35 Burst results for "Great Plains"

As heat records fall in Northeast, some city dwellers flee

AP News Radio

00:45 sec | 2 weeks ago

As heat records fall in Northeast, some city dwellers flee

"Heat warnings are across the United States and meteorologists say it's likely to get a lot hotter from the Pacific Northwest to the southern great plains to the interstate 95 corridor more than 85 million Americans have been under excessive heat warnings or heat advisories and the national weather service warns of extremely oppressive conditions from Washington to Boston The weather service says numerous record highs are expected to be tied or broken in the northeast where at least two heat related deaths have been reported officials in Philadelphia have extended a heat emergency through Monday evening in Boston the mere is keeping a dozen cooling centers open organizers of the New York City triathlon have cut the distances athletes have to run and bike I'm Donna water

Boston The Weather Service Pacific Northwest National Weather Service United States Washington Philadelphia Boston New York City
At least 5 dead as Midwest rocked by hurricane-force winds

AP News Radio

00:53 sec | 8 months ago

At least 5 dead as Midwest rocked by hurricane-force winds

"A a deadly deadly storm storm system system struck struck a a broad broad stretch stretch of of the the Great Great Plains Plains and and Midwest Midwest Wednesday Wednesday night night I'm I'm Ben Ben Thomas Thomas with with details details those those sirens sirens are are from from video video posted posted J. J. Sharni Sharni showing showing blackened blackened skies skies over over Ames Ames Iowa Iowa with with forks forks of of lightning lightning illuminating illuminating funnel funnel clouds clouds on on the the horizon horizon you're you're all all just just Corey Corey Mead Mead at at the the National National Weather Weather Service Service in in Nebraska Nebraska says says it'd it'd been been an an unseasonably unseasonably warm warm day day in in the the lower lower to to mid mid seventies seventies at at Lincoln Lincoln and and Almonte Almonte that's that's you you know know that's that's quite quite a a departure departure from from what what we we normally normally see see here here and and in in mid mid December December system system spawned spawned hurricane hurricane force force winds winds and and likely likely tornadoes tornadoes in in Nebraska Nebraska and and Iowa Iowa as as well well as as Minnesota Minnesota officials officials have have confirmed confirmed at at least least five five deaths deaths the the storm storm has has since since shifted shifted north north of of the the Great Great Lakes Lakes into into Canada Canada producing producing more more high high winds winds with with snow snow and and hazardous hazardous conditions conditions in in the the upper upper Great Great Lakes Lakes region region I'm I'm Ben Ben Thomas Thomas

Great Great Plains Plains Ben Ben Thomas Thomas J. J. Sharni Sharni Iowa Midwest Nebraska Corey Corey Mead Mead National National Weather Weat Lincoln Lincoln Almonte Almonte Hurricane Hurricane Minnesota Lakes Lakes Canada Upper Great Great Lakes Lakes
WATCH:  Semitruck is blown over by high winds in Nebraska

AP News Radio

00:40 sec | 8 months ago

WATCH: Semitruck is blown over by high winds in Nebraska

"The the Great Great Plains Plains and and Midwest Midwest are are recovering recovering from from a a powerful powerful storm storm system system that that spawned spawned tornadoes tornadoes the the National National Weather Weather Service Service says says there've there've been been thirteen thirteen tornado tornado reports reports in in the the plains plains states states scattered scattered through through eastern eastern Nebraska Nebraska and and Iowa Iowa meteorologist meteorologist Cory Cory Mead Mead says says at at least least two two have have been been confirmed confirmed but but that that number number is is likely likely to to increase increase as as crews crews survey survey the the damage damage including including whether whether or or not not it it was was a a tornado tornado and and if if so so what what the the intensity intensity of of the the tornado tornado was was Meade Meade says says temperatures temperatures were were in in the the seventies seventies Wednesday Wednesday in in Omaha Omaha and and Lincoln Lincoln and and the the unusually unusually mild mild weather weather contributed contributed to to the the storms storms storms storms interacted interacted with with very very strong strong winds winds aloft aloft to to

Great Great Plains Plains National National Weather Weat Midwest Tornado Tornado Cory Cory Mead Mead Nebraska Iowa Meade Meade Omaha Lincoln
The Notorious Crime Boss Ma Barker

Crimetown

01:51 min | 1 year ago

The Notorious Crime Boss Ma Barker

"When we walked in the door. I could not believe it. This place looked like it was from another time period retired community. College instructor sue sutton was a teenager in the mid sixties when her family moved to concordia kansas zeus father took her and her sister to the local bank to open bank accounts but when she walked in. She couldn't believe what she saw. The bank tellers were separated by bulletproof. Glass there were spikes. There were electrical wires running over the top of the partitions. It seemed over the top for local bank. Small five thousand person town in the great plains. Even the employees were expected to protect the bank. There was a shotgun behind the door and everyone who was in employee was encouraged to take target practice on their lunch hour down in the basement the bank. So why was the small town bank so intensely on lock. These modifications all came about because of the bank robbery that took place in nineteen thirty two eighty nine years ago this week on the morning of july twenty six nineteen thirty to a gang of bank robbers walked into the cloud county bank and concordia kansas and they walked away with more than two hundred thousand dollars without firing a single shot and the legendary mastermind behind it all the notorious avocado ma barker ma

Sue Sutton Concordia Kansas Great Plains Ma Barker Ma
Regenerative Agriculture: Kelsey Scott Is a 125th-Generation Land Steward

Climate Connections

01:12 min | 1 year ago

Regenerative Agriculture: Kelsey Scott Is a 125th-Generation Land Steward

"As farmers grapple with climate change many are turning to regenerative agriculture practices these techniques help store carbon in the soil and make the land more resilient to extreme weather. The approach is increasingly popular but not new regenerative. Agriculture is really just a return to how this landscape evolved with the indigenous communities as the stewards prior to fourteen. Ninety two kelsey. Additional scott is with the intertribal agriculture council and owner of dx beef. My favorite thing to do is introduce myself as a fourth generation cow calf producer but a one hundred and twenty-fifth generation land steward of the great plains on a ranch in south dakota dushi. No scott uses regenerative grazing methods. She rotates where her cattle roam so the grass can rest in grow deeper roots and as the animals move. They dropped manure than adds nutrients to the soil. We're really trying to encourage our cattle to impact the land in the way that the bison did as the great plains was evolving. She says her goal is to nurture not just her animals. But the plants wildlife soil and people at the end of my prayer and lakota. We say madaka or yossi which means we're all

Intertribal Agriculture Counci Scott Kelsey South Dakota Madaka Yossi
"great plains" Discussed on Rewilding Earth

Rewilding Earth

05:36 min | 1 year ago

"great plains" Discussed on Rewilding Earth

"Of rewinding in terms of connectivity. Using you know leveraged private lands to buffer and connect the the larger chunks of public lands. How big is your staff in the summers. I imagine it balloons quite a bit with all the studies that you do and all the help that you need doing those studies. Yeah maybe not as big as you would think considering the size of the reserve already is we have about thirty fulltime staff and that can balloon to up to around forty five fifty including temporary staff to come in the summer. And that's just people that you know where the apr where the american name tag right. But that doesn't include a we don't do science in house. As an institution knowing that we have a different responsibility different mission that we set out to actually kind of use the best available science to do it but we need to keep generating that science and so we do that through partnerships primarily now with the smithsonian conservation biology institute but also with a number of universities both local in montana and then throughout the united states as well. So we've got graduate students and post docs and Smithsonian researchers some agency folks as well and none of those people kind of you know quote unquote where the american prairie hat. They're not on the payroll so to speak. But if you if you include those people yes there. There's quite a number of people now. In i keep trying to grow that. Actually t t to get more people more scientists more researchers come to this place because the more we know about it the more attention it attracts right people think of yellowstone now not as just the first national park but it's kind of a research laboratory of love to have people think of american prairie the same way but then also to help inform us you know..

smithsonian conservation biolo montana united states
"great plains" Discussed on Rewilding Earth

Rewilding Earth

01:45 min | 1 year ago

"great plains" Discussed on Rewilding Earth

"And you think about the american pray project include that three point two million acres is intended to include a bunch of public lands. Right in fact the majority the vast majority that will be public land. This already exists as public land. Apr just needs to kind of like glue together. Right like Piece together some of the the deeded parcels and they are few in that part of the country to kind of hold. Those could hold those public lands together as a as a kind of unified whole unified kind of re wilding project at a place for nature. But yeah we've got about one hundred thousand acres land that we own outright right now. Plus another three hundred or so least acres Primarily blm bureau of land management land that we the grazing leases four and a little bit of dnr or montana state lands on that we have grazing leases four as well. And so that's that's the four hundred and twenty thousand acres that you mentioned you. Add that to the one point. One million acres of the charlie russell national wildlife refuge around which. Apr is being built. And you have something close to like almost a million and a half acres that is in one way or another set aside for wildlife or put another way set aside for for biodiversity right. And that's the goal so so yeah we're we're a little less than half to the goal even including the cmo ours. We we we. We have quite a bit of ways to go and there's other kind of intricacies beyond just a land model that need to be addressed. But yeah it's it's a place that that people can visit now and there's quite a bit to visit actually So yeah the mission. Twenty years on we just celebrated our twentieth anniversary is well underway. It's not just a pipe dream at this point. There's there's quite a bit of land that's already being managed for this biodiversity management as opposed to kind of commodity production. Which would have been the the former state of those.

charlie russell national wildl wilding montana
"great plains" Discussed on Rewilding Earth

Rewilding Earth

05:53 min | 1 year ago

"great plains" Discussed on Rewilding Earth

"I don't wanna. I don't wanna i don't gloss over that but there's still so much left to understand questions we just don't know the answer to about what the best way to kind of rebuild. The thing is that that's the kind of challenge that i like to deal with and to the extent that i can speak for my colleagues. I think we all like to do that. But man what what a tasks great because you recognize the monumental importance of it. Both you know anthropologically sociologically ecologically and recognize the weight of that task that we set out for ourselves and yet still need to find a way to do it without guidelines daunting task. Sometimes how much do you have to let nature tell you the things you don't know but isn't there some place in there that you have to. You have to step back and put your hands on your hips and go. Well i mean the rest now is up to nature. And i can't wait to see what she does. Because i have no idea where we go from here. There's an aldo leopold quote. I think right one one of many right this idea that like the first rule of any kind of intelligent tinkering is to retain all the parts and pieces paraphrase. Something like that right. And i think you kind of speak to that and i i definitely think that fits into the kind of the prayer reserve model the thesis that we operate under which is the first step is to just put all the ingredients back there right. Yeah you need the biodiversity to support the resilience of the place so that those natural processes that we know are important can take hold again. And so we think about things like you know ecosystem engineers the keystone species that that build and preserve this kind of heterogeneity and diversity on the landscape that we know intern supports greater levels of biodiversity. Which in turn supports greater levels of resilience and so the prairies have always been this place. That's kind of has an enormous amount of stowe cast in the natural system right like he gets extremely cold. It gets extremely hot. It can have droughts that last for decades typically you would have had wildfires burning grazing at an incredible scale by wild ungulates. That looks almost chaotic. At some point. Right and all of those kind of chaotic or stow cast features combined to create a very very variable landscape but in an interesting like almost ironic heterogeneity that that promotes the resilience. Right the heterogeneity gives space for all these different all these different ecological niches for different parts of biodiversity to fill and then of course. Biodiversity leads to resilience. So when you talk about kind of the rewinding process. I think you're right. I think the first step. The first thing that we need to do is acquire the land bates are. You need. you need some kind of security and in. It's got to be big because i just mentioned prairie ecosystems work on on large level scales right you know. Historically part of it would have burned. Part of it would have flooded grazing. Ungulates need somewhere to get away from that and in the process of grazing they're creating these other habitat so apr needs to be. We think scientists tell us about three point two million acres so that's the size of yellowstone national park and glacier national park combined about the size of the state of connecticut and you need a land base. That's that's truly that big to even think about having an ecologically meaningful prairie and ecologically functioning fully functioning ecological prairie ecosystem right and then in addition to that. The next step is is the reviling right. How do we put all of those pieces back together. And then i think your point jack although got a little ways to go before we get to then kind of stand back and take a look and say okay..

