35 Burst results for "Great Lakes"

Sen. Debbie Stabenow calls Great Lakes rapid warming incredibly alarming

Climate Connections

01:12 min | 5 d ago

Sen. Debbie Stabenow calls Great Lakes rapid warming incredibly alarming

"As the climate warms, the Great Lakes are heating up. The Great Lakes are warming faster than the oceans and Lake Superior, which is the largest deep us. Great. Lake is one of the five fastest warming lakes in the world incredibly alarming to me and to everyone paying attention to this. That Democratic Senator Debbie Stab Nov Michigan. She says the rapid warming poses risks to her State's economy and way of life. It threatens fish such as Walleye and trout, and it can lead to more harmful Algal blooms. We have about twenty two, billion dollar tourism industry that is very much based on the lakes on voting on swimming and fishing and fact one out of five jobs in Michigan is connected in some way to the water. So it's a very serious and rising temperatures are not the only threat. Storms are getting more intense and causing more severe flooding and erosion in lakeshore communities. We have boat docks and things that are being destroyed because of the wider levels. So she says the climate crisis is already affecting Michigan and to minimize the impacts, it's important to invest in cleaner more energy efficient future.

Great Lakes Michigan Senator Debbie Stab Lake Superior
laura Leftovers Headed to New York, Tri-State Area

10 10 WINS 24 Hour News

00:52 sec | 3 weeks ago

laura Leftovers Headed to New York, Tri-State Area

"For Well Yeah, What we really need right now is hurricane leftovers, But the remnants of Laura are headed our way. Let's get the latest live with AccuWeather meteorologist Carl Levinsky. Well, Kathleen. Yeah, partially, really. The true core of tropical moisture associated with Laura is headed through the D C area and points south of the tri state area this afternoon. What we're really concerned about is a cold front that's packing some punch moving through the Great Lakes this morning that caused some strong thunderstorms overnight in the greater Detroit area, and we'll see a period of rain this morning, but Stronger thunderstorms of erupting this afternoon, and we're concerned about some strong wind gust that could lead to damage also a drenching downpour. Yeah, Laure making a small contribution, but we're not really anticipating flooding on this Saturday. I'm much more concerned about winds gusting to near 50 MPH this afternoon in storms once that blows through the second half of the weekend looks really

Laura Carl Levinsky Laure Great Lakes Kathleen Detroit D C
What's the Largest Lake in the World?

BrainStuff

05:09 min | 3 weeks ago

What's the Largest Lake in the World?

"Siberia's Lake Cal is not your average. Lake. At forty, nine miles wide by three hundred and ninety, five miles long that seventy, nine by six, hundred and thirty, five kilometers. It's the world's largest freshwater lake and with history that dates back twenty, five, million years it's also Earth's oldest. But size and age aren't the only things that make this. Lake. Special. Lake by cow is also home to more than three thousand, seven, hundred different species, many of which are only found in the Baikal region. That's why by cows often considered the Galapagos of Russia. No in case it's bio-diversity doesn't dazzle you here's another but Julia fact. Lake by cow has its own version of the Loch ness monster. Its name translates to water dragon master and it's described as a giant sturgeon with a prominent stout, an armored plating along the back. The monsters history goes back centuries with ancient carvings depicting this terrifying creature. Interest peaked we thought. So here's a starter guide to this ancient beautiful and mysterious late, which is by the way a UNESCO World Heritage Site. Lake Baikal is located in southern Russia near the border of Mongolia, its depth of five thousand, three, hundred feet about one thousand, six, hundred meters makes it the world's deepest lake about five hundred feet or two hundred meters it's also famous for its clarity of water and ice. When the lake is frozen, you can see dozens of meters or hundreds of feet down. And as we said at the top, it's also the world's largest lake that size twelve, thousand, two, hundred, square miles, or thirty one, thousand, six, hundred square kilometers makes it comparable in volume to the entire Amazon Basin? A first scale? It reportedly takes about three hundred and thirty years for single water molecule to flow from inlet to inlet. So. How did like by cow get so massive About twenty, five, million ago lake by CAL formed through fractures and shifting within Earth's crust. It wasn't Lake Baikal as we know it. Now, though experts believe it was a series of lakes similar to the Great Lakes in the United States while scientists aren't positive how lake by CAL went for many lakes to the behemoth. It is today they do have theories. It could have been sinking earth erosion earthquakes or increased water from melting glaciers although it's likely a mix of these factors and more. That unifying change took place in the pleasing epoch about five point three to two point five million years ago. But this lake isn't finished growing. It's expanding at a rate of about point seven inches to centimeters every year at the same speed at which Africa in South America are drifting apart. At this speed, some scientists believe lake by Baikal is actually an ocean in the making. The lake boasts twenty-seven islands, the largest of which spans two, hundred, eighty square miles or seven, hundred, twenty, five square kilometers and has its own lake mountains and the population of fifteen hundred residents. The locals connected to power van underwater cable in two, thousand and five, and we're connected to the Internet shortly after. Some Call Lake by Cao, the Galapagos of Russia not only because it has an impressive array of those nearly four thousand species but also because eighty percent of those animals are found nowhere else. One reason for this unique biodiversity is the lakes. Array of hydrothermal vents which are commonly found in oceans but lake by cow is the only freshwater lake known to have them. Cold water from the lake enters cracks in the Earth's crust through these hydrothermal vents. When the water reaches magma, it heats up, then returns resurfacing with minerals and heat. These rich minerals are probably the reason some of the lakes most unusual species were able to develop including several unique fish and the nerpa seal species, which is the only exclusively freshwater seal species in the world and its evolution is mysterious and some scientists believe it arrived by a prehistoric river from the Arctic But beyond seals fish other common animals found in the forests and mountains surrounding Lake Baikal include. Elk. Reindeer links wild-boar, and of course, the lakes frequently reported water dragon master. And this ancient lake has another air of mystery about it. UFO sightings. Many locals have reported strange lights and alien spacecraft throughout the years and several Soviet era documents mention ufo instance in sightings around Earth's largest lake. However for all of its natural wonder, amazing wildlife end stranger sides for lake cows one hundred, thousand permanent residents it's simply home. Made, occupations are forestry agriculture, fisheries, hunting, and tourism though that's currently on hold due to covid nineteen. Here's hoping they opened back up soon.

Call Lake Lake Baikal Lake Cal Russia Galapagos Unesco World Heritage Site Siberia CAL Julia Great Lakes Loch Ness Monster Amazon Basin Mongolia South America United States Africa
Can the Midwest expect more derechos?

Climate Cast

03:47 min | Last month

Can the Midwest expect more derechos?

"That durant show that tour across Iowa and Illinois August tenth flattened as much as fourteen million acres of cropland seventy to one hundred plus mile an hour winds blew down trees and power lines more than half a million islands lost power some for more than a week. The word the ratio means straight ahead in. Spanish these massive straight line wind events travel more than two hundred and fifty miles and produce wind gusts over. Seventy five miles an hour. Why is the Upper Midwest climatological hotspot for these massive windstorms that howl for hundreds of Miles Victor Seaney is a professor with Northern Illinois University specializing in severe storms. Hi Victor Welcome to climate cast. Thanks for having me on. Paul what stands out to you about that August tenth Rachel probably the number of wind reports that we had over seventy five miles per hour usually when these jobs occurred you. Can get widespread fifty to sixty mile per hour winds. But as we saw in several cities in Eastern, Iowa in Northern Illinois and even into the Chicago land area, this particular day Joe was producing winds in excess along its path of seventy five miles per hour. Obviously, the wind speed gets higher. So does the damage we all know about Tornado Alley and there's also a higher donate show frequency there but the radio frequency is Also high here in the Upper Midwest and the southern Great Lakes right it is an actually if you had to pick one city on the map that experiences more durations than anywhere else in the United States, it would be sort of Rockford Illinois Northern Illinois here is really ground zero for the shows and it really goes back to the ingredients that you need in order to get these types of long live windstorms we've. Had some historic data shows in the Upper Midwest? The Boundary Waters Blow Down Fourth of July nineteen ninety nine is something people here in Minnesota remember what is it about the summertime atmosphere over the Upper Midwest? That's conducive to durant chose well, for those of us who live up here in the summer we know it's the heat and humidity, and of course, you have heat and humidity present on many days in the summertime. But what really differentiates from a direct show, Dave versus a normal thunderstorm day are these bigger disturbances that moved through the atmosphere and a lot of vertical wind shear strong jetstream overhead that all comes together to create a very favorable atmosphere for these rages. The bulk of evidence seems to suggest that climate change doesn't show strong links to the intensity of d'auray chose why is that? It's not that it doesn't show strong relationships is. That it's sort of unknown in that we have a lot of errors right now with our experiments in the models that we have that can project into the future the potential changes. Our best guess right now is that the amount of days that we're going to have in the future that having this extreme heat and humidity will increase, but it's sort of unclear if that's GONNA translate to more of these types of Drake Joe. Windstorms is there any evidence that Rachel climatology could shift northward as the climate warms there are certainly studies out there that show northward shift in what we call the mid latitude jetstream and these types of phenomenon in theory should shift with that northward shifting jet. Again, these are attribution type of studies that will need to be retested in the future and continue to be tested with new data before I think we can say anything. More robust about what we're going to expect with these types of storms. I don't think there's a rating system for Rachel's how would you rate that one that crossed Iowa into Illinois on August tenth this particular Drake Shift you had to ask me is probably one intend to one in fifteen year event across the Midwest Professor Victor Jen, Seaney with Northern Illinois University. Thanks so much for being on climate cast today. Thanks for having me.

Upper Midwest Illinois Northern Illinois University Rachel Climatology Iowa Durant Miles Victor Seaney Windstorms Northern Illinois Professor Victor Jen Dave Minnesota Professor Tornado Alley Great Lakes United States Rockford Paul Chicago
Bald eagle attacks $950 drone, sends it to bottom of Lake Michigan

KCBS Radio Weekend News

00:29 sec | Last month

Bald eagle attacks $950 drone, sends it to bottom of Lake Michigan

"Sensing a foe or pray, perhaps a bald eagle launched an aerial attack on a drone that was being used to map shoreline erosion near Escanaba in Michigan's upper peninsula. It was being operated by the state Department of Environment, Great Lakes and Energy. Ironically, known as Eagle Drone, Pilot, Hunter King says the satellite reception became spotty. Eagle ripped off a propeller and sent the craft in the lake, Michigan Bird watchers say the eagle flew away, apparently unhurt.

Eagle Michigan Escanaba Great Lakes Hunter King Department Of Environment
Bald eagle attacks $950 drone, sends it to bottom of Lake Michigan

KNX Weekend News and Traffic

00:35 sec | Last month

Bald eagle attacks $950 drone, sends it to bottom of Lake Michigan

"In a battle between nature and technology. It was Eagle one, environmental drone zero correspondent Pam Culture, Sensing a foe or pray, perhaps a bald eagle launched an aerial attack on a drone that was being used to map shoreline erosion near Escanaba in Michigan's Upper peninsula. It was being operated by the state Department of Environment, Great Lakes and Energy. Ironically, known as Eagle Drone, pilot Hunter King says the satellite reception became spotting the eagle ripped off a propeller and sent the craft in the lake Michigan. Birdwatchers say the eagle flew away, apparently unhurt.

