"Welcome to coast to coast AM. How are you? Great, richard. Thanks for having me. Let's start with a little bit about what bio quark is. And what you do. Absolutely. So, you know, we are a biotech company, and we are developing pharmaceuticals and other healthcare products that are basically taking clues from the natural world to to solve some of the major problems that we have before us and those clues can be from an Vivians as we study how they regenerate or species that do not age or even the ones that, you know, have the skill of dying and coming back to life. We like to take these clues and say, okay, all these other species via the powers of evolution have been here. Hundreds of millions and billions of years before us, how do they survive? So very well. And why do we continually get wiped out by all the diseases? Acute and chronic. That's about as basically biocrops core mission is continuing to look at nature and find these answers that basically been the background the hundred years in the healthcare industry, but we wanna take it a step further. I was reading some of your press material. And I thought this line sort of sums up what we'll be discussing tonight, and that is that bio cork studies. Evolution -arily perfected a raise of meadow bowl lights or small molecules from the natural world that can lead to the development of novel therapeutics for a range of chronic diseases, responsible for human degeneration and suffering which is quite a mouthful, but let's focus on what you mean by the evolutionary perfected arrays of metal bullets. What does that mean? Well, I mean, look out your window. And you know, you might see a tree, you know, the ancestors of that tree were around a billion years ago, they survive I. Ages. They survive, you know, just a nasty stuff on this planet, and they died and get sick of the same stuff to kill. But they don't pay when they get sick ministry outside my window. Here gets sick. It doesn't take, you know, fifty milligrams of amoxicillin it basically create inside itself. Tells shall we say of bioactive substances to defend itself from funguses and bacteria and animals chewing on it and so forth and so one so we say evolutionary perfected over time. These species have had to develop these skills, and whether their plants or bacteria, or you know, and they can regenerate or flat worms that can resist cancer. This is something that happens over time that you know, we as humans. We don't have the skills yet. We've only been here in terms of a couple of million years. So that those are the foods that we're looking for. And when we say metabolite, basically, the natural chemicals and proteins and other substances that these creatures make internally to protect themselves from disease degeneration death. So we'll get into mosquitoes and just a bit. But I want to further understand a little bit more about what you do and what you're hoping to achieve. So when we think of the natural world at the example, I liked I like is the Greenland shark because it was in the news a couple of years ago. And according to a recent study, they the Greenland shark lives at least as long as four hundred years and get this. They reach their sexual maturity at the age of about one hundred and fifty so have we figured out why Greenland sharks, for example, live that long? In is something we we can extract from the Greenland, shark synthesize it into a drug help humans. Let's say live longer healthier lives. Or is that I'm guessing a vast over simplification, not if you've hit it on the head the freemen sharks, a great example of species that are so called negligibly senescence. So basically, they age age extremely slowly in comparison. To us. Another example related to that the Arctic ice landed clam, they found one they've found one recently that was over five hundred years old. It was year before America because here so. Yeah, I mean, these are wonderful examples of how evolution has decided. These species are going to live a lot longer than us. And of course, it's gone via the marvels of chemistry. But, you know, not the marvels of chemistry produce down the road. It's you pod. But reneged, and so yes, besides from you know, some of the other things we're doing and we'll get into negligibly senescence organisms do hold a wide range of bioactive substances that keep them healthy. Whether those are anti-inflammatories antioxidants were wide range of other substances with farm, clouds activity, absolutely beautiful examples in the Greenland, shark is one of the greatest ones. Yeah. And you mentioned flat worms, and I was reading in preparation for this program. I was reading this British newspaper article from twenty twelve and it reported that flat worms could hold the key to immortality. And they could live theoretically forever after they've examined their ability to repeatedly regenerate is that true. Flat. Worms can live, theoretically. Forever. Wurmser probably one of the most elegant example. So they they have a perpetual ability to regenerate through sort of what is sort of a vision process. So every new cell. They create is basically almost embryonic in nature and pristine you can cut the thing apart. They can cut it in half. It regrows you can cut his head off including destroying its brain it regrows in its entirety. And I'm Hal remembers things from before the brain was destroyed, and they have is amazing ability. There's beautiful papers on this to atypically reverse cancer. When you give it to them in the lab. So funny little creatures. You know, you can kill lots of species in the lab, you can kill them by we can kill the rabbit kill the Guinea pigs with tumors, but you give Trump cancer, and it just decides to get rid of it. It turns it into normal tissue and goes happily about it say, so it is one of these lovely examples of biological resilience that the planet has created and yet it can go one wherever in essence as long as it wants to cut very comfortably. And you're right or your press material says nature's eco cream systems represent a completely untapped reservoir. For new drug candidates. Give me a kind of a great six level primer on the actor cream system. Okay. So, you know, many are probably familiar with the endocrine system, which is something that we as humans have which are basically hormone secretions within our body. These are what a lot of these other species do that. In essence bites vomit for lack of better words. Upon us or other species. So think anything that bites you and not only might something from you. But then deposits something within you. And these are most insects do this. We don't think about it. But the mosquito is one beautiful example that deposit. Sales of substances for one purpose or another into our bodies. And I'm not talking about the malaria, zika and that stuff, but these natural secreted substance in their saliva, and it's one of those things that lots of creatures. Do they've been doing it for hundreds of millions of years. I mean, mosquitoes were around biting dinosaurs at some point, and there is a back and forth process. It's not just that they're sucking blood. They're giving things back. And when we say, it's never been explored. We do it's never been explored as to what the purpose of this. Live a whatever you wanna call it it. It's not just bit. There. There's a biologic processes going one year, and a reason something that evolution created that. It's being it's happening. And so that in general is what? Yeah. External secretion that is going to do something to some other creature. Okay. So let's now get to the heart of the matter. And that is as you say mosquitoes spit. Lovely. But how did you have a partner in this venture that you're studying with how did you settle on mosquito spit? I mean, how you sit around in a in a board room brainstorming and he site. Well, let's figure out what we can find in mosquito spit. How did this idea courteous? I it's really very fascinating. Doctor wants me here who is our partner in this project. He spent the last several years university of Colorado working on vaccine option, I specifically in the area of some of these malaria, but also, Dan. Some of the other nasty stuff. Mosquitoes are typically known to carry around and during that production and study back teams he kept running to these problems that. Yeah, you know, they want him to study and create vaccines against malaria. But there was all this other stuff. President in the mosquito saliva, and it was getting in the way of the process. So he basically what what is this other stuff is there? And why is it sounding the hunt for the new vaccine? And so he started basically basically doing what we do. Pharmacology went one. Okay. Let's take this good this bit. And look at it. They either the microscope blasted apart with all the fancy equipment in the lab. And see what's there? And you know, in basically, what was there was this treasure trove of substances that have never been studied before proteins peptides, small molecules. So the obvious question was what do they do? And you know. The antidote. All component of this also fed into it. Because as spoken in the past you never do feel the mosquito bite, you do you see the after effects? Well, why is that? Well, could it be that there's some very interesting painkillers there that we don't know about? And there was one example, another thought the mind, you know, when the mosquito bites you blood never coagulate, if it did the mosquitoes head would explode because you so all of these like basic sort of anecdotal point got to thinking, you know, what there's probably a treasure trove of stuff here. And it's just one of those things that we always think skeet obeyed we're not gonna look any further radio vaccines. But we can't forget that. It's there, and we have to study it. And so that was the basic premise behind why we said, okay, let's go a little further on this. And see what may be there? And how to connect human health. And so if I go into the back garden, and I get bitten. Up and down the back of my calves and so forth. Even though, you know, it's an incredibly annoying. It's itchy and most of the mosquitos up. Here are not carrying. Well. It's it's possible that they can carry I guess Norwalk and different things like that. But. Is am I am I getting any health benefits from that? That mosquitoes spit that circulating in my blood. I even hate saying that. I it's you know, it might sound disgusting. But the truth is, yes, very much very likely when you put aside what I'm just giving maybe carrying in terms of infectious disease. There are tons of substances that when that little look we we we joke around me, call it. Evolutionary perfected flying hypodermic needle. But when it stabs you doing where your blood, it's an essence depositing saliva. Literally, hundreds of substances into you to get into your body and your bloodstream these include as we mentioned painkillers, and it's like, why are you in? But they can also include immunomodulating agents. They could include neuropeptide all of these things modulating for a second. We have sixty five million people in the United States alone. They have some form of autoimmune disease. Whether that's rheumatoid arthritis psoriasis lupus, multiple sclerosis on down the line. And here's set, you know, why do why does the mosquito having immunomodulating substance in why because it wants to modulate your immune system up and down to protect. What was it again you and so once again, here's an example your. We never studied before we haven't epidemic. Here. Let alone around the world in all sorts of autoimmune diseases nowadays. Is there potential connection? And so there's a lovely example, some very positive benefit that you could be getting when you're standing in your backyard. Absolutely. Yes. Should I think twice about, you know, buying those mosquitoes zappers, or or slapping on some mosquito repellent, should I encourage mosquitoes bite me. You know, the issue comes down to clean mosquito. Now, obviously, that's not something that you can buy it began in the wild. So you don't know what mosquitoes carrying what? But in laboratory, we are able to segregate an isolate and extract. That we are interested in studying the message is, you know, if you're not living in malaria endemic part of the world, it's not always be afraid of what of what's happening there because they're potentially a lot of benefit. All right. Listen, we're going to pick this up. We'll pick us up on the other side, and we'll get more on the salivary secretions of hemet affair Amtra pods. I think I said that right? But here is a Bonnie Raitt taking us into the break with an old cover of del. Shannon's nineteen.

