35 Burst results for "Great Plains"

"great plains" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

06:10 min | Last week

"great plains" Discussed on KCRW

"This is morning edition from NPR News. I'm David Greene and I'm Steve Inskeep Years ago, Less pain was a New York newspaper columnist. He was a Pulitzer Prize winner, one of the stars of his paper news day. Occasionally, he wrote a column about Malcolm X. But readers may not have realized just how much less pain was interested. His daughter Tamra Pain, says he reread Malcolm's autobiography every five years because Malcolm really spoke Clearly and concisely about our history in America and the troubled relationship that blacks have with lights in America and Dad understood that 1990 less pain, met one of Malcolm's surviving brothers and was surprised to learn. He didn't know the full story. It appealed to his his sensibilities as a journalist. And he wanted to tell the story. The only way he knew how which was to use journalism, employing his daughter, Tamra as his researcher. Less pain began interviewing more people finding documents and writing a book. It took him the rest of his life 28 years. Book wasn't quite finished when he died in 2018, but his daughter Tamra, Pain completed it. And this month it 11 of the highest prizes in American writing. What went through your mind when you realize that this work had won the National Book Award? I was so happy that my father was feed the accolades for his life's work. And You know, and that I miss him. The biography of Malcolm X is called. The Dead are arising It's especially revealing about Malcolm's youth. The adult Malcolm X. The 19 sixties was a controversial and charismatic figure, a defiant black nationalist, a fiery alternative to Martin Luther King. Young Malcolm Little was a kid from the Great Plains. I associate Malcolm X, of course with New York, where he spent a lot of his adult life and where he was assassinated. But now I know that he was born and grew up around Omaha. Nebraska is my fellow Midwesterner. What was it like for him growing up there, So Yeah, he grew up in Ah, behind. He was born in Omaha, Nebraska. His family's there for a couple of years. His parents were Garvey, I'd say followed Marcus Garvey's movement United Negro Improving Association. And those set out outpost and in different areas. Marcus Garvey, an immigrant writer, speaker and activist in the early 19 hundreds, Garvey's group promoted black self reliance and dignity and separation from white people. But when Malcolm Little's parents moved to a farm outside Omaha, representatives of a very different group of people came by This book opens in Omaha, Nebraska, and Malcolm in utero and their family. The little family is visited by their local clans chapter in Omaha, Nebraska. His pregnant mothers stared down the Ku Klux Klan and the Klan's been left. Luckily, his father, who they really wanted wasn't home. Not long after that. Malcolm was born in 1925 and Tamra Pain, says she found traces of the Midwest in his later life. Malcolm was down Earth, He was very grounded. In that sense and very grounded in his home and his family. Nevertheless, a difficult time growing up. His father died when he was what, six he was six and Yeah, and and also, Malcolm was close to his father, too. I mean, his father used to take him to meetings where he was organizing, and he got to watch his father and action. And so he has an image of his father, You know, being a good speaker being charismatic, having strong work ethic, you know his father's to get up early and wake up the family and do chores around the house before he would go out and take on jobs, and that's exhibiting Malcolm. I mean, Malcolm and extremely strong work ethic. Throughout his life. Not that his adult life started well. He moved east committed crimes went to prison. It was in prison that he was introduced to an American Muslim sect, the nation of Islam. He emerged to become the popular spokesman of the group leader. Is he? Someone that we can think of, is reinventing himself two or three times and is relatively short life. I see it as more evolving when you know better you do better. He evolved beyond the nation of Islam to we mentioned Marcus Garvey, the activist. His parents followed who spoke of black pride and also of separation, the nation of Islam advocated him or extreme separation, so much so that its leader explored the possibility of working with the KKK. Open is not happy about that. But he's not the leader of the nation of Islam. But this is where he seeks starts to see that they're different. And this clan situation really starts the rift between him and any lies your mama. Well, how would you describe the evolution in his thinking in the final months of his life, then? Well, he was not endorsing separation, he said. We can't we're gonna live in this country. We have to interact with large society and he was even espousing. Voting during last year's If it's like using our voting bloc to be our power, because what he wanted was that more impact with having us thrive in society, and you can't do that. You're not going to be a part of the society, but Malcolm, then he's going abroad. He goes on his hodge. He's connecting up with African countries. He's going to the Middle East. He's going to Africa. He's going to Europe. But in all these places he's learning about. Struggles and all these different places and what people are telling him is that they identify and they feel solidarity with the struggles of black people in America because they have similar struggles, although their struggles are basically on class issues, specifically class issues with We're racing class, so Mountain was listening to that, and he started involved again. He hadn't fully evolved on that because he's killed Tamra Pain on the unfinished life of Malcolm X. Her father, less pain, died with an unfinished book on Malcolm X, which she completed and which won the National Book Award. It's called.

Malcolm Little Tamra Pain Marcus Garvey pain Omaha Nebraska National Book Award NPR News Pulitzer Prize America New York Ku Klux Klan Steve Inskeep Middle East Martin Luther King David Greene Africa Europe group leader Great Plains
78: The Indian Wars Part 2: The Battle of the Little Bighorn (the Greasy Grass) - burst 02

History That Doesn't Suck

00:55 sec | Last week

78: The Indian Wars Part 2: The Battle of the Little Bighorn (the Greasy Grass) - burst 02

"It's the afternoon of june twenty fifth. Eighteen seventy six as many as a thousand lakota. Cheyenne and arapaho village sprawl across the prairie. It's six to eight thousand. Inhabitants are enjoying a relaxing day. You're currently at war with the united states. But no one is expecting an attack presently. Us troops should be at least a day's travel out. Women are preparing food and chatting. Young men are watering their ponies. Playing hoop and pole gain still others are sleeping in after a late night of salvatori dancing as the hot afternoon. Sun beats down. Kids are swimming in the river at the villages edge these tribes and many other indigenous peoples of the great plains. Call it the greasy grass. You might know by another name though the little big horn river but the mood of leisure comes to an end around three pm. They're charging the charges are coming. A messenger yells

Arapaho Cheyenne Salvatori United States Great Plains SUN
Coronavirus infection rates continue to rise in the U.S.

MSNBC Rachel Maddow (audio)

08:53 min | Last week

Coronavirus infection rates continue to rise in the U.S.

"I would like to start by introducing you to nikki. tomlinson nikki. Tomlinson is an icu. Nurse at great plains health which is in north platte nebraska. At one point in time we had a physician here that everybody knew really well known him for a long time. Then a family doctor for a long time. That was my lowest point I still get teary thinking about it That i've been a nursing for twenty years and that was actually my breaking point. I when he didn't make it i had to. I already had some time off scheduled in that couldn't come at a better time I couldn't get through the next day of work without breaking down for an hour Our every hour was that was probably my darkest time at work. My darkest time over and my last twenty years of nursing so that was a. I was hard and then seeing some other family and friends come in That have fought this. That have beat this. That are scared along the way and other patients. That just aren't making it. I've never seen anything like cova. There's i we don't we just don't know enough about it. We learn new things every day and it seems like things change every day and i it. Just that's the one thing. That's constant about covid fluctuate senate changes and we just learn new things all the time. And that's what makes it scary. I've been a nurse for twenty years. And i've never experienced out like this. It's we're working. Extra shifts were working. We do great as a team but the the stress the emotional stress the physical stress that it is putting on us being there for the patients. Which is what we got into nursing. Four we're the only ones that can be there for some of these patients that most emotional stress losing them. is just. I've never experienced anything like it before. So the emotional and the physical stress. It's exhausting absolutely exhausting. I don't know how we are getting through it. We are but. I don't know how what i'm thankful for right now. During all this time is my health. My fellow coworkers health and my family know my family understanding how many how i have to work the long hours and not always be home during all of this And adapting to a can't touch mommy when you get home or to run and take a shower and And their health. I just hope it continues. But she's thankful for is her own health and the fact that her family doesn't have this. The family hasn't gotten it and she hopes that continues. That's what she's thankful for. Last night. i talked here about my own experience being home in quarantine. I tested negative. But i've been taking care of my partner. Susan while she sick i just wanna say to. Everybody reached out and was so nice. Response it was overwhelming. Actually was really kind. It was had to pick a word. I would say it was boolean to me and susan. So thank you everybody. But you know susan i will be are going to be okay. We are coming out of this. She is coming out of that. She is going to recover the people who i'm really worried about. I'm thinking about even as we're going through our own experiences beyond everybody who's sick and suffering right now. Susan has been these past couple of weeks beyond the eighty thousand plus americans who are in the hospital right now with kovic. The most we've ever had mean beyond the people who are suffering directly themselves trying to fight for their lives with this thing that people are really worried about the healthcare workers who are all over the country right now. We're staring down both barrels of this without the kind of support that they had in the spring when this all started with this now just tidal wave of cases and hospitalizations and deaths all coming down on them directly and personally in a way that does not feel sustainable in terms of them being able to keep doing it and terms of keeping them back stop keeping them supplied keeping them at work keeping the american health system open and able to function so frankly not to be too blunt about it but so save abol people can be saved. That's what i'm worried about. Is our health workers right now in the strain on them this many months into it with things. This bad right now i mean. Here's the front page. Today of the atlanta journal constitution. And you see the mix there right. I mean politically. Of course the big news out of georgia is that georgia. This is this morning's papers. They finish their recount. Yesterday showed once again. That biden clearly won the stage that set the stage. Today for georgia formerly certify its results and of course that's significant news. We'll talk more about that later tonight but but look at. What else is sharing the front page with that. Huge political news right see. Stay home for the holiday. Georgia state health official. Ads rethink traditional thanksgiving below that. There's the biggest front page headline in atlanta. Today it makes me shake with anger. That's a quote from a doctor who works in a covert war in atlanta talking about people blowing off the risk as the number skyrocket and as the hospitals get overwhelmed. You see their healthcare workers on the front lines feel. They are fighting a losing battle as public floats safety rules. That's georgia today. It's the same song up in minnesota. Today this is the west central tribune in willmar minnesota front page headline today. A plea for help. Hospitals are perilously close to running out of workers. It's one thing to run out of beds beds can be found in moved and bought but enough healthcare staff to take care of patients who are in those beds. That is what we are running out of in rural minnesota and all over the country. Here's the first column in that same paper today. Case rates skyrocket in the region again. That's west central minnesota. Here's the front page of the news star in monroe louisiana blunt headline hospitals overwhelmed. Here's the front page in grand junction colorado. Today the daily sentinel county says. Icu beds are full. Here's the front. Page in muncie indiana. Today the star. Press in muncie. Indiana hospitals cove in nineteen rates. Sores in indiana go to wyoming. The casper star tribune today casper wyoming deaths rise by record number. Something has got to turn this around kentucky. Here's the lexington kentucky paper. The herald leader kentucky sets staggeringly high new record for coronavirus cases. Go to new mexico the albuquerque journal today cova cases explode up in washington state bellingham herald. State virus rate's the worst since the beginning of pandemic all over the country right and as as overwhelming as this crisis is may now tonight. We've just learned that. The president's eldest son and namesake. Donald trump junior has it as well he has tested. Positive is reportedly isolating hope that he doesn't get symptoms so far apparently doesn't god blessed and maybe the president's eldest son who has such a high profile in the republican party now and in conservative media. Now maybe that will have an impact on thinking about this thing at the white house and in the conservative media on the right maybe even if the president himself getting it didn't seem to light a fire under them. I don't know but as overwhelming as this crisis is we are avoidably at this moment in history where we have two huge totally unprecedented crises. Heading simultaneously the minneapolis star tribune. Today i was actually a pretty good snapshot of what the heck we as americans are supposed to do with the twin disasters. We've got all at once and look at the front page at the minneapolis star tribune today a raging forest fire virus sweeps minnesota state to get ambulances from fema for surge importantly those are staffed ambulances so ambulance with their crews from fema going into minnesota to help them deal with patients and the need to move patients in hospitals. That are overwhelmed

