35 Burst results for "Great Depression"

Stimulus And The Shopper

The Indicator from Planet Money

02:21 min | 3 weeks ago

Stimulus And The Shopper

"The coronavirus pandemic and recession and the employment crisis. That it brought did not hit everyone in the us economy equally and one of the clearest places we can see that is in the retail sector. Yeah so last year. Even as unemployment levels were the highest we'd seen since the great depression retail sales took off the hit an all time high record and that's partly because a lot of people who were able to keep their jobs but weren't necessarily able to travel or eat out or spend their money on those kinds of things started spending their money on stuff instead yes own sales spiked and also exercise equipment home office furniture electronics. Yeah outdoor furniture also. Took off and fire pits. Were selling out also food and cookware. Huge stuff for the kitchen and on a related note athletes or clothing. Saw a big bump you know people buying stretchy pants Stretch your paths more. Stretchy pants than i used to. They're comfortable they're comfortable and they accommodate all the extra food and do you know are changing. Lifestyle has changed what we bylik skin care. Products have done really well. I think because we're all steering visas on zoom all the time and it's not healthy. Oh it's not healthy and so then you end up spending like two hundred dollars on like makeup and face cream to try to like improve that experience yet. Not every retailer was flying high though it's been really lean times for some of them. A lot of small businesses closed their doors for example or just really struggled but some big businesses have also struggled j. crew neiman. Marcus guitar center. Jc penney gnc. I'm running out of breath all filed for bankruptcy and also last month. All of that spending everyone had been doing all that seemed to be kind of running out of steam retail. Sales started to dip of it now. Stimulus checks are arriving and a lot of retailers. Could see a boost. Fourteen hundred dollar stimulus checks are coming to most americans and that will put really desperately needed money into the hands of people to do things like pay rent buy food pay bills but also maybe buy some things. They've been waiting to get like for their home office for online school. Or maybe just for fun and this is a big deal because consumer spending people buying goods and services that makes up three quarters of the us economy. You might say so go shopping. So goes the

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Unpacking Inequities in Unemployment and Economic Recovery

The Brookings Cafeteria

04:37 min | Last month

Unpacking Inequities in Unemployment and Economic Recovery

"I am marcellus co bari. A senior fellow in the global economy and development program here with a sustainable development spotlight as part of the greater recovery from cove nineteen. The biden administration has an opportunity to tackle three into related challenges facing the american economy. The first one is unemployment. Even as unemployment rates have gradually fallen. Since last april the labor force was a whole has shrunk. We still have ten million fewer workers employed today than before the pandemic and because covid nineteen proportionately disrupted sectors like cleaning hospitality and food services high contact sector that also typically pay low wages. The workers most affected are more likely to be black hispanic female anion second even before the pandemic made things worse the. Us labor market was incredibly precarious. Almost half of the american workforce some fifty. Three million people were working in low wage jobs. Earning on average eighteen thousand dollars a year. These workers also see very little upward mobility looking at the transition of some twenty million workers in the lowest paid jobs. We found the low wage workers sticky for every two years or worker remains in lower work their chances of escaping get cut in half and third. The us just doesn't invest enough in infrastructure. We spent just over. Two percent of gdp on infrastructure while european country spend five percent on average in china around eight percent this lack of investment hamper productivity in long-term growth by looking at new infrastructure proposals to a workforce lands. The administration has the opportunity to address the precarious low wage labor market and speed up reemployment while providing much needed infrastructure like broadband. Roads and bridges. Should be the primary goal. We think that the jobs that go into it can make all the difference to workers hit hardest in this crisis in a new policy. Brief we provide an example. What this analysis might look like we use data from hundreds of thousands of real occupational transitions in the last twenty years to answer some questions. That may help policymakers prioritize and adapt projects to maximize their workforce in impact. I absorption how many what kind of workers will new projects employees each will require a unique occupational mix and occupations employed different kinds of workers take broadband an eighty billion dollar investment. The amount proposed in clyburn. Bill would enjoy about two hundred thousand workers over the course of a year in occupations like telecom line installers electronics engineers. Most of them eighty five percent can be sourced from currently unemployed and underemployed people from the telecom construction industries. These workers tend to be older wider in mail. So policymakers might consider a diversity inclusion strategy when hiring for infrastructure projects second. How good will be the recovery from the two thousand and eight recession left too. Many workers behind the quality of jobs created and who has access to them matters if we want to make sure the recovery for the economy also means recovery workers given the urgency to accelerate. Reemployment policymakers may favor investments that create jobs with low natural barriers to entry and that provide living wage basic labor protections instability here infrastructure. Jobs to well. They generally pay more than the national medium offer opportunities for upward mobility and are accessible to workers without a college degree. Third what specific reskilling may be required if we assume that the two hundred thousand jobs in broadband are created in year. One we find there are not currently enough unemployed and underemployed workers to fill about fifteen percent of the jobs created. The potential shortages aren't highly technical jobs specialized telecom industry. These jobs pay well and many workers would benefit from the opportunity to learn the skills needed to fill up. This type of analysis can help maximize the long term impact of these investments on the workforce and informed local reskilling efforts. They can help follows. He makers prioritize projects that can absorb locally displaced workers plugging abandoned oils for instance not only can reduce harmful methane emissions but maybe helpful to workers in places like pennsylvania transitioning from fossil fuels. There are precedents for programs like this. During the great depression federally funded infrastructure investments amounted to six point seven percent of gdp at speak it provided paid work for up to forty percent of unemployed americans equivalent to about four million jobs today. So what we're thinking about the great new bridges and broadband will end up with. We also need to be considering the people who build them and how. This is a massive opportunity to really break ground on both our economic recovery and to reconcile with labor markets card by equity and lack of opportunity.