malaria autoimmune disease painkillers Vivians richard partner Bonnie Raitt Shannon amoxicillin America Wurmser Hal Guinea United States Norwalk university of Colorado President Dan five hundred years
"great richard" Discussed on KTRH

KTRH

15:44 min | 1 year ago

"great richard" Discussed on KTRH

"Deals, and bringing lead drug candidate from discovery stage to phase three development prior to that he was employed by SmithKline Beecham, pharmaceuticals working in sales, marketing and business strategy positions. Ira has also served as vice president of corporate development for the pharmacy benefit management company, prescription delivery systems. He has an MBA from temple university and a Bs in pharmacy. From Rutgers University IRA s pastor welcome to coast to coast AM. How are you? Great, richard. Thanks for having me. Let's start with a little bit about what bio quark is. And what you do. Absolutely. So, you know, we are a biotech company, and we are developing pharmaceuticals and other healthcare products that are basically taking clues from the natural world to to solve some of the major problems that we have before us and those clues can be from an Vivians as we study how they regenerate or species that do not age or even the ones that have the skill of dying. And coming back the way we like to take these clues and say, okay, all these other species via the powers of evolution have been here. Hundreds of millions and billions of years before us, how do they survive? So very well. And why do we continually get wiped out by all these diseases? Acute and chronic. That's basically biocrops core mission continuing to look at nature and find these answers that you know, basically been the background for the last hundred years in the healthcare industry, but we want to take it step further. I I was reading some of your press material. And I thought this line sort of sums up what will be discussing tonight, and that is that bio cork studies. Evolution airily perfected, a raise of metal bullets or small molecules from the natural world that can lead to the development of novel therapeutics for a range of chronic diseases, responsible for human degeneration and suffering, which is quite a mouthful, but let's focus on what you mean. By the evolutionary perfected arrays of meadow lights. What does that mean? Well, I mean, look out your window. And you know, you might see a tree, you know, the ancestors of that three were around a billion years ago, they survive, I is they survive, you know, all sorts of nasty stuff on this planet, and they died and get sick of the same stuff to kill up. But they don't take when they get sick ministry outside my window year. Get sick. It doesn't take, you know, fifty milligrams of amoxicillin it basically creates inside itself. Hotels, shall we say of bioactive substances to defend itself from funguses and bacteria and animals chewing on it and so forth and so one so we say evolutionary perfected over time. These species have had to develop these skills, and whether their plants or bacteria, or, you know, incipient victim regenerate or flat worms that can resist cancer. This is something that happens over time that you know, we as humans. We don't have these skills yet. We we've only been here in terms of a couple of million years. So that those are the clues that we're looking for. And when we say metabolite, faithfully the natural chemicals and proteins and other substances that these creatures make internally to protect themselves from disease degeneration and death. So we'll get into mosquitoes and just a bit. But I want to further understand a little bit more about what you do and what you're hoping to achieve. So when we think of the natural world at the example, I liked I like is the Greenland shark because it was in the news a couple of years ago. And according to a recent study, they the Greenland shark lives at least as long as four hundred years and get this. They reach their sexual maturity at the age of about one hundred fifty so have we figured out why Greenland sharks, for example, live that long and his your something we we can extract from the Greenland, shark synthesize it into a drug help humans. Let's say live longer healthier lives. Or is that I'm guessing a vast over simplification. No, if you hit it on the head Freeman sharks, a great example of species that are so called negatively senescence. So basically they age, but they age extremely slowly in comparison to us. Another example related to that the Arctic ice Iceland clam. They found one they've found one recently that was over five hundred years old. It was year before America northbound 'cause here so yeah, I mean, these are wonderful Zambales of how evolution has decided. These species are gonna live a lot longer than us. And of course, it's done via the marvels of chemistry, but not the marvels of chemistry produce down the road. It's you pod. But reneged, and so yes, besides from you know, some of the things we're doing and we'll get into negligibly senescence organisms do hold a wide range of bioactive substances that keep them healthy. Whether those are anti inflammatories or antioxidants were wide range of other substances with pharmacological activity, absolutely beautiful examples in the Greenland, shark is one of the greatest ones. Yeah. And you mentioned flat worms, and I was reading in in preparation for this program. I was reading this British newspaper article from two thousand twelve and it reported that flat worms could hold the key to immortality. And they could live theoretically forever after they've examined their ability to repeatedly regenerate is that true. Flat. Worms can live, theoretically. Forever. Wurmser probably one of the most elegant example. So they they have a perpetual ability to regenerate through sort of what is sort of a vision process. So every new cell. They create is basically almost embryonic in nature and pristine you can cut the thing apart. They can cut it in half. It regrows you can cut his head off including destroying its brain it regrows in its entirety and to somehow remembers things from before the brain was destroyed, and they have is amazing ability. There's beautiful papers on this to basically reverse cancer. When you give it to them in the lab. Funny little creatures. You know, you can kill lots of species in the lab, you can kill them by you can kill the rabbit, and you can kill the Guinea pigs tumors, but you give room cancer, and it just decides to get rid of it turns it into normal tissue goes happily about it say, so it is one of these lovely examples of biological assay resilience that this planet has created. And yet it can go wherever in essence as long as it wants to cut very comfortably. And you're right or your