aldo leopold stowe bates glacier national park yellowstone national park connecticut jack
"great plains" Discussed on Rewilding Earth

Rewilding Earth

04:58 min | 1 year ago

"great plains" Discussed on Rewilding Earth

"The rewarding earth podcast Supported by businesses such as patagonia tula and bio habitats as. Well as the weeden foundation and listeners like you if you love the work that the rewarding institute is doing please consider donating at rewinding dot. Org and be sure to sign up for our weekly newsletter while. You're there when. I talk to people about the really big rewarding projects. I'm usually talking to conservationists in africa when asked to describe their vision of big wild places with large herds and iconic carnivores people often describe large parks in african countries. But there's a really big project happening right here in the lower forty eight states of america. And that's what i'm excited to discuss with. Dr daniel kinko from american prairie reserve a planned three point two million acre network of private and public lands in northeastern montana. A very large chunk of the northern great plains. Daniel is american. Prairie reserve wildlife restoration manager and his primary responsibilities include restoring and monitoring wildlife on the reserve and managing the wildlife friendly ranching program wild sky he also acts as a liaison to scientists conducting research at american prairie. He joined american prairie in twenty eighteen shortly after completing his doctoral degree in college at utah state university in reserves misogynist create the largest wildlife refuge in the continental united states in the lower forty eight. And that will be a refuge for both people and wildlife or biodiversity manage in perpetuity for the benefit of people and wildlife where we work. This area of the northern great plains in central montana is part of what we call the northern great plains ecosystem. The kind of goes from montana and spans the border into canada and touches on alberta saskatchewan the northern part of the great plains that stretch the entire continent of north north america. And the reason why we work. There is grassland temperate. Grasslands savannahs prairies These are similar. Terms are the least protected by him on the planet. So there's less than five percent protection for for these places and we can get into what that protection means. But but basically particularly in north america particularly in the united states. We did a decent job. Protecting from development the areas of pristine pristine natural beauty things like mountains and geysers and canyons. That sort of thing. We didn't have a lot of focus on. I think biodiversity particularly the large mammalian biodiversity. That was kind of in my mind as an ecologist part of the gem of the continent right the you know you're you're bison and elk bighorn. Sheep grizzly bears wolves all the way down to prairie dogs. Black footed ferrets said sort of there was calls for that in the early eighteen hundreds by some of the early kind of white settlers but it just never came to be and that story of north america writ large across across the globe looks very very similar..

weeden foundation Dr daniel kinko american prairie reserve Prairie reserve wildlife resto montana american prairie patagonia america north north america utah state university africa Daniel saskatchewan alberta canada north america
"great plains" Discussed on WLS-AM 890

WLS-AM 890

02:10 min | 1 year ago

"great plains" Discussed on WLS-AM 890

"805 169931. It's 14 after your with America in the morning. Thanks for joining us. We've got a lot of active weather around the nation today, including more severe weather threats east of the Mississippi. Here's the latest with AccuWeather dot com. Meteorologist Mike Larceny Mike Will be rather cloud again cool across the Northwest. Today, Clouds will be on the increase across western Washington and western Oregon as a Pacific storm approaches the coast another storm system. This one moving out of the northern Rockies will produce rain across northern Idaho and western Montana. There will be snow about 5000 ft and outdoor enthusiasts should plan on winter conditions at these elevations in the back country. Meanwhile, cooler, less humid air has swept through the Northeast and that will lead to plenty of sunshine and dry weather for much of New England into the mid Atlantic states. Today, however, stalled frontal boundary across North Carolina, Tennessee will become the focus for numerous heavy showers and thunderstorms. It will be hot across much of the great Plains today. There will be widespread 100 degree or higher temperatures across southern and western Texas into southeastern New Mexico with pockets of triple digit heat as far north as Montana, South Dakota and Minnesota. While much of the great Plains will be dry. There will be strongest thunderstorms rumbling across parts of eastern Montana into the western Dakotas and western Nebraska during the late afternoon and evening hours. Sunshine and midsummer like Key will bake the desert Southwest. Today. It'll be dry across California into four corner states with a full day of sunshine. While it will remain comfortably cooler across much of California today afternoon temperatures across southern Arizona and southern New Mexico will again exceed this century Mark. And that's the weather across America in New York today, turning out partly sunny militiamen High 82 in Seattle today Variably cloudy high 65. That's the nation's whether I'm accuweather dot com meteorologist Mike Larceny. You're with America in the morning at 16 after I'm John Trout meat Company JBs confirms it paid $11 million ransom in a cyber attack. Correspondent Mike Rossiya is following.

Mike Larceny California New England Mike Rossiya $11 million Seattle South Dakota Minnesota Montana 100 degree North Carolina Today New York northern Idaho southern New Mexico Mike Larceny Mike 805 169931 John Trout meat Company southeastern New Mexico about 5000 ft
Myths And Realities Of America's Rural Economy

The Indicator from Planet Money

06:29 min | 1 year ago

Myths And Realities Of America's Rural Economy

"Economists benghazi. Laurie says the first rule about rural america is that there is no rural america. Like fight club except with cow. I was saying that's that's not actually what he said. What do you actually said was this. There's so many different parts of rural america that it's a misnomer to actually categorize all on one monolithic theme. Bend means is that rural. america is not one thing. It's more like a collection of rural communities each with different economies with different strengths and problems and different characteristics and binga says one of the best ways to see this is to look at the racial ethnic makeup of the people who live in each of these rural communities if for example throughout much of middle america including the big farming areas more than nine out of ten people are white and for all of rural america. Roughly eight out of ten people are white. Now that's definitely higher than the six out of ten people who were white in the us overall but bengals very point is these figures mask. A lot of demographic diversity in the individual rural communities for example here are some estimates from his own analysis. And so if you look at our break down just a regional breakdown. Americans in rural areas in northeast is only about two percent in the mid west. But what a half percent in west. It's even smaller. It's under one percents. But in the south it is sixteen point. Six percent so the population of african americans in the rural south is greater than it is in a national one. Benji says that's why this part of rural america in the south is often referred to as the black belt. There's also the rural parts of the great plains states that have a high share of native americans living in them like in new mexico and montana. Plus there is rural hispanic centers in south west and west like in arizona and california and in all three of these regions. There is a smaller share of white residents than there is in the us overall. And that's why banca says it's a myth that rural america is all white. The second myth that needs to go bunga says is it. The rural american economy is all about farming and the extraction of natural resources like mining. These are definitely still important sectors. But they're far from the biggest. So service sector. Employment is the largest sector in rural communities. And it's been like that for a long time. In most rural communities the combined services education and health care and social assistance employed the most people in fact these sectors employ roughly the same share of people throughout rural america as in the rest of the country about twenty three percent in a lot of rural counties. A local school system or the hospital for example is the single biggest employer and even in rural towns that originally depended on a different industry or on a different employer. These services naturally sprung up around those industries to complement them says banca bow meat packing plants and in the twentieth century. Early part of twentieth century. Me packing plants were prevalent in urban areas. But they start to move out into smaller towns to become kind of like that one employer to town. Another example is automobile industry Move from the north moving down south to mississippi and alabama. A lot of it is to take advantage of the low wage labor market and the lack of united nation and so this is actually has pushed these rural economies away from agriculture. To service sector. This is also why it's a big deal. When the one hospital in a rural town closes there might just not be many other employers left plus it means that residents of that town have to look further out to access healthcare. This is especially a problem in places like the black belt where there's been a huge increase in the number of hospitals that have closed over the last few decades and finally myth number three that needs busting bunga says is the idea that rural america is dying or destined for permanent decline but in fact some parts of rural america are thriving about one out of every three rural counties has enjoyed strong population growth in recent decades with their populations actually peaking as they headed into the last decade. That's according to the latest data. Unfortunately that's also roughly the same share of rural counties that are depopulating about one out of every three rural counties has lost more than twenty five percent of its population since nineteen fifty. The populations of these counties are aging partly because so many young adults of childbearing age are leaving for the cities and suburbs in search of job opportunities and for these counties this kind of fishes cycle consenting people leaving means there's less money for taxes and investment to provide the amenities and services that people want and so more people leave which means the tax base drops again and so on and this is one reason why incomes are lower and poverty rates are higher in rural america then in the rest of the country but nothing about this cycle is inevitable it can be slowed or even reversed and says even in some communities where the population looked like. It would be in permanent decline. There have been success stories especially in the places that have a lot of immigration as so you have a lot of people. Immigrants coming in to work meat. Meatpacking plant manufacturing places. The other thing is that a lot of immigration From other areas in terms of people coming to the us for becoming doctors lawyers things like that a higher education and income communities. So you think about the mid west. There's like a population of say vietnamese and brass or these areas or like the monk population in minnesota that these places do not struggle as much with population loss because they're welcoming immigrants and that helps them to not only just having people there but then these people start stores or start their own business. So we see a lot of that entrepeneurship self-employment that's helping to keep that area of vibrant. Finally bengals primary message here. Is that people who live in cities and suburbs should not think of rural america is a place that's in decline in needs help instead. They should be turning to rural america as a place that's experienced a wide diversity. Economic challenges and triumphs and therefore as a place to find ideas for how to address the big socio economic issues of the day like climate change trade immigration education healthcare. Pretty much. all of them

America Binga Banca Bunga Benghazi Middle America Bengals Laurie Benji South West New Mexico Montana Arizona California Mississippi
Interview With Shane Balkowitsch