Tomlinson Nikki Kovic North Platte Georgia Tomlinson Susan Atlanta Journal Minnesota Nebraska West Central Tribune Senate Atlanta Muncie Sentinel County Kentucky Casper Star Tribune Biden Willmar
Confirmed world coronavirus infections surpass 40 million, according to a Johns Hopkins University tally

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:30 sec | Last month

Confirmed world coronavirus infections surpass 40 million, according to a Johns Hopkins University tally

"The world has now recorded more than 40 million Corona virus cases. Johns Hopkins University says the milestone was hit today, but the actual figure is likely far higher. Because testing varies. Many people have had no symptoms and some governments have concealed the true number of cases. The US, Brazil and India reporting the highest numbers of cases in the US cases are on the rise in 44 states, with many of the biggest surgeries coming in the Midwest. And the Great Plains. Up ahead

Johns Hopkins University United States Great Plains Midwest Brazil India
The US has reached 8 million Covid-19 cases, and the pace of new infections signals a tough winter

10 10 WINS 24 Hour News

00:42 sec | Last month

The US has reached 8 million Covid-19 cases, and the pace of new infections signals a tough winter

"States is approaching eight million Corona virus cases since the pandemic hit with infections on the rise in 44 states. Many of the biggest surges have occurred in the Midwest and Great Plains, where there has been a resistance to wearing masks and other precautions and where the virus is considered only a big city problem. According to Johns Hopkins University. New cases in the US have increased in the past two weeks from an average of about 40,000 day to an average of more than 52,000 day depths or climbing in 30 states. But responses to the surgeon the hardest hit states have varied from raising the risk level. To doing nothing. I'm Mike

Johns Hopkins University Great Plains Midwest United States
The Now-extinct Castoroides Was a Bear-sized Beaver

BrainStuff

03:47 min | 2 months ago

The Now-extinct Castoroides Was a Bear-sized Beaver

"Brain stuff Lauren Vogel. Bam here. mammoths, mastodons and Sabertooth hats weren't the only giants roaming ancient America. The Pleistocene was a global epoch kicked off two point six, million years ago. It lasted right up. Until Earth's most recent ice age ended about eleven thousand, seven, hundred years before the present day. When you live in a cold environment, being big has its advantages. Large animals tend to conserve body heat more easily than smaller ones. This is one of the major reasons why colossal mammals were so widespread during the frigid pleistocene. CASTA Roy was very much a product of its time. The largest rodent in Pleistocene north. America, this very big beaver grew to more than seven feet long from tail to stout that's over two meters and could have weighed as much as two hundred and twenty pounds or a hundred kilos or more. Rivaling the American black bear in size casta royalties utterly dwarfed the Beavers that lived today modern Eurasian, and American beaver species clock in just around three feet long a bit less than a meter and way somewhere between twenty nine, seventy, seven pounds. That's about thirteen to thirty five kilos. Proportionately castaways had a narrower tail and shorter legs albeit with bigger hind feet than its extant relatives. We also know that it didn't eat the same foods. What he plans are a crucial part of every living beavers diet. The critters use chisel like incisors that's their front teeth to gnaw through bark and take down trees. But. Even though castaways incisors grew to be a whopping six inches or fifteen centimeters long the teeth had dollar edges by comparison. Dental differences would have made it a lot harder for Castro to eat tree bark and indeed it looks like this was not really on their menu. Using isotopic signatures and castaways teeth from Ohio and the Yukon a twenty nineteen study found that the giant beaver mostly eight softer aquatic plants. The findings say a lot about the Rodin's ecological niche and why it might have died out. For starters, castaways probably didn't build dams. Unusual. About that the earliest known beavers appeared during the easing. A which lasted between about fifty, six, thirty, four, million years ago. New evidence suggests that the wood harvesting specialists came along much later perhaps around twenty million years ago. In all likelihood, these bark fanciers used would as a food source before any of them started constructing dams. Since as fed on aquatic plants, its survival would have depended on wetland habitats. The animal was highly successful for a time cast Roy these fossils representing at least two distinct species have been documented in the Great Plains the Great Lakes, the American South Alaska and numerous Canadian provinces. Unfortunately for the mega sized beaver north. America. became warmer and drier after the last ice age ended wetlands grew scarcer as a result. Today's beavers used their logging skills to reshape the land around them so that it meets their needs with some well placed would in the nearest stream, a determined beaver engineer brand-new Pons. Yet if Castro Reuters didn't harvest would or build dams, it couldn't followed suit. So theoretically decline in natural wetlands left the giant beaver more susceptible to extinction. Last of these creatures perished around ten thousand years ago.

Casta Roy America Lauren Vogel Sabertooth Castro Reuters Great Lakes Castro Ohio Engineer Pons Yukon South Alaska Great Plains
Vail Resorts invests in massive Nebraska wind farm

Climate Connections

01:13 min | 2 months ago

Vail Resorts invests in massive Nebraska wind farm

"None of the thirty four ski resorts owned by Vail are in Nebraska but the company is investing in the states. Abundant wind-power. Vale has committed to buying three hundred, ten thousand megawatt hours of energy from the new plum creek wind farm in Wayne. County. That's enough to offset more than ninety percent of the electricity used at all avails. North. American resorts just give you an idea of scale to about thirty thousand homes worth power annually for twelve years. That's cates Wayne Wilson Fail Senior Director of Sustainability. She says, the power purchase agreement helped bring the wind farm online this summer. So for us, it's really important in our renewable strategy that we're bringing new renewables to the grid and the project takes Vail resorts close to the company's goal of zero emissions by twenty thirty, and we're really excited and proud of that, and we're also looking at the local level of how can we engage in solar and wind and other renewables on the ground where resorts are. She says for Ski. Company like Vale Protecting. The environment is a necessity. The great outdoors is our business and we feel like we've special obligation to protect it. So by investing in wind turbines in the Great Plains Vale is reducing the climate impact of its High Mountain Resorts.

Vail Resorts Great Plains Vale Vale Vail Wayne Wilson Senior Director Of Sustainabil Nebraska SKI High Mountain
American and United to furlough 32,000 workers

Tim Conway Jr.

02:04 min | 2 months ago

American and United to furlough 32,000 workers

"Airlines. Bad news. If you work for American Airlines, they're going a ton. Of layoffs. Unfortunately, you know, I think a lot of companies doing this I'm taking for my airline. I'm making for all the airlines that making sure all the employees on all of us who loved to travel, Retired flight attendant Karen Harper worked for United for 32 years. She's been through a few rounds of furloughs herself, but nothing like this in the early seventies. Fine, great plains with five passengers on it, you know, so that the economic ups and downs over the years has been dramatic. And then, of course, After 9 11. He walked into an airport today. Travel is down 70% from a year ago, and federal stimulus funds that helped airlines through the summer expired today. Although negotiations are ongoing, there's no guarantee the White House or Congress will pass. An extension is forced American and United to furlough 32,000 workers combined. Oh, my God! And those air 32,000 skilled workers. You know these air, not guys picking up trash like this is that these are very skilled technical workers both send letters to team members last night. Explaining the decision, American Airlines CEO Doug Parker wrote. I am extremely sorry we have reached this outcome is not what you all deserve. It is a privilege to advocate on behalf of the hardworking aviation professionals at American and throughout the industry. And you have my assurance that we will continue to do so in the days ahead. United ended its letter saying to our departing 13,000 family members like God, 13,000. I've members of united. Thank you for your dedication, and we look forward to welcoming you back well, some believe airlines should be using private loans to keep employees passengers. We spoke to say it's a tough situation across the board this year is not good for anybody. So everybody's going through it right now. Airlines say they'll reverse the furloughs. If Washington comes to an agreement in the next couple of days, which is why they're urging employees to reach out to their elected officials don't know how good that's going to do.

American Airlines United Karen Harper Doug Parker 13,000 Washington CEO White House Congress
Covid: US death toll passes 200,000

NPR News Now

00:50 sec | 2 months ago

Covid: US death toll passes 200,000

"The US has crossed a grim threshold in the pandemic more than two hundred thousand people of now died from covid nineteen comes as a raw cases are also starting to rise after falling significantly the end of the summer more memoirs will stone certain parts of the country have higher death toll from Cova. Just. Three States Massachusetts New York and New Jersey account for more than a quarter of all US deaths Florida Texas and California also had a large share of deaths. Fewer. People are dying compared to the spring partly because younger people are getting infected but Dr. Bill Pounder Lee at Washington University in St Louis Worries about a surge of cases in the winter we'll see more people die the proportion may be less but the numbers will still be high cases are now climbing significantly in the Great Plains and parts of the

United States Dr. Bill Pounder Lee Covid Cova Great Plains New Jersey St Louis Washington University Massachusetts New York Florida California Texas
Moo-Dunnit: How Beef Replaced Bison on the American Plainsand Plate