press materials says nature's ExCo cream systems represent a completely untapped reservoir. For new drug candidates, give me a kind of a great six level primer on the screen system. Okay. So, you know, many in the are probably familiar with the endocrine system, which is something that we humans have which are basically hormone secretions within our body. Oh, what a lot of these other species do that in essence bites spit vomit for lack of better words upon us or other species. So think anything that bites you and not only my something from you. But then deposit something within Yale, and these are most insects do this. We don't think about it. But mosquito is one beautiful example that deposit. Sales of substances for one purpose or another into our bodies. And I'm not talking about the malaria Zeke and that stuff, but these natural secreted substances in their saliva, and it's one of those things that lots of creatures. Do they've been doing it for hundreds of millions of years. I mean, mosquitoes were around biting dinosaurs at some point, and there is a back and forth process. It's not just that they're sucking blood. They're giving things back. And when we say, it's never been explored. We it's never been explored as to what the purpose of this. Alive. Whatever you wanna call it. But it's not just sitting there. There's a biologic processes going one year and reason something that evolution created that. It's being it's happening. And so that in general is what? Yakin system is external secretion that is going to do something to some other creature. Okay. So let's now get to the heart of the matter. And that is as you say mosquitoes spit. Lovely. But how did you and you have a partner in this venture that you're studying with how did you settle on mosquito bit? I mean, how you sit around in a in a board room brainstorming. And he said, well, let's figure out what we can find in mosquito spit. How did this idea courtesy you? It's really very fast. And the doctor wants me here who is our partner in this project. He spent the last several years university of Colorado working on vaccines production. I specifically in the area of some of these malaria, but also Dan gays other nasty stuff mosquitoes are typically known to carry around and during that production and study genes he kept running to these problems that. Yeah, you know, they want him to study and create vaccines against malaria. But there was all this other stuff. President in the mosquito saliva, and it was getting in the way of the process. So he basically, you know, what what is this other stuff is there? And why is it can standing the hunt for the new vaccine? And so he started basically, basically doing what we do sort of basic pharmacology went to one, okay? Let's take this good this bit. And look at it. They microscope blasted apart with all the fancy in the lab and see what's there? And you know, in basically, what was there was this treasure trove of substances that have never been studied before proteins peptides, small molecules. So the obvious question was what do they do? And you know, the antidote all component of this also fed into it. Because you know, as spoken in the past know, you never do feel the mosquito bite you do you see the aftereffects? Well, why is that? Well, could it be that there's some very interesting painkillers there that we don't know about? And there was one example, another thought seems to mind, you know, when the mosquito bites you blood never coagulate, it did the mosquitoes head would expire explode because it just stuff it out. You. So all of these like, basic sort of anecdotal point got us thinking, you know, what there's probably a treasure trove of stuff here. And it's just one of those things that we always think skeet obeyed we're not gonna look any further. Event. But we can't forget that. It's there, and we have to study it. And so that was the basic premise behind why we said, okay, let's go a little further on this and see what may be there. And how it connect human health. And so if I go into the back garden, and I get bitten. You know up and down the back of my calves and so forth. Even though, you know, it's an incredibly annoying, and it's itchy and most of the mosquitos up. Here are not carrying well. It's possible that they can carry I guess Norwalk or different things like that. But. Is am I am I getting any health benefits from that? That mosquitoes spit that circulating in my blood. I even hate saying that. It it it it might sound disgusting. But the truth is, yes, very much very likely when you put aside what I'm just giving maybe carrying in terms of infectious disease. There are tons of substances that when that little look we we joke around be call it. Evolutionary perfected flying hypodermic needle. But when it stabbed you it's doing nothing your blood. It's an essence depositing saliva. Literally, hundreds of substances into you to get into your body and your bloodstream these include as we mentioned painkillers, and it's like, why are you in? But they can also include immunomodulating agents, they could include neuropeptide all of these things modulating for a second. We have sixty five million people in the United States alone that have some form of autoimmune disease. Whether that's rheumatoid arthritis psoriasis lupus, multiple sclerosis on down the line. And here's why do why does the mosquito having immunomodulating substance in it why because it wants to modulate your immune system up and down to protect what does it again you? And so once again, here's an example, we never studied before we haven't epidemic here. Let alone around the world and also. Sorts of autoimmune diseases nowadays is there potential connection. And so there's a lovely example of some very positive benefit that you could be getting when you're standing in your backyard. Absolutely. Yes. I think twice about, you know, buying those mosquito zappers, or or slapping on some mosquito repellent. Should I encourage mosquitoes to bite me? The issue comes down to clean mosquitoes. No, obviously, that's not something that you can buy it began in the wild. So you don't know what mosquitoes carrying what? But in laboratory, we are able to segregate and isolate and extract. Substances that we are interested in studying. The message is if you're not living in malaria endemic part of the world. It's not always be afraid of what of what's happening there because there are potentially a lot of benefit. All right. Listen, we're going to pick this up pick us up. On the other side, and we'll get more on the salivary secretions of hemet affair. Anthropoids? I think I said that right? But here is a Bonnie Raitt taking us into the break with an old cover of del. Shannon's nineteen sixty one classic.