Photography Radio

06:02 min | 1 year ago

Interview With Shane Balkowitsch

"Well hello everyone and welcome to another podcast from frames magazine my name is scott olsen and today we are going old school and we are going deep into a really really wonderful type of photography. That's not practice very much anymore and really frankly when you see it. It's going to knock your socks off. We're talking with shane belkevich. Shane happens to live just a couple hours. West of me out here on the great plains of north america up north dakota chain that afternoon. How's everything out in the middle part of the state. good scott. thanks for having me on. We've got a little snow last night. Which was a very welcomed. Got a little snow over here. It's cold it's january is imagine about winner on the american that should be asked should be. You're absolutely right shane. You are just absolutely mesmerizing with the work. You're doing you do wet plate colin on photography. You do when one of the earliest styles of photography and admit you know. When i first heard about it i thought why in the world would anyone want to go through that amount of work for an image that i can do in my mirrorless. Dsl are very quickly. And then i realized how wrong. I was can't do that image and i certainly can't come up with a product that you've come up with so first question for people that that are familiar with the process. What is wet plate photography. What is the whole call it on process. Yeah so a wet plate clothing. Photography's invented by frederick scott archer in. He started working on about eighteen. Forty eight we believe in eighteen fifty one. He came out with a journal article in a scientific journal and presented it to the world. So what we're doing. I'm sure many of your listeners. Know about daguerreotype process which was invented by the declare. The frenchman About ten years. Before what plaguing frederick scott archer wanted to improve on that and This is what he came up with and the final product. And what your comment about why. You can't capture wet played in a modern a digital camera. Is that this is completely analog and the final images the images that i make. I an amber typist. That means i make my photographs on glass specifically for me black glass and these images are made out a pure silver on glass. And what's about silver silver does not degrade so these images that i have Have made over the last eight years of made a three eight hundred of them all by ten most most eight by ten black last amber types of they'll be here thousand years from now broken which which is not something you can save for princeton pigments in paintings and other things like that so the these are very archival images and i. it's just a very very romantic process. i was never photographer before. A two thousand twelve took my first exposure on october. Fourth never owned a camera. And i just find myself chasing this this historic process. It is really really interesting and we need to tell people that there is a movie out. There is called belkevich b. a. l. k. o. w. i t. s. c. h. on video. It's on amazon. Prime it is a documentary about you and your work and folks. You need to go there. You need to watch this film if you are in the any kind of photography. You need to do this but shane one of the things. That really intrigued me. Watching the film is that most of us that are in the photography files were making digital files. Or you know. We're coming up even if we're still dealing with old thirty five millimeter film or that kind of stuff Medium format film. You know we come up with a negative but then you know actual print is a temporary thing. You much more like a sculptor are making an object's this glass plate and it's not revisable you can't go back and tweak the highlights you can't go back and ask grain if you want. What is the appeal of making that object versus a kind of idea. We have to understand most web play. Cloudy and artists There was one here in bismarck. North dakota orlando scott gough. When he he was known for capturing the first ever photograph of sitting. Bull here bismarck. In the in this process that i practice and i i happen to capture ernie lapointe the great grandson. The city hundred thirty five years later in the same town in the same process but goth would have made a negative like you had said he would make a glass of so instead of putting his images onto black glass which you cannot contact with. He would have used clear glass. Clear glass as you insinuated. You can make multiple copies and you can enter. The final product in that scenario is a print. Because you want to be able to sell you know apprentice shayna print scott where wants to print you can make as many prints of these want is your business and it. Did you know good to have a one off plate because you and you know when you're talking about eighteen fifty one is no way of duplicate and they didn't have scanners and we couldn't do anything like that so you know. I think there's something very special about the the fact that these images are one offs and they can never be duplicated in they can never be replicated. When i make one of these images. I've for instance. I've dropped an image once and tried to go five minutes later. Ten minutes later tried to make this image with the same sitter the same camera. The same lenses saint chemistry. And i can never get back to that so if you look at this romantically. I'm not actually taking snapshots people actually making ten second movies. I'm still life movies. Because my exposures in my natural studio that i built here in bismarck. It's called nostalgic glassware plate studio the first one in in the country bill of the ground up and over a hundred years. I'm making ten second exposure. So there's heartbeats and there's blood flowing through the person there's a couple. Maybe a blinker to and what. I really love about this is. Maybe there's a thought so. I'm capturing thought on that piece of glass pure silver. That'll be here on.

Frederick Scott Archer Shane Belkevich Scott Olsen Shane North Dakota Colin North America Scott Gough Ernie Lapointe Scott Shayna Print Scott Bismarck Amazon Orlando
'Nomadland' drops Frances McDormand into a rootless life on the open road

Pop Culture Happy Hour

04:45 min | 1 year ago

'Nomadland' drops Frances McDormand into a rootless life on the open road

"So nomad land is based on a nonfiction book of the same name by jessica bruder. It's about these folks who are in many cases older they're sort of battered by economic changes particularly the Economic meltdown of two thousand eight. They are left with very few options. And this fictional story about fern was written by khloe. jiao is also the director as we mentioned fern. This lifestyle is connected to her grief over her husband staff and it it leaves her at really the mercy of the weather and other people. She has no access to health. Care any kind of security. But there's also. I think it's safe to say a freedom in it that she appreciates at times She has a chance to see new things and be independent. There are a lot of kind of sweeping vistas of the western great plains and she starts to develop a relationship with a guy named dave. Who's played by david straight there and and obviously that complicates her wanderings somewhat. Glenn what did you think about nomad. Land. i mean this is pretty great right. I mean fair warning. It is unhurried. It is discursive it's also as you mentioned. It's in love with the natural environment which is very Khloe zhao thing. It's smartly a film that teaches you how to watch it because in those opening minutes we the audience are that woman that fern meets at the store. Were worried about her. Where the manager that gas station. We want her to find a shelter for the night. Because it's going to be cold She's been dealt a couple serious blows and the story of the film is her finding an equilibrium. It's not perfect and it's fragile and take some work to maintain we see the work it takes to maintain but he's got the strength and resolve to maintain it finds a community Found family which is something queer folk no little something about That said you take frances. Mcdormand out of the equation. I'm not sure. I'm still as invested. Because that actor is just an empathy engine. It just radiates from her Even when the role she's playing is more comedic as it is in fargo or even when it's a completely underwritten and onenote like it wasn't three billboards. There's not a trace of condescension in any role. She plays humankind essential or socioeconomic condescension. No actually remove no sense of judgment because francis. Mcdermott is a woman who graduated from the yale school of drama. She's married to a kohen brother. And what do the coen brothers love to do. More than make fun of a yokels. There's nothing about her holding fern at a remove when she's packing amazon boxes. That's fern packing amazon boxes. Even though it's france clearly packing boxes the scene where she goes on quite a bit about how she got more counter space in her van. E you play that wrong and that is a hollywood actor doing a ride along. That's fake but i mean there's something about are you just fall in love with firm. The way she smiles without opening her mouth There's such pain in it but there's joy now did i need fern to quote shakespeare at me. Nope did. I need the scene with her sister where she tells firm. That firm has always been strong in special and smart. Smells nice in this kind of puppies. I didn't need that either. Those moments felt like that was the film. Not trusting itself. Kind of putting on some training wheels So in the end. I think i was more taken by this amazing performance then by the movie itself. Interesting stephen i was taken by the amazing performance. And the film itself I think this is a wonderful piece of really subtle storytelling. It is so thoughtful. It is so respectful and careful and clever. You can tell that this movie. And it's makers spent time with its subjects and really got invested in their lives. This movie could have so easily tilted into mawkishness could so easily tilted into cynicism. It's so easily could've tilted into kind of capital. I issues based thundering and it never ever does. I mean it's funny. Glenn mentioned francis mcdormand's performance in three billboards outside ebbing missouri. The kind of purported to be about the real america kind of the real underbelly of america and it did so by throwing grotesques at us and this movie does the exact. It is a really human and lovely movie and its surrounds. Frances mcdormand and david strathern with nomads. With people who actually live this lifestyle and lets them tell their stories albeit fictionalised versions of their stories. And i just think that works beautifully. Well you can tell in spots when this movie is working with non-professional actors and you can kind of feel that but for the most part i just got totally lost in it. It is as glenn's had its unhurried. But i didn't find it slow at all. I loved this movie.

Jessica Bruder Khloe Zhao Jiao Khloe Fern Glenn Mcdormand Yale School Of Drama Amazon Dave Frances Mcdermott Fargo David Francis Francis Mcdormand Shakespeare France Hollywood Stephen
A Conversation With Loren And Lisa Poncia Of Stemple Creek Ranch

How I Built This

05:43 min | 1 year ago

A Conversation With Loren And Lisa Poncia Of Stemple Creek Ranch

"Today my conversation with lauren. And lisa pawnshop owners of stemple creek ranch stemple creek ranch produces beef pork and lamb on more than a thousand acres in marin county california. It's one of the only carbon neutral livestock ranches in the united states. Lauren is a fourth generation rancher and he and his wife lisa transformed stemple creek into an organic regenerative farm. Fifteen years ago today they sell their grass fed meat to restaurants and grocery stores across the bay area and also directly to consumers across the us. So my first question to lauren was how do you make such a carbon intensive products like meat carbon-neutral guy what we do is what we call a dance with mother nature so basically replicating weather nature and what she did across the great plains hundreds of years ago with massive herds of bison crossing the great plains they were regenerating the soil just naturally so they eat the grass in front of them stomp on the grass below and poop on the graph behind him that generated the soil and grew more perennial plants and really. It's a photosynthesis business so if we have a living plant in the ground that's capturing sunlight it's growing with photosynthesis pulling co two out of the atmosphere. Storing it in the soil. So are you able to actually measure it. We think of cows for example as creating methane and that contributes to carbon pollution. But are you able to actually measure how you're you're able to sequester. Carbon offset the methane that they release. We have some really good data. This is the fun part about our businesses. A lot of times people say oh. This is what we're doing but we actually have hard data. We started this. Marin carbon project about seven years ago and we did a study about applying compost and how the compost effects sequestering carbon or not sequestering carbon in our soil's applied with all of our other management practices like fencing off the right perry in areas planting trees diversity in our pastures and basically what the data seven years later shows. We're sequestering about a thousand pounds of carbon per acre per year. Managing it the way we are even our control. Plots are other management practices. Besides applying compost are really helping with sequestering carbon and having healthy soils well from what i understand mean one of the things that releases carbon into the atmosphere. When soil is churned. Right and you aerate it. So what do you do to avoid doing that. We have a pretty intense rotational grazing system or pulse grazing. We call it where we rotate the cattle round in large herds and we try and replicate mother nature. We're not perfect at it but we dry and it just promotes printing plants. That are going to make more more photosynthesis which is going to question. Moore carbons lauren. We featured you on our segment. We did on the show a couple years ago called how you built that which unfortunately to put on pause this year because of other things. We're doing And i had a chance to busy ranch As you know and it was amazing to see some of the things that that just blew me away For example you plant chicory plants. Because i guess they have deep roots and they aerate the soil. And you've got worm farm. So the worms like dig into the soil things like that. Can you explain that. So basically a lot of people would say what's your biggest limiting nutrient and california dry land pasture and many people would say. Oh it's water because we're dry half the year but that's not really truly are limiting factor our biggest limiting factors air in the soil because without aaron the soil. It's like a human with a three hundred pound weight on our chest so there's three ways to get air. In the soil one is with the plow. And when you're plowing with a tractor you're actually releasing carbon into the atmosphere. The other one is with routes routes get down into the soil and break up the soil. And when they die they leave air in the soil and the worms. So we're trying to embrace not the plow and embrace the worms and roots and so there's diversity in the pastors real important and chicory has deep tap root plantation has deep tap root. There's some other really awesome natural plants that have deep tap roots. That actually help break up the soil. And they're printing they live for you know five ten years and they're super nutritious. That kendall loved them and she loved them and they make great coffee. I exactly lauren. You're a fourth generation california rancher. And i know that as a kid you watched your parents struggle to make ends meet while they were raising cattle that they would sell to. You know larger cattle ranches. And you even vowed never to go into the family business. You are in the veterinary pharmaceuticals for a while. But you did come back. And you and lisa decided to transform the family farm into an organic grass-fed farm. How did you come to that decision. And why I think that really comes down to guys. You have to be dissatisfied with their current results to create change and try something different. I'm super passionate about raising high quality food and we had to figure out a way that we can do this and actually make money and not struggle so. We've figured very quickly the way to do that was to be the price maker instead of the price taker and having unique product do what's right for the environment at the same time we do. What's right for the environment where we're making money on it. We've totally flipped the whole and instead of just being a price taker and doing what everybody else does. We've gone out and changed our market and created their own brand and basically dictate to the market. What we need to be able to make a