Gastropod

06:14 min | 2 months ago

Moo-Dunnit: How Beef Replaced Bison on the American Plainsand Plate

"Nearly, all the hamburgers in America today come from cows that spend at least part of their lives on the Great Plains that famous open range in the. American. West. So that is where we will go to start our story today to the American West before it was American before Europeans and their horses started showing up there in the late sixteen hundreds. So before there were cattle and before kind of United States had control of the planes in the. West you had a variety of American Indian policies, groups like the Comanche themselves essentially a very powerful empire across the West and they were hunting bison numbers for that time are kind of hard to come by. But it's estimated that there were about thirty to sixty million bison roaming through the middle of north. America. These are big grazing animals and what they can do is they can turn the abundant grasses of the West into animal flesh which then hunter's. Can Eat and so they become the foundation of the economy whenever I'm in the same spot as a cow I'm always kind of amazed at how big they are. But Bison is a heck of a lot bigger and faster. They can run about thirty five miles an hour faster than most horses, and they can pivot on both front and back hooves and literally turn on a dime. These are terrifying and dangerous creatures. It's not the kind of animal you'd. WanNa meet on foot and other key thing about them is that they're herd animals. So they gather at times massive herds, massive herds that would have represented a very appetizing dinner plus some warm and sturdy buffalo-hide imagine writing towards a herd of kind of terrifyingly huge bison if you're safely on horseback but how did native communities had them before horses very carefully so you could really only do it in the spring or summer when Bison gathered together to mate. You would do it on foot and you could work as a group, but it was difficult. You couldn't really do it fulltime. You could hunt by some kind of part time before the Horse, the planes really belong to the. Bison. But we now think of as plains tribes actually lived on the edges of the planes combining a little small-scale hunting with some farming. But once you had horses than well-coordinated hunters could hunt the animals very efficiently. The horses came with the Spanish. The native communities got a hold of some of those horses and horses quickly caught on they even changed the politics of the region, the communities that had more horsepower like the comanche kind of took over and they. Would kind of dominate everybody else and basically built these very successful empires empires that were built on Bison, hunting them and trading them with European settlers on the east coast. So people like the Comanche Kiowa were very successful from horseback and they may have actually been causing slow population declines in Bison. The story I heard him school is that white people killed off all the Bison and the truth is they did but the bison were already under a little bit of extra pressure. Thanks to the horses that white people brought. But waited until the spread of ranching and Commercial Bison hunting from Euro Americans to really collapse and by one thousand, nine, hundred, there's only maybe three hundred bison left. The West from at least thirty, million bison to just three hundred and about fifty years that by some more systematically wiped out in only a few decades thirty million bison were eventually replaced by thirty million cows de Bison izing roses really got started in the mid eighteen hundreds when people of European descent or beginning to move out west of the plains and start settling there. It was all sorts of people particularly I when it was scale so When what is Texas belong to Mexico you had lots of Mexicans who are setting up ranch's then you've got kind of poor white settlers anglos coming into the region setting things up as the American civil war approaches you got people who are kind of second and third sons of wealthy southern plantation families who can't inherit the family plantation and so they kind of go west to a place like Texas to set up kind of these small scale ranch's. Looked out at the planes and they thought, okay there are huge rangy creatures that live there why not replace them with other huge rangy creatures but why didn't they just stick with the bison that were already living there bison meat is freaking delicious and there is more of it per animal because Beissner. Bigger and bonus bison more already perfectly ecologically suited to the native. Grasslands and climate conditions. That's a really interesting question. I've I've thought about it a lot because in some ways, bison would be a very natural animal to raise. But then when I was reading diaries and things, I found that these people they were kind of disgusted bison they didn't view that as an animal that could be farmed. They saw it as a wild animal. and. So what's interesting about that is on one level people go with what they knew. Euro. Americans know about raising cattle, but another thing gets into their ideas of what is civilized and Dave you. The Bison is not the kind of animal that a civil in their minds a civilized people would raise and so cattle is the way to do it. So why couldn't settlers just leave the? Bison alone race cattle separately well, they could but the animals can't live on top of each other. So if thirty million animals are occupying most of this land, it has to be taken another thing though is that the Bison of the foundation of wealth of native peoples and if the sellers want WanNa take control by force of this land while they want to eliminate the means of support. And the foundation of power of people like the Comanche and so they view attacking the Bison as a way of achieving their other goal, which is taking as much land as possible for themselves and for the United States and what's funny is that difference in cattle is what justifies to them taking the land but the similarity is what means they can be successful as ranchers that similarity between. Bison, and cattle at first these early cattle ranchers was small potatoes they in their cows were outnumbered and overwhelmed compared to the native people and Bison. Well, the herds were relatively small. It's kind of like a few hundred animals. So it's it's a few enough animals that you disarm people who manage them and kind of ride around taking care of them are the same ones who owned them. And it's it's pretty mobile. You know you don't have kind of official ownership of the land. You're just kind of occupying land where you don't find any other settlers and you're hoping that the nearby fort or the US military will protect you from violence even though you're of course, using land that other people live on like the Kiowa

United States America Texas Great Plains Hunter Official Dave Mexico
Moo-Dunnit: How Beef Replaced Bison on the American Plainsand Plate

Gastropod

04:48 min | 2 months ago

Moo-Dunnit: How Beef Replaced Bison on the American Plainsand Plate

"Nearly, all the hamburgers in America today come from cows that spend at least part of their lives on the Great Plains that famous open range in the. American. West. So that is where we will go to start our story today to the American West before it was American before Europeans and their horses started showing up there in the late sixteen hundreds. So before there were cattle and before kind of United States had control of the planes in the. West you had a variety of American Indian policies, groups like the Comanche themselves essentially a very powerful empire across the West and they were hunting bison numbers for that time are kind of hard to come by. But it's estimated that there were about thirty to sixty million bison roaming through the middle of north. America. These are big grazing animals and what they can do is they can turn the abundant grasses of the West into animal flesh which then hunter's. Can Eat and so they become the foundation of the economy whenever I'm in the same spot as a cow I'm always kind of amazed at how big they are. But Bison is a heck of a lot bigger and faster. They can run about thirty five miles an hour faster than most horses, and they can pivot on both front and back hooves and literally turn on a dime. These are terrifying and dangerous creatures. It's not the kind of animal you'd. WanNa meet on foot and other key thing about them is that they're herd animals. So they gather at times massive herds, massive herds that would have represented a very appetizing dinner plus some warm and sturdy buffalo-hide imagine writing towards a herd of kind of terrifyingly huge bison if you're safely on horseback but how did native communities had them before horses very carefully so you could really only do it in the spring or summer when Bison gathered together to mate. You would do it on foot and you could work as a group, but it was difficult. You couldn't really do it fulltime. You could hunt by some kind of part time before the Horse, the planes really belong to the. Bison. But we now think of as plains tribes actually lived on the edges of the planes combining a little small-scale hunting with some farming. But once you had horses than well-coordinated hunters could hunt the animals very efficiently. The horses came with the Spanish. The native communities got a hold of some of those horses and horses quickly caught on they even changed the politics of the region, the communities that had more horsepower like the comanche kind of took over and they. Would kind of dominate everybody else and basically built these very successful empires empires that were built on Bison, hunting them and trading them with European settlers on the east coast. So people like the Comanche Kiowa were very successful from horseback and they may have actually been causing slow population declines in Bison. The story I heard him school is that white people killed off all the Bison and the truth is they did but the bison were already under a little bit of extra pressure. Thanks to the horses that white people brought. But waited until the spread of ranching and Commercial Bison hunting from Euro Americans to really collapse and by one thousand, nine, hundred, there's only maybe three hundred bison left. The West from at least thirty, million bison to just three hundred and about fifty years that by some more systematically wiped out in only a few decades thirty million bison were eventually replaced by thirty million cows de Bison izing roses really got started in the mid eighteen hundreds when people of European descent or beginning to move out west of the plains and start settling there. It was all sorts of people particularly I when it was scale so When what is Texas belong to Mexico you had lots of Mexicans who are setting up ranch's then you've got kind of poor white settlers anglos coming into the region setting things up as the American civil war approaches you got people who are kind of second and third sons of wealthy southern plantation families who can't inherit the family plantation and so they kind of go west to a place like Texas to set up kind of these small scale ranch's. Looked out at the planes and they thought, okay there are huge rangy creatures that live there why not replace them with other huge rangy creatures but why didn't they just stick with the bison that were already living there bison meat is freaking delicious and there is more of it per animal because Beissner. Bigger and bonus bison more already perfectly ecologically suited to the native. Grasslands and climate conditions. That's a really interesting question. I've I've thought about it a lot because in some ways, bison would be a very natural animal to raise. But then when I was reading diaries and things, I found that these people they were kind of disgusted bison they didn't view that as an animal that could be farmed. They saw it as a wild animal. and. So what's interesting about that is on one level people go with what they knew. Euro. Americans know about raising cattle, but another thing gets into their ideas of what is civilized and Dave you. The Bison is not the kind of animal that a civil in their minds a civilized people would raise and so cattle is the way to do it. So

America Texas Great Plains United States Hunter Dave Mexico
"great plains" Discussed on AP News

AP News

02:27 min | 5 months ago

"great plains" Discussed on AP News

"Sometimes leading conflicts got on video with workers trying to enforce mask where the problem is, when there's an absence of clarity around with the obligations are for everybody. That comes frankly from the governors themselves. They need to set clear rule. Brian Dodge, the association's president, has sent a letter to the National Governors Association asking them to require facemasks. Julie Walker, New York, Florida has been especially hard hit by the virus. 200,000 cases more than 3000 deaths. Other Sunbelt states are also seeing big jumps in cases and hospitalizations. Here's the AP Soccer Mahogany on Texas. Hospitalizations across the state have more than doubled the past two weeks to nearly 9000 people yesterday, officials in Houston say intensive care units have already passed based capacity. Austin's mayor says hospitals are at risk of being overwhelmed in coming days and his counterpart in San Antonio, says hospitals there are also nearly full. The Trump administration is pushing the force local school systems to be fully operational this fall despite the pandemic. Education Secretary Betsy DeVos into called the governor's dismiss plans by some districts to offer class instruction just a few days a week. President Trump has insisted that all schools and colleges returned to in person instruction as soon as possible in a tweet yesterday, he claimed Democrats want to keep schools closed for political reasons, not for health reasons. Heading into the final hour of trading. The Dow is down to 50. The S and P is off. 17. This is AP News. The Lower 48 Alaska are baking this summer. AP Science Writer Seth Bornstein reports that the traditionally hottest weeks of the season are coming up and the heat may linger for months. The worst part is That when me here I'll just look at long term forecast, which aren't as good as short term forecasts. Obviously They don't see any brink. They'll see below average temperatures, not August, not September. Heat advisories are expected from Phoenix to Charleston, South Carolina, later this week into the weekend. Next week. The climate prediction Center says close to 2/3 of the country will be warmer than normal. About 40% of the lower 48 has a moderate risk of his extreme and dangerous heat, including the upper Midwest and Great Plains. I'm to McGuire AP News..

AP Soccer Mahogany president AP National Governors Association Betsy DeVos Sunbelt Trump Julie Walker Brian Dodge Great Plains Houston Seth Bornstein Alaska McGuire New York Secretary Texas Austin San Antonio
Pine Ridge Indian Health Service regains accreditation

Native America Calling

04:00 min | 5 months ago

Pine Ridge Indian Health Service regains accreditation

"This is national native news I'm Antonio Gonzalez the Pine Ridge Indian Health Service Hospital in south, Dakota has regained accreditation and can now bill Medicare for services. Jackie Henry has more the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid. Services ended its provider agreement with the Pine Ridge IHS facility in two thousand, seventeen, citing the facilities failure to meet care standards. Losing that agreement meant the facility couldn't reimburse treatments through those programs by November of last year. A CMS survey team reported the hospital to be one hundred percent compliant with standards. Last month. The Joint Commission awarded the hospital full accreditation after a virtual survey. James Driving Hawk is the Great Plains area director for Indian Health Services? Services he says the Pine Ridge team has demonstrated, it can consistently meets standards. We have expanded leadership oversight from the office to the hospital and improve staffing levels, and we have increased requirements for medical staff, credentialing education of our staff were quality standards and implemented new checks and balances to ensure new issues that arise are addressed promptly. He says the agreement with CMS will help. The facility maintained and expanded services going forward now that all of our visits that we have a with our our patients are are able to be reimbursed, fully reimbursed now and so those the hospitals will receive that additional revenue, and then we take that revenue investment back into to. Into Services Driving Hawk says one of those investments planned renovation of the Pine Ridge IHS Emergency Department I'm Jacky, Henry in Sioux Falls South Dakota native people, their allies and city officials took part in a celebration in Santa Fe. New Mexico Thursday after a statue a Spanish governor Don. Vargas was taken down. They also called for the removal of a war monument, bearing racist inscription. The celebration followed demonstrations earlier this week in Albuquerque and Rio Arriba. County were statues of Spanish. One day on Yati were removed autumn. Roseville a CO founder of three sisters collective spoke to the crowd about the atrocities. Committed against Tacoma people in the late fifteen hundreds, hundreds of people passed away dirty, not massacre, and the men who survived the were enslaved, and had the right foot amputated. And that's why you saw the statue. In the late nineteen ninety S, Donlon Yahtzee with his right foot cutoff. Because we still remember native people say the removal of statues of colonizers in new. Mexico is a long time coming including tribal leaders who've worked with politics on removing the stone pillar, honoring military actions Jorge Rivera former governor of a Pueblo and has been involved in talks about its removal. MONUMENT CARVED IN MARBLE We're referred to as savages and savage has a lot of meaning both legally and culturally. Has a lot of meaning, and it was not appropriate for it to be used. In describing are people. I. Think are people are. the public people touch people now hope people create the image of the southwest, and everybody knows that you know that tribes are still alive and vibrant in this area. The mayor of Santa Fe Ellen Weber spoke at Thursday's event, calling the removal of statues part of healing and justice. He did not mention if for when the monument would be taken down or a statue of Soldier Kit Carson. The Hilo River Indian community has closed its casinos for two weeks due to recent spikes of covid nineteen in Arizona. The tribe halted gaming operations in March due to Cova nineteen and reopened in May after the state lifted stay at home orders. The second closure comes after a casino employee reportedly died recently due to complications of Covid nineteen I'm Antonio Gonzalez.