malaria painkillers partner SmithKline Beecham Rutgers University autoimmune disease Vivians Ira temple university richard vice president of corporate de Bonnie Raitt Yale Shannon amoxicillin hemet affair America United States Wurmser
"great richard" Discussed on Larry Wilmore: Black on the Air

Larry Wilmore: Black on the Air

01:33 min | 2 years ago

"great richard" Discussed on Larry Wilmore: Black on the Air

"Because Patti LaBelle had just performed, you know, he's the great Richard Pryor. But he can't just launch into jokes. That's right. You know, he's got a breakdown that berry and aiding to look at that. How he goes about the end you can see the switch to material. I know I I actually have the right now. I don't often get that you. But you do your special just watch a dirty dirty dirty clean, right? Right. And you come out, and I go what is Pete doing right now? Is you spent a lot of any road interview. They were like he walked out. Like he forgot what he was doing. Like, what do you think? I didn't add I know. I know because I going out. Yeah, I'm here. And there is an artifice in the room because you filming something, you know, you you call. Attention to smoke out of the window and get that shit out. But you know, the I remember going to the library, and I got VHS is of standup. So when you certainly when I was, you know, it's probably fifty fourteen. Maybe I don't know. I couldn't just get anything. You get what they had. And they had I think maybe I bought them. Maybe you'd have to buy them. Right. I don't know if they had them at the life, although they were more expensive to buy. It was in. There was there was one period in videotape history. Nothing the videotape historian. We're like the day would like if you wanted to buy a movie because like a hundred I remember. Yeah. And you can rent it for five. That's right. 'cause they wanted you to run blockbuster when we would not return video we're still going with those old prices ten thousand dollars. What guys this is for pork?.