Lauren Lisa Pawnshop Stemple Creek Ranch Stemple Cr Stemple Creek Marin County Moore Carbons California Lisa United States Marin Aaron Kendall
Tom Brokaw says he's retiring from NBC News after 55 years

AP News Radio

00:49 sec | 1 year ago

Tom Brokaw says he's retiring from NBC News after 55 years

"Hi Mike Rossi a reporting Tom Brokaw says he's retiring from NBC news Tom Brokaw of NBC news says he's retiring from television the eighty year old Brokaw who anchored NBC nightly news from nineteen eighty two to two thousand four says he plans to continue writing books and articles Procol last appeared on air on MSNBC's morning Joe on December thirtieth in two thousand seven Brokaw reflected on his arrival at NBC news after just two years on local TV in the Brzeska arrive in California working for NBC in nineteen fifty six just four years off the Great Plains working class families and small town Brokaw was with NBC news for fifty five years in twenty thirteen roll call was diagnosed with multiple myeloma and curable blood cancer that affects the bone marrow hi Mike Rossio

Tom Brokaw Mike Rossi Brokaw Nbc News NBC Procol Msnbc JOE Great Plains California Curable Blood Cancer Myeloma Mike Rossio
"great plains" Discussed on MyTalk 107.1

MyTalk 107.1

01:37 min | 1 year ago

"great plains" Discussed on MyTalk 107.1

"As VP social venture partners is an organization connecting successful executives and leaders in their field with promising nonprofits to help them get off the ground and thrive for people like us who are corporate, because I can get that plug into something that's just a whole different dimension. Think a lot of times people. Just need to be aware of being busy and you're dizzy through four record or else you're doing. I mean, you go. No, that's just the avenue looking for. Especially people have had some financial success. They want to give back, but they just haven't come across the great Plains. It's easy to write a check, but it's another thing to create a legacy to be proud off. They need you. You may find that it's just what you needed to this identity. Transformational, extraordinarily beneficial. Make it happen. Is it s V P and social venture partners start toward way know that we're asking Americans to do a lot right now. So we're asking everyone to be selfless for others so that we can protect those who are most susceptible to this virus. A question I often get asked if why should young people care about the spread of coronavirus? We know that people with underlying medical conditions over the age of 60 are at highest risk, but they've got to get it from somebody. Social distancing is really physical separation of people gets what we referred to. When we asked people to say at least 6 ft apart. Not going to ball is not going to restaurants not going to feed is whether a lot of people at all just means Physical separation so that you have a space between you and others who might actually be infected or effect. You We all have a role to play and preventing person to person spread of this disease, which can be deadly for vulnerable groups. For more information on how you can social.

VP great Plains
"great plains" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

06:10 min | 1 year ago

"great plains" Discussed on KCRW

"This is morning edition from NPR News. I'm David Greene and I'm Steve Inskeep Years ago, Less pain was a New York newspaper columnist. He was a Pulitzer Prize winner, one of the stars of his paper news day. Occasionally, he wrote a column about Malcolm X. But readers may not have realized just how much less pain was interested. His daughter Tamra Pain, says he reread Malcolm's autobiography every five years because Malcolm really spoke Clearly and concisely about our history in America and the troubled relationship that blacks have with lights in America and Dad understood that 1990 less pain, met one of Malcolm's surviving brothers and was surprised to learn. He didn't know the full story. It appealed to his his sensibilities as a journalist. And he wanted to tell the story. The only way he knew how which was to use journalism, employing his daughter, Tamra as his researcher. Less pain began interviewing more people finding documents and writing a book. It took him the rest of his life 28 years. Book wasn't quite finished when he died in 2018, but his daughter Tamra, Pain completed it. And this month it 11 of the highest prizes in American writing. What went through your mind when you realize that this work had won the National Book Award? I was so happy that my father was feed the accolades for his life's work. And You know, and that I miss him. The biography of Malcolm X is called. The Dead are arising It's especially revealing about Malcolm's youth. The adult Malcolm X. The 19 sixties was a controversial and charismatic figure, a defiant black nationalist, a fiery alternative to Martin Luther King. Young Malcolm Little was a kid from the Great Plains. I associate Malcolm X, of course with New York, where he spent a lot of his adult life and where he was assassinated. But now I know that he was born and grew up around Omaha. Nebraska is my fellow Midwesterner. What was it like for him growing up there, So Yeah, he grew up in Ah, behind. He was born in Omaha, Nebraska. His family's there for a couple of years. His parents were Garvey, I'd say followed Marcus Garvey's movement United Negro Improving Association. And those set out outpost and in different areas. Marcus Garvey, an immigrant writer, speaker and activist in the early 19 hundreds, Garvey's group promoted black self reliance and dignity and separation from white people. But when Malcolm Little's parents moved to a farm outside Omaha, representatives of a very different group of people came by This book opens in Omaha, Nebraska, and Malcolm in utero and their family. The little family is visited by their local clans chapter in Omaha, Nebraska. His pregnant mothers stared down the Ku Klux Klan and the Klan's been left. Luckily, his father, who they really wanted wasn't home. Not long after that. Malcolm was born in 1925 and Tamra Pain, says she found traces of the Midwest in his later life. Malcolm was down Earth, He was very grounded. In that sense and very grounded in his home and his family. Nevertheless, a difficult time growing up. His father died when he was what, six he was six and Yeah, and and also, Malcolm was close to his father, too. I mean, his father used to take him to meetings where he was organizing, and he got to watch his father and action. And so he has an image of his father, You know, being a good speaker being charismatic, having strong work ethic, you know his father's to get up early and wake up the family and do chores around the house before he would go out and take on jobs, and that's exhibiting Malcolm. I mean, Malcolm and extremely strong work ethic. Throughout his life. Not that his adult life started well. He moved east committed crimes went to prison. It was in prison that he was introduced to an American Muslim sect, the nation of Islam. He emerged to become the popular spokesman of the group leader. Is he? Someone that we can think of, is reinventing himself two or three times and is relatively short life. I see it as more evolving when you know better you do better. He evolved beyond the nation of Islam to we mentioned Marcus Garvey, the activist. His parents followed who spoke of black pride and also of separation, the nation of Islam advocated him or extreme separation, so much so that its leader explored the possibility of working with the KKK. Open is not happy about that. But he's not the leader of the nation of Islam. But this is where he seeks starts to see that they're different. And this clan situation really starts the rift between him and any lies your mama. Well, how would you describe the evolution in his thinking in the final months of his life, then? Well, he was not endorsing separation, he said. We can't we're gonna live in this country. We have to interact with large society and he was even espousing. Voting during last year's If it's like using our voting bloc to be our power, because what he wanted was that more impact with having us thrive in society, and you can't do that. You're not going to be a part of the society, but Malcolm, then he's going abroad. He goes on his hodge. He's connecting up with African countries. He's going to the Middle East. He's going to Africa. He's going to Europe. But in all these places he's learning about. Struggles and all these different places and what people are telling him is that they identify and they feel solidarity with the struggles of black people in America because they have similar struggles, although their struggles are basically on class issues, specifically class issues with We're racing class, so Mountain was listening to that, and he started involved again. He hadn't fully evolved on that because he's killed Tamra Pain on the unfinished life of Malcolm X. Her father, less pain, died with an unfinished book on Malcolm X, which she completed and which won the National Book Award. It's called.

Malcolm Little Tamra Pain Marcus Garvey pain Omaha Nebraska National Book Award NPR News Pulitzer Prize America New York Ku Klux Klan Steve Inskeep Middle East Martin Luther King David Greene Africa Europe group leader Great Plains
78: The Indian Wars Part 2: The Battle of the Little Bighorn (the Greasy Grass) - burst 02

History That Doesn't Suck

00:55 sec | 1 year ago

78: The Indian Wars Part 2: The Battle of the Little Bighorn (the Greasy Grass) - burst 02

"It's the afternoon of june twenty fifth. Eighteen seventy six as many as a thousand lakota. Cheyenne and arapaho village sprawl across the prairie. It's six to eight thousand. Inhabitants are enjoying a relaxing day. You're currently at war with the united states. But no one is expecting an attack presently. Us troops should be at least a day's travel out. Women are preparing food and chatting. Young men are watering their ponies. Playing hoop and pole gain still others are sleeping in after a late night of salvatori dancing as the hot afternoon. Sun beats down. Kids are swimming in the river at the villages edge these tribes and many other indigenous peoples of the great plains. Call it the greasy grass. You might know by another name though the little big horn river but the mood of leisure comes to an end around three pm. They're charging the charges are coming. A messenger yells

Education United States Research Irreverent Podcast History American Lakota Cheyenne Village Commander Lakota Cheyenne Pickoff Marcus Reno Prairie Cheyenne Battalion Fred Gerard Horn River George Armstrong Custer Charles White Tucson Beatrix Arapaho Salvatori Great Plains SUN
Coronavirus infection rates continue to rise in the U.S.

MSNBC Rachel Maddow (audio)

08:53 min | 1 year ago

Coronavirus infection rates continue to rise in the U.S.