Pine Ridge Indian Health Servi Indian Health Services James Driving Hawk Pine Ridge Ihs Antonio Gonzalez New Mexico Santa Fe Pine Ridge Ihs Emergency Depar Jackie Henry Dakota Hilo River Indian Community Joint Commission Medicare Covid Tacoma Cova Sioux Falls South Dakota Vargas Albuquerque
South Dakota National Parks

The Amateur Traveler Podcast

06:08 min | 6 months ago

South Dakota National Parks

"Welcome the amateur traveler. I'm your host Chris Christensen. Let's talk about South Dakota. I'd like to welcome back to the show Gary Art from everything. Dash EVERYWHERE DOT com. Who's come to talk to us? Surprise surprise about national parks. This time about the National Parks of South Dakota Gary. Welcome back to the show. It has been so long. Yeah and we never get to talk so it's always a pleasure. It has been a very short period of time since I talked to carry but we have talked about doing this show since we ran into each other. Probably at Mount Rushmore last October September September. I think yeah. Maybe it's October. But yeah we're going to t backs and and this was totally unplanned. You just happen to be a remote rushmore exact same time. It's one of those odd coincidences that happen. And it doesn't happen to meet all that often but there are some national parks in South Dakota. That are not Mount Rushmore. So where are we going if we go to the National Parks of South Dakota? They're six national park. Service sites in South Dakota and five of them are in the West located in or near the Black Hills. And then there's one all by its lonesome in the east so we might as well talk about that one. I and that is the Missouri River National Recreation area. It lies on the Missouri River as you might guess given the name it is in the charming little town of yanked him. South Dakota believe it or not. I was actually rather curious to visit yanked and because I had read a list several years ago that had the cheapest place to live in America was yanked in South Dakota so it was kind of curious to see I was kind of curious. What kind of community is this? And it's very nice and it's not rundown or anything now it's cheap. It just happens to be in the middle of nowhere and that's why the site is right on the border with Missouri arm starting Nebraska and it's fifty nine mile stretch of the Missouri River. Very nice some very large bluffs that are overlooking the river and a national recreation area. So it's not a park if you go to the visitor center and look to get your National Park Stamp. It is not a visitor center per se. It is the office. So that's where the maintenance vehicles and the office staff and they're all there and in that building there's a very small lobby and they just sort of stick the stamp out there for people that want it but unlike pretty much every other national parks that you go to. There's no movie there's no displays none of that. It's very straightforward. It's just something that you can visit. There's a bridge which goes from South Dakota to Nebraska that crosses the river and that's probably some of the best views you're going to get of the river if you WANNA take some photos. There's a place you can pull out just before the bridge. You can't really stop on the bridge nor can you really walk across the bridge. So that's kind of difficult so you just have to keep those things in mind. It's far enough east for. I think you could easily do day-trip if you happen to be in Sioux falls or if you're driving across the state I mean if you wanted to dip down interstate ninety s the interstate. The kind of runs across South Dakota East West. You could do that if you're a serious national parks. Yeah other than that. There's not a lot there. Well I should say for the listeners. The show who are either not from the US or possibly geographically challenged the Missouri River may not stick out in your mind but Missouri River is the longest river in North America. If you include the merchant into the Mississippi River in Saint Louis even if you don't include the Mississippi part I believe North think it's the Missouri Mississippi Slash Missouri. So if you took if you went from New Orleans and then just kind of banked left at Saint Louis rather than right that would take you further. 'cause THE MISSISSIPPI goes up into northern Minnesota whereas the Missouri goes much further will the I? I'm looking it up in the Missouri River just until it gets to the mouth Where it enters into the Mississippi is well for our European listers who I was mentioning this forest. Thirty seven hundred thirty seven sixty seven kilometers or two thousand three hundred forty one miles. So there's really quite an amazing amount of the length of this river not to mention the fact that it empties into the Mississippi River. The river at this point and yanked is pretty good sized. It's not a rapid river. Anything like that. It's far too big for it if anything else. It kind of gives you an appreciation for the river. Think if you go up to North Dakota there are some sites that are close to the as well and you with Lewis and Clark and these the Missouri kind of as their highway to get to the West speaking of the river. I in South Dakota many times live in Minnesota and I think South Dakota is kind of. There's two half's to the state the east and the West in the dividing line is the Missouri River it kind of goes along Nebraska and then it hooks up in when you're on interstate ninety that goes East West when you cross the river. The geography changes pretty dramatically so on the eastern side of the river. It's really flat. Is Your stereotypical great plains. Corn for miles. Once you cross it then you start to see hills instantly like instantly instantly. And that's a function of the river the meandering of the river in the flood plain and everything has basically scour out everything to the east of it and literally. When you cross the bridge you start to see some hills and that's not the black hills yet but it's kind of building up to that. I think you're still well over one hundred miles away at that point and all of the rest of the parks are in this. Western part of the state in the western part of the state is by far the most interesting. It gets the most tourists. You've heard of pretty much anything. In South Dakota it is to the west of the Missouri River in that Black Hills area. So we're talking deadwood Mount Rushmore while drug everything except the Mitchell Corn Palace.

South Dakota Missouri River Missouri River National Recrea Mississippi River Missouri Mount Rushmore Nebraska North Dakota Black Hills Chris Christensen Mississippi National Park Stamp Gary Art Minnesota Mitchell Corn Palace United States America New Orleans Sioux Falls
Interior official helped clear way for payments to ex-employer

Mark Thompson

03:13 min | 7 months ago

Interior official helped clear way for payments to ex-employer

"Department official in the trump administration is under fire over her role in securing access to billions of dollars in corona virus aid and she was securing it for a handful of what wealthy corporations of their wealthy Alastor corporations including one that previously employed her as a lobbyist and toppings this is Jones great isn't it it's nice that all this money came along just in time to take care of my former employer in under the most emergency orders then you know you can it's easier to hide that stuff I mean look at others and tired most of this money it goes unsupervised I mean there but you know again thank you politico for this story without journalists you wouldn't know it right Assistant Secretary for Indian affairs terrace Sweeney is among a small group of interior officials advising the treasury department on how to distribute eight billion dollars in a rescue funding that Congress is earmarked for native American tribes V. R. I mean native American communities so hard hit by this and I have a story about them getting some help in a moment okay they include now the trump administration plans by the way just let's just be clear about this that money was intended solely for the five hundred and seventy four federally recognized tribes hit hard by the economic shutdown okay that was it was specifically earmarked for for them but the trump administration now it's saying that it plans to include more than two hundred for profit Alaska native corporations among the eligible recipients and that includes corporations that rank among the largest businesses in the state a lot of tribal leaders are outraged they say the decision code you know take all this money nearly half of it according to tribal leaders and take it away from the tribes and into the corporate coffers Sweeney's role has since come under intense scrutiny with Democrats and several tribal organizations seizing on the financial interest that she retains as a shareholder of her former employer arctic slope regional corporation she's not only diverting funds there while she's still a stockholder in the company at least one tribal organization this week called for her resignation over the issue telling treasury secretary Steve Mnuchin and interior secretary David Bernhardt but she has lost the confidence of Indian tribes R. Sweeney must be removed because she cannot be trusted to advise treasury on Alaska native corporations according to the Great Plains tribal chairman association that represents sixteen midwestern tribes anyway terrace Sweeney the assistant secretary chief seems as though she's doing really well in all of this and she's gonna take care of the people who are those that she's connected to that's one thing happening in the

Official Jones Treasury Department Congress Steve Mnuchin David Bernhardt R. Sweeney Assistant Secretary For Indian Alaska Secretary Great Plains Chairman Assistant Secretary
Virtual Indigenous commencement celebrates 2020 Indigenous graduates

Native America Calling

03:45 min | 7 months ago

Virtual Indigenous commencement celebrates 2020 Indigenous graduates

"This is national native news. Antonio Gonzales the Mescalero Apache tribe is calling for the resignation of us. Assistant Secretary of Indian Affairs Tara. Sweeney the New Mexico tribe sent a letter to president trump this week raising concerns about Sweeney's ties to Alaskan native corporations and their inclusion in the eight billion dollars and treble cove in nineteen relief aid in the Cares Act Mescalero. Apache president gave Aguilar believed Sweeney has a conflict of interest as a former businesswoman. For An Alaskan Native Corporation. Aguilar says Mescalero is joining other tribes. Which have already called for her to resign. Time of quogue nineteen. We've been working very hard with the with everybody in the federal government working with our lobbyists and we just been trying to push and push it has come to our attention that You know mysteriously has tried to a lot corporation you know it's money set aside for tribes or a bunch of tribal leaders have been on calls. We've been talking and saying how unfair this was you know so we didn't feel it was right so we. I'm of us. We went ahead and just says you know what it's right. We can't have somebody in there representing you know. Other corporations besides tribes in mid April the Great Plains Tribal Chairmen's association similar letter to the trump administration accusing Sweeney of seeking to divert emergency treble cove in nineteen eight to Alaska native corporations a spokesperson from the Interior Department. Said it's false. Sweeney has attempted to divert funds away from American Indians and on the talk show native America calling Tuesday Sweeney commented about the controversy. I want to reiterate the I am and will continue to be committed to supporting all American Indians. And Alaskan natives My approach has always been focused on inclusiveness transparency and partnerships and I was raised with high ethical standards and I take those responsibilities seriously I made sure that my participation was evaluated by career ethics officials who determine that there was no statutory or regulatory prohibitions in the administration's ethics pledge that would limit my participation in consulting with Treasury As they went to implement the the Cares Act the issue of Alaska native corporations eligibility for Tribal Cares Act. Funding isn't federal court. Sweeney declined to comment on the litigation. Meanwhile tribal leaders including Aguilar say. They're waiting on much-needed treble cove. Nineteen relief aid. Several national organizations are hosting the event virtual indigenous commencement on facebook Friday. They're recognizing native students as cove in nineteen has cancelled graduation ceremonies and celebrations across the country. Graduates families and friends can share photos videos or comments. Melvin Monette Beraha says President and CEO of indigenous education. One of the hosts he says are already more than forty five hundred participants. Beautiful are excited to be able to share their photos People do feel a little bad. I think that they are not receiving their cap and gown Like they were going to so. We're asking people's supposed excited pictures of their treatment in their personal celebration. Maybe they're in their traditional regalia. Maybe they're not maybe photos of them throughout the year just to share who they are and what they're going to do next. The celebration is for graduates of all grades. The Hash Tags are twenty twenty native Grad and deer native graduates. The virtual commencement will continue through this summer. I Antonio's Gonzales.

Sweeney Alaskan Native Corporation Aguilar Mescalero Antonio Gonzales Alaska Great Plains Tribal Chairmen Assistant Secretary President Trump Melvin Monette Beraha Quogue New Mexico President And Ceo Facebook Apache Gonzales Interior Department Treasury America
Federal judge invalidates key permit for Keystone XL pipeline. Tribes push back on ANCs included in tribal COVID-19 funds.

Native America Calling

03:54 min | 8 months ago

Federal judge invalidates key permit for Keystone XL pipeline. Tribes push back on ANCs included in tribal COVID-19 funds.