Patti LaBelle berry Pete ten thousand dollars
"great richard" Discussed on NewsRadio KFBK

NewsRadio KFBK

01:48 min | 2 years ago

"great richard" Discussed on NewsRadio KFBK

"Shelley niece is the vice president of the Jerusalem connection international and nonprofit organization based out of Washington DC, Shelley lived and studied in Israel from two thousand two thousand and four where she learned conversational Hebrew and received her EMMY and Middle Eastern studies from Ben Gurion university of the Negev the high point of your studies and first crack at investigative journalism was her master's thesis, examining the secret multilateral negotiations. Ending the two thousand and two siege of the church of the Nativity in Bethlehem as a freelance columnist for several publications or articles of appeared in the Jerusalem Post a route Sheba front page magazine and more Shelley has been present for the most central events in the copper scroll project over the last decade, including the initial excavation at coumarin in two thousand and nine and experienced public speaker, Shelly is on the Jewish national fund's speakers bureau, she is a dressed various Jewish student groups and partic-. On debate panels, and she is the author of the copper, scroll project an ancient secret fuels the battle for the Temple Mount Shelly. Welcome to coast to coast AM. How are you? Great, richard. Thanks for having me. My pleasure. Let's set the scene here. Take us back to the early nineteen fifties, the coumarin caves, and the discovery of this amazing collection of scrolls. The Dead Sea scrolls, the copper schools, of course, part of that. But but just sort of paint that picture for us if you will. Right. Well, so that the copper scroll is one of the Dead Sea scrolls. It's part of the Dead Sea scrolls collection by you can't understand the copper scroll without having a pretty good foundation on the miracle. That is the Dead Sea scrolls.

Shelly Shelley Dead Sea Ben Gurion university Temple Mount Shelly Jerusalem Post Jerusalem vice president EMMY richard Israel Bethlehem Washington page magazine
"great richard" Discussed on WBT Charlotte News Talk

WBT Charlotte News Talk

01:34 min | 2 years ago

"great richard" Discussed on WBT Charlotte News Talk

"Cover four and also they'll break off their roles EVA's a seok-kyu covering the Gaurav he'll off now snows Beck show to faith for eighteen yards. So you've got to really be able to cover these guys that I think our guys I think they come from wealth Richard Sherman. Did look right. So he look terrible San Fran. It was. He did. I mean Evans just ran right by and they win at the the former great Richard Sherman. But I don't know. I hope you're right, gene, more. I think I'm more nervous about this matchup than than you are just because of how they've been pitching and catching and how the Panthers struggled in the second year. But you know, just just just the singular point of Dante Jackson if he's able to run and play today instead of being out last week. He I heard on the first play that could change things in your favor. This dossier have a backup in place. That's off the practice squad granted, but that we've all been high on watching him play in the preseason last couple. You've liked the way Lorenzo Dawson played in the preseason. We've taught a easily have made this team being the squad. We said that before optic. He is one of the unsung guy since you don't get to you. Don't knows how good he is. He is a somebody's hurt. And now he has to play. I think you'll see that in and dos. But also what I think we're going to see is. I think in that secondary rule. I know that coach Rogers Jilin. Hey, look, man, we're the guys that Buddha game. If it if we don't do our job in the secondary. Do it's over there's absolutely over. So I think that coming forward going into this game. I think that leadership that room I can't help. But think that these guys will be on the test. I look.

Panthers Richard Sherman Dante Jackson Lorenzo Dawson San Fran EVA Gaurav Rogers Jilin Beck Evans eighteen yards
"great richard" Discussed on Lights Camera Barstool

Lights Camera Barstool

03:48 min | 2 years ago

"great richard" Discussed on Lights Camera Barstool

"Owe you a podcast now tro like one of your choosing of a franchise that like we don't know anything about but you're super deep in the Laurent. No. I liked this podcast. I was listening because it was a refresher on what actually happened in the movies. And some of the Lord it's hard to keep track of all these characters if you're not into it. There's a lot of people in these movies like game of thrones. Yeah. Nice may deaths. Ken, Jack, number one number one is chamber of secrets. I think it was the most true to the books, which is a very asshole thing to point out. But it's true. And it was also I think the most magical if that makes sense, it was the most one where you where you feel like there is magic happening, and you feel really connected to that like whimsical sort of nature behind. What really is like a kind of childish and stupid concept. Infuriate think about it. Like, that's one where you feel really connected to it in his bought into it with that movie. And I think it was some of the better performances in the whole franchise especially from. I'm in their kids stage like obviously philosopher's stone. They weren't very good this one. I think they grew up a little bit more in got better. Kenneth Branagh was a great Lockhart. If you read the books thought he would phenomenal job is him. And it was the last performance of the great Richard Harris as Dumbledore still think is the best will door is perfect old wise, which is what he's supposed to be not as energetic, yuppie, hipster guy. And I loved him. He was great. And I think it was out of all the movies. The best blend of school and like his adventure life. If that makes sense you get a good grasp of what he has to do as a student, and then also getting thrust into this world of fucking nightmares proportions that he just consistently thrown into. So I think that that blend was really great in every other one they sort of mixed it up too much with like that most arrests from twenty percents school life and then like eighty percent adventure. I'm team gambling t Michael I'm like, I don't think he's a good Domo or not a good representation. Again. It's a book thing. Are you? Well, James, I know you're you're number one. You have a video on it on YouTube. I belief recently, right. I do. Yeah. I did a thirteen minute mayo. Harry Potter deathly hallows pot one at just in summary while I while like it is because I like, it is all those things that you guys have been saying how it's they shouldn't have split into two. The other thing that is true. But I think it has the best performances. It's got the most most emotional moments in terms of the character interactions and also things like Nobis death really hot felt the infiltrate the ministry is fantastic, Satan, really tents. They bring back a lot of you know, a lot of characters from the past like Delors umbrage in Alexander. Who hasn't been in film since the first one on are really like a book like that section of the book because most of us just sitting in a tent is but the fuck of doing and I really enjoy that. Because it gets away from the school the school yet storytelling model, which I really like. But I think what says is maybe know that bottle and throws it away. So without that structure that he's gone to peeling not knowing what to do. And so that's that's what I think. It's it's my favorite favorite movie. Yeah. No, it's great for sure I mean, easy top three for me. My my number one is definitely hallows too. I think those two movies. Are fantastic. And they're they kind of so impressive about the franchise. I know they're base really good book, but they are able to make good movies and make them better in a sense as they went along. They're able to take good source material and turn them into some really good solid movies, especially something so goofy and Mike Webb. It's magic right. So many franchises fail like something like divergent or transformers where it's like, it's a leap to make it into a believable movie. And this the same people and grew over the course of however, many years and the same actors turned into these great movies..