Lake Michigan Pam Culture Escanaba Upper Peninsula Michigan Hunter King Great Lakes Department Of Environment
Bald eagle attacks $950 drone, sends it to bottom of Lake Michigan

Sean Hannity

00:19 sec | Last month

Bald eagle attacks $950 drone, sends it to bottom of Lake Michigan

"Is the winner of a battle with a drone over Lake Michigan. The drone was videoing shoreline erosion in the Upper peninsula for the Department of Environment, Great Lakes and Energy when it was attacked. In the 3.5 seconds after the attack until it plunged into the lake. The drones sent 27 warning notifications.

Lake Michigan Upper Peninsula Great Lakes Department Of Environment
Bald eagle takes down government drone

Joel Riley

01:12 min | Last month

Bald eagle takes down government drone

"Oh, and I don't know that government officials really thought it all the way through Michigan's Department of Environment, Great Lakes and Energy. They have this drone. They were doing some observation around the lake Michigan, uh, what they were doing? They were charting soil erosion on the lake's shorelines. And it seems like an appropriate thing. They've got the drone up. Well enter. Oh, and by the way, the drones name is Eagle. It's e g l E for environment, Great Lakes and energy. OK, Eagle, the Eagle Drum. Now they got this thing flying around the enter a really life bald eagle. It's just kind of doing what Eagles do probably fishing along the shores of make ish in Michigan, and it didn't really seem to take a liking to the drone, and it attacked. And it won. Yeah, it it ripped a propeller off of the Eagle drone. Sending it to a 162 foot plunge plunge into into the the waters waters of of Lake Lake Michigan. Michigan. So So people people think think technology technology is is all all that that in in a a bag bag of of chips. chips. Well, Well, the the bald bald eagle eagle wasn't wasn't having having any any of of it and real quick

Lake Lake Michigan Michigan Eagle Drum Great Lakes Eagles Department Of Environment
Great Lakes temperatures breaking records

Climate Cast

03:38 min | Last month

Great Lakes temperatures breaking records

"You may have missed it in this extreme news year of twenty, twenty climate changes in the north are happening at a record pace this year the data points record setting one hundred re temperatures in Siberia, Arctic wildfires omitting record greenhouse gas emissions, and the Lowest Arctic Sea ice coverage ever recorded in July. Closer to home water temperatures in the Great Lakes have been running high this summer. Erik. Anderson is with Noah's Great Lakes Environmental Research Laboratory Eric Welcome to climate cast. Glad to be here. Thanks for having me. Let's talk about Great Lakes water temperatures this year. How warm are they? So. Generally, they're about one to two degrees warmer than what we've seen. We saw spike in early July that race temperatures up. So in Lake Michigan that's. About seventy six degrees. Fahrenheit. Lake Huron slightly cooler around seventy two degrees. Lake Erie getting close to eighty just under eighty maybe about seventy eight and Lake Ontario? Kind of seventy six point five degrees I would say. Let's talk about Lake Superior why is it different than the other Great Lakes? Well, you know generally there's differences just across the Great Lakes from geographic scale of the region. So superior. Is the farthest North Lake I can see dramatically different weather than you see in Lake Erie you're on -Tario. Pursue the southern stretch of Lake Michigan. So that's one factor. It can get slightly different weather, slightly different air temperatures and winds in that region. But another key feature is just the size and the depth of the lake. Because Lake Superior so big in. So deep the cold water that's down below does a tremendous job at keeping the surface. Cool. Even when we have a streak of warm air temperatures like we've seen this summer. What about longer term trends on the Great Lakes seasonally, what trends are you seeing for warmer summer temperatures in the Great Lakes the data that we have on surface water temperatures has shown that summer temperatures in the lakes are all trending upwards. So we see warmer water temperatures over. Roughly the last three decades when we have consistent or even four decades based on temperatures or we have consistent data sets in that's on par with what we see in ocean temperature changes even may be slightly more rapid rates in it sounds small. If I, give you the number typically it's around a a half a degree for decade, but that's actually quite a. Lot of change for these large bodies of water But we're also starting to see from the data that we see rapid warming in the fall in the spring as well, which is a signature that this summer period is really getting longer. It's stretching in both directions. So the shoulder seasons in the spring and fall are are warming up sooner in cooling off later respectively. What will you be watching for for Trans on the Great Lakes and climate in the next few years? Lakes and really lakes in general are a good measure of the impacts of climate change. So they're small enough that they can. Give us a discernible, a clear signal of of climate trends if they exist. But they're large enough that they do have that climate memory. So they're they're not so tiny that responding to every daily fluctuation in whether they had that long term memory part that US to look at long-term trends like what a climate change might Britain. Eric Anderson with Noah's Great Lakes Environmental Research Laboratory thanks so much for being on climate cast today. Yeah. Thanks for having me.

Great Lakes Great Lakes Environmental Rese Lake Superior Great Lakes Environmental Rese Lake Erie Lake Michigan Lake Huron Noah Lake Ontario Eric Anderson Lowest Arctic Sea Erik Siberia United States Britain
Michigan wants Enbridge to pledge funds in case of oil spill

Newsradio 950 WWJ 24 Hour News

00:36 sec | 2 months ago

Michigan wants Enbridge to pledge funds in case of oil spill

"The head of the Michigan Department of Natural Resource is is asking the owners of an oil pipeline running under the Straits of Mackinaw for a written agreement on cleanup costs, if there ever is an oil spill Letter requests N Bridge provide sufficient financial assurances to cover any loss, including a catastrophic release from the duel. Oil pipelines and Enbridge subsidiary has already pledged $1.8 billion front cleanup or damage to the Great Lakes. But it's unclear if N Bridge could be exempt. And Enbridge spokesman says the company is reviewing the state's

Enbridge N Bridge Straits Of Mackinaw Michigan Department Of Natural Great Lakes
Heat wave to bake most of U.S.

Newsradio 950 WWJ 24 Hour News

00:35 sec | 2 months ago

Heat wave to bake most of U.S.

"And current he'd wave good last from a week to two weeks covering the eastern 2/3 of the United States. The heat wave will make its way from Detroit in the Great Lakes region down through Washington before moving through the south. A sweltering summer heat wave is on the way for the majority of Americans. This has the potential to be a very large, long lasting and very Intense heat wave. Now it is early, but it does seem likely that many millions of people are going to sweat through heat index numbers of about 105 to 115 degrees for many days in the road that

Great Lakes United States Detroit Washington
Heat wave to bake most of U.S.

Vickie Allen and Levon Putney

00:16 sec | 2 months ago

Heat wave to bake most of U.S.

"Jeff Farraday Lee has more on this week's expected heatwave core of the Heat wave early to the middle of this week. Is gonna be across the Great Lakes, the Ohio Valley in the Middle Atlantic. Then we turn our attention to the Plain states and the lower Mississippi Valley area ahead of the

Middle Atlantic Jeff Farraday Lee Mississippi Valley Ohio Valley Great Lakes
Early findings grim on the health of Flint kids after water crisis

60 Minutes

05:21 min | 2 months ago

Early findings grim on the health of Flint kids after water crisis

"Flint, once a prosperous hub of the American auto industry, was nearly bankrupt back in 2014. Officials hope to save money by switching the city water source from the Great Lakes to the Flint River. Almost immediately, residents began noticing something wasn't right. The water was rust colored and many people had rashes. Michigan's Department of Environmental Quality in the city insisted. The water in Flint is safe. Later, a state investigation found those officials hid the fact that the river water was not treated with chemicals that would prevent the pipes from corroding. So for months, the water ate away at Flint's old pipes. Releasing led into residents tap water. They were poisoned. I mean, they were poisoned by this water, and they they were all exposed. The toxic water. Dr. Mona Hanna. Tisha is a pediatrician in Flint, who her patients call Dr Mona is our Dr Mona is a bit of a superhero herself here because she was the first to link the water toa high levels of lead in the Children of Flint. So within a few months of being on this water General Motors, which was born in Flint, and still has plants in Flint, I noticed that this water our drinking water was corroding their engine parts. It's possible the drinking water was corroding engine parts, so they were allowed to go back to Great Lakes water. Anybody at that point say, if it's corroding an engine, maybe they shouldn't be going into our bodies and our kids. I mean, that should have been like fire alarm bells like red flags. So what did it take before your your eyes open about this? Yeah, it was the word lead because the word lead When you're a physician or a pediatrician signals what in your brain? There is no safe level of lead. We're never supposed to expose a population or a child to lead. Because we can't do much about it. It is an irreversible neurotoxin. It attacks the core of what it means to be you and impacts cognition. How Children think actually drops I Q levels It impacts behavior leading to things like developmental delays and has these life altering Consequences. In 2015 Dr Mona and a colleague started digging through blood test records of 1700 Flint Children, including the kids, She sees that the Hurley Children's clinic ready, Okay. The nonprofit clinic serves most of Flint's kids. The city is 53% black and has one of the highest poverty rates in the country. So we looked at the Children's by the levels before the water switch. We compare them to Children, but lead levels after the water switch. And in the areas where the water lead levels were the highest and that those parts of the city we saw the greatest increase in Children's lead levels. Armed with the first medical evidence that kids were being exposed to lead from the water. Dr. Mona did something controversial. She quickly held a press conference to share the blood test study. Before other doctors reviewed her work was a bit of an academic. No, no kind of a form of academic disobedience. But you knew that I knew that but like, but there was no choice. There was no way I was going to wait to have this. This research about Ed. Two weeks later, Michigan Governor Rick Snyder ordered the water switch back to the Great Lakes and declared a state of emergency. I say tonight is 1/2 before. I'm sorry, and I will fix it. The damage was done. Dr Mona estimates 14,000 kids in Flint under the age of 6 may have been exposed to lead in their water. I never should have had to do the research that literally used the blood of our Children as detectors of environmental contamination. Three years after the crisis began, the percentage of third graders in Flint, who passed Michigan standardized literacy test dropped from 41% to 10%. I'm very concerned about my Children and not only my Children, but I'm concerned about the Children of Flint Kenyatta Dotson is still fearful of the water. Even though the state is spending more than $300 million to fix the water system City promised to replace all 12,000 supply lines that may have been contaminated with lead. Last fall. Now they say the work won't be done until summer. Dotson says she and her daughters will continue to use bottled water for cooking and brushing their teeth any time to come back to a place where I feel whole again. You don't feel right now. Would this have happened in a rich white suburb? Maybe it would have happened in interest twice over. Would it have continued for a long A zit has? I don't believe

Flint Hurley Children Dr. Mona Flint River Flint Children Flint Kenyatta Dotson Great Lakes Dr. Mona Hanna Michigan General Motors Department Of Environmental Qu Rick Snyder Tisha
Crop failure rate for wild rice is increasing with climate change