"The National Native News. I'm Antonio Gonzalez a federal judge. Wednesday invalidated a key hermit for the keystone xl pipeline. Judge Brian Morris says a permit issued by the US Army Corps of engineers bypassed necessary environmental reviews the order says TC energy formerly trans. Canada cannot build across waterways along the pipeline route until the core does more work on the permit Victoria wicks. Has This report. Doug Hayes is an attorney for the Sierra Club one of six environmental agencies that sued the Corps of Engineers Hayes says the core used a streamlined approval. Process called nationwide permit number. Twelve that precludes public review and circumvents transparent approval processes good pipeline would cross approximately six hundred eighty eight. Different waterways rivers streams and wetlands across Montana South Dakota and Nebraska and the Army Corps of Engineers is the agency that approves those crossings in the Order. The Federal Court notes that the expediter permit is used. When a project will result in minimal damage to aquatic environments Judge Morris also notes that the core failed to consult with us fish and wildlife or national marine fisheries before determining the pipeline. Construction would have no effect on endangered species or critical habitat. Hey says the car has to do further environmental review and consultation under the endangered species. Act before it can reissue the permit. Qc energy cannot build through any of the waterways along the pipeline route until it revamped its process into related cases tribes and environmentalists have challenged permits for the one point. Two Miles of pipeline. That crosses the border between Montana and Alberta. Tc Energy has started preconstruction on that segment for National Native News. I'm Victoria wicks in rapid city. South Dakota Judge. Morris is hearing arguments in those two related challenges to the keystone. Xl Pipeline. Thursday. He'll issue an order in those cases at a later date. Many tribal leaders are calling for Alaska native corporations or an sees to be excluded from funding. Set aside for tribes in the Cares Act Wyoming Public Radio Savannah Mar reports. Gerald Grey is chairman of the little shell tribe of Chippewa in the Rocky Mountain Tribal Leadership Council he says Anne Siese Corporation status should preclude them from accessing the eight billion dollar tribal stabilization fund. The last good native corporations should not be getting any of the funding because they're not tribes and We just basically don't feel that you know a good idea to be doing that this week. The Rocky Mountain Tribal Leadership Council urged the US Treasury Department to exclude an sees from the emergency funding. The Great Plains Tribal Chairman Association when a step farther calling for the removal of Tara Sweeney. As Assistant Secretary of Indian affairs. They say since she wants worked for an there's a conflict of interest at play but Shauna President of the KONIAK regional corporation says Sweeney simply following the law simply put Alaskan native corporations are eligible for funding under the cares act because we're included in the law and we're going to use the funding from the cares act to help our communities prepare and respond to the nineteen tribes in an CS. Have until Friday to apply for their slice of Betrayal Stabilization Fund. It's not yet clear how the money will be divided up for national native news. I'm Savannah Mar Oglala Sioux Tribal. Police have verbally warned or issued citations to more than one hundred and fifty people on the Pine Ridge Reservation in South Dakota for violating curfew or shelter in place orders the tribes currently on a fourteen day lockdown due to a public health response to Cova nineteen. I'm Antonio

Brian Morris National Native News Us Army Corps Of Engineers South Dakota Savannah Mar Oglala Sioux Trib Tc Energy Rocky Mountain Tribal Leadersh Antonio Gonzalez Montana Great Plains Tribal Chairman A Victoria Wicks Doug Hayes Tara Sweeney Corps Of Engineers Canada Federal Court Pine Ridge Reservation Wyoming Alaska
Teens convince their city to act on climate

Climate Connections

01:12 min | 9 months ago

Teens convince their city to act on climate

"In two thousand eighteen. The city of Saint Louis Park. Minnesota made the commitment to become carbon neutral. The decision was the result of pressure from local high school students. They felt passionate like a lot of youth around the country do that. There's an urgency brought urgency city council in the form of letters in the form of presentations. They went and spoke with the city council and to their elected officials and just capturing homeless message of. This is our home to write. Jesse white is with the Great Plains Institute. The group helped the city right. A climate action plan that addressed the students concerns. After it passed the institute kept the youth engaged. We wanted to leverage these students. Whose voices were so powerful. And who had this passion? The group gave the students data about the suitability of each rooftop and the city for solar panels than the teens went door to door. They talked to people about the Solar Energy. Their roof could generate and how to finance solar panels ultimately why it says that effort will lead to at least seven new solar installations. She says the teens knowledge and energy where amazing. These students are intelligent. They're smart they know climate and they're our future leaders. We can hand off the baton with confidence that the next generation knows what they're doing

Great Plains Institute Saint Louis Park Minnesota Jesse White
Boeing swings to annual loss as 737 MAX costs near $19 billion

Financial Exchange with Barry Armstrong

05:10 min | 11 months ago

Boeing swings to annual loss as 737 MAX costs near $19 billion

"For the first time and I believe it's two decades Boeing lost money yeah the last time they had an annual loss not a quarterly one but its annual one was nineteen ninety seven so it's it's been a little while and obviously this is all related to the seven thirty seven Max there there is no other reason why Boeing is losing money what they are estimating now is that the total costs related to this between money they have paid a victim's paid another operators money lost you know from not being able to actually sell these planes in the living room they're anticipating it's gonna be about eighteen point six billion dollars now which is pretty much double what they had earlier estimated even with that I think analysts were fearing that this you know could have been worse and so mowing stock is actually about two and a third percent today not even with the the loss that they reported part that's just because the stock has been so badly punished yeah over the last year in a year where the S. and P. five hundred you know rose thirty percent yes Boeing stock obviously did not it was down you know significantly over the course of the year ag I saw the new C. E. L. interview this morning on television though did you and I thought he did a great job because he's really lowered expectations you know he came out I think it was yesterday and said well you know we we were hoping we might be able to get this thing back in the air second half of twenty twenty and then the FAA corrected and said now we think we can actually get the swing approved in June which is a complete turnaround from his predecessor Mister Bolan Burke but the even there he he he's managing expectations and Bill Gates yes there are too young to remember but Bill Gates was the master at that eat when he was reporting earnings you'd say well you know it's you know we yeah we had a good quarter but the next court he would sandbag people Steve Jobs to eve jobs is great at it you know law yeah we had a good quarter but you never know so this new CEO is much more humble much less that he is not trying to intimidate the FAA he's completely given up control saying look this is in the hands of the engineers and the scientists and regulators yep and we'll put this plane back in the air and it will be in that this is where it was really a great statement it will be the safest plane in the air which is what I've maintained all along that when it does get approved I think you're going to I think everybody's going to want one first of all they're great plain a if you ever flown on a mac struck we'll know most people haven't I have flown before they took him now they they fire route Miami to Saint Croix and the the A. K. your ago they were in the air and so I've flown in on several occasions they're great plane you we the truck Zada will like this plane better than the Airbus three twenty year the old seven thirty sevens or re eek I think you're going to enjoy the plane and you're gonna go into that plane saying this thing must have an indoor just a tremendous amount of due diligence to get back in the air we'll see you are so skeptical I I am skeptical that companies are I'm I'm skeptical that this that the seven thirty seven Max brand is going to survive yeah I I just I okay if they have another incident you're absolutely right and a I don't know it because it isn't that kind of the tower to hero seven thirty seven Max B. yeah I I don't know a I'm looking forward to it being back in the air and you know I'm I figure start see the state the problem is the turnaround for bowling even if it gets approval let's say they're right they get approved in June yeah in terms of ramping up production and deliveries you're talking probably July of twenty twenty one before they're back to where they should have been a year and a half earlier yeah I mean they they have said they're going to start production before they get final approval so that will help a little bit on that side okay but it is going they have what like I think it's like five hundred planes that are sitting there that they really don't know what to do with right now because they're just sitting on the parking lots yeah you know when when you have five hundred planes is lying around your backyard you have problems and I say this as someone I I own Boeing stock I do believe there's an upside case here yeah but it's just the this seven thirty seven MAX thing like a it's it's reprehensible just how they got to this point night going you just left a bad taste in my mouth they go on YouTube and watch some of the interviews this morning that the CEO did and I think you'd be eat he turned me around I was pretty negative on it yeah and now I'm feeling I'm feeling better about it I just I'll I'll leave it at that and you know a act IV on unlike you truck I'll get on that plane even even if it's a little more expensive hello I'll get on it don't get me wrong like I'm not saying I will get on it I'm saying that I think they're going to have a wider problem with selling these things in the future we'll see time will

Boeing
Barred Owls Invade the Sierra Nevadas

60-Second Science

02:33 min | 11 months ago

Barred Owls Invade the Sierra Nevadas

"Barred owl has a very distinctive call. That's the one that goes who cooks for you. Connor would is a conservation biologist and apply to colleges at the University of Wisconsin Wisconsin Madison. Who happens to do a pretty great barred owl impression himself. Who barred owls are native to the eastern US but in the last century? They've crossed the great great plains flooded into Canada and taking up roost in the Pacific northwest. Where they're a major threat to northern spotted. Owls barred owls are bigger and more aggressive than SPA. Ah Dollars and so far have been able to. Basically drive spotted owls out of their preferred nesting areas and also. Because they're more flexible than what they eat. There can be lots more bartels on landscape in now they're invading. The Sierra Nevada mountains further south the native range of the California spotted owl and the big question. Question was what is the size of the population there. And how fast is it growing to answer. That wouldn't team deployed audio recorders. Roughly a thousand locations uh-huh throughout twenty three hundred square miles of the northern Sierra Nevada. And they listened for two years. Collecting the faint calls of spotted. Owls barred owls house to in total. They gathered two hundred thousand hours worth of audio. Pretty daunting seeing. It all accumulate a- and knowing we had to make something intelligible out of algorithms that comb the audio for our call's helped make sense of it all and through models. The researchers were able to estimate estimate who was living in those forests barbells or spotted owls in approximately how many of them there were the key. Finding is that barred. Owls occupied about eight percent of the the northern. Sierra Nevada landscape and twenty seventeen but that jumps to twenty one percent in two thousand eighteen. So that's a two point six fold increase in just one year ear and on one hand. That's really worrying because it suggests that that bartell population has begun to grow really rapidly and thus pose direct immediate threat the California's byd l.. But the other hand. It's really exciting. Because this means we've caught the problem early and actually have a chance to do something about it. Most biological logical invasions really aren't fully identified until it's too late. The results are in the Journal. Condor ornithological applications would and his team advised that it might be necessary. Sorry to take lethal action. Remove the barred owls before they wipe out California spotted. Owls assuming that is we. Give about two spotted. Owls continued survival.

Connor California Sierra Nevada University Of Wisconsin Wiscon Pacific Northwest United States Canada Bartell
"great plains" Discussed on Weather Geeks

Weather Geeks

01:59 min | 1 year ago

"great plains" Discussed on Weather Geeks

"Compromised and landing aircraft getting SEIs getting good locations for mobile radars. Which can't scan through trees. There's a whole lot of problems that trees present and also hills. You know, there's only some hills and the Great Plains to be sure but hills, particularly the combination of hills and trees really difficult to operates, particularly the the mobile radars. Yeah. And so, yeah, I mean, it the Great Plains just presents a lot fewer obstacles and a lot more opportunities to execute project. Like this. I'm curious tell us little bit about sort of envision a real time day your setup you're deployed there in the morning UC probably doing your meteorological analysis to see where the activities going to be later that afternoon walk us through how that day evolves. If you see sort of targeted hotspot that day. Yeah. And then. The particular day actually begins the day before when we're thinking about what were we pre position, you know? So where we where we stay where we lodge for the night. The previous night has been informed by what we think's gonna happen. The following the next day. So Sumi decent decision. You know in. We're we're near that area. We get up in the morning, we start prepping vehicles gassing up and all that stuff. And we have a forecast briefing where we discuss where we went to try to to target some of the limitations and etcetera with also some some time spent towards the following day. Okay. Once we're done with today, where do we need to to end up? So once we've made that decision about where we wanna go we get on the road. Hopefully, we don't have to travel really far. But you know, you know, it just depends on how how good are forecast. What's your rain? I mean, what what's your sort of a reasonable operation range for you. Yeah. Well, I mean, if we hope to get. Get.