Lockhart Dumbledore Kenneth Branagh Mike Webb YouTube Richard Harris Nobis Harry Potter Ken Michael I Delors James Jack thirteen minute eighty percent
"great richard" Discussed on Lights, Camera, Podcast

Lights, Camera, Podcast

03:48 min | 2 years ago

"great richard" Discussed on Lights, Camera, Podcast

"Owe you a podcast now tro like one of your choosing of a franchise that like we don't know anything about but you're super deep in the Laurent. No. I liked this podcast. I was listening because it was a refresher on what actually happened in the movies. And some of the Lord it's hard to keep track of all these characters if you're not into it. There's a lot of people in these movies like game of thrones. Yeah. Nice may deaths. Ken, Jack, number one number one is chamber of secrets. I think it was the most true to the books, which is a very asshole thing to point out. But it's true. And it was also I think the most magical if that makes sense, it was the most one where you where you feel like there is magic happening, and you feel really connected to that like whimsical sort of nature behind. What really is like a kind of childish and stupid concept. Infuriate think about it. Like, that's one where you feel really connected to it in his bought into it with that movie. And I think it was some of the better performances in the whole franchise especially from. I'm in their kids stage like obviously philosopher's stone. They weren't very good this one. I think they grew up a little bit more in got better. Kenneth Branagh was a great Lockhart. If you read the books thought he would phenomenal job is him. And it was the last performance of the great Richard Harris as Dumbledore still think is the best will door is perfect old wise, which is what he's supposed to be not as energetic, yuppie, hipster guy. And I loved him. He was great. And I think it was out of all the movies. The best blend of school and like his adventure life. If that makes sense you get a good grasp of what he has to do as a student, and then also getting thrust into this world of fucking nightmares proportions that he just consistently thrown into. So I think that that blend was really great in every other one they sort of mixed it up too much with like that most arrests from twenty percents school life and then like eighty percent adventure. I'm team gambling t Michael I'm like, I don't think he's a good Domo or not a good representation. Again. It's a book thing. Are you? Well, James, I know you're you're number one. You have a video on it on YouTube. I belief recently, right. I do. Yeah. I did a thirteen minute mayo. Harry Potter deathly hallows pot one at just in summary while I while like it is because I like, it is all those things that you guys have been saying how it's they shouldn't have split into two. The other thing that is true. But I think it has the best performances. It's got the most most emotional moments in terms of the character interactions and also things like Nobis death really hot felt the infiltrate the ministry is fantastic, Satan, really tents. They bring back a lot of you know, a lot of characters from the past like Delors umbrage in Alexander. Who hasn't been in film since the first one on are really like a book like that section of the book because most of us just sitting in a tent is but the fuck of doing and I really enjoy that. Because it gets away from the school the school yet storytelling model, which I really like. But I think what says is maybe know that bottle and throws it away. So without that structure that he's gone to peeling not knowing what to do. And so that's that's what I think. It's it's my favorite favorite movie. Yeah. No, it's great for sure I mean, easy top three for me. My my number one is definitely hallows too. I think those two movies. Are fantastic. And they're they kind of so impressive about the franchise. I know they're base really good book, but they are able to make good movies and make them better in a sense as they went along. They're able to take good source material and turn them into some really good solid movies, especially something so goofy and Mike Webb. It's magic right. So many franchises fail like something like divergent or transformers where it's like, it's a leap to make it into a believable movie. And this the same people and grew over the course of however, many years and the same actors turned into these great movies..

Lockhart Dumbledore Kenneth Branagh Mike Webb YouTube Richard Harris Nobis Harry Potter Ken Michael I Delors James Jack thirteen minute eighty percent
"great richard" Discussed on WCBS-FM 101.1

WCBS-FM 101.1

02:00 min | 2 years ago

"great richard" Discussed on WCBS-FM 101.1

"Just minutes away Nope. from the thousand dollar song the day on CBS f f. CBS? The free fall song of the day. And it's coming up for we say bye bye. Have you were born on this day? You share your birthday with a great Richard Dreyfuss member him close encounters of the third.

Richard Dreyfuss CBS thousand dollar
"great richard" Discussed on WXYT CBS Sports Radio 1270

WXYT CBS Sports Radio 1270

03:00 min | 2 years ago

"great richard" Discussed on WXYT CBS Sports Radio 1270

"Hi thanks. For taking my call, sure, yeah, I wanted to talk. About the preseason I don't agree that. There, should be four but I. Do. Agree, that they should be at least thirty Well, two to three and the reason why I said as goals example tonight with picks with. Pittsburgh Steelers played they played a former evolve Joshua dogs to fourth quarterback that they. Have on the team so they are going to get rid of. Someone and they put him out there he played a eight out of twelve hundred and fifty one yards so he did a great job in the reason why they put him out there and they give them such high. Praise because they're looking at getting. Rid of him getting what they can out of him if they do and he did a great job 'cause. He's, trying. To get another place knows that either he stays, there or he's needs, to find another one yeah right and it helps if you've had a strong preseason? You've got to moment but did you just, say you don't think there should be a fourth preseason game I think that three would be enough and if there was only three than they would have. Put, him. Out there 'cause on the the third preseason the, Steelers actually didn't play, him so I think if there's a third they would have put him out there Maybe maybe not I mean if they've already made up their mind as you. Talk about their more showcasing him than they are anything else then. Maybe they're more concerned about the most important. Thing the, the critical point which is getting their team. Ready, and making sure. That the guys that are actually. Going to play on the same page, so I think the fourth preseason game is kind of a luxury it's not a necessity teams will use. It I mean Sean Payton tried, to sell it last night oh it's so important we. Need a running back here we need. To chart and it is but they also do that based on preseason the. Pre the previous preseason games as, well as training camp so they. Don't necessarily need it but they'll use, it as long as they have it Right. Yeah so they could get by without an. Extra one, and certainly the veterans would prefer it now. They're, always guys who. Are trying to make a roster. For the first time or trying to, find a new home that are desperate for that opportunity so yeah I I can see both sides of. It I don't wanna be grudge, them the chance to continue to chase that dream either That's. Correct and, oh, and also wanna say that I'm glad. That I'm not the only one that has dog sledding fuck I do I accidentally I, have, no idea how to make that happen or flying with the blue angels but those things are still on my. Bucket list Well listen to you all the time while delivering papers. L., every, show, first time, caller, and, I, appreciate, what, you do great Richard thanks so much for tuning and, have a great weekend. Eight five five two one two four two two seven but, screw the phone calls out of that was very very nice at all you put,.

Pittsburgh Steelers Sean Payton Richard fifty one yards
"great richard" Discussed on Talk 1260 KTRC

Talk 1260 KTRC

01:38 min | 2 years ago

"great richard" Discussed on Talk 1260 KTRC

"Cards but this one just be if you're a member of the other political party so if you're gonna go to a concert you get twenty five dollars off so you get rewards you get perks for that in addition well we're looking for a campaign song so for twenty dollars and twenty cents you can submit a campaign and all this money does it does it all goes into the into the pool we're gonna need you'll need poster art you'll need t shirts exactly so we're we're looking for a vision statement so for twenty dollars and twenty cents you submit and then you get credit for it however it becomes the property of the other political party but that way i figure people will be interested everyone's creative everyone can submit something and there's a chance that literally their campaign song would be played from roughly from two thousand nineteen the two thousand twenty of you played at every event all right but you know we have to we have to you know focused on remember the underlying concept here is the creator better country with more options and greater political entities whether you want to call it a party or not a party and if you are dissatisfied if you're fed up with the democrats republicans even libertarians or the tea party whatever you know and you're looking for an option maybe check out the other political party dot org that is correct all right tom stay in touch with you great richard thank you for the opportunity to get the word out appreciate it big success right okay we'll be in touch all right twenty four minutes after two o'clock anything you want talk about today can be political can be edible.

republicans tom twenty dollars twenty five dollars twenty four minutes
"great richard" Discussed on Kevin Pollak's Chat Show

Kevin Pollak's Chat Show

01:38 min | 2 years ago

"great richard" Discussed on Kevin Pollak's Chat Show

"There is no room sam it's two different beast every now you know it's like a golf course where it can look the same every day it's the same old augusta national but she plays different every time you don't know what the grass is like today no now you gotta think of another my next sports i like that we're going into golf now barely qualifies as a sport by more of a sport than wrestling i here's the thing i'm gonna quote the lake great richard jenny he says golf is not a sport because unlike the majors there is not enough chance of injury if the chance of major injury is is under five percent you can't call it it is so funny to like if you pose russell westbrook and the free throw line on the road and just how crazy the fans are going to try to distract them and then you cut to a golf course everybody's gotta be like perfectly still always screen babu until after yeah so anything that they yell soon as tiger tees off here bubba your mashed potatoes his thing people mashed potatoes all that do you watch oh five or six years love washington all right all right good to know especially when mark yeah so harlow where does the dillydally commend to play so while i was doing stand up in two thousand and one i was working at california pizza kitchen before dan antic pave the way.

richard jenny russell westbrook washington golf harlow california five percent six years
"great richard" Discussed on Blank Check with Griffin & David