Climate Cast

05:04 min | 2 months ago

Crop failure rate for wild rice is increasing with climate change

"Minnesota's legendary extreme winter cold is critical to the survival of many native plants and animals, but temperature trans show Minnesota's average winter temperature has warmed six degrees since nineteen seventy, and the milder winters appeared to be Reducing Wild Rice Harvest Yields Peter David is a wildlife biologist for the Great Lakes, Indian fish and Wildlife Commission Hi Peter, welcome to climate cast. Thanks for the opportunity. Why is extreme winter cold so important to wild rice? This is a plant that's adapted to northern harsh growing conditions. And so even northern Minnesota Northern Wisconsin that's solar edge of its range, and you can suspect this is going to be a point out. That's really susceptible. To. Climate impacts one of them winter aspect is just that the SPLAT needs a long hard winter for the seed Germination. And those harsh winter conditions also helped not back. Some of the other plants that wild rice typically competes with. There's really whole host of native. Climate change that are probably impacting wild rice throughout its growing season, so if the range is limited climate change is in Minnesota and Wisconsin. Would they be pretty important then to wear? The wild rice is able to flourish. There are two species I should mention lose in northern and southern wound rise, but the northern species is the one that is really important human harvesters, because it has a large highly nutritious seed. That's found only in any level of abundance in these two states, so if you're a tribal member for example living on this landscape, it doesn't help you. Much of wild rice can only grow successfully Canada in the future. Wild Rice is called Minoan in the JIB way language. Wiersma Noman so important to the JEB loy culture. Is almost impossible for me to overstate how culturally important manolas. For people who are familiar with your jubilee or initial migration story, these trouser living once along the eastern seaboard, and they move to this part of the world following prophecies that indicated that they had to go west if they were going to survive as a people. And that migration. They weren't sure how long it was going to be. Where exactly they were going, but the prophecy was that they would be at their destination. When they came to the place with the food grew out of the water. And so they brought them finally probably over generations to this western Lake Superior Regionally monoment bowl of the world, so this plant has great cultural significance right there, but it is also this food that rose out of the water, and it has more overall nutrition than any other food that was available in the region, the native diet, and so you can imagine the significance. This has, and it's literally. This food day is present. From birth to death. throughout the year and all of the ceremonies, it's intricately tied to a deputy. Tell us about the elders four year rule and how that's changing. One of the first things the elders taught me when I started three decades ago and you'll very little rice. The wild rice is an annual plant. It comes up from CD cheer, and that's one of the reasons why it may also be more responsive to climate change. But it, it's naturally variable in abundance. In the four year rule states that in a four year period you could expect one very good crop to occur, and maybe to sort of fair to midland years and one year. That's going to be near failure. And Dean late, and he can county. Minnesota's one. That I often think about here as we look at the lake each year. You never know what you're going to see when you fly up to it some years, it's open wire. Other years it looks like a gigantic heat-sealed and some years now with a disease that we're seeing more frequently associated with climate change Brown back. It looks like a Brownfield instead of the vibrant Greenfield the failure read on Dean leg in the last dozen years, or so is approaching fifty percent, and that really stands such a stark contrast to that t k ruled traditional ecological knowledge of the elders. You mentioned fungal disease I understand. That's become a problem. How is that connected to climate change? So the one that really most concerned about is a thing called Brown spot disease. Is a fungal disease, it's been around for a very long time, but it likes warm wet, humid conditions that are becoming more and more frequent, so we're in the past it sort of seemed to occur now and then here and there We're starting to see years where it has theory large regional outbreaks, and it's a real problem, because when the answer badly infected by this, the seeds germinate the plants girl that they are not able to produce, eat themselves, and so they're not replenishing that seed bank, and they're not providing for for human harvesters, or for all the myriad while species and also benefit and utilize wild rice.

Minnesota Wild Rice Wisconsin Wiersma Noman Dean Great Lakes Lake Superior Wildlife Commission Peter David Jeb Loy Culture Canada Brown
Michigan shows lower growth in COVID-19 cases and deaths than other Great Lakes states

Newsradio 950 WWJ 24 Hour News

00:29 sec | 3 months ago

Michigan shows lower growth in COVID-19 cases and deaths than other Great Lakes states

"Two Michigan has lost close to six thousand residents from the pandemic as yet however to see us second spike state officials report one hundred eighty new cases overnight with another twenty two fatalities this has more than six thousand cases are potentially linked to the disease with two hundred forty five additional probable deaths the state reporting close to sixty thousand confirmed cases with nearly forty five thousand people who have recovered more than ten percent of Michigan's population has been tested for the

Michigan
The Assistance Urban Refugees Need

UN News

01:14 min | 4 months ago

The Assistance Urban Refugees Need

"Of thousands of refugees living in urban settings across the East Horn and Great Lakes regions of Africa are struggling to meet even basic needs as the economic impact of Covid nineteen takes hold the UN refugee agency. Unhcr has said on Tuesday. It appealed for MORE REFUGEES TO BE INCLUDED IN GOVERNMENT RESPONSE. Plans to the pandemic over and above the preventative. Health measures already taken. Unhcr fears that without further support. Many oven refugees could become extremely vulnerable to exploitation. They risk falling into major debt and could be forced into transactional sex or child labor to survive. Spokesperson Charlie actually said we do see different circumstances in different areas than in some places. Refugees are strongly affected by some of the measures that have been put in place as well as host communities because lockdown curfews implemented in this is daily restricting refugees abilities to sustain that sources of income and other places restrictions elusive a across the board businesses and economies have been affected by this in Rwanda. Most of the country's twelve thousand refugees have seen the family wage-earners lose their jobs. Misty actually said as businesses have closed after border restrictions

Unhcr Covid Rwanda UN East Horn Africa Misty Great Lakes Charlie
Chicago - Rain Showers Ahead, Into Weekend

John Howell

00:30 sec | 5 months ago

Chicago - Rain Showers Ahead, Into Weekend

"Forecast well much of this last weekend of April will finish up with the upper level low pressure continue to hang out across the Great Lakes here it's been around for much of the month our temps tonight at forty degrees with showers showers cool on Saturday north winds high forty six low forty and then some brighter weather for the new week Sunday Monday your fifty on Sunday from the weather channel meteorologist Scott Lori Moore WLS AM eight ninety with another update thirty minutes forty two degrees right now Chicago's lakefront forty seven at midway forty eight officially at

Great Lakes Chicago Scott Lori Moore
How Michigan's governor is battling coronavirus

Cape Up with Jonathan Capehart

09:34 min | 5 months ago

How Michigan's governor is battling coronavirus

"Jonathan Cape Heart. Welcome to this special edition of Cape. Up Two separate interviews with two elected officials in two different jurisdictions dealing with the corona virus. Pandemic Governor Gretchen of Michigan and Chicago. Mayor Lori. Lightfoot the start with Governor Whitmer who after instituting one of the strictest. Stay at home. Orders in the nation is getting set to review them and ask her why after all the attacks and president trump. She's polling better than him in a brand new Fox News. Poll Governor Whitman. Thank you very much for coming on the PODCAST. Client to be with him. So you have one of the strictest. Stay at home orders and now word comes that you're now reevaluating that stay at home order. What's changed to make that possible so I think you know? I want to assure kind of the rational. Why we have one of the strictest. Stay home orders. Michigan is the tenth most populous state in the nation. And yet we had the third highest death in the nation and that's something that It has just absolutely devastated. Communities across my state created an incredible amount of fear and concern and we know that Cova nineteen was spreading far and wide long before it was ever detected via test so it took actions to keep people safe and there are more restrictive than other states but I thought that it was absolutely essential after a few weeks of the stay home pasture. We have seen our trajectory. Really Start to flatten. We've saved lives on one of the things about Public Health when you're successful. You've never able to really quantify precisely. How many lives he saved. But we know that. This strategy is working here in Michigan. Every day. We're learning more about Kobe. Bank teen we are crunching the data. We are learning more through increased testing. We're not where we want to be your where we need to be as a nation and sterling. That's that's true in Michigan as well but we are seeing This data that gives us Optimism and so as we evaluate extending the stay home order. We're also an a moment where we can evaluate if there are some things that we might Lighten up on not dramatic changes but changes. That may bring us more in line with some of our our other states and so this is a moment where alphabet evaluation is happening. I'm GonNa make a very Thoughtful data driven determination that centered around promoting public health but also ensuring that people are still eager to abide by the stay home. Stay safe order. I think that's always the balance fat that we have to do here to make sure that we keep compliance than and we keep giving people confidence that we've got a strategy to re-engage in a very thoughtful safe manner so this is not a just so that no one thinks that you're gonNA completely junk your stay at home order. This is. This is going to be something. That is gradual. Sure yes absolutely. This is we're going to look at it. I think the trump administration says as a some people say we're GONNA open stages I like the visual of waves were We're surrounded by the great late. So I'm always thinking in those terms but I do think that we are going to be very thoughtful. We're GONNA have to measure every step of the way There will be you know it'll be necessary that we're nimble if we see a spike Dr. Start to happen that we pull back when necessary that if we are continuing to see success as we open things up where numbers stay down in our ability to meet the needs in our hospitals that are PPA. Needs are much than we can. Take the next step forward. But I think that the the leader's epidemiology and and health sciences across our country are advocating. That is the best practice to avoid a second wave and I hope even if you're a dissenter of the current stay home order we can all agree that avoided. A second wave is the most critical thing that we need to do. It will save lives but it would be absolutely devastated under economies Leeann. A second wave two so you are a part of a compact of states and correct me if I'm wrong. Great Lakes Region Governors who have joined together in sort of dealing with the with the pandemic at can that compact that you're in hold if each of you opens up your respective economies separately or are you given the evaluate reevaluation that you're undertaking and the one that Governor Dewine Ohio is undertaking are those being coordinated so that way these the waves of reevaluation as you put it are all being done in. Concert saved us. You know one of the things that I have found incredibly helpful in these unprecedented times is that I've got group of governors with whom I can share information and data and our thoughts and learn from and I think it's made all of our determinations better the fact that we've got an open dialogue and it's open with Democrats and Republicans. I think that's really important when I pulled kids out of schools here in Michigan as one of the first states to do that and immediately got a call for my friend. Jay Pritzker governor of Illinois. Same tell me. Your thought process did you. What are your experts telling you because they were contemplating it but I had made the decision and they wanted to understand you know weeks later. Maybe a week later when he decided to close bars in Illinois and Mike Dewine closed bars in Ohio and they made the restaurants dine out. Only I got on the phone with both of eminent said. Tell me your thought process. Tell me what you're seeing so I think that the sharing of information has been incredibly helpful. There are many people who can understand all the pressures that we are under but we certainly can understand it from one another and in the global pandemic were all in the in the same situation and we've got similar economies and so I think that's important. That's what really drove Reaching out and trying to get everyone to join this kind of Compact that doesn't mean that when I make a decision in Michigan Kentucky Ohio Indiana Minnesota Wisconsin Illinois. We're going to make the same exact decision at the same cadence but what it does mean is that we are having those robust conversations. I am organizing it. So we're getting on the phone regularly and our teams are as well so that our sharing at we are learning from one another and it makes all of our decisions that are informed and I think better decisions you you created the Michigan Corona virus taskforce on racial disparities and it's dedicated to the memory of Schuyler. Herbert who had five years old is the youngest person to dive the corona virus in in Michigan. It's the Task Force is headed up by your Lieutenant Governor. Why is this task force important sort of a leading question? But I'll have you hold forth. Well you know So you know governor Garland Gilchrist as the chair of this task force and one of the things that I'm really proud that we did in Michigan. We were one of the first states to do it. And frankly not Everyone has followed suit and I'm hopeful that eventually we'll have every state following suit but we've been releasing racial data on our current virus cases now even when it's not completely full because we do have a lot of Tests that were conducted on. The race was not noted early on in the process by gathering. This data has really put a spotlight. On the fact that we've got a disparate health outcomes and anyone who studied it anyone who's been paying attention isn't surprised by that but I think I think the surprise is that is so desperate that fourteen percent of the Michigan population is African American and yet forty percent of the deaths from Kobe. Nineteen are African American. And I think that that's something that we absolutely have to in this crisis. Learn the lesson and make them. Societal changes to improve outcomes and to have real equity meister. I gave a few months ago. It feels like a lifetime ago. Now highlighted. Is that a good part of my save. The state addressing the dispirit outcomes for women of Color and babies of color is three times more dangerous Three times more deadly for a woman of color to have a baby in Michigan than it is for women. And there's implicit bias. There there are a lot of contributing factors. I think it's incumbent on every leader. Everyone who has a position of authority to understand that? That's an issue that there's a problem and we've got to fix it and I think this is held a mirror up to our country and really magnified The the historic racial discrepancies. That we have in our society and fix them