Great Plains Sumi
"great plains" Discussed on KOMO

KOMO

02:33 min | 1 year ago

"great plains" Discussed on KOMO

"They were detained by the US border patrol the three had been living in Snohomish county, but not legally in rekindle Vera's sister tells the Everett herald her parents are natives of Mexico who originally came to the US sixteen years ago because they said they couldn't find a safe neighborhood to raise their kids. She says they overstayed their tourist visas in that time the parents have become successful owners of an ever tire store. Urban is a U dub Bothell senior in biology and is interning at Seattle Children's hospital despite their release the family are not off the hook their congress member. US Representative Susan Dell Benny tells the herald. Ice has ordered all three to appear before a judge at an immigration hearing Corwin Hake. Komo news. A former playboy model is accused of murder ABC's, Amy Rohbock reports. The only picture Kelsey Turner is posing for a mugshot after being accused of killing a California psychiatrist Turner now in an orange jumpsuit on Monday up hearing in a California courtroom for the murder of seventy one year old Thomas Bouchard police say they found his body in the trunk of the models car abandoned in the Las Vegas desert last month. It's been really difficult. You know, my whole world is literally been turned upside down Judy urp Bouchard's girlfriend of seventeen years. Speaking out saying the doctor had befriended Turner and provided her with some three hundred thousand dollars over the past two years. He helped her financially he helped so many people with their rent, you know, car payments or education, according to an arrest warrant obtained by ABC news, Bershad traveled to Vegas with the intentive. Visit Turner he. Was attacked inside the vehicle and died from blunt force trauma to the head. I received some texts that I didn't think we're from him. The vocabulary was was not his vocabulary. And I said on the tex- you need to call me because I don't think this is you police say Bouchard had also been helping Turner pay to live in this Nevada rental home inside they say, they found blood and cleaning supplies calling it evidence of a clean-up while a possible motive for Maine's unclear urban cysts their relationship wasn't sexual Heathrow. He could solve people's problems with her though, she severely took advantage of it. Police arrested the model in California, but she is waiting expedition to Las Vegas used to back in court next week. Is not done with the Great Plains. Upper.

Kelsey Turner US Las Vegas Judy urp Bouchard Thomas Bouchard California Bouchard Komo Corwin Hake Snohomish county ABC Everett Susan Dell Benny murder Mexico Vera Great Plains congress Seattle Children
"great plains" Discussed on Collective Insights

Collective Insights

05:30 min | 1 year ago

"great plains" Discussed on Collective Insights

"Let's jump back in. Not patients remove the eating of moldy foods from their diet. And my patients still get well soon. I'm in your camp that that is consistent with my clinical experiences. Well, so. So we're about to do a study with Great Plains laboratory, which we're going to take patients or volunteers, actually, and we're gonna do this as a multi center trial using a number of physicians who are on the executive board of high CI. We're going to take patients have stopped consuming all known moldy foods for ten days. Measure in their urine and had them pig out on all those known moldy foods for ten days. And then see what we get now to my knowledge that's never been done where that study should launch at the end of this year beginning of the year, and I hope by early two thousand nineteen I'll actually be able to have a preliminary answer, for physicians and consumers of to what extent does that matter answer? Don't know. Does it matter? I don't think so. Have had a handful of patients respond to not eating those foods. Don't know what. That means. I'm going to shift gears for a second on food. What we do know is treating mold in which Candida almost always plays a role in wanna be on a high protein, low carb diet because Kubwa hydrates particularly sugar and fruit shade Candida and feed fungal species. And that does make a difference. And we use the same diet for lime because that seems to make a difference as well. Okay. So consistent with both lime animals have that low sugar, low, carb diet, hypertension, high nutrient dense and stay away from from the fluff. So. Testing for Lyme kind of. Complicated. I would say is a short answer to that aside from what you mentioned with the genetics western blot. Is there anything any other way that you can get to what co-infections are what's going on there? And then is that important when it comes to treatment. Again, many answers to that question. There are other tests on the market and then mold versus lime. So both are going on. Where do you start? Virtually always with mold hundred give you a bunch of reasons for that. Number one because mold and lime look so similar. I can make the mole diagnosis with much more certainty because the testing is better number two. I don't need to jump into antibiotics which are almost always necessary in the line world. I would like to avoid that. So literally if you if you you can't be certain that one is not in play. So if you treat the mold successfully and all the symptoms go away, you didn't have to provide antibiotics for that patients on necessarily from both a toxic affect affect on their gut. Biomass affect on cost. You didn't need to do that. So I would always treat them old. I it is also less toxic easier to treat and much less hard on the body. So I typically start with mold. I can tell you that. I've had. Very very few exceptions tattoo couple where they had both. And for whatever reason they could start with mold their body wouldn't let them when we started with Nella their body tolerated in handler better. And then we were able to move on to mold. They're really exceptions in the nisei argument that perhaps the body will take care of the line or the co-infections. If the toxicity is gone in the immune system starts to work a little better. Or do you not typically see that have you seen the look on my face? I know. These are both nasty processes for most of my mold patients, the mold has colonized, and they're gutting sinuses. They're happy there. This is perfect temperature. Watts of nutrients it's dark. It's comfy. They love their host or hostess, why would they leave? They're not gonna go away because you wish them away sameness true with Lyman co-infections. Perfect temperature lovely nutrients lovely cellular debris defeat upon. Why would they leave? They they just don't go away. Now, you are alluding to something that's important, which is lime weakens the immune system and predisposed to not being able to handle mould mould, we consume insistent and pretty disposes to to to letting y or co-infections flourish..

Candida Great Plains laboratory executive Lyman ten days
"great plains" Discussed on Elvis Duran and the Morning Show

Elvis Duran and the Morning Show

04:03 min | 1 year ago

"great plains" Discussed on Elvis Duran and the Morning Show

"Pay for this. Tricycles cute lawful. She's wearing one of those big boots Aaron over her foot. And then drove all final. I'm surprised look, I can't tell you. How many times I've walked right into the street and a bus at three inches away on backup. Just in time. Happens. All the time. Be careful. I know let's get into the Danielle report Daniel so net. Flicks UK changed at the ending of the notebook. Instead of watching the main characters this is a spoiler alert. I'm just telling you notebook spin out for a long time never seen it. Instead of what of never seen it both. Both. Yeah. Yeah, you'll see it. Sometimes it's a it's a great plain movie instead of watching the main characters die together, you see a flock of birds fly over a lake so people were pissing the best part of watching. This is having your heartbroken at the end home. Why would you take that away from us? So. Yeah. Shorter gave the sorry that get totally gave the ending away the alternate. Yeah. Sorry, psalms depressing. She she gave with the ending of the real movie in any other possible enemy. It's been out a long time. Sleeping with the enemy reboot is in the works. No official word on the cast. But that was an incredible movie. If you've never seen that you make Joe tell the. Marie condo from tidying up. She is being credited for an increase in sales of shredders, file, storage supplies, and specialty labels. She also is the reason that thrift store donations are up. I know they oh this woman a lot of money. She's really done. So many great things for you know, like, you said thrift stores and donations to people who need clothing, but also for all of us to clean out our clutter. Yes, he definitely lover three fashion week, right? That's right. It is official Jenna Bush Hager will replace Kathie Lee as his co host for the fourth hour of the today show. I told you yesterday the Kathy Lee's last day will be April fifth. So I know you're going to be over there today show next week so today, no say show next and data Jackson announced to Las Vegas residency yesterday. She's gonna launch her first Las Vegas Renzo. The inmate metamorphosis, that's the name of it. It will begin may seventeenth and it will be at the park theatre at park MGM resort. And they're going to add more shows. And if you're a fan of Janet Jackson, you're gonna. To figure out how to get those tickets. There's a new movie on the waves called fighting with my family's actually based on the true story of WWE superstar page and bringing it up because like you love WWE. So does Josh the movies actually filled with comedy? It's got a lot of heart. And you honestly don't have to be a wrestling fan to enjoy this movie. It's a it's such an incredible story. So people like you indomitable enjoy it. But other people like maybe Gandhi who doesn't enjoy WWE is much. It's really the story of WWE superstar page. I'm looking it up. Finding out now fighting with my family at cynthia's. Now. Don't call me tonight. I'm going to be at the theater, they went to go. Check it out. You got two hour season finale of the mass singer tonight, the be the monster and the peacock who's gonna be who's gonna win at all. I can't wait. I'm so excited. Don't call my house. Daniel she'll be watching live. I finished umbrella kademi last night started. Yeah. I finished a great tea. So now, we can talk about it. But not not here. Not here. You know, there's got to be a second season. Now. That's all. Everyone knows that they said there's there's go away. They cannot. Stop stop. No, people aren't done. They know that the people leave us hanging for second seizes what a great finish dog. Daniel of all. I talked about a movie that's been out for like twenty five. The differences. You gave the entire VAT line knows how they die at the end come on pressure. There has to be some type of name for the disorder. You feel to like watch his show because everyone else is watching it. And they're going to ruin it for you. Okay. I'm not going to allow anyone to ruin the umbrella academy, turning great tease, Michael. And I'm kicking him out. Get of here. I love you. I'm doing it to free. I'm helping you save yourself..

WWE Daniel Kathie Lee Janet Jackson official Joe Michael cynthia Aaron UK Las Vegas Renzo Las Vegas wrestling Jenna Bush Hager umbrella academy Danielle MGM Josh Gandhi three inches
"great plains" Discussed on Dose of Leadership

Dose of Leadership

02:05 min | 2 years ago

"great plains" Discussed on Dose of Leadership

"And we need to talk about a subject matter. That's passionate for me. Why can talk about? But if we're gonna talk about trivia stuff, I'd rather be a cave somewhere. Not talk to anybody of right. And I'm good with both. Right. So, but I know that about myself, and I know that I need to be consciously seeking feedback. And I do that through through making statements like I don't know what I'm talking about. But but this is what I'm thinking. And that that enables gives the group the right to kinda gawk, and that's not right or in his what I think got couple of good. But this is no good. And so that you're always in that sort of cultural state where the organization is is given the the alliance to think and put their perspective into any any of these decisions that we go. Yeah. I love that mean again, so many things that is in. In your face to face and talkies again that attended a will that talked about the humble teachable spirit not afraid about being wrong. I say that I think that is critical the moment that you could stop warring of you don't wanna be wrong. But the moment you can stop worrying about being wrong, your whole life can be transformed. Right. And it's almost embracing the failures looking at failures nonsensical word. What does it even mean? The a hill. Right. You're always striving for excellence striving for improvement pushing yourself at a comfort zone being comfortable being uncomfortable. These are the things that I see you. That are essential leadership traits. But I see that in you in them. I wish more CEO's would have it that kind of humbled teachable. It your perfect example of where you don't have to have this John Wayne s charisma personality to be ineffective leader, you still have a strong presence. But yet you're like, I said, I see the interested in you. I see the the humbleness, but I see this intensity to insist. It's a powerful combination. I don't have ever looked at it that way. But no, I think it's great in the what's what's new and exciting for Great Plains. What what's down the pike?.