"I would like to start by introducing you to nikki. tomlinson nikki. Tomlinson is an icu. Nurse at great plains health which is in north platte nebraska. At one point in time we had a physician here that everybody knew really well known him for a long time. Then a family doctor for a long time. That was my lowest point I still get teary thinking about it That i've been a nursing for twenty years and that was actually my breaking point. I when he didn't make it i had to. I already had some time off scheduled in that couldn't come at a better time I couldn't get through the next day of work without breaking down for an hour Our every hour was that was probably my darkest time at work. My darkest time over and my last twenty years of nursing so that was a. I was hard and then seeing some other family and friends come in That have fought this. That have beat this. That are scared along the way and other patients. That just aren't making it. I've never seen anything like cova. There's i we don't we just don't know enough about it. We learn new things every day and it seems like things change every day and i it. Just that's the one thing. That's constant about covid fluctuate senate changes and we just learn new things all the time. And that's what makes it scary. I've been a nurse for twenty years. And i've never experienced out like this. It's we're working. Extra shifts were working. We do great as a team but the the stress the emotional stress the physical stress that it is putting on us being there for the patients. Which is what we got into nursing. Four we're the only ones that can be there for some of these patients that most emotional stress losing them. is just. I've never experienced anything like it before. So the emotional and the physical stress. It's exhausting absolutely exhausting. I don't know how we are getting through it. We are but. I don't know how what i'm thankful for right now. During all this time is my health. My fellow coworkers health and my family know my family understanding how many how i have to work the long hours and not always be home during all of this And adapting to a can't touch mommy when you get home or to run and take a shower and And their health. I just hope it continues. But she's thankful for is her own health and the fact that her family doesn't have this. The family hasn't gotten it and she hopes that continues. That's what she's thankful for. Last night. i talked here about my own experience being home in quarantine. I tested negative. But i've been taking care of my partner. Susan while she sick i just wanna say to. Everybody reached out and was so nice. Response it was overwhelming. Actually was really kind. It was had to pick a word. I would say it was boolean to me and susan. So thank you everybody. But you know susan i will be are going to be okay. We are coming out of this. She is coming out of that. She is going to recover the people who i'm really worried about. I'm thinking about even as we're going through our own experiences beyond everybody who's sick and suffering right now. Susan has been these past couple of weeks beyond the eighty thousand plus americans who are in the hospital right now with kovic. The most we've ever had mean beyond the people who are suffering directly themselves trying to fight for their lives with this thing that people are really worried about the healthcare workers who are all over the country right now. We're staring down both barrels of this without the kind of support that they had in the spring when this all started with this now just tidal wave of cases and hospitalizations and deaths all coming down on them directly and personally in a way that does not feel sustainable in terms of them being able to keep doing it and terms of keeping them back stop keeping them supplied keeping them at work keeping the american health system open and able to function so frankly not to be too blunt about it but so save abol people can be saved. That's what i'm worried about. Is our health workers right now in the strain on them this many months into it with things. This bad right now i mean. Here's the front page. Today of the atlanta journal constitution. And you see the mix there right. I mean politically. Of course the big news out of georgia is that georgia. This is this morning's papers. They finish their recount. Yesterday showed once again. That biden clearly won the stage that set the stage. Today for georgia formerly certify its results and of course that's significant news. We'll talk more about that later tonight but but look at. What else is sharing the front page with that. Huge political news right see. Stay home for the holiday. Georgia state health official. Ads rethink traditional thanksgiving below that. There's the biggest front page headline in atlanta. Today it makes me shake with anger. That's a quote from a doctor who works in a covert war in atlanta talking about people blowing off the risk as the number skyrocket and as the hospitals get overwhelmed. You see their healthcare workers on the front lines feel. They are fighting a losing battle as public floats safety rules. That's georgia today. It's the same song up in minnesota. Today this is the west central tribune in willmar minnesota front page headline today. A plea for help. Hospitals are perilously close to running out of workers. It's one thing to run out of beds beds can be found in moved and bought but enough healthcare staff to take care of patients who are in those beds. That is what we are running out of in rural minnesota and all over the country. Here's the first column in that same paper today. Case rates skyrocket in the region again. That's west central minnesota. Here's the front page of the news star in monroe louisiana blunt headline hospitals overwhelmed. Here's the front page in grand junction colorado. Today the daily sentinel county says. Icu beds are full. Here's the front. Page in muncie indiana. Today the star. Press in muncie. Indiana hospitals cove in nineteen rates. Sores in indiana go to wyoming. The casper star tribune today casper wyoming deaths rise by record number. Something has got to turn this around kentucky. Here's the lexington kentucky paper. The herald leader kentucky sets staggeringly high new record for coronavirus cases. Go to new mexico the albuquerque journal today cova cases explode up in washington state bellingham herald. State virus rate's the worst since the beginning of pandemic all over the country right and as as overwhelming as this crisis is may now tonight. We've just learned that. The president's eldest son and namesake. Donald trump junior has it as well he has tested. Positive is reportedly isolating hope that he doesn't get symptoms so far apparently doesn't god blessed and maybe the president's eldest son who has such a high profile in the republican party now and in conservative media. Now maybe that will have an impact on thinking about this thing at the white house and in the conservative media on the right maybe even if the president himself getting it didn't seem to light a fire under them. I don't know but as overwhelming as this crisis is we are avoidably at this moment in history where we have two huge totally unprecedented crises. Heading simultaneously the minneapolis star tribune. Today i was actually a pretty good snapshot of what the heck we as americans are supposed to do with the twin disasters. We've got all at once and look at the front page at the minneapolis star tribune today a raging forest fire virus sweeps minnesota state to get ambulances from fema for surge importantly those are staffed ambulances so ambulance with their crews from fema going into minnesota to help them deal with patients and the need to move patients in hospitals. That are overwhelmed

Tomlinson Nikki Kovic North Platte Georgia Tomlinson Susan Atlanta Journal Minnesota Nebraska West Central Tribune Senate Atlanta Muncie Sentinel County Kentucky Casper Star Tribune Biden Willmar
"great plains" Discussed on Newsradio 700 WLW

Newsradio 700 WLW

02:36 min | 1 year ago

"great plains" Discussed on Newsradio 700 WLW

"430 for this hour from Bloomberg. I'm Jeff Hullinger on news radio 700 wlw. Jason got traffic. What's going on Pretty quiet so far. Just the one early morning accident. South 75 Hobble Street doesn't look like it's causing any problems for your 75. North looks good through the cut on the hill. In fact, you cross the bridge onto the Ohio side. No problem all the way up through Sharon Gill 71 same story No problems across to 75 year overnight construction as pretty much wrapped up from the UC health traffic Center. You see Health proudly serving as Cincinnati's leading adult organ transplant program for more than 50 years. Jason Erhard on news radio 700 wlw. General Mark isn't nine. First warning Weather Center. Good morning to you. Good morning, sir. Where else would I be? Is Election day. The fun has begun. Poles officially open. It felt like the opening of the Kentucky Derby. When the When the gates come down, Yeah, horses going. OK, Here we go. It's going to be fantastic. Problem is it's not over in a tew minutes. Well day down the stretch. They come May last two weeks. You got it. You got it. I'm voting today because I like to get my little sticker. I am Teo. I'm actually taking my daughter with me. She's eight or she's nine now, and she's very interested in this whole civic process. He's been talking a lot about our president on who is to be our president. And it has. I'm taking away from my girl. You're going to see what this is about. It's gonna be great. All right. Now, let's look at the world number one. It's the weather is actually nice here and mostly across the country. It will be no Excuse for people not to vote today. They haven't No. I mean, there is so much dry weather in temperatures that are not terrible here across the Midwest, the Ohio Valley the Great Plains East Coast. I mean, yeah. You have no excuse not to go vote today. Now what I'm saying, though we'll make it back to about 59. So that makes for a nicer day. Sunshine is just icing on the cake there. Tomorrow. That sun in Southwest flow continues so well jumped to 67 tomorrow and kind of stay in the mid sixties to finish the week. So it's listen Nice, so the weekend are the seventies called off. Are you telling me that they are still there still cute up 70 on Saturday, 71 on Sunday. Still no rain in the extended which I've heard from many farmers, and they said Thank you because they're I've seen a couple fields that the farmers went out and they are just rutted and a mess. So yeah, it's been a little too wet for them to get those last two crops out long as the farmers are happy. I'm happy. I mean, they are what make us run. All right, General. Thanks. We'll talk later. Temperate now is just 38 700 wlw..

Jason Erhard president Jeff Hullinger Bloomberg Weather Center Ohio Cincinnati Sharon Gill Kentucky Derby Midwest Ohio Valley Mark Southwest flow
"great plains" Discussed on KPCC

KPCC

03:23 min | 1 year ago

"great plains" Discussed on KPCC

"Not at all. That's why we took the pledge to do clean campaigning. Ah, in the United States Senate. My focus really is the same focus that drove me to Do the work in politics that I began doing back when I first ran for City Council in 1998 and came out of Yale Law School and moved into a low income neighborhood, same neighborhood I still live in today. My focus has always been trying to fight for those people that are being left out and left behind and in many ways that don't have a voice down here in Washington that's often squeezed out. By the money to interests will be I think Senator Booker's line may have dropped again, well, fork to get him back for these last couple of minutes. It's two weeks out from Election Day, but the country's biggest story isn't politics. It's still the Corona virus heading into the winter months. The U. S is seeing another cove. It 19 Serge. New Corona virus cases. They're up 30% and states in the Midwest and Great Plains are posting record high daily numbers. You can follow your local NPR news station for the latest updates. Senator Booker, Please continue. Yeah, Doctor. What? I dropped off, but we've got to clean up our campaign finance system. We've got to clean up s O many things and I'm very proud to be one of those senators made a reputation for myself. Even when I ran for president, bringing those voices to whether it's a presidential debate or to the legislation that we're crafting around criminal justice or environmental justice or economic justice that brings the voices of those Who are too often left out of the system to the table. We'll you ran for president. You dropped out of the race in January and then endorsed Joe Biden. But before doing that, you went after him on the debate stage for his record on race and criminal justice. Saying he didn't have an authentic connection with black voters and that he doesn't want to legalize marijuana. What's changed? Well, nothing's changed. I have to say that Joe Biden. I not only sport on the debate stage would have had many private conversations as well. And one of the things that's most impressed me about Joe Biden. Is his not only humility but is also a recognition that he doesn't have all the answers about everything. And made a real commitment to me and the nation about creating an inclusive leadership table. I think of anything symbolizes that, mostly, it's the person he choses to be his vice presidential candidate. So I have actually extraordinary confidence in his ability to have a team around him that will enable him to be one of the greatest presidents we've had when it comes to trying to push to end things like mass incarceration to try to push The retrenchment on rollback of voting rights to try to deal with other issues of equity and inclusion that are so urgent in our nation right now, and so I'm excited about the biting Harris team and having had the experience Of competing against Joe Biden and really showed me and both personal and public moments, the kind of character he has, and that's the reason why he earned my full blooded endorsement. That was Senator Cory Booker, a Democrat from New Jersey. Senator. Thanks for your time, Jen. Thank you very much. That we've heard from a few of you during our conversation, Susan writes. If Miss Barrett, meaning Amy Cockney Barrett is a constitutional originalist as she states how does she reconcile the fact that women weren't citizens and thereby not.