Michigan Governor Whitman Governor Gretchen Fox News Illinois Governor Dewine Ohio Governor Whitmer Jonathan Cape Heart President Trump Lori Chicago Ohio Lightfoot Jay Pritzker Cova Mike Dewine Michigan Kentucky
"great lakes" Discussed on Natural Disasters

Natural Disasters

07:43 min | 7 months ago

"great lakes" Discussed on Natural Disasters

"Snow wasn't the only lasting consequence the weather patterns in the wake of the white hurricane complicated navigation on the lakes for over a week in Detroit Michigan slightly warmer Air Behind. The storm created severe fog that settled over the city for several days on Nineteenth. Two ships collided at a major dock because of the reduced visibility news of the crash spread further traumatizing. Other freighter captains the next night. The fog was so dense that all boat traffic halted. No captain was willing to risk the safety of his ship and crew. They had seen an unprecedented level of destruction on the lakes and now lived with a new wary awe of the natural power of waves wind. Still there were schedules to keep. The Great Lakes. Shipping industry had learned a painful lesson about the dangers of inland seas. But the captain's still had to finish their final runs of the season within days. The freighter traffic resumed as captains race to deliver cargo. That had been delayed a few weeks later. Another victim of the brutal storm was found partially buried on a sandy beach. A few miles north of Muskegon Michigan. He was identified as Captain Axel Larsson. He had been aboard his barge the Plymouth. When it went down in Lake Michigan his was the last body found before winter set in and halted the search. Exact numbers were difficult to compile in nineteen thirteen as no single company or government agency kept track of the shipping losses on the Great Lakes but with the recovery of Larson's body at the end of the year the ultimate toll of the deadly storm was finally able to be calculated eventually the late carriers association a conglomerate of shipping companies and cargo purveyors released a year end report with some sobering numbers. Two hundred and fifty. Three sailors were drowned on the steel freighters that went down in the storm and this number didn't even reflect the full scale of the tragedy. It only accounted for the twelve. Large ships that had foundered other tugboats. Small sailboats and wooden steamers had been destroyed and their crews. Were gone forever. Lake Huron alone had hosted seventeen ships at the height of the storm on November ninth. Only two of them had made it back to port and both were severely damaged the rest were sunk or ground across the rest of the Great Lakes. Over seventy vessels had been caught in the water. In addition to the sunk freighters another thirty one ships. Were run aground on beaches and rocks the damage to the shipping industry including ships and cargo total nearly one hundred and twenty million dollars in today's currency the record-setting losses were largely blamed on the captain's themselves but many people looked at the weather. Bureau warnings as insufficient. It was unfair accusation for meteorologists. Like William Alexander. He had been fighting a losing battle from the start beyond the gap of twelve hours between national weather reports. The Weather Bureau simply didn't have the technology to accurately predict the storm. The white hurricane had been the result of unseen altitude cold air slamming into low pressure. Humid air over the lakes. Meteorologists had no way to predict the air currents which blew thousands of feet in the air. It wasn't until the discovery of atmospheric jet streams in the Nineteen Twenties and thirties that meteorologists thought to study these high level wind patterns but in nineteen thirteen. The process of weather prediction was still little more than calling someone to the West and asking them to look outside while the Telegraph allowed for these reports to be compiled simultaneously. The accuracy was often suspect as a result of the storm. The Weather Bureau unveiled a new level of storm. Warning called the gale warning. This new label was reserved for tempests with winds between thirty eight and fifty five miles per hour. Anything above fifty five miles per hour and the bureau issued the simple but serious storm warning. The terrible toll of the white hurricane influenced captains of even the largest steel ships to take heed of these warnings. The Weather Bureau also began to phase out its system of using flag signals to communicate over the following years. They transitioned to direct radio transmissions. These became the standard for disseminating weather reports. As the decades wore on radio technology greatly expanded. And the shortwave. Marine radio was soon common on all ships. This allowed them to not only receive whether bureau reports but also transmit up to the minute information on wave and wind conditions and provide warnings to other nearby vessels vessel safety technology also developed including more efficient life jackets and survival suits. Sailors were safer in emergencies. And during the day to day work above deck but there was no taming nature's fury storms continue to wreak havoc on the Great Lakes. The tugboats sport sank in a storm. Only a few years after carrying the diver to identify the Charles s price and over fifty years later nature still had power. Over even the most modern technological advancements in nineteen seventy five the most notorious sinking in great lakes folklore occurred the or carrier Edmund Fitzgerald disappeared with all hands on November tenth. It was exactly sixty two years to the day after the white hurricane struck. The huge freighter was making its way across. Lake Superior in the midst of another November gale. When the ship broke in half it sank so quickly that not a single radio message could be sent before the crew was overwhelmed except for this infamous reminder in nineteen seventy five the powerful storm of nineteen thirteen was largely forgotten over the twentieth century. Then in two thousand thirteen the huge wreck of the or freighter Henry. B Smith was discovered on the bottom of Lake Michigan. A book about the expedition soon followed and once again. The public was enamored with the century-old storm the story's of huge ships being overcome by the power of the lakes made for captivating entertainment today. The Great Lakes continue to be a primary inland waterway for North America. Freighters still churned through the waves on the same routes. They did over one hundred years ago and nearly all of their captains no the legend of the nineteen thirteen storm. They keep a sharp eye on the western sky for the approach of the next white hurricane..

Great Lakes Weather Bureau Lake Michigan Michigan Nineteen Twenties Captain Axel Larsson Lake Huron Detroit Snow Muskegon Lake Superior North America Plymouth gale William Alexander Larson B Smith Edmund Fitzgerald
"great lakes" Discussed on Natural Disasters

Natural Disasters

06:16 min | 7 months ago

"great lakes" Discussed on Natural Disasters

"William Baker. A professional diver from Detroit arrived on Friday. The fourteenth by then Lake Huron was calmer and he was ready to go immediately. He boarded a tugboat called sport. For the overnight journey onto the lake by six. Am on the fifteenth. They were anchored alongside the bobbing Steele Hall. Baker dawned his enormous rubber suit and bronze helmet. The huge clunky outfit represented cutting edge diving. Technology in nineteen thirteen to crew members had to help him lumber over the side. Drop into the water. All while keeping his airline and safety tether clear of any obstacles with a calm breath baker disappeared beneath the waves. The normally clear light blue water was still gray and muddy the ferocious storm. And it's thirty five foot. Waves had churned up sediment that obscured the water for weeks as he submerged. Underwater Baker was mostly blind. He said I felt her sides. All the way down for twenty feet then I lost it but I kept going down expecting to run into it when I discovered I was too far down. I started to come back up until I ran into the pipe rail there was around railing and I went until I found her name. I stopped took my time. I read the name twice. And then once more to be absolutely sure the name was painted in black on white bulwarks it Charles s price the five hundred twenty four foot or freighter had departed ash to Beulah Ohio on November eighth and capsized sometime during the height of the storm on the tenth as soon as the news spread that it was the price. Former assistant engineer Milton Smith came forward. He hit abandoned the ship in Asheville Beulah after he had a premonition of impending disaster now he was volunteering to help. Identify THE BODIES. That had washed ashore. It was a gruesome task. Milton was saddened to see his old crew. Mates waterlogged corpses laid out in the morgue. He remembered how certain captain black had been that. The last trip of the season would be a success. Now the captain and his crew were all dead. One of the bodies belong to Herbert Jones. The steward and Cook of the Price Jones was still clad in an apron. Not a life jacket looking at his old shipmates body. Milton said there Jones was just as he looked when he was about to prepare a meal which shows just how quickly the boat must have gone down. This conclusion was typical for most of the ships lost in the white hurricane. The storm had whipped the lakes into a frenzy of deadly waves. That overcame them with very little warning. The massive forces broke steel hulls wide open shattered wheel houses and drenched boilers before sending the ships to watery graves a few days after the identification. The price joined the others and sank to the bottom of lake. Huron still there was a glimmer of hope that some ships listed as missing or sunk would still turn up after all the Elsie. Waldo had been reported as sunk but the crew was found alive two days after the storm had broken. Their ship into this hope was not unreasonable. It was rather common in the early twentieth century for a Great Lakes ship to be reported lost before a few days later in different harbor or with mechanical issues most ships in nineteen thirteen. Didn't have a radio aboard. And those that did often too far out to transmit a signal to shore however by the end of that fatal week in November the shipping companies had given up hope that their ships would be found intact and the families of missing sailors were forced to accept that their bodies with never be recovered. The white hurricane finally dissipated over northeastern Canada. On the weekend of November fifteenth the Great Lakes region had been through the worst storm in its history. Now it was time to clean up and rebuild. We'll hear about the enduring legacy of the nineteen thirteen storm right after this now back to the story throughout the rest of November nineteen thirteen the shores of the Great Lakes were strewn with debris and bodies from the freighters that had been caught in the white hurricane shipwrecks were piled up on rocks off shore or run aground on desolate stretches of beach. Evidence of the catastrophe was turning up for weeks afterwards. Meanwhile cities across the region were digging out from under massive snowfall and repairing the damage from the vicious winds in Chicago. At the southern end of Lake Michigan the water cribs had been damaged by the enormous waves. The CRIBS were water. Pumping stations a mile offshore. That provided most of the city's drinking water. Each one had a bunk house for the maintenance crews stationed there and they were forced to replace all the furniture and supplies after a rogue wave the windows in Cleveland several hundred miles southeast on Lake Erie towering snowdrifts had blocked the railroad tracks a train coming in from Chardon Ohio was snowbound by drifts over eight feet. High more than three hundred. People were trapped on the train for over thirty hours until rescuers could dig a trail to the passenger cars..