Great Plains John Wayne CEO
"great plains" Discussed on Dose of Leadership

Dose of Leadership

02:35 min | 2 years ago

"great plains" Discussed on Dose of Leadership

"And and and meanwhile, half of the group is going on really believe in. And so I you know, that's one of the more difficult things to do. But, but it is one of the things that I spent a lot of energy on managing the namic between the people that generally. Okay. Not speaking and those that are perfectly. Okay. Talking all the time. And so we manage that process in a we make everybody aware what it is. And then we engage the. People that don't speak because usually they're the thinkers. Yeah. They're not. Yeah. You're right. You're absolutely. I told the when we have a CFO. That's just awesome. He's a he's the biggest rock star of work with for an doesn't get any better than, but he, but he doesn't say much, and so as we were going through this the group said, you know, as we move forward, you gotta reflect on on a couple of things one of them is that. We have to call the CFO out to actually say we have to give him the ability to say something and usually takes time for him to say something, but you know, in the six years of being there with a company there's never been a moment where one of asked him to make a comment that it wasn't some some that. I didn't learn from that something of Niver never did. I say that was a waste of time. I mean, everything that comes from him has been thought through. Yeah. While the talkers, you're thinking as you're talk, right? As some of the stuff, I kinda don't really want to know. So what what we do? We manage the process of coming to a common vision and showing that the people that that are the thinkers are fully engaged, then the entire organization, you know, believe in what we're doing and it's also easy to to then pass through the entire organization. Yeah. When that entirely ship group is you know, really believes, Ed. Intention -ality behind that most stretching emotional quotient muscle, right? That really is a primary function of you is the CEO, right. I can vision you can sit there in vision. You. You know, sitting back and making sure you're aware of one it's happening. Right. And then interjecting and polling, right? I resonated with me because as good aircraft commander of plane, you have to do that right in because so many accidents have happened because of the dynamic type a personality sit down and shut up, you know, in trying to get that interview COPA at the speak up, those you're about the crash into the mountain right in there's been tons of accidents over the history of.

CFO Niver COPA commander CEO Ed six years
"great plains" Discussed on Dose of Leadership

Dose of Leadership

04:05 min | 2 years ago

"great plains" Discussed on Dose of Leadership

"And that's how I see leadership. You have the skills. You have all the skills right now to be the leader that someone needs to be today. And so your goal is to figure out what is that leader that I need to be for this person persons that organization today. Right. That make sense does that resonate with you. Yeah. Yeah. Interesting. This was so refreshing to hear Victor, I can't tell you how much that gets me jazzed. Because I think that when you look, well, let's talk about some of the the the time where you've you've had to in your career with all the organization or that you've had to fight that kind of Frederick Winslow Taylor perception of management would tell me about those times where you've come head to head with that that kind of old mentality based on what I'm hearing from you. Yeah. And I and I have had those were the house very very fortunate early on in my career that I that I eat I don't know whether divine intervention of what happened, but I ended up in organizations that that fit my my paradigm fit, my belief system, and how you did this. And I was also very fortunate that I actually had an it's it's an interesting word that you use empowerment just happened. So that the last three days we had our leadership development summit for three days. And I did that with with Brian from W one of the topics that we that we we talked about was empowerment and in its badly abused work because you know, it's sort of like it can be misused than it can be it can be wrongly used. But, but it's really a simple relationship empowerment, you can only empower somebody to the degree to which their skills. And their experience allow them to be. So, you know, you don't wanna go give you know, the the the guy who doesn't is gone Cessna one sixty to fly a seven forty seven right because he's probably gonna kill everybody. So you need to make sure that there's always that balance in that you moving people forward with the empowerment stuff, but it get it. You know, getting that getting to that to that place where where we we're we're mobilizing the organization, you you gotta get inside it. So that there's so that so this empowerment transformation is taking place, and it's and it's deliberate. Right. Eminence delivered an instant peace in the other interesting question that came up recently was if you look at the empowerment spectrum, right? It's a balance between thority and your skillset an experience. So but somebody has to step into higher authority perhaps without having the experience, right? Or they are they are they have too much experience. But they don't have enough power. And the question was where do you prefer for people to be in a place where they have more skill set than than power or the put them in a place a little bit uncomfortable. And they learned to take you know to grow into their power. And I think it's both depends on the personality. They were halfway through the conversation. But I wanted to take the time to talk about my good friends, the sponsor here this special series equity Bank. Have you ever noticed that most business bankers seem to really understand just one thing? It's banking, right. And not a lot about business make sense since most banks were built generations ago. And now they're often run by caretakers not business builders will it's not the case here at equity Bank, the bankers equity Bank, didn't Herod a Bank generations ago, they built one of their own. They know that building something takes expertise vision and hard work in over the past decade. They've built one of the region's fastest-growing banks by working side by side with customers with entrepreneurs with leaders in communities all throughout Kansas, Missouri, Arkansas and Oklahoma recently equity Bank was listed on the.

equity Bank Frederick Winslow Taylor bankers equity Bank Victor Brian Herod Kansas Oklahoma Arkansas Missouri three days
"great plains" Discussed on Dose of Leadership

Dose of Leadership

03:54 min | 2 years ago

"great plains" Discussed on Dose of Leadership

"How would I do this? And and just retired that I had an opportunity to be a leadership role. I would try to model that. Yeah. And. That that appeal to me because you're right. Most engineers we like being in slightly dark rooms cave. Leave us alone. You know, we'll we'll work on something. And we'll give you the answer. And and and he just go away. Yeah. Even engineered engineer engineer to death. Right. That's what they wanna do. Right gets excited rate. But the fact that you love it the combination though, I think Victor is such a powerful combination because I can sense it from you. I can see it from you. You've got this humble, I say this on the show a lot he had this humble teachable spirit. But inside I see this intensity of will combined with that. Right. And that combination of that hump humility with teachable spirit with that intensity. Will is very makes for a very effective leader. I don't know if you've seen it that way. You look at it that way. But I think some of the, you know, you're you're you're quiet your sauce Bokan. But I'm looking at you. And I know that people can't see you you have this intensity about you. That is composed intensity. Right. And is. A fair assessment of you. I mean, I see that. I see that inside of you that. Yeah. That people that I think everybody would tell you that I that I can be intense. But but. And if you were to come into GP today and ask some of the people that work women are regular basis in other Nomi now six years later, as so they know that a lot of it is really an act because that, you know, I'll get a get very dramatic too. Because I'm start to realize that a point hasn't been made. So I'll sell they'll make a show out of it. And then which is back off. So you know, we will have this high energy intensity. But, but yeah, I mean, I think I I am I would imagine most people in leadership roles would need, you know, you gotta have a lot of energy to keep. Absolutely. I think to be an effective one a really effective one. It's the combination. I sometimes I see. Even some very visible leaders famous leaders that we see they're either one of the other there too extreme on one end right there either to humble, and Hugh, you know, they don't have that intensity. There ain't they're almost laws fair, right. Or the other side. They're almost like it's all about charisma and Taipei and this and that, and they don't have that humility piece. That's where you get a lot of egocentric side of leadership. Right. See that a lot of politics. I'll see around the ego Centric side of leadership rate, and there's still a belief. I even work in the corporate arena for sixteen seventeen years this perception of this belief that you have to be this larger than life charismatic egocentric forced to be an effective leader. And I just don't buy into that. What your thoughts on that? No, you're right. I mean, just before we started this. We were talking a little bit about that. And you're right because it isn't about you driving the organization it's about the organization transforming into drive in itself. Yeah. So you have to push the, you know, get that you have to mobilize the workforce get the energy into the organization because it can't come from one individual right in Iowa's. He loo while back when I was with grandfather's there for twelve years with these guys as chairman asked me at over dinner. He he said we were having this philosophical discussion he said 'cause you're gonna know when you've sort of reached the highest level of your career when you being really the most effective, and I said well the day that I could walk out of this company. And absolutely nothing changes for years. That's when I've done my job the best route great because the organization is now truly independent rights. It's functioning on its own knows what to do..

Victor Hugh engineer Taipei Nomi Iowa chairman sixteen seventeen years twelve years six years
"great plains" Discussed on Dose of Leadership

Dose of Leadership

04:22 min | 2 years ago

"great plains" Discussed on Dose of Leadership

"Special entrepreneurial and leadership series of those leadership. Brought to you by my friends at equity. The come so excited to sit down and talk with your welcome to the show. Thank you. Thank you. And you've got a storied career from a leadership perspective. How did you get? How did you? And we were talking before the recording in Yugoslavia Toronto gains, the city Californian, you're here in Wichita. How did you get here? How did you get to this leadership role? That's a good question. Well, you know, the leadership. I it wasn't a plant. It wasn't. I didn't wake up, and and think to myself, I gotta be a seal. It was a sort of a sequence of of of events. You know, when I got when I started working and so being an employee stock observe the leadership around you, and I thought to myself. This is not really all that affective. I don't you know, they're the way in which they interact with me with other people. It's it. It's not it doesn't produce the results that it could. And and as I as I moved through my career, and it and it progressed. I just kept thinking about how would I receive this? If I was on the other side, and I don't know whether that was what what and that up putting me further and further into the management chain. But every time I had an opportunity to be in the leadership role. I practiced the art of what would I what would IB doing on the on the bottom, and how would I be perceiving my leadership style? You know, that's impressive. Because it's so true. I've always said, I think back to all the examples of leadership have been exposed to the greatest lessons have been sometimes from those really poor examples right in the fact that you had the awareness and the ability to go man, I'm going to do that. And then, but but the I'm curious about okay. So you're given a leadership role. So it wasn't your plan. It's always funny. Lot of people say that they never thought it'd be in this role. What was the intention? What was the idea when you got your degree at Ryerson university? When you when you're entering the workforce. What was the intention? Well, originally was imagined wanted to be an engineer. He and I end so that's what I did. I started off designing electric heaters. And and then I thought man there's more to it than and and. Just this ineffectiveness of of of the people that were providing leadership to me and to other engineers, I would end up stepping up to do some of the things that that I thought well, we we need some guidance. We need some encouragement we need some direction on some of this stuff. And so that in I just sort of evolved in a piece by piece, but the willingness to go I'm not going to want to do something different. Right. That's I think that's a little different. Sometimes particularly people with I've worked with a lot engineers, and engineering mindset, you know, and certain type of mindset, you have it. But you're also said, you know, I'm gonna this. Ain't right. I'm going to change the world. Right. So where did that come from? Do you think? Yeah. Well, he Noah some immigrant as you said, I was born in informing us live. It was just as small kid when we laugh, so we had nothing I'm my family had zero. And so when when we ended up in Canada, you know, going throw a stray Elia and. In high school, and we have nothing. And so I realized was my mum's value system that if you want to get something you're going to have to work for yourself. And so that work ethic was there very early on. And I just you know, working progressing through. And I realized that it for me personally to to grow ahead. Make a lot of effort into into doing that and to go back to the engineering piece within very short period of time. I realized that the people that made the money, and the people that had, you know, had really the ability to influence the business were the the guys up at the top. And and I'm receiving their leadership styling thinking, this is really not very effective such that thinking along the lines..