Joe Biden Senator Cory Booker Senator United States Amy Cockney Barrett Senate Yale Law School NPR Washington Midwest City Council Great Plains Jen president Susan New Jersey marijuana
Confirmed world coronavirus infections surpass 40 million, according to a Johns Hopkins University tally

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:30 sec | 1 year ago

Confirmed world coronavirus infections surpass 40 million, according to a Johns Hopkins University tally

"The world has now recorded more than 40 million Corona virus cases. Johns Hopkins University says the milestone was hit today, but the actual figure is likely far higher. Because testing varies. Many people have had no symptoms and some governments have concealed the true number of cases. The US, Brazil and India reporting the highest numbers of cases in the US cases are on the rise in 44 states, with many of the biggest surgeries coming in the Midwest. And the Great Plains. Up ahead

Johns Hopkins University United States Great Plains Midwest Brazil India
The Now-extinct Castoroides Was a Bear-sized Beaver

BrainStuff

03:47 min | 2 years ago

The Now-extinct Castoroides Was a Bear-sized Beaver

"Brain stuff Lauren Vogel. Bam here. mammoths, mastodons and Sabertooth hats weren't the only giants roaming ancient America. The Pleistocene was a global epoch kicked off two point six, million years ago. It lasted right up. Until Earth's most recent ice age ended about eleven thousand, seven, hundred years before the present day. When you live in a cold environment, being big has its advantages. Large animals tend to conserve body heat more easily than smaller ones. This is one of the major reasons why colossal mammals were so widespread during the frigid pleistocene. CASTA Roy was very much a product of its time. The largest rodent in Pleistocene north. America, this very big beaver grew to more than seven feet long from tail to stout that's over two meters and could have weighed as much as two hundred and twenty pounds or a hundred kilos or more. Rivaling the American black bear in size casta royalties utterly dwarfed the Beavers that lived today modern Eurasian, and American beaver species clock in just around three feet long a bit less than a meter and way somewhere between twenty nine, seventy, seven pounds. That's about thirteen to thirty five kilos. Proportionately castaways had a narrower tail and shorter legs albeit with bigger hind feet than its extant relatives. We also know that it didn't eat the same foods. What he plans are a crucial part of every living beavers diet. The critters use chisel like incisors that's their front teeth to gnaw through bark and take down trees. But. Even though castaways incisors grew to be a whopping six inches or fifteen centimeters long the teeth had dollar edges by comparison. Dental differences would have made it a lot harder for Castro to eat tree bark and indeed it looks like this was not really on their menu. Using isotopic signatures and castaways teeth from Ohio and the Yukon a twenty nineteen study found that the giant beaver mostly eight softer aquatic plants. The findings say a lot about the Rodin's ecological niche and why it might have died out. For starters, castaways probably didn't build dams. Unusual. About that the earliest known beavers appeared during the easing. A which lasted between about fifty, six, thirty, four, million years ago. New evidence suggests that the wood harvesting specialists came along much later perhaps around twenty million years ago. In all likelihood, these bark fanciers used would as a food source before any of them started constructing dams. Since as fed on aquatic plants, its survival would have depended on wetland habitats. The animal was highly successful for a time cast Roy these fossils representing at least two distinct species have been documented in the Great Plains the Great Lakes, the American South Alaska and numerous Canadian provinces. Unfortunately for the mega sized beaver north. America. became warmer and drier after the last ice age ended wetlands grew scarcer as a result. Today's beavers used their logging skills to reshape the land around them so that it meets their needs with some well placed would in the nearest stream, a determined beaver engineer brand-new Pons. Yet if Castro Reuters didn't harvest would or build dams, it couldn't followed suit. So theoretically decline in natural wetlands left the giant beaver more susceptible to extinction. Last of these creatures perished around ten thousand years ago.

Casta Roy America Lauren Vogel Sabertooth Castro Reuters Great Lakes Castro Ohio Engineer Pons Yukon South Alaska Great Plains
Vail Resorts invests in massive Nebraska wind farm

Climate Connections

01:13 min | 2 years ago

Vail Resorts invests in massive Nebraska wind farm

"None of the thirty four ski resorts owned by Vail are in Nebraska but the company is investing in the states. Abundant wind-power. Vale has committed to buying three hundred, ten thousand megawatt hours of energy from the new plum creek wind farm in Wayne. County. That's enough to offset more than ninety percent of the electricity used at all avails. North. American resorts just give you an idea of scale to about thirty thousand homes worth power annually for twelve years. That's cates Wayne Wilson Fail Senior Director of Sustainability. She says, the power purchase agreement helped bring the wind farm online this summer. So for us, it's really important in our renewable strategy that we're bringing new renewables to the grid and the project takes Vail resorts close to the company's goal of zero emissions by twenty thirty, and we're really excited and proud of that, and we're also looking at the local level of how can we engage in solar and wind and other renewables on the ground where resorts are. She says for Ski. Company like Vale Protecting. The environment is a necessity. The great outdoors is our business and we feel like we've special obligation to protect it. So by investing in wind turbines in the Great Plains Vale is reducing the climate impact of its High Mountain Resorts.

Vail Resorts Great Plains Vale Vale Vail Wayne Wilson Senior Director Of Sustainabil Nebraska SKI High Mountain
American and United to furlough 32,000 workers

Tim Conway Jr.

02:04 min | 2 years ago

American and United to furlough 32,000 workers

"Airlines. Bad news. If you work for American Airlines, they're going a ton. Of layoffs. Unfortunately, you know, I think a lot of companies doing this I'm taking for my airline. I'm making for all the airlines that making sure all the employees on all of us who loved to travel, Retired flight attendant Karen Harper worked for United for 32 years. She's been through a few rounds of furloughs herself, but nothing like this in the early seventies. Fine, great plains with five passengers on it, you know, so that the economic ups and downs over the years has been dramatic. And then, of course, After 9 11. He walked into an airport today. Travel is down 70% from a year ago, and federal stimulus funds that helped airlines through the summer expired today. Although negotiations are ongoing, there's no guarantee the White House or Congress will pass. An extension is forced American and United to furlough 32,000 workers combined. Oh, my God! And those air 32,000 skilled workers. You know these air, not guys picking up trash like this is that these are very skilled technical workers both send letters to team members last night. Explaining the decision, American Airlines CEO Doug Parker wrote. I am extremely sorry we have reached this outcome is not what you all deserve. It is a privilege to advocate on behalf of the hardworking aviation professionals at American and throughout the industry. And you have my assurance that we will continue to do so in the days ahead. United ended its letter saying to our departing 13,000 family members like God, 13,000. I've members of united. Thank you for your dedication, and we look forward to welcoming you back well, some believe airlines should be using private loans to keep employees passengers. We spoke to say it's a tough situation across the board this year is not good for anybody. So everybody's going through it right now. Airlines say they'll reverse the furloughs. If Washington comes to an agreement in the next couple of days, which is why they're urging employees to reach out to their elected officials don't know how good that's going to do.

American Airlines United Karen Harper Doug Parker 13,000 Washington CEO White House Congress
Covid: US death toll passes 200,000

NPR News Now

00:50 sec | 2 years ago

Covid: US death toll passes 200,000

"The US has crossed a grim threshold in the pandemic more than two hundred thousand people of now died from covid nineteen comes as a raw cases are also starting to rise after falling significantly the end of the summer more memoirs will stone certain parts of the country have higher death toll from Cova. Just. Three States Massachusetts New York and New Jersey account for more than a quarter of all US deaths Florida Texas and California also had a large share of deaths. Fewer. People are dying compared to the spring partly because younger people are getting infected but Dr. Bill Pounder Lee at Washington University in St Louis Worries about a surge of cases in the winter we'll see more people die the proportion may be less but the numbers will still be high cases are now climbing significantly in the Great Plains and parts of the

United States Dr. Bill Pounder Lee Covid Cova Great Plains New Jersey St Louis Washington University Massachusetts New York Florida California Texas
Moo-Dunnit: How Beef Replaced Bison on the American Plainsand Plate

Gastropod

06:14 min | 2 years ago

Moo-Dunnit: How Beef Replaced Bison on the American Plainsand Plate

"Nearly, all the hamburgers in America today come from cows that spend at least part of their lives on the Great Plains that famous open range in the. American. West. So that is where we will go to start our story today to the American West before it was American before Europeans and their horses started showing up there in the late sixteen hundreds. So before there were cattle and before kind of United States had control of the planes in the. West you had a variety of American Indian policies, groups like the Comanche themselves essentially a very powerful empire across the West and they were hunting bison numbers for that time are kind of hard to come by. But it's estimated that there were about thirty to sixty million bison roaming through the middle of north. America. These are big grazing animals and what they can do is they can turn the abundant grasses of the West into animal flesh which then hunter's. Can Eat and so they become the foundation of the economy whenever I'm in the same spot as a cow I'm always kind of amazed at how big they are. But Bison is a heck of a lot bigger and faster. They can run about thirty five miles an hour faster than most horses, and they can pivot on both front and back hooves and literally turn on a dime. These are terrifying and dangerous creatures. It's not the kind of animal you'd. WanNa meet on foot and other key thing about them is that they're herd animals. So they gather at times massive herds, massive herds that would have represented a very appetizing dinner plus some warm and sturdy buffalo-hide imagine writing towards a herd of kind of terrifyingly huge bison if you're safely on horseback but how did native communities had them before horses very carefully so you could really only do it in the spring or summer when Bison gathered together to mate. You would do it on foot and you could work as a group, but it was difficult. You couldn't really do it fulltime. You could hunt by some kind of part time before the Horse, the planes really belong to the. Bison. But we now think of as plains tribes actually lived on the edges of the planes combining a little small-scale hunting with some farming. But once you had horses than well-coordinated hunters could hunt the animals very efficiently. The horses came with the Spanish. The native communities got a hold of some of those horses and horses quickly caught on they even changed the politics of the region, the communities that had more horsepower like the comanche kind of took over and they. Would kind of dominate everybody else and basically built these very successful empires empires that were built on Bison, hunting them and trading them with European settlers on the east coast. So people like the Comanche Kiowa were very successful from horseback and they may have actually been causing slow population declines in Bison. The story I heard him school is that white people killed off all the Bison and the truth is they did but the bison were already under a little bit of extra pressure. Thanks to the horses that white people brought. But waited until the spread of ranching and Commercial Bison hunting from Euro Americans to really collapse and by one thousand, nine, hundred, there's only maybe three hundred bison left. The West from at least thirty, million bison to just three hundred and about fifty years that by some more systematically wiped out in only a few decades thirty million bison were eventually replaced by thirty million cows de Bison izing roses really got started in the mid eighteen hundreds when people of European descent or beginning to move out west of the plains and start settling there. It was all sorts of people particularly I when it was scale so When what is Texas belong to Mexico you had lots of Mexicans who are setting up ranch's then you've got kind of poor white settlers anglos coming into the region setting things up as the American civil war approaches you got people who are kind of second and third sons of wealthy southern plantation families who can't inherit the family plantation and so they kind of go west to a place like Texas to set up kind of these small scale ranch's. Looked out at the planes and they thought, okay there are huge rangy creatures that live there why not replace them with other huge rangy creatures but why didn't they just stick with the bison that were already living there bison meat is freaking delicious and there is more of it per animal because Beissner. Bigger and bonus bison more already perfectly ecologically suited to the native. Grasslands and climate conditions. That's a really interesting question. I've I've thought about it a lot because in some ways, bison would be a very natural animal to raise. But then when I was reading diaries and things, I found that these people they were kind of disgusted bison they didn't view that as an animal that could be farmed. They saw it as a wild animal. and. So what's interesting about that is on one level people go with what they knew. Euro. Americans know about raising cattle, but another thing gets into their ideas of what is civilized and Dave you. The Bison is not the kind of animal that a civil in their minds a civilized people would raise and so cattle is the way to do it. So why couldn't settlers just leave the? Bison alone race cattle separately well, they could but the animals can't live on top of each other. So if thirty million animals are occupying most of this land, it has to be taken another thing though is that the Bison of the foundation of wealth of native peoples and if the sellers want WanNa take control by force of this land while they want to eliminate the means of support. And the foundation of power of people like the Comanche and so they view attacking the Bison as a way of achieving their other goal, which is taking as much land as possible for themselves and for the United States and what's funny is that difference in cattle is what justifies to them taking the land but the similarity is what means they can be successful as ranchers that similarity between. Bison, and cattle at first these early cattle ranchers was small potatoes they in their cows were outnumbered and overwhelmed compared to the native people and Bison. Well, the herds were relatively small. It's kind of like a few hundred animals. So it's it's a few enough animals that you disarm people who manage them and kind of ride around taking care of them are the same ones who owned them. And it's it's pretty mobile. You know you don't have kind of official ownership of the land. You're just kind of occupying land where you don't find any other settlers and you're hoping that the nearby fort or the US military will protect you from violence even though you're of course, using land that other people live on like the Kiowa