William Baker Milton Smith Great Lakes Herbert Jones Lake Huron hurricane Detroit Lake Michigan Steele Hall Lake Erie assistant engineer lake Ohio Asheville Chicago Canada Cleveland Waldo Chardon Ohio
"great lakes" Discussed on Natural Disasters

Natural Disasters

03:19 min | 7 months ago

"great lakes" Discussed on Natural Disasters

"By Tuesday morning November eleventh. The storm had petered out over eastern Quebec. It had been two days since the blizzard hit Cleveland but there was still eighteen inches of snow on the ground enough to cancel a lecture at First Baptist Church. The lecture was to be on the general topic of regional weather patterns and the speaker was none other than William Alexander. The city's Weather Bureau chief William didn't mind the cancellation of his speech. One bit he was far too busy tracking the storm damage across the region. His instruments recorded twenty one point two inches of snowfall in the city of full eight inches more than the longest standing record. In that morning's newspaper William had been quoted saying take it. All the depth of the snowfall tremendous wind the amount of damage done and the total unpreparedness of the people. I think it is safe to say that presents storm is the worst experience in Cleveland during the whole forty three years the weather bureau has been established in the city. The storm had impeded at least one other famous lecturer scheduled to Helen. Keller the blind and deaf but outspoken advocate for disability rights. Had Been Cleveland on a speaking engagement and been trapped overnight. She later said I knew it was storming. Before I was told the rooms the corridors everywhere vibrates with the power of the storm outside Cleveland's urban infrastructure was desperately unprepared for such a heavy snowfall. Emergency services resorted to using horse-drawn carts to reach victims when they're gasoline engine ambulances became mired in the slushy snow firefighters carried equipment by hand or on horseback to the small fires that broke out during the storm. While Cleveland was digging out from under the snow the Great Lakes Shipping Community was taking stock of the enormous toll. The white hurricane had taken on their freighters and cruise fifteen steel. Ho Freighters had been sunk or run. Aground countless smaller wooden steamers and sailboats had been reduced driftwood and almost all of these vessels were missing crew members. The death toll was still being calculated at the end of the day on the eleventh four days after the storm I hit bodies were washing up. But at least one hundred and seventy eight sailors. Were still unaccounted for the single day. Losses to commercial shipping would remain unmatched until the Nazi submarine attacks of world. War Two. There was an ugly footnote to this sudden appearance of corpses along the Lakeshore Policing. The thousands of miles of shore was impossible. Looters would comb the rocks for cargo and bodies taking belongings from the dead. With little regard for respect or ownership..

Cleveland William Alexander Weather Bureau First Baptist Church Quebec Lakeshore Policing Great Lakes Shipping Community hurricane lecturer Keller
"great lakes" Discussed on Natural Disasters

Natural Disasters

02:18 min | 7 months ago

"great lakes" Discussed on Natural Disasters

"We'll hear about the gruesome discoveries along the lakeshore right after this podcast listeners. We realized that there are a lot of par- Castro's to choose from each day. Sometimes not enough time to sort through them all but in our new feed podcast daily. We filter through your favorite podcast series to highlight the most timely and relevant episode premiering. Each day every Monday through Friday. Discover new and captivating episode curated specifically for you. That's one new episode from our slate of content handpicked with you in mind. Time is precious. And we've got you covered follow Parkas daily free on spotify or wherever you get your podcast. You can check out more cash shows and a full library of episodes in spotify by searching for podcast in the spotify search bar or by going to spotify dot com slash. Podcast now back to the story on Monday November tenth nineteen thirteen. The storm known as the white hurricane had left a stunning trail of destruction across the Great Lakes region and dumped a record setting twenty one inches of snow on Cleveland. Ohio after two days the blizzard was weakening on its way into Quebec but the snow was still falling in Cleveland. An additional seventeen inches fell that afternoon snowdrifts reached heights of six feet long. The city boulevards and electric lines toppled under the weight of ice and snow. As the power lines fell like dominoes. Streetcars suddenly lost power and grind to a halt without power. The cars were stuck the hulks of stranded tram-cars lay dormant on streets all across the city. Any tramlines that luckily maintained power still had to contend with the enormous snowdrifts blocking the tracks. Pedestrians caught outside in the blizzard leaned into the wind as they tried their best to reach shelter. Many people who were stranded across town from their homes had no choice but to hold up and wait for the storm to pass.

spotify Cleveland Castro hurricane Great Lakes Ohio Quebec
"great lakes" Discussed on Natural Disasters

Natural Disasters

06:07 min | 7 months ago

"great lakes" Discussed on Natural Disasters

"On the shore of Lake. Erie a hundred miles to the south Cleveland's forty-one-year-old Weather Bureau chief. William Alexander was startled when he took his customary measurements at eight PM. The fast moving cyclone had been fed by the low pressure. Air For the last few hours in the storm had changed dramatically since his last report. The Weather Bureau station only made reports at eight. Am and eight PM. So any developments in twelve hours between readings would be missed by the meteorologists. This gave the storm the entirety of Sunday afternoon and evening to build up hurricane-force winds without anyone noticing now as he sent his APM measurements to Washington for the national weather map. William knew it was too late to warn anyone about the impending disaster storm was coming on too fast by the time has forecast sent out the white hurricane would already be upon them. He shuddered to think about the freighters trapped on the water. He knew many of them would be at the bottom of the lake by the time the next weather report came out tomorrow morning out on Lake. Huron Captain Hagen of the ore carrier. Howard Hanna Junior looked out over his ship from the PILOTHOUSE. He couldn't even see the back of the ship through the blowing snow. He had never seen conditions. This bad hagan turned his attention back to the lake for a moment. Keeping an eye out for the Port Austin Lighthouse at the entrance of Saginaw Bay by his calculations the Hanno was still fifteen miles offshore too far to see the beacon even in clear weather but he was concerned about the strong winds. The ship could be blown off course without warning. Hagan turned to the first mate at the wheel and told him to maintain their course then through the blowing snow he noticed chief engineer Charles. Mayberry creeping along the pitching deck towards the PILOTHOUSE. Mayberry was wearing a safety harness that resembled a parachute clipped onto a long steel cable. Called a Jack. Line that ran the length of the ship. Even with this safety tether he was still washed off his feet several times by the huge waves breaking over the ship mayberry abandoned his attempt to reach the pilot house and turned back to the engine room at the stern moments later. A seventy mile per hour gust of wind twisted the Hannah into a trough between the waves. This was the most dangerous position for a ship during a storm may berry would later say after she got into the trough. The Hannah commenced to roll tumble the mountainous seas smashed over her. The propeller was out of the water and it was impossible for us to bring the ship back to head into the sea. We lay in the trough rolling heavily ship caught. Broadside between waves was at risk of capsizing. If they couldn't turn the Hannah back into the waves they would have no steering control then. Captain Hagan glimpsed a flash of light slicing through the whirling ice and snow. His stomach dropped. It was the lighthouse. It was only a few hundred yards off their bow. The ship was fifteen miles off course and in danger of smashing onto the rocks. Higgin ordered the first mate to drop both of the Bowie anchors to slow their approach. The giants steel chains rattled off the bow and splashed into the turbulent water. But it wasn't enough. A sudden grinding scrape from deep under the deck directly. Along the ship's hull signaled the impending destruction of the Hanna Captain Hagans said she drifted broadside into the reef at ten PM. The portside fetched up on the rocks. I in the seas and wind pounded her the rest of the way onto the reef. The Hannah had run aground less than five hundred feet from the Port Austin Lighthouse. To make matters worse the men were divided between the bow and stern. They had no way to know if their crewmates in the other section were still alive. An enormous wave tore the smokestack off the ship and ripped it away into the lake. The crew watched helpless and terrified large swaths of the pilothouse and engine room. Roofs were torn up by the howling wind. As the steel weakened under the constant onslaught of the waves a giant crack formed amidships. The Hannah was slowly splitting in half but so far the Hannah had been relatively lucky between six PM and ten PM on Sunday. November ninth. Eight other ships vanished on lake. Huron waves had rolled over them with a force of about two thousand pounds per square foot twisting the long holes of freighters and popping the giant rivets between the steel plates. The tiny explosions of steel sounded like gunshots. Winds gusted to over ninety miles per hour blasting snow and spray the turn two layers of ice along the windows and walls. This added thousands of pounds to the ships making them dangerously. Top-heavy many vessels went down so fast that the whole crew was entombed in the whole one of these was a massive bulk freighter Charles s price. Who's assistant engineer? Had left the ship before its final voyage now. It was apparent that decision had saved his life on another ship. The Regina only a handful of crew members had time to put on their life jackets. Their buoyant corpses were the only clues to the disappearance of their vessel.

Hannah Captain Hagan Mayberry Port Austin Lighthouse Lake PILOTHOUSE William Alexander Weather Bureau Hanna Captain Hagans Captain Hagen Erie Cleveland Howard Hanna Junior Washington Saginaw Bay assistant engineer chief engineer Higgin
"great lakes" Discussed on Natural Disasters

Natural Disasters

04:00 min | 7 months ago

"great lakes" Discussed on Natural Disasters

"The the first rain hit Cleveland Ohio. A little after four. A M on Sunday November Ninth Nineteen Thirteen. The temperatures drop to near freezing in by ten. Am A wet slushy. Snow was falling over the city. The city's inhabitants were unimpressed. By the so-called white hurricane that had wreaked havoc over the western Great Lakes for the past two days but then the blizzard arrived. Tiny icicles formed in the beard of seventy eight year. Old William Lambert homeless confederate veteran. As he huffed his way through the driving wind and snow he was living in an alley along. Eagle AVENUE IN DOWNTOWN CLEVELAND. He had a small makeshift hut. Long dirty brick wall and a shepherd dog that kept him company. The allie was a well known area for vagrants and Homeless Men Lambert and his brethren were accustomed to insults from the Cleveland socialites. Shopping along the avenue but today none of them paid attention to the so-called bums as they hurried back to their sturdy homes. Lambert was cold and exposed out on the street in the early afternoon with snow piling up outside. He crawled onto his dirty mattress and tried to get warm his faithful shepherd nestled inside to at some point in the evening. Lambert got up again. Perhaps it was to relieve himself on the stained bricks or to scrounge up some scraps from the nearby garbage bins. He pushed aside the threadbare blanket and stepped back outside into the blizzard. He never made it back inside. He collapsed into a snowdrift piled up in the alley. His shepherd dog tried to wake him up and then resorted to dragging his master's body back toward home. He only made it a few feet with a heavy body in his jaws so the dog hunker down and faithfully remained on guard as the snow continued to fall around them two days. Later William Lambert's frozen corpse was found in the alley by police. He was Cleveland's first victim in the Great Lakes storm known as the white hurricane in the next forty eight hours. Nearly three hundred more people would be dead. Welcome to natural disasters. Apar- cast original. I'm your host Kate and I'm Tim every Thursday. We'll explore the moments in history when the natural world turn deadly. You can find all episodes of natural disasters and all other podcast originals for free on spotify or wherever you listen to podcasts to stream natural disasters for free on spotify. Just open the APP and type natural disasters in the search bar at podcast. We are grateful for you our listeners. You allow us to do what we love. Let us know how we're doing reach out on facebook and Instagram podcast and twitter at podcast network? This is our final episode on the Great Lakes Storm of nineteen thirteen of fatal inland cyclone. That slammed into the region on November seventh. The legendary storm was national news eventually becoming known as the white hurricane last week we heard about the approach of the storm over. Lake Superior and how it wrought havoc in Duluth Minnesota before moving onto Lake Michigan. This week will follow the surviving crews from ships in the path of the storm. We'll also hear about the blizzard that shut down the city of Cleveland and the storms lasting effects on the region.