Elia Ryerson university Yugoslavia Wichita engineer Noah Canada
"great plains" Discussed on Filmhaus

Filmhaus

02:12 min | 2 years ago

"great plains" Discussed on Filmhaus

"These, he's got shot at purple golf shirt on. Who's good, who's good at almost every movie. I've seen him in Oscar, Isaac. Yeah, Oscar Isaac is really, really also kind of brooding telling you can be angry. He can be like, looks like he's got something brooding underneath them. He cares about the city. If you've seen, what's the HBO show. Mayor most violent year? No. No, it's the other one. Yeah. The other one is super good. Something about being a nice person. I know sorry. I said the wrong name, but I watched it because of you guys recommendations, really good, six episodes something. Something a hero that's SIM. He cares about the city. I'm gonna do an old Batman and say, have Michael Keaton. Great. Great Plains back. He pees back and he's, I mean, I'm not really even joking. Like I would like to see that that'd be kind of cool like full circle to is it. Is it not to knock number? Is it to infusing though that he is America's vulture America's in Birdman Spiderman, homecoming? No, he went to jail. I don't care. Sure. We'll be didn't do anything in the end of that movie. That was my one complained about the whole thing you're talking about. He didn't do anything. I agree. He got in the way. No, Michael Keaton crashed himself like Harry Potter Harry Potter syndrome. Everything happens around Harry Potter and Harry Potter's like, oh, whoops, of oughta cadaver he doesn't cuss that. This is very fine. Scott, really jacked and played old Batman, heavy really committed as naming people. Yeah, yeah. Told me Jones. Timothy Grint or whatever, who played Ron Weasley grid. I don't the Olifants. Chompers. There's just too easy to tell. He's got the big. They would have said that about Christian bale critic bills. Oh, pursed lips. As we kind of weird. He's Ray. He's ready for kissing. I always thought when they announced Chris Nolan was going to be making Batman. I thought guy Pearce was going to be as his homeboy. That's probably where cart came from because he couldn't scheduling conflict guy. Pearce Aaron, Eckerd the true. I mean, they look so similar. Oh, I guess..

Michael Keaton Harry Potter Batman Timothy Grint Oscar Isaac Isaac guy Pearce golf Pearce Aaron HBO Great Plains Chris Nolan Olifants America Ron Weasley Jones Scott
"great plains" Discussed on Newsradio 830 WCCO

Newsradio 830 WCCO

05:00 min | 2 years ago

"great plains" Discussed on Newsradio 830 WCCO

"And he will cover some of those questions for you so tell us how decarbonising. You have a big report this roadmap coming out, tomorrow you're unveiling it in Milwaukee How will it and the information within it. Help power the growing economy One of the things we do at the Great Plains, institute is we we have a bunch of experts on the energy system, but rather than sitting in our offices and devise solutions on our own we bring together diverse interests around the. Table to try to figure out what the best solutions are for everyone so the force behind this roadmap are the power companies, semi environmental, groups that have come to the table to jointly sort of you know put all their differences out and find their common ground and essentially map out for, us how we can take the electricity system from where it is today which is primarily fuelled, by uncontrolled natural gas and coal to a place in twenty-fifty where we're we're protecting the environment by generating our power, without without, emissions without, carbon emissions that damage the environment as I understand go ahead go ahead Sorry part of that is is driving new jobs driving, new industries, putting solar panels on roofs putting solar panels and shields building wind turbines putting retrofitting existing gas plants with carbon capture unit these are these are real high, paying jobs in our economy and so you you know you can tear this goal of protecting, the environment with the goal of stimulating the economy and and driving job creation this listener asks you this FRANZ doesn't. Natural gas. Produce carbon Yes it does metro gas is a carbon, based fossil fuel that comes. Out of the ground and one. Of the things that will will increasingly have to do according to our analysis is if we're gonna use natural gas we're gonna have, to capture the carbon as? It comes out of the effluent, streamed air pollution, stream and sticking under the ground? Sequester, it so that's one of the things that, in this report, we're going to have to, differ if we choose to continue to use, natural gas then we're gonna need to we're gonna. Need to. Control it what would you say FRANZ are kind of in in, your order, of priority or preference or what you think would be the safest the different kinds of resources you know when we. Have wind we have, solar what would be your healthy mix That is one of the cool things, about this route map the diverse group that came together to devise it essentially agrees that what we need is a mix we need right, now, we don't. Have enough certainty with any of the technologies in our toolbox to that on. On one of them and so what we need to do right now is we need to draw on all of them wind, solar we need to get to a place where we can capture the carbon a natural gas plant in underground we have to, think hard. About how we deal with existing nuclear plants which have no emissions so the precise mix. I think it's going to depend on an individual, state and its regulators and. Stakeholders but the one of the. Key points that the collaborative is making with this roadmap is that we do need a mix and we we need to keep as, many tools in the toolbox? Is possible and talking with FRANZ, Liszt you can, to in our remaining minutes with Him he's a Great. Plains institute that is, a national nonprofit nonpartisan organization based in Minneapolis its mission to transform the energy system. To benefit the environment and the economy and I think that's the key right it's like how do we mesh those interests of being, good for the environment yet the business sector or the economic drivers aren't down your throats about that it seems like that's the huge conundrum Yeah we we have long since decoupled, energy. From from the economy another tweet we can, grow the? Economy and and we can we can use? Less and less? Fossil fuels, or we can use fossil fuels in a responsible way and still grow the economy that's that is something I think we've. Demonstrated in the collaborative I think is is saying in a release of this roadmap, now I know you could talk for hours about this topic FRANZ it's not. The sexiest topic for most Americans, but? What what, do you want to leave us with why do we you know why should we also be excited that this report is released tomorrow in Milwaukee. And you're continuing to work on decarbonisation The cool?.

FRANZ Milwaukee Great Plains Plains institute twenty-fifty Liszt Minneapolis
"great plains" Discussed on AP News

AP News

02:15 min | 2 years ago

"great plains" Discussed on AP News

"The northern great plains of the dakotas where more than one million bee colonies spend their summer feasting on pollen and nectar but from two thousand six to two thousand sixteen more than half the conservation land within a mile of beat colonies was converted into agriculture usually that means row crops such as soybeans and corn which hold no food for bees for more than a decade bees and other pollinators in america have been dwindling in numbers because of a variety of problems including poor nutrition pesticides parasites and disease experts say this new study highlights another problem that affects the health of bees the northern great plains lost about six hundred twenty nine square miles of prime be habitat and bees that have a hard time finding food are less likely to survive the winter the federal government pays farmers to keep some land wild and that benefits bees that feast on grasslands flowers and weeds but the conservation program has a cap on how much will pay for during the ethanol boom farmers found they could make more money and corn and soybeans the fbi is investigating facebook sharing of user data along with the securities and exchange commission and the justice department according to the washington post they've joined the federal trade commission investigators and looking at what facebook new in two thousand fifteen when it learned that cambridge analytica access the personal data of tens of millions of facebook users facebook didn't disclose it until this march and the post says they wanna know why they're looking at the actions and statements of the company and is executives including ceo mark zuckerberg according to the report facebook confirmed to the associated press that it has received questions from these agencies and said it's cooperating it's now easier for new jersey transgender residents to change their genders on their birth certificates a new law signed by governor phil murphy allows the registrar to amend certificates based on how people identify themselves as male female or undesignated previous law allowed birth certif cricket changes only if a doctor certified that a person's gender was surgically changed murphy also signed legislation permitting gender identity to be listed on death certificates hi i'm megan crane ap digital manager.

america fbi facebook mark zuckerberg washington ceo phil murphy megan crane six hundred twenty nine square
"great plains" Discussed on WHO NewsRadio 1040 AM

WHO NewsRadio 1040 AM

01:33 min | 2 years ago

"great plains" Discussed on WHO NewsRadio 1040 AM

"In the threat of tornadoes to the great plains today we're told a portion of central kansas to southern iowa could be feeling the impact today including wind and hail the biggest risk for tornadoes will be stretching across parts of kansas and nebraska iowa though is in the crosshairs for severe weather later tonight most likely after ten pm in southwest iowa has the highest chance of severe weather of course we would like you to keep it here on newsradio ten forty who so you're in the know through the evening our top local story the name of the man involved in a fatal shooting sunday has been released the iowa division of criminal investigation says twenty six year old joshua ewing of carol was shot and died of his injuries when state trooper justin parman had responded to help a motorist and encountered ewing and a woman having a dispute the man fired the gun at parman the to exchange several rounds ewing died in that gunfire are windy day monday was troublesome in more ways than one gary barrett has more high winds toppled an empty semi and a fan flames of a grass fire forcing officials to close part of six eighty near neo lane western iowa other fires were cropping up in several areas including in central iowa the national weather service station a wind advisory for a number of counties including poke for the early evening hours on monday but by about eight thirty the winds had died down so did any weather activity i'm gary barrett to mobile homes in the webster county town of colville were destroyed and two others were damaged initial indication is started in.

kansas iowa nebraska joshua ewing carol justin parman gary barrett colville webster county twenty six year
"great plains" Discussed on WGN Radio

WGN Radio

02:32 min | 3 years ago

"great plains" Discussed on WGN Radio

"Which for a century we've taken for granted not watch running water plumbing sewage hygiene things that we just by god were astonished dorni out houses in america in kenya they're out houses every in on the mass amari which is one of the great plains of the world one of the great places left we have a society that is living as it live in 1600 seventeenhundred for the most part but which is rapidly adapting to the 21st century and that's for an kent taylor in the end kent taylor fund ak taylor fund come into being and can't taylor was on the show several years ago talked about our work in africa and i followed it sense and and as a lady that i've had the pleasure of knowing now for oh i dunno forty years much of my life and she is the kind of person when we think about individuals making a difference in the world and can't taylor is one of those people so let's start off with the maasai mari one of the great plains of kenya and where the wild life is being decimated because of the advancement of human population and also human technology yet at the same time that technology is clashing with the interest of the world in ecoterrorism maintaining elephants lions leopards hyenas in wild animals and it's an inextricable conflict which and kent taylor has jumped into having grown up in kenya having lived there much of her life and having gone back every year for her entire life in 1999 she started the ak taylor fun to help save the muslim ari built on four principles part of it antipoaching part of it humanwildlife mitigation part of habitat preservation and another part education and now more recently community empowerment in the ak taylor fund is doing the kind of work that one individual with the vision hard work without being led by government but being led by the private sector and this is not a statement on government but it's a great example of how the private sector and how individuals lead then we can think of great conservation work here in the united states almost all of.

america kenya ak taylor fund kent taylor united states taylor africa forty years
"great plains" Discussed on WTMA

WTMA

02:26 min | 3 years ago

"great plains" Discussed on WTMA

"Great plains between maintaining communications with the far west news communications as i go into in the book actually helped provoke the war because of environmental reasons fighting erupts in it leads to customer being deployed on great plains against the cheyenne in the likud is the sue in he fails he fails uh to come to grips with them and he doesn't want to he's in the midst of a personal crisis with his wife on may he is caused heated in the midst of a uh a personal crisis because the nation now is divided over him after his political career in he lashes out he orders deserters to be shot if they try to escape he's ordering um had shavings and humiliations of his men for minor offenses in finally when when libidos enjoying him at his western coast he he leaves is men behind takes you large attachment in right hundreds of miles away from where he spoke to be deployed to return to see liby and it's too much for the army he he he's tried to exempt and so from the rules too many times interest both to professional crisis in also personal crisis showing her costas flaws led him to create a great crisis for himself a major theme is is later life creating a crisis in men having to find a way to get out of it there are several kong a contest at this time between the national government this is grant and the white house and the democrats the at the same time the corruption in new york we now understand it but at the time was all new the world of railroads and domination domination of the stock market in jobbers and then there was a contest between the settlers people who one of the west and the minors one of the resources and the native american populations and the cheyenne and the sewer resistant but the army was used as a wedge to drive in to grab resources and custer was willing as that wedge buddy was also anxious to be a rich man before we get to custer's pursuit of wealth back in new york because this is a matter of two worlds is very happy is tj presents him in the fifth and a hotel the metropolitan hotel or with the with the metropolitan club in hanging out with.

likud white house new york stock market custer costas tj