United States America Texas Great Plains Hunter Official Dave Mexico
"great plains" Discussed on AP News

AP News

02:27 min | 2 years ago

"great plains" Discussed on AP News

"Sometimes leading conflicts got on video with workers trying to enforce mask where the problem is, when there's an absence of clarity around with the obligations are for everybody. That comes frankly from the governors themselves. They need to set clear rule. Brian Dodge, the association's president, has sent a letter to the National Governors Association asking them to require facemasks. Julie Walker, New York, Florida has been especially hard hit by the virus. 200,000 cases more than 3000 deaths. Other Sunbelt states are also seeing big jumps in cases and hospitalizations. Here's the AP Soccer Mahogany on Texas. Hospitalizations across the state have more than doubled the past two weeks to nearly 9000 people yesterday, officials in Houston say intensive care units have already passed based capacity. Austin's mayor says hospitals are at risk of being overwhelmed in coming days and his counterpart in San Antonio, says hospitals there are also nearly full. The Trump administration is pushing the force local school systems to be fully operational this fall despite the pandemic. Education Secretary Betsy DeVos into called the governor's dismiss plans by some districts to offer class instruction just a few days a week. President Trump has insisted that all schools and colleges returned to in person instruction as soon as possible in a tweet yesterday, he claimed Democrats want to keep schools closed for political reasons, not for health reasons. Heading into the final hour of trading. The Dow is down to 50. The S and P is off. 17. This is AP News. The Lower 48 Alaska are baking this summer. AP Science Writer Seth Bornstein reports that the traditionally hottest weeks of the season are coming up and the heat may linger for months. The worst part is That when me here I'll just look at long term forecast, which aren't as good as short term forecasts. Obviously They don't see any brink. They'll see below average temperatures, not August, not September. Heat advisories are expected from Phoenix to Charleston, South Carolina, later this week into the weekend. Next week. The climate prediction Center says close to 2/3 of the country will be warmer than normal. About 40% of the lower 48 has a moderate risk of his extreme and dangerous heat, including the upper Midwest and Great Plains. I'm to McGuire AP News..

AP Soccer Mahogany president AP National Governors Association Betsy DeVos Sunbelt Trump Julie Walker Brian Dodge Great Plains Houston Seth Bornstein Alaska McGuire New York Secretary Texas Austin San Antonio
"great plains" Discussed on Aerial America

Aerial America

03:42 min | 3 years ago

"great plains" Discussed on Aerial America

"When summer arrives in Nebraska, it's easy to be convinced that every inch of the state is covered by fertile fields. It's rows of corn alone seemed to go on forever in two thousand thirteen farmers here, planted, one hundred million acres of this one, crock, the largest amount since nineteen thirty three but there is a place in the Brassica with a far field come to an end a place where there's nothing to see, but dudes of sad. It's an area known as the Nebraska sandhills here, rolling dunes, covered twenty thousand square miles of land making this the largest formation of dunes in the western hemisphere. The sand hills created during the last ice age this region of both America was suffering from severe drought. As wins across the dry earth. Great deeds of sand reformed. Later thick grass and plants stabilizing the sand and creating this remarkable landscape. But these dunes play a key role in making the Brassica and agricultual powerhouse. They're part of a complex, ecosystem. That is responsible for supplying Nebraska, farmers and millions Brassica and agricultual powerhouse. They're part of a complex, ecosystem. That is responsible for supplying Nebraska, farmers and millions of people across the Great Plains with the precious water. They need to survive. That's because under the sand hills is a geological formation. That contains vast amounts of water is so big, it stretches under the states of South Dakota. Wyoming, Nebraska, Colorado. Kansas, Oklahoma, Texas and even New Mexico. It's like a giant underground lake, and is called the Oglala aquifers. The impact of this aquifers on the American economy is a standing thirty percent of all, groundwater, used for irrigating crops in the US comes from this one water source scientists discover the Oglala aquifers in the eighteen nineties, but even though they knew it was there, farmers didn't have an effective way to get that water out of the ground, and onto their crops, which is one reason they suffered hard during a famous period known as the dust bowl. Nineteen thirties, farmers across western Nebraska, and throughout the Great Plains, or over plowing their fields after years of good rain and productive yield when the rain stopped. The winds started to how. Taking up giant clouds of dust since the grass to hold it in place had been plowed under. Destroyed entire fields, blinded cattle and ruined machinery bringing farmers to their knees. One farmer later described what happened. The birds fluttered the rabbits, ran in the sky turned black. We thought it was a twister, the dust lay so thick in the back bedroom, we just moved. The mattress into the middle. We could sleep, many Nebraskan farmers lost their farms to clouds of dust, even though those same farms should right on top of one of the greatest sources of freshwater in the world. At the time the technology to tap that water, successfully had not yet been invented which is why the Great Plains was often called the great American desert.

Nebraska Great Plains South Dakota US America Wyoming Kansas Colorado New Mexico Oklahoma Texas twenty thousand square miles one hundred million acres thirty percent
"great plains" Discussed on KHVH 830AM

KHVH 830AM

09:47 min | 3 years ago

"great plains" Discussed on KHVH 830AM

"And if you take care of that, it'll take care of you and I love to hear what the what the effect has been for you and how it has worked. All right. We're dialed in together quick program note tomorrow. Is a little have Friday, the goodfellas will be in studio. We'll also get together with Rolando sunsets, one of my favorite fellas in town, performing at the blue note, and Rondo will be in studio tomorrow at the thirty Mark. Michelle Pollino radio BFF the Fox News entertainment, LA will join us as well. I've been chatting about this conversation for quite a while, because friends of Hawaii charities. I've been privy to their wondrous work for so many years a continues, and it is profound, and can't wait to jump in and get updated with Mitch. I wanna thank you Mitchell for coming in today because I can't wait to get into some of the details. Good morning to you. Rick. Thank you for allowing me to be heard, so it's an honor. Thank you for that supplies introduction of yourself. Please a little bit about you. Well, I actually went to Bishop Gorman high school. No kidding. Vada. My dad was in the marines, and he was one of the first Hawaiians in Vegas and he made my, my mother up there. She's from South Dakota blond hair, blue eyes, German descent. And so I, I was kinda primarily raised in, in Nevada, but have a lot of family. My dad was from nanakuli a lot of family in Hawaii. We come back and visit in the summers. And there was something about this, the islands that kind of drew me here. When I had an opportunity to when I graduated from high school and had an opportunity to come back and play football Hawaii. That was that was tremendously. I was fortunate for that opportunity. So I've been back here ever ever since basing. How many? Would we find in Vegas now? There's a few. You still there. I love that football. What was the catalyst for you and playing this wonderful sport was a great opportunity. My, my time here at the university of why was was was great. And. I noticed there was a lot of a lot of people like to Alec Waterhouse's of the world, you know, at Wong's and you saw a lot of the good that was going on in the community. And I think that's kind of helped me, you know, kind of form my opinion about, you know, see all the difference, people were making in the community. And so it was a good experience. It was great plain football for the university of Hawaii position was offensive lineman. I was actually in, in high school. But when we came here, that's when Paul Johnson came he was office coordinator Wagner was his first year as head coach. Yeah. We switched over to the, the spread option. And they weren't any tight end. So next besting was offense. What's it like that line though? What you expect a lot of folks can see broad shots of the of the movement in the play. But when your nose to nose, how was that experience for you? Great. I mean there's a lot of things that that happen out on the field. Offense line is kind of a real cerebral position. There's a lot of things going on making Kohl's adjustments at the line but. It just depends on know the person is across from you how how the game's going to go right? Talking back and forth, that kind of thing but. A lot of respect. So you just go out in battle. Yeah. Well, nineteen Ninety-two man, I mean, holiday bowl and all I still remember it says, so vivid in our memories and one final point. That's what I love about organized sports is, and you can share more. It is you have that have responsibility because of your team, you have accountability because of your position performance. There's consequence that you learn from all of that. But that's an SP two core that you can carry into various other parts of your life, professional and personal. And that's why I'm I'm always drawn to folks who have had that experience because it can transcend. What goes on in the field? You apply to your everyday life. Yes. There's a lot of life lessons in there. I really appreciate my time playing sports, but perseverance and teamwork like you mentioned and those type of things and you know, there's, there's times when things are going your way and you need to, to push through and persevere in, you know. It helps with that last part because I talked football all day. It's just when you when you're confronted with this situation that demands. One hundred ten percent. And odds are against you. But you overcome that, man, that is a character, building moment that imbues confidence. And I think confidence is the most important part because you've done it and you can carry that memory with you. I remember I had a moment or two in, in sports when I was a kid, I still draw on that. Now, I'm forty eight years older than you are. But back in the day. So anyhow, I thank you for sharing that about about your experience on the field. What after graduation went onto, where ended up going into consumer finance. I I'm at Bank now been at the Bank for going on twenty years now. It hasn't been also been a great opportunity, but. Going to work. I ended up going back to graduate school at UH pretend to do the MBA program. So that was a great opportunity as well. And just meet a lot more people and more experiences. And it was it was great. My son's attended just grad, and he's ready. He's ready now. Stay here at home. Go and university of a great school. I mean, the, the value that you get for two tuition your pain. Number one is tremendous but. It is a tremendous school, though. It is a lot of positive. Right. You know, your association with friends of charity is an expression of caring for our community. And I've mentioned this. Regularly going back to the first days of talking with Corbett and other friends about friends of white help us understand before we take our only break mission of friends of white and how it's accomplished. Well, the friends and a lot of people don't realize, you know, the, the formation of it, but when to Pete, as you know, I think, you know, the PGA kind of where they wanted to come up with a way to have more impact in the communities in which they hold tournaments. So one way, was to have a nonprofit such as the tournament operator be responsible for the tournament. But and by doing that being able to, you know. Bring it other community resources and, and have greater impact in the community. So it was in nineteen ninety eight believe that the friends was was formed, and we had that great partnership with Sony Sony just happens happens to have been the title sponsor since since day one. Yes. And in fact, there this past Turner was the twenty first annual tied for the third longest running sponsorship into into PG, so tremendous. But. Also, along with Sony. Marrying Jeanette Weinberg foundation, stepping up in ninety nine is our charity partner, which they match the dollar for dollar the funds raised so that helps us create even more impact and it's been tremendous opportunity to be able to try and make an impact in the community with different nonprofit organizations that we've been able to, to assist one of the great things with the PGA is over a period of time. Well documented that in excess of two billion dollars has been raised in communities, where the PGA has a presence and it's, it's not an oft reported part of, of the PJ's efforts, but it's substantial and of course, benefits us here at home when we come back with Mitchell, we're going to go through friends of charity, the impact, and really. The role that friends plays was so many other organizations, who have that commitment to our town and beyond, if folks want to learn more about friends of Hawaii Mitchell, how do we do that? You can visit the website at WWW friends of Hawaii dot org. Excellent we will be back and standby thoroughly enjoyed our conversation and it resumes. In a moment. Bluecross blueshield believe everyone should have access to healthcare, no matter who you are or where you live. That's why in every state are companies are working to improve health and expand access to care from training..