William Lambert CLEVELAND Great Lakes Storm Great Lakes Ohio Lake Superior spotify Lake Michigan Duluth Minnesota Apar facebook Kate Instagram
"great lakes" Discussed on Natural Disasters

Natural Disasters

02:42 min | 7 months ago

"great lakes" Discussed on Natural Disasters

"The immense size and unbroken length of Lake Superior allows much bigger wind driven waves to form than would be expected on most lakes over the three hundred fifty miles of open water. The wind can build waves thirty feet. High much of the lakeshore is vertical jagged cliffs that reflect the wave energy back into the lake instead of breaking it on a gentle beach when a thirty foot wave hits a cliff and is reflected back into the lake. Enough energy is stored in the huge column of water to create another twenty foot wave if this reflected outgoing wave energy is synchronized with the wave coming in from the lake. The two can combine to form a rogue wave over fifty feet high due to the physics of wave mechanics. These waves often form in sets of three sailors on the Great Lakes. Call this trio of waves. The three sisters many captains believed the sisters can be three times the size of the waves around them and the third sister in line is by far the largest the sound captain. Huddleston heard with the sinister crest of the third sister. This giant wave was likely over fifty feet high. It appeared out of the blinding snow and slammed into the ship's pilot house the icy windows shattered and the walls cracked and buckled freezing water poured in and washed. Helmsmen Foley out of the broken doorway. He disappeared into the blowing snow on deck. I Made Kiefer dove after his crewmate desperately reaching through the snow to find a hand foot a clump of fabric anything to stop fully from falling overboard instead. The helmsmen fell onto the icy steel deck. Keefer found him injured and shivering. He brought fully back inside the confines of the shattered pilothouse but as the waves crashed over the bow there was little difference between inside and outside. Keefer rushed to the helm and try to turn into the waves to steady the ship. Meanwhile Captain Douglaston gave him orders to make for the shore. The only goal now was to save the ship taking shelter on the far side of the peninsula's windbreak then Keefer felt a snap. He spun the wheel but nothing happened. The ceaseless pounding of the waves had finally broken. The Wall does rudder. They had lost all ability to steer. The Waldo was now completely adrift in the Worst Storm. Great Lakes history..

Keefer Helmsmen Foley Lake Superior Great Lakes Captain Douglaston Huddleston Waldo Kiefer
"great lakes" Discussed on Natural Disasters

Natural Disasters

02:15 min | 7 months ago

"great lakes" Discussed on Natural Disasters

"This process is what William. Alexander was able to see from Lake Erie with his regional network of observer reports and what Captain Dudleston was witnessing firsthand on the deck of the Elsie Waldo on Lake Superior. Then at five PM on November sixth a blast of cold wind came pouring out of the atmosphere above Duluth Minnesota at over sixty miles per hour. The city was built below a ridge of bluffs overlooking the wide protected harbor below the gale blew down the hillside into the streets and blasted away fences storefront signs billboards and trash a newsstand tipped over entirely scattering hundreds of newspapers across a main thoroughfare up. The street from the destroyed newsstand the front window of a Chinese restaurant shattered into the dining room as terrified diners. Scattered at the waterfront an iron steam boilers shook on its foundations at the C. Rice coal companies number. Three doc it's door cracked open and spilled hot coals across the timber doc planks. The wind quickly fanned the embers into flames until the whole dock was ablaze a few miles across the harbor. The gale force blast tore three coal loading cranes out of their docks. The terrible winds were clocked at sixty eight miles per hour. As they hurtled across Lake Superior by the time the storm reached the Elsie Waldo one hundred fifty miles out in the middle of the lake. It turned into a blizzard. The driving snow swirled around. The Wall does pilothouse as it headed around. The Upper Peninsula Michigan the first mate. A man named Kiefer was at the wheel with captain. Douglaston around midnight. The rest of the crew was in the rear section of the ship. Either Asleep or finishing dinner. The visibility dropped to less than a quarter mile as blizzard settled around the ship. Captain Dudleston and Keefer would have to navigate the peninsula almost blind..

Elsie Waldo Lake Superior Captain Dudleston Lake Erie Upper Peninsula Michigan Minnesota Alexander C. Rice Kiefer Keefer
"great lakes" Discussed on Science Friday

Science Friday

11:34 min | 8 months ago

"great lakes" Discussed on Science Friday

"Africa right around the evil epidemic and they were doing the same thing. They had body temperatures in the airport and actually came down with malaria. When I was in Zambia and I had to fly back to South Africa so my friends and I put cooling blankets all over me to lower my body temperature right before I went in through the scanner to make sure that my fever was low enough that I could fly so if I was able to do that during the epidemic? What's to say that people can't do that now that you have the illness and they're trying to come back to the United States and they're just cooling their body temperature down and then fly? Why do you have a response? Well first of all. I'm sorry that you were traveling with malaria I that's a really good point. And part of it is that we know travel screening and airport screening is imperfect it's not designed to be a catchall especially during respiratory viruses in which we're in. We're GONNA heavy flu season but it's just one stopgap we we can use but also an education tactic. That's the way I like to see it so even if you might be having a fever near trying to cool yourself down hopefully providing you with that information and that education education should you continue to be sick one courage you to seek care. That's what we saw in Washington. Actually were before. These airport. Screenings started to occur. The patient actually knew about the outbreak and sought Medicare knowing that they probably were exposed at some point Doctor Levin Lipkin. There was a report out this week earlier. There was speculation suggesting adjusting. This came from a snake but that was cooked quickly debunked by other scientists hopping on social media trying to stamp out that speculation and one of the reasons the point that bring it up one of the reasons they could debunk. That is because there's already so much genetic data available about this particular outbreak. Why is that? And how helpful is that so before getting into that. I just want to add one more thing. With respect to the airport screening people can be infected and not yet Feb brial and there have been people become very sick without developing a fever. So it as we've said this is not as useful. Perhaps perhaps as identifying yourself as having been through region where there might have been infection and being you know being forthright about the fact that if you develop symptoms we need to get evaluated now the point of the snake this assassinating when those first came out Not so much because it was wrong and those of us who knew a lot about these viruses recognize it as such but because the community policed it so well immediately went back and said you know this thing is ninety six six percent identical to other viruses that have been identified in Bats. And it's highly unlikely that this is something that represented a virus that came out of a snake Though it made for very very good story and there are lots of interesting figures in that paper of you. Want to look at it but it illustrates the point that today with social media and rapid sequencing we can learn so much so quickly in two thousand three. The genome of SARS Corona Vars took a team of people working around the o'clock for over a week with modern sequencing methods. We can generate these sort of data and a matter of hours so it's social media. DNA also improvements and technology that allows us to get a handle on this so quickly so how far away then last both both of you let me start with with you Dr Doctor. How far away if you know so much about the genetics is a vaccine for this I am not a virologist so I applaud those that are working on and I would imagine a couple of years to be honest with you. Can you agree. I think it's a much shorter timeframe I mean to make first of all to make a vaccine Against this virus is not going to be that difficult We know the protein that's likely to be implicated located and attaching to cells and getting into them the challenges always with the development the manufacturer and the distribution because this requires different levels of testing safety as well as efficacy. And that's what takes time. It wouldn't surprise me if we didn't have a vaccine candid ended it. You know in a matter of weeks but it may take as much as a year to roll it out. It shouldn't take that long and We're continually trying to accelerate channel rate that process. It's going to the phones. Get a call before we go to more questions Suzanne and in Dolores Colorado did I get that right Suzanne. Yes you did thank you go ahead High in two thousand Seventeen in Wuhan China a biosafety level. Four lab was opened to study New Pathogenic viruses And SARS was one of them. There's an article in the in the To February seventeen issue of Nature Journal about this biosafety level four lab in China and it expresses concerns about China's ability to contain. Excuse me the pathogens at the gym in this lab Can any of your experts weigh in on this. I'd be happy to take that. I refuse So I've been to Wuhan John and I know the investigators work In that laboratory and they are. They're careful investigators. I they're world class and and I'm not concerned about an infraction. That would lead to release more likely in my view is that there were wild. The animals in this market and Wuhan not snakes but small mammals bats the transmitted this virus to people who went into this market and then ultimately at least shifted to a human to human transmission. We run into this This concern and I understand it Because it seems like you might be concentrating. Intrigue Risk but in fact scientists who work in this area here on our inevitably very very cautious and very very concerned me breaking because I have to give a station break Meyer Plato this his science Friday from WNYC studios. And and I want to go to one last question before I run out of time for for a SASKIA You wrote about how the US just cut funding for the type of hospitals that deal with disease outbreaks of this nature corona virus. Ebola stuff like that. Tell us what's going on here. Well we after right about two thousand fifteen right after during I should say the outbreak there was a a tiered hospital approach to dealing with special pathogens now. This new corona virus has not been classified as that so it is important to say that but something like Ebola that really requires enhanced healthcare care measures and that we're just not prepared for so we developed four tiers and that includes frontline hospitals which are the most or the majority. I should say assessment hospitals Treatment centers and regional treatment centers and unfortunately the funding for everything but those regional treatment centers. And there's only about ten is set to expire so the concern. Is that in the face of a new outbreak. It's always a good reminder of how prepared are we how well are we supporting our preparedness efforts especially in the front lines and healthcare and with this kind of funding set to expire. It's very concerning. Because it doesn't necessarily encourage hospitals to maintain that increased level of readiness that we know is expensive. And and you know if it's not very common event there's just not a lot of incentive there and where did that funding come from it was through the health and human services the the healthcare on emergency preparedness Funding so they did specially below funding just for this. And so it's it's going to expire in a few weeks. I yes I believe. In March and April. It's set to expire to look into. You share her concern. I do funding for research in public. DOC health preparedness is down in some ways. We're a victim of our own success. If we do our jobs well people people like ours. So but deep but emerging infectious diseases. Unfortunately here to stay so it's a marathon not a sprint and so we need a larger longer range picture of this then is what you're saying. Yes we need sustainable and Dr Board. Yeah Dr Pesky. What would you suggest happen? I I would love to really focus. Not just on the top tier which will likely to continue funding but also the frontline hospitals because when people get sick whether it's from emerging infectious disease or anything else they're going to go to a healthcare facility and unfortunately there's just not the resources and attention to infectious disease and bio-preparedness. So I I would love more attention to that and more of that public private partnership unfortunately it takes a disease outbreak. Like this to get that attention right and then it goes away as you were saying. I want to thank both of you for taking time to be with us today and have a good weekend. In Lipkin Director of the Center for infection and immunity at Columbia here in New York and John Snow Professor Presser of epidemiology and Susica Pascu senior infection protection epidemiology prevention epidemiologist at honor health in Phoenix and an infectious just disease writer and researcher. We're going to take a break and when we come back we're going to talk about. The Great Lakes. Are Book Clubs Subject the Great Lakes the largest. So did you know the largest source of surface freshwater on the planet right here in your backyard. So what happens when you can't drink it of water will phrase about water water everywhere and not a drop to drink. We'll talk about it after the break so stay with us. This is science Friday. I'm IRA PLATO PLATO. We're going to venture now back to the Great Lakes where twenty percent of the surface fresh water on the planet and in one lake alone. Ten percent of that water is in Lake Superior alone and the sci-fi book club is reading all about the lakes this month looking at Dan Egan's book the death and life of the Great Lakes. But clubs are Krissy. Taylor is back to take us on a tour of what it's like to depend on the lake for your drinking water. Welcome back wisconsinite Christie. It never going to get past that well like you said. The Great Lakes have a lot of water in them. Quadrille liens gallons. I don't even know how many billions that is a freshwater which is why do you can drink shower. Cook your food with. Except sometimes you can't. The people of Flint Michigan are still recovering from a series of choices by their city leaders that lead to it dangerous levels of lead in their drinking water. Five years ago and Lake Erie now regularly has blooms of algae that produce toxins. You can't even boil out of your water and you shouldn't even touch it much much less. Drink it that's what happened in the city of Toledo Ohio in the summer of two thousand fourteen a report last year from the natural resources. Defense Council points out that the undrinkable water drinking water problem is a problem all over the country but especially if you live in an area with more poor people people of Color and Non English speakers and this isn't always in cities. Take this the story from listener. Kristy in Indiana who submitted this story on the Science Friday. Vox Pop up. We live in the country so we get our water from a well. There have been times when it has not been safe to drink from our well because we periodically get flooded by the Ohio River which means are well is underwater after after that happens we are required to put bleach in the well and then run and bleach out to sanitize the well..