Marcellus Co Bari Biden Administration Clyburn United States China Bill Pennsylvania Depression
Casting the net wider: remaking the welfare state

The Economist: The Intelligence

08:23 min | Last month

Casting the net wider: remaking the welfare state

"Good evening my fellow americans to light. I like to talk to you about where we are as we mark one year. She's everything stopped because of this pandemic last night. President joe biden spoke to america in primetime address from the white house for the first time since taking office he promised to direct states to make all adults eligible for covid vaccine by may and discussed the bill he had just signed into law. The american rescue plan one point nine trillion dollar stimulus program extends unemployment. Benefits it helps. Small businesses lowers healthcare premiums for many it provides. Food and nutrition keeps families in their homes. America's not the only country that's responded to the crisis with increasing generosity. I kind of went in. It was like a state of panic. That i honestly i can't tell you day-to-day thoughts were because they were just scrambled. Like what am i gonna do. What am i gonna do. How am i going to survive. How am i going to what. That's more good. Hope a fifty. Seven year old self employed chef based in canada when the pandemic swept away all of her work. She didn't expect much outside. Help after alberta's oil crash in two thousand fourteen. She received no government support and had to close her restaurant. But this time around with covid nineteen. The federal government included the self employed in. Its rescue package. I honestly i couldn't believe it. Until i saw myself until i filled out the application i pressed met and two days later. There was money in my bank account. And i was absolutely shocked across the world from america to canada to western europe. The pandemic prompted a shift in thinking about the role governments can and should play in crises. The greatest expansion of the wealth estate in living memory in this past yet social nada is our public policy editor. She's been tabulating that expansion which currently stands at nearly sixteen trillion dollars. That's more than four times. The support that countries provided during the financial crisis of two thousand and seventy thousand nine. And it's a shot departure from the pas not just in size but in shape too and because of that this could well mark the start of a new chapter for the welfare state. How do you mean how was this response. Different from what came before significantly. I think it mocked a risk shift from individuals to the state with governments essentially bailing out the people say things like schemes in britain and much of europe as well as cash gifts and in unemployment benefits in america what lawsuit of the state stepping up and taking a lot of risks that otherwise would have fallen onto households and individuals that is a sharp contrast from what we've seen over the past couple of decades when risks such as example being replaced by an algorithm or foreign worker had actually increasing been offloaded from governments and employees own individuals and you saw a lot of countries just for pragmatic reasons really move to universalism so with government prefers blanket benefits instead of fussing of eligibility. Or what's the basis of the way that it was before the pandemic the risen one model of course of welfare state but if we take as a starting point side of a social contract where there is a certain amount of poverty relief and social security that is supplied by the state to go back to suit of the early twentieth century. So the great depression in america really triggered the idea of we need some social security and in europe of course in the second world war was reading the moment when people started to realize that there were these collective big risks that they wanted to ensure against and then the big shift in both sides of the atlantic ready staw in about the seventy s and the welfare state becomes leaner and more focused on getting people into jobs and so benefit make order to get the incentives work or boosted welfare in many countries become stigmatized and at the same time. The labor market is made. More flexible has made easy to fire people. And you really see particularly from the early ninety s on more and more risk being shuffled back to individuals but even before covert hit there was talk about a need to change things right absolutely as with so many things covid nineteen has really shown quite a start light on the flaws in the traditional model and although the lessons are different for every country there are a few general ones. The welfare state on the hall was built around yesterday's worker middle skilled work who today is increasingly. Rare will become even rarer we've seen the labor market polarize over the last couple of decades in rich countries. The sheriff skilled in high-skilled workers growing whereas middle skilled and indeed middle income jobs have been falling and will continue to fall and the pandemic also related to that highlighted. How little job. And income security many of our essential workers indeed have because they fall into that low paid bracket low security bracket and then the other thing that covert has exposed is the vulnerability of work with kids of course when schools closed. There was suddenly this extra job that needed to be done. The situation has put childcare which we knew was an issue before the pandemic but it sort of forced onto the agenda and one of the encouraging things. I think that might be coming out of this. Is countries making better plans for things like child benefit. So