Hawaii Hawaii Mitchell football Vegas university of Hawaii Bishop Gorman high school PGA Michelle Pollino Sony Sony Bluecross blueshield Rolando Mitch LA Rick South Dakota Fox News Rondo Bank Sony Paul Johnson
"great plains" Discussed on NutriMedical Report

NutriMedical Report

13:27 min | 3 years ago

"great plains" Discussed on NutriMedical Report

"And also, you want hormone analysis. For example, I can do a test of Great Plains of all the toxins, including Zeno, toxins, that are feminizing, as I mentioned before, I think a lot of the disturbed behavior in terms of our society, were United Nations has one sex and sixty genders sixty three genders actually granted by one of my colleagues is because of the toxins, and earn viruses, that are feminizing almost all toxins are lock under the genyk female, receptor, even a males the cause cancer and females causes stir behavior. And they rewrote model the different neural pathways that actually.

Great Plains United Nations
"great plains" Discussed on Pet Life Radio

Pet Life Radio

01:39 min | 3 years ago

"great plains" Discussed on Pet Life Radio

"The team is testing ways to draw beat across thousands of acres of Perry dog colonies belong term goal to Indian is very Dong populations in all black ferret reintroduction sites across the northern Great Plains. They live in the northern Great Plains. They are endangered approximately around three hundred to three hundred seventy in the wild. They weigh about one point five to two point five pounds and eighteen to twenty four inches, and they live in the grass. Lands. Join our pet family on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram at talkin, pets dot com. You're listening to talk and pets. Why did you lower it? You wanna hear me say? Well, once again, you are listening to talking pets pick up the phone and give us a call. Wing. Somebody got that. Because Ben's during the show today with this doesn't normally produced the show with the network. So he doesn't know my forte. I don't think, but we usually ask the people in tribute to.

Great Plains Ben Facebook Twitter twenty four inches five pounds
"great plains" Discussed on The Healthy Moms Podcast

The Healthy Moms Podcast

03:27 min | 3 years ago

"great plains" Discussed on The Healthy Moms Podcast

"Thousand fifteen the last report that they did says that grass fed cows emit more carbon than grain fed cows. Because the only thing they looked at was lifespan. So because they live longer they emit more carbon into there. So that's kind of like the backdrop of what what what people say on the on the Negra side. There's a whole bunch of research happening right now, which is really interesting citing about soil, and what they call carbon sequestration and about what happens when you put animals on the soil. So if you've ever been to a farm where you you're looking at a pasture anywhere that the animal has been is generally a way more lush grass fields and in the middle of this country. There are lots of fields that have been over farmed for years with crops, and essentially the soil is ready depleted and has complete has just been tilled until until and. What people are seeing is if you put animals on on the land their pooping, they're using their who's to mash that poop in and is growing these incredibly fertile grasslands. If you think about this company like our country back in the days of the buffalo. It was the Great Plains these wide open plains of grass, and that grass was, you know, basically, Buffalo's eating the grass pooping up seize their mashing them, and is creating more and more grasslands. And what people are measuring. Now is what they call carbon sequestration, which is the ability for those grasslands just like a tree to essentially Sep carbon out of the atmosphere, and and story in the ground where it's a nutrient for the ground and the ground can continue to get better. And better more fertile. So there's a ton of there's actually some really there's the savory institute which has done a lot of research on this. He actually from I think symboblic, and if seen this with elephants in and. And large animals as well where they go to areas where it's aired or where grass is not grown. And they're they're able to regenerate savannah in really interesting exciting ways. So we're very excited for this notion of a mission for your carbon neutral meat, and we are working with people on measurement that our measurement making sure that so there is a methane cows far in produces methane there is that but in terms of like first of all they're eating diet. That's made for them. It's less end. If there if there but nobody's really measure the stuff before. So there's there's some really interesting work being done in this space. And I I mean, there's there's a lot of different arguments for and against. So the vegan argument of not eating animals is interesting because generally, you know, the tofu that people. Are you dating or the beans? The reading are come from those same overcropped areas. And I mean, it's a there are a lot of insects a lot of animals a lot of bees a lot of, you know, things in the ground there. There's a lot of living life that exists in an open grass fields doesn't exist in a, you know, a planted soy feel and that's just say it's interesting because I had never really comes up..

Buffalo Negra side Great Plains
"great plains" Discussed on 1A

1A

01:43 min | 3 years ago

"great plains" Discussed on 1A

"They're not a lot of restaurants in North Carolina, and I can imagine throughout the United States that caters to of Egan diet Timberlake. Thanks for sharing your story with a Stephania newer longtime. But for people who are trying to make being vegan work within kind of a mainstream world, particularly if they're on a whole lot of specifically vegan options, what might you suggest on? Yeah. That's a great plain, and you know, being DC. It's very very lucky and major cities. It's so much easier to do it quickly. You know, I know she mentioned in her comment that she used to do meal prep. And that is really it is huge. I think with any diet any any healthy attempt at any omnivore or not or vegan you need to put some thought and some time into it, and my recommendation to people and this comes from me being in the past having been a personal chef, obviously, I'm a restaurant chef in it's very different way of cooking. But you know, do do a little bit of research. It was you know, already like disgust that you want to go into something with knowledge. And if that means like going on a blog and looking up like, hey, how can I look at it make a meal in ten ingredients or less or thirty minutes or less do that? And that's probably going to be the easiest way. Stephanie turnout skew the sous-chef at the fancy radish. Stephanie, thanks for talking to us. Thank you very much offi. Bob moon, the author of the vegan soul food guide to the galaxy. Thanks you. Thank you. And Dr Walter Willett professor of epidemiology and nutrition at Harvard t h Chan school of public health. Thanks, Dr Willett. Could you talk to you? This conversation was produced by page Osborne..

Stephanie turnout Dr Walter Willett Dr Willett Stephania North Carolina Harvard t h Chan school of pub United States Egan Timberlake Bob moon thirty minutes professor
"great plains" Discussed on WBSM 1420

WBSM 1420

02:40 min | 3 years ago

"great plains" Discussed on WBSM 1420

"Walks around plane walks around the plane. Airplane down. It wasn't on the Great Plains. Okay. Okay. A buffalo. You didn't have to worry about being overrun by a buffalo. You may have heard of the TV series naked and afraid. I always wanted them to call that one scared shirtless. But there possibly could be one titled naked on a plane because the actions of a passenger on a flight over the weekend a man on an air. India express flight reportedly stripped off all his clothing and began parading up and down the aisle leaving federal flyers completely stunned flight attendants quickly covered the nude man with a blanket and then kept him seated for the remainder of the trip. While the merely the answer is yes, somebody did help the naked man the motive for the high altitude sauntering remains unclear the paper, and I'm gonna guess alcohol was involved. I don't know the paper indicated he was suffering mental trauma after alleged workplace harassment indivi- by a supervisor whom he said his Pakistani among the harassment claims was not being granted time off due to him. I didn't realize naked sauntering was a symptom of workplace harassment. They make it sound. So pleasant naked sauntering the guy at McDonalds was having a Big Mac attack six oh three says and the guy in Norway. He was trapped in a fjord escape. This one's pretty sad. Mom dies on Christmas after bathrobe catches fire. I hate it. When my bathrobe catches fire a Michigan. Mom died from her injuries. Mr speaker. When are we going to install a seven day waiting period for bathrobes to prevent these kinds of needless senseless tragedy after her bathrobe caught fire merry men? Sixty eight years old. Dropped a lit cigarette on herself Tuesday, enter Chester township home causing her bathrobe to ignite. She couldn't she couldn't. No, she couldn't. She couldn't put it out herself. Brushoff deputies said men had limited mobility, so she called for husband who attempted to put out the blaze and contacted nine one one. She was rushed to the hospital, but she died seven hours later. Isn't that terrible? Well, they say smoking kills. That's awful officer. Mark says the guy who was beaten up by the girl at McDonald's gives new meaning to the phrase takeout food. He had an unhappy meal at McDonald's safe to say shaken after that. Burrowing bandits Representative Al green southwest Houston office broken into what Representative Al Green's Houston office in southwest Houston. They steal any of his sexual harassment settlements is broken into early. This morning..

Mr speaker harassment Great Plains McDonald McDonalds Al Green Houston Representative Norway India Michigan supervisor Mark Chester township officer Sixty eight years seven hours seven day