Great Lakes fever United States malaria Africa Zambia China Doctor Levin Lipkin SARS Lake Erie Washington Wuhan China Suzanne Nature Journal Wuhan John Wuhan South Africa Ohio River
"great lakes" Discussed on Science Friday

Science Friday

07:21 min | 9 months ago

"great lakes" Discussed on Science Friday

"I should I should clarify like coho and Chinook Salmon And One guy basically got to decide that instead of restoring lake trout we were GONNA put Salmon in the lakes Peter. How did that happen? Yeah well they win. The lampre Lampre came in and knocked out the top predators. Donna said to lake trout. That through the lake's ecosystem in food web completely out of balance so then we had another other non native species crayfish the alewife that exploded and the populations were dying off and washing up on beaches and the Great Lakes and they they were bulldozing. These stinky piles off at the beaches in the nineteen sixties and. He's really turned people away from the lake so there was somewhat of Food Web have emergency and So you had people in Michigan pumping these Pacific Salmon which are eating machine especially their Chinook Or the Kings says they're known in Alaska into the lakes to beat back this alewife population and so now we have sort of native species Predator prey relationship Asian ship in the fishery competing with the non native species Predator prey relationship in the lakes and the people and the Great Lakes region who grown up catching his Pacific salmon who who think they are actually a native species in the Great Lakes. And obviously they're not Donna. You mentioned the Zepa Quad Muscles and they play a role in the algae blooms. Blooms that we're seeing in Lake Erie in that correct. Yeah they have a lot of impacts on the lakes and one of them That has been linked is through the increase in Harmful Algal blooms. And there's a lot of different mechanisms going on one thing that happens in the type of algae we have the the mussels come in and they filter the water making it more clear so we have some of the algae that grows on the bottom or the benthic algae flourishing so because the lane is hitting the bottom now but then we also have the cyanobacteria or the what used to call the Blue Greens or the harmful toxin producing algae's that muscles can actually reject so they will take in the healthy the green algae that doesn't produce toxins and eat. Eat those but spit back. The the cyanobacteria that produce the toxin. So it's creating this dynamic where it's facilitating these blooms even further by multiple mechanisms uh-huh And Peter you're the author of a book called the Great Lakes Water worse which is about the worries about the water supply in the lakes. Is this just about Chemicals is this just about pollution invasive species or. Is there something else in this story. Yeah it's really the idea that you know with twenty percent of all the fresh surface surface water as we continue to enter a period of a global water crisis in some parts of the continent entering a period of severe water stress. There might be a run on Great Lakes water in a way that could harm the ecosystem of the Great Lakes rather significantly. There's been a lot of paranoia about that. In the Great Lakes region for decades and decades and so two thousand eight a Great Lakes Compact was adopted by Congress and signed by the president. Dan Creating a legal water fence around the edge of the Great Lakes watershed preventing long-range large-scale diversions out of the Great Lakes Basin descended keeping that water inside the watershed for the people in the ecosystem and the economy. That's here pretty. Bipartisan Act. Wasn't it it was was an extraordinary bipartisan. Yeah and what you see. In the Great Lakes region it's one of the last bastions of bipartisanship in the country when it comes to the environment environmental policy and It's remarkable to go to the hill and see on Great Lakes days which is in early March every year this line of Members of Congress who who come and testify on behalf of the Great Lakes to advocates who are there and it's INCR- incredibly bipartisan and really quite remarkable thing in the partner that we're in today I'm looking at the water supply. I mean one question. I have those haven't water levels been extremely only high on the lakes. The last couple of years is really a worry about the supply. Yeah we'll so first of all with the Compaq now and place. There is much less worried about a supply and that's right. Water levels vary naturally and the Great Lakes space and to a degree that is drives humans crazy but it's actually very good good For the environment to ecosystem here has thrived and evolved based on that natural variability. But it's significant the difference team say the all time high water level an all time low water level on lakes Michigan here on his more than six vertical feet. So if you if you live in a cliff that six vertical feet but if you're on a gradually we sloping shoreline. It can be a hundred yards difference between where the water was quote unquote when I was a kid and where water is today and today we are indefinitely dealing with Very significant water supply issues their stories daily about people marinas People who are living and working on the shoreline dealing with this really record breaking or near record breaking high water levels at a high water period. We were in a record occurred low water period two thousand thirteen and that's part of living with the Great Lakes but we're we're seeing is more volatility and water level changes more recently. And that's really sern. Thank you just interrupting to remind everyone. I'm Christy Taylor. This is science Friday from WNYC studios talking about the Great Lakes and the ecological changes of the last decades Donna before we go The lakes have changed so profoundly in a century of human interference errands. But you're saying that there's still a lot of positive things happening there things to look forward to why aren't the Great Lakes that Doomsday story yet. Well well I think they're in some ways getting close to doomsday in in some ways but there are other aspects that we that we've seen really improving The the the problems of the seventies Cuyahoga River catching on fire multiple times contaminate so. PCB's have gone down we've seen Improvements and PCB levels in the eggs of Herring Gulls D.. which is a breakdown product of DDT which is used on for a lot of a pesticide mosquitoes? Historically we've seen those levels go down down. Mercury is going down in the water. We've seen Bald Eagles. Peregrine Falcons ospreys having higher fledgling gear as we've seen beaver re we coming back the Detroit River. So we're seeing a lot of positives on the Great Lakes but we still have these negatives we worry about like increases of Climate Emmett change impacts continue changes with invasive species vector-borne diseases like West Nile encephalitis associated with water so am botulism in the Great Lakes so we still have a lot of things to be concerned about. And we'll talk about all of that in the coming weeks. In the meantime I have to let you go for now. Thank you so much Peter Annan director of the Mary Griggs Burke Center for Freshwater Innovation at Northland College Ashland Wisconsin and Donna cash professor of biological sciences at Wayne State University in Detroit. Thank you so much for coming in today. Great Talk So let's talk about the book club. How can people get involved in the book club shirt so first of all? It's.

Great Lakes Great Lakes Basin Great Lakes Compact lakes Peter Donna Peter Annan Michigan Salmon Congress Lake Erie lake trout Zepa Quad Muscles Food Web Pacific Salmon Compaq Cuyahoga River Detroit River Blue Greens Detroit Kings
"great lakes" Discussed on The Casagrandes Familia Sounds

The Casagrandes Familia Sounds

08:17 min | 9 months ago

"great lakes" Discussed on The Casagrandes Familia Sounds

"Nothing like sitting out on the stoop listening to the sounds of Great Lake City. Prima and coral sorry listeners me of esther I have to watch him, so he's coming along for the podcast Carl in. What is that I knew keyboard. Dj Mode with tons of noises like lasers and far. but this button is my favorite. TJ CARLEEN J Carl in La Catha Catha. Changing Carl is available for Birthdays Weddings Dhakal Tate. Hey guys. Working on the podcast you know it on your way to the hospital. You know it I'm prepping patient for a spleen removal. Morrow. What's Today's episode about J. Carl Kinloch I know it's about Great Lake City I'm taking the listeners to someone. My fever places around town. That's a great idea. Ronnie I pretty much thought of it. What are some of your favorite places? Who let me guess it's going to be a surprise. I know the Skate Park Mall. You love hotdogs. You're visiting Bruno's hotdog cart. Mom, she's good. Okay? Okay I have to get to work anyway. That spleen isn't going to remove itself. Fill gross wish. I was there luck with the podcast. We'll chat us. Ok listeners so maybe my mom was right. We are going to Bruce. hotdog cart a first have to stop by the coolest spot on the block. The. Oh. You said we were going somewhere. Cool on the and ignore ham listeners. This is my family's market on the ground floor of our apartment. Building me a low and older brother Bobby Rennet, we're are then. They asked me to watch joint about bobby getting his head stuck in a can of being. This is Mabel. She's one of the regulars here and she really loves mangoes. Ronnie you talking ghosts spill listeners. Okay then this I not want. You took my egg sandwich from purse. WON'T IT BACK NO QUESTIONS? Move I like you. You know I think they got this produce section all wrong. Be Sweet juicy mango should be up front fact. move the apples. Asthma. Let's check in with par. He's the macos delivery Guy Hey. Everyone! Actually talk a little bit closer to the phone like this like. Is this good Kiki everyone here? Me Menial that way too close. Just step back a little stay rate their check one check two. How's that perfect? So tell us about? What is that definitely drums? Maybe A to those probably don't WanNA parade. All the eggs sandwiches say stole from. Does it make sense? Let's see what it is Carl J. Worry free. Dr Everywhere. The Great Lake City Wiener Dog. Tony, little! Masters a ceremonies! Beatles ducks. Last! Car. Much better paper and we'll take two great lake city specials. Younger Easy Yami Bruno Dragon through. The guard can't means putting all the toppings on the hot dogs. Long. From Wester. You're just squirting mustard in your mouth. Like it go, kids you. How. These dogs are the best I. Wish I could send our listeners one. Maybe we can through. That in work. You relish all over. Okay Bruno. Can you tell us? Here's Dari they bananas day. It's so people. No, I've got more favorite spots to visit come on. My Buster. I never realized how noisy the city can be luckily our neighborhood here that. Gives a prisoner on. Keyboard I liked that record scratched though as I was saying. Luckily, our neighborhood has tons of awesome businesses to check out. It's our with Margarita. Salon garbage truck outside. Oh looks like it's broke down. Be. Following That I think we need to have different. We can take this. Here we go the peaceful quiet of the subway station. We can take this plane uptown to my favorite movie theater now busies actually the best place in Greek League city. That's right. You love trains. Would you like to tell the listeners about the subway? I thought you'd never ask. The subway is a public transportation system. Got Ya. Okay please continue as I was saying the subway system. On Didn't keep, that must be stuck. Turn! In. This is my actually nightmare. I know. Jack. He was my first. We Miss The stock to the movie theater reaching the downtown training cross platform. Where are the stairs to the other side? I've never been to before me neither. It's kind of creepy. I'm not scared. I didn't say you are coral. knocked. was that. Sounded like. Coming from both sides. Could. I have something to tell you. What is it coral I. I. I. Thought we turned that. Batteries vacuum. Up. The rats are frightened by your super annoying. Dj Voice. Let me see that keyboard I can clear the path. Having. It's working following. Was a close call. I know it's getting late to worship probably had back home. Is that power in the delivery van. We think so. Hey and Carl Hey. You WanNa live back to the Machado. Are. All know it looks like there's some traffic up ahead. Wiener, dog. not this again. Indoor podcast episode here. Thanks so much swore listeners for tuning in today I. Hope You had as much fun as we did and I hope you like to visit. Some of my favorite places as can tell. I just love the city their source to see and you'll never know who you're going to run into Karl. Can you place out since you've got that thing working again? You gotTa Prima. Clinton! Wasn't me?.