Blank Check with Griffin & David

01:40 min | 2 years ago

"great richard" Discussed on Blank Check with Griffin & David

"She did yeah it was brooks direct you get a a lot lot of of those those i was in i was in i was stuck in a kind of a rut with writing my trolls which took twenty years to right it turn around myself who's in minne turnaround as a side project i mean had this story because gonna rattling around this was to wait there's a story in this movie we call to be fair finglas came out of aborted subplots for your trolls right this like my off limb and then it turned into its own troll me trouble originally the villain was taylor oni she isn't the villain with she was to eight ning for the troll to move to exactly i guess today you of course know him best from kim team the widowmaker that's right vanilla sky the water leading the water i was gonna say richard that's sort of like late nineties early two thousands that's that's a saving private ryan ryan that's like the zone you're in i like it always gravitate right to that yet me as a teenager or in college that's where we're at host a little gold man podcast writes for vanity fair and is now a published novelist at the time this upsets coming out the top of the charts richer richard lawson the great richard lawson is here with us today ola got that so i just searched for spangler in the mpaa and i got no.

richard lawson ola spangler mpaa twenty years
"great richard" Discussed on WFAN Sports Radio_FM

WFAN Sports Radio_FM

01:32 min | 2 years ago

"great richard" Discussed on WFAN Sports Radio_FM

"Don't even even even know if they should have made it now mets fans this is what we got to hope for the mets have a chance to do something never in their fifty seven year history they can win a penny or deflation leading wiretowire that'll be incredible if they can do this and i got one more quick you guys why quickey john sterling nineteen seventytwo took off for jack spector so he was taking calls back then summer is seventy two now back then the climate was all young kids call you didn't have any grownups calling sports talk shows i'm a seventeen year old kid i call up john john doesn't suffer fools gladly he called after i hung up he says oh that guy made a sophomore statement i look up the word sophomore gift i hang up and i found out what it means it means mature two months later in october i take the sat's at wouldn't you believe that word sophomoric was on the sat great richard yesterday called them bronco something from six months ago and today brought up something from thirty seven years ago that was really good but that was a cute story though mark on the sat's i liked it back to the future i can't wait 'til we're talking about mickey own in the forty one world series tomorrow afternoon i like it i like richard skulls calls to say they have like they have going that that's the beauty of any brings facts to the show who we going down with man we need to place a bed by saturday we got time i mean if you wanna ride the sixers we could do that what do you wanna ride.

mets jack spector mickey richard skulls sixers john sterling john john thirty seven years fifty seven year seventeen year six months two months
"great richard" Discussed on WFAN Sports Radio_FM

WFAN Sports Radio_FM

01:50 min | 2 years ago

"great richard" Discussed on WFAN Sports Radio_FM

"The fan bill irit your great richard they bring my call a bill are you doing so i'll add to the big it gorman live nine amman providence fan and i know it never will be the old big east but once you come back and seeing the nittygritty style that's what i believe big east basketball about it was electric last night you know this conference is probably one of the deepest in college basketball you know you got the the the winless st john's red stormed beating do 'cause before they be the big east team so i really do believe that these teams in this conference are doing better than the teams that left no you can't isn't doing as well uh you know the the american conference's boring to watch so i really do think that the big eastern benefited or watson split well i i also think that uh about the on before the selection today honestly i couldn't care less about college basketball but we know it's a sports stock station so as well we do but it's anybody's tournament yeah i mean it it it so wide open now and it's it's got to get itself fixed them in and they are now talking about may be allowing high school guys to go into the nba or to go into a developmental league may know what we can get into that at another time because the tournament on you want to concentrate on the play itself but now they are uh look i i go back to the days on the biggest tournament when it was in new york man now is it was all you talked about that's all you cared about it was a syracuse say john see now georgetown villanova i mean it was everything let's go go to a dan in danbury you're on the fan dan good morning a dan graf your mom.

basketball st john nba syracuse danbury dan graf richard gorman watson new york
"great richard" Discussed on What Really Happened?

What Really Happened?

02:30 min | 2 years ago

"great richard" Discussed on What Really Happened?

"They favored it and i'm gonna say almost half of them are not were not said churchill it's incredible uh we'll play the game um if you of enemies that's good it means you stood up for something in your life that has been debunked by the great richard illingworth and other people and uh no he didn't say that uh i'm gonna get this wrong so they need you to to help me finish it um uh uh uh uh a rumor will get so far what was it is a rumor will gets a halfway around the world before its before its stopped checked i would've won usually attributed this along the lines of a lie we'll be halfway around the world uh before it gets its pants on and that's churchill right uh but no he did in fact uh it's attributed to cordell hull roseville secretaryastate a very taciturn tennessee and and uh it sounds so much like churchill in so unlike hole but apparently all set it and there's uh all this one one of the most famous that the english navy churchill said is nothing but rumours sodomy and the lash i mean i heard that one when i was a kid and years later over dinner when he was still alive some us that's one of my favorite called sir and he said i wish i had said it so so he's in that one attitude is a little thing that makes a big difference i didn't say it that i know a pretty sure i may be drunkeness but in the morning i'll be sober and you'll still be ugly didn't say it really have him saying that to various people including uh nancy astor who is an american but moved to england and she was a political enemy of churchill's and she was elected to parliament and usually she's the uh the one he's saying that too well uh unless his vision was excluded she was pretty goodlooking uh you can say to anybody uh we'll see here remake a living by what re get but remake a life by what.

churchill richard illingworth tennessee nancy astor england