Ronnie TJ CARLEEN J Carl Great Lake City Bobby Rennet Bruno Great Lake City Wiener Dog Carl Hey J. Carl Kinloch La Catha Catha Carl Jack Carl J. Morrow fever Clinton Skate Park Mall Beatles Wiener Ta Prima Greek League
"great lakes" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

03:52 min | 2 years ago

"great lakes" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

"I think any discussion of the Great Lakes should also shout out Lee Murdoch the singer who wrote about or was saying the sea shanties, which my father loved, and there's also a lot of culture a lot of immigrants certainly Sheboygan Wisconsin where I grew up came. There originally on boats through the Great Lakes. My father even published a book about shipwreck Phoenix that went down in flames outside of Cheboygan in eighteen forty seven. So discussing means so much emotionally. And I guess I had your bird is my fear would be that, you know, one day the Great Lakes in addition to the threats that he mentioned the he'd been muscles such certainly off interrupt crunching on what about the water management will one day of the Great Lakes in danger of going the way of the ROTC. And it looks looks. Let's pose. Let's pose that to Dan Egan, the award lovely remembrance of that to share with us. Dan. We've got a couple minutes left. You actually have practical ways in which you think are relatively straightforward to help sustain the lakes and ensure them up in terms of their quality. Yeah. I mean, we're talking about the front door and the back door Chicago in the Saint Lawrence seaway, and we need to close those doors. It doesn't mean closing to navigation necessarily, but it means closing them as pathways for invaders to get into the lakes. You know, we've been talking about a lot of stuff that sounds grim and gloomy, but it's it's not all the lakes are still the, you know, spectacular natural resources. And there are great signs that native species are really figuring out how to live under this new regime with all these invasive species, if we can just stop the next one from coming give you real quick example. There's an invasive fish that is eating all of the not all eating eating, these Cuagone, zebra mussels. And and there's a lot of protein inside those shells that was otherwise inaccessible to the rest of the food web. So anything that can eat a goby is doing really well. And we're. Seeing native lake trout thrive to the point where they had been sustained on Lake Michigan only by hatchery for years and years. We're seeing natural reproduction whitefish are thriving on Gobi whitefish aren't Piscopo wars. Normally, they're not normally fish eating fish. But they'll eat a Gobi rather than starve and for briefly. You also said selling is practical is using trains instead of ships to to to bring some stuff in there. There are solutions, and you know, the shipping industry. I don't wanna see the ships. Go away, you know, particularly the Lakers, the ones that stay inside the lakes. They're big part of our economy, and our culture and there's room for him. But there isn't room for the next invasive species, and we need to fix that. And you right there heard the telling words of Dan Egan author death in life for the Great Lakes, Dan. So great to have you with us here in studio. Thanks for having me especial, thanks to the team right here. Wisconsin public radio and Madison all week for helping us and making this broadcast possible, including tumbling Bradley. Bryant off Aubrey Ralph in radio operations on points produced by NFL men. Brian hearts in TI Lena modest cuts Sonus Ellison poli Tanya rally. James Ross Alex Rodman marine Wasser with help from Alan Dangelo. Barclay Palmer and Lexi puree our executive producer Karen ship. And we pulled this off here in Wisconsin. I'm David Folkenflik. And this is on point. So about the time that he begins putting the duct tape on. He says this is a robbery. Last seen a new podcast from WB warr in the Boston Globe investigates, the largest unsolved art heist in history. The theft of thirteen artworks music Abella Stewart Gardner museum in Boston artwork involved was from Rembrandt Vermeer. It is to holy feel. Five hundred million will the painting. There's absolutely no question knew the police were coming the authorities. That are on this case are the wrong stories when the FBI says, we solved it, we know who did it. It's like, no, you don't because you don't have the paint. Subscribe. And listen to last seen now on apple podcasts or wherever you get your podcasts sponsored by Samuel Adams and ADD smart home.

Great Lakes Dan Egan David Folkenflik Wisconsin Gobi whitefish Phoenix ROTC Sheboygan Wisconsin Lee Murdoch Cheboygan Boston Globe Lake Michigan FBI Gobi Chicago Lakers Saint Lawrence seaway Barclay Palmer Madison apple
"great lakes" Discussed on Science for the People

Science for the People

02:03 min | 2 years ago

"great lakes" Discussed on Science for the People

"The coho salmon and then the next year they brought in should they thought the salmon would just you know make a beeline down the saint lawrence river for the ocean just they had a nose for salts or something or they die or they wouldn't be able to find the allies but you turned out it was a perfect predator prey match and the salmon just went to town on the airlines created this remarkable inland salmon fishery and again so i'm in are an anadromous theses they spend their adult life in the saltwater but they don't have to there's ample habitat is to civically food and that's been found in the great lakes so they they had an abundance of these allies to pray a pot and we created this wonderful recreational fishery that you know has been valued in the billions of dollars but that was just the story of the first wave of invasions i mentioned earlier about these salty's these overseas ships sailing up the saint lawrence seaway they they started coming in nineteen fiftynine kind of at the peak of all these early invasive species charles nobody really realized that time but he's tanks were teeming with life and so what happened in the nineteen sixties is we basically broke the top of the chain we took out the lake trout and we've we re stitched onto it grafted onto a new apex predator but what happened with these seaway invaders they attacked food chain and bottom which is a much more vulnerable place and then specifically talking there's been some i think fifty nine sixty sixty one new species discovered in the lakes attributed to balance water cincy way opens nineteen fiftynine but nothing's been as devastating as zebra in quantum muscles which are filtered feeders and you know you look at one of these things and they're the size of fingernail and you think how much damage could that do and yeah one can't really do any damage to speak of except for like you know.

saint lawrence river saint lawrence
"great lakes" Discussed on Science for the People

Science for the People

02:22 min | 2 years ago

"great lakes" Discussed on Science for the People

"When the when the atlanta came tumbling back in and you know that really kinda grabbed my imagination because i thought what would you what would civilization look like if we didn't have the mediterranean you know that's just kind of a cradle of civilization and then and then the black sea you don't has a very similar story in and in this case it was the mediterranean that came tumbling over and that was after sea levels really rose up to the last ice age so we're not talking millions of years we're talking houses of years it's relatively recent but these were both you know kinda that trump phenomenon that drove the opening of these you know very critical navigational areas that linked lake them on not only to to cities and cultures within their own basins but to the globe wolves are all and so thinking about time scale and how you know one was happening you know millions of years one was happening on a scale thousands of years and then what happened with the great lakes we're talking decades and and it wasn't nature taking its own course it was it was human grabbing nature and and steering the direction they wanted to so i just kind of noodled around with that my head a little bit and tried that out as an opening and often you're reading something you know that's substantially long you'll try many different ways to open and that was really the only one i tried because it worked for me was the idea we had these kind of in today's world you know the mediterranean filling in would be considered a natural disaster same thing with the blacks black sea and and and we we didn't wait for natural disaster we kind of just created on so that leads really well into how the great lakes do connect to the atlantic ocean so there's always been a pathway from the great lakes to the atlantic but people being people we have now made a connection go the other way and allowed things to get from the atlantic to the great lakes and that was all a manmade effort.

atlanta atlantic ocean
"great lakes" Discussed on Science for the People

Science for the People

02:02 min | 2 years ago

"great lakes" Discussed on Science for the People

"Because it was in the middle of a bunch of federal land and this was in the early nineties i've never a lot of high profile environmental issues popping up that time things like the endangered chinook and sockeye snake river sam and grizzly bear restoration wolfrestoration and so i was kind of drawn into those things just by the demands of the job and from there i moved to a newspaper over near yellowstone national park and and there's obviously lots of natural resource issues in that area and then i went down to salt lake city you know somewhat i tender into lose paper reporters are and i worked there covering a higher education and i did some environment recording but not a lot and then after about a decade being out west i took a job in my home state at the milwaukee journal sentinel and i had no job description really when i took the job other than it was called this is two thousand and two super general assignment reporter which you get to do longer feature stories on on pretty much anything that you want it was a very nice job sign but after spending the better part of or more than a decade i guess out in the desert or the high desert you come back and you look at the great lakes with a whole you know fresh set of eyes and and and the sense of appreciation so i just found myself drawn to great lakes issues and just started writing feature stories and within a year or so the the managing editor paper suggested that i just turn it into a beat and become the great lakes reporter which at the time and as far as they know now is is i think the only newspaper great lakes just pay per beep in existence so that's what got me started and you know all along i was never.

yellowstone national park milwaukee journal sentinel general assignment reporter reporter salt lake managing editor
"great lakes" Discussed on Science for the People

Science for the People

02:13 min | 2 years ago

"great lakes" Discussed on Science for the People

"The views expressed on science for the people are not necessarily the views of this station it's affiliates sponsors or advertisers not the least to which being stripping plankton from the water sucking life out of the waters just the way to put it but they also from an industrial perspective they they clog water intakes which can create huge problems for cities who rely on the great lakes for water and you know there are millions of people who rely on the great lakes for drinking water hello and welcome to science for the people i'm rochelle saunters with me as dan egan an awardwinning writer and reporter at the milwaukee journal sentinel and senior water policy fellow at the university of wisconsin milwaukee school of freshwater sciences he is a graduate of the columbia journalism school and lives in milwaukee he's also the author of the book the death and life of the great lakes which he is here today to talk to us about dan lovely to have a year on science for the people it's lovely to be so before we get into the book specifically can you tell me a little bit about what got you i interested in reporting on in writing about the great lakes sure i'm a native of wisconsin i grew up in green bay in the northern part of the state which is on a bay of lake michigan and i spent a lot of my my childhood vacation in summertime on the water i two sets of grandparents who had summer homes on the door peninsula with just like i've thought about into the cold waters of northern michigan northern michigan and so i took many fun memories of those waters in in that place with me when i graduated from college and moved out west and started working at newspapers and i didn't have any kind of brand plan to become an environment writer i started out basically covering county government at a small paper in catch him idaho onto the sun valley ski resort but a lot of the issues out there were environment relate.

rochelle saunters writer milwaukee journal sentinel columbia journalism school milwaukee wisconsin michigan dan egan reporter university of wisconsin milwau lake michigan idaho sun valley
"great lakes" Discussed on Science Friday

Science Friday

02:19 min | 2 years ago

"great lakes" Discussed on Science Friday

"Thank you for avenue you're welcome so how big is this win project so relatively small uh first thing to remember about this guy called the icebreaker project it's kicks turbines about twenty one megawatt which the developers say it's enough to power about seven thousand homes seven thousand homes and and know what kind of potential to the great lakes has a whole half for wind energy the resort researchers opt in the past several years have been looking at the great lakes potential finding out some of the best the area's uh for doing it added deterrence out there's there's a relatively good supply or or good areas uh it could be done to lake erie it's one of them uh lake michigan sort of in the middle of the lower peninsula as well as uh lake huron sort of on the thumb of of lake michigan uh they've also found some good areas up and lake superior but the some other challenges there and to in terms of water depth than just sort of the the more rugged conditions make that a little more challenging switch city how on lake erie is going to be closest to it can you have cleveland at it'll be about eight miles are so outtrim cleveland so standing on the shore you you can sort of make out and uh tell me why this is the first one wonder why is it taken so long here though the history of this a pretty interesting in in the great lakes uh for what i understand that the the first ideas a of a project outside of cleveland originated around two thousand four two thousand five by some some local groups and foundation to really saw it uh as a as an academic developments uh you know opportunity and uh some some of the challenges that but that city and and others in the midwest have had economic we it was it was seen early on as a way to uh you know sort of beal a leader on on this issue and and with this technology and then uh uh by about two thousand then eight two thousand nine was was really the height of interest you saw big m most of the states that are that are along the great lakes involved in this in some way or another uh michigan the.

wind energy lake erie cleveland midwest lake michigan lake huron michigan lake superior twenty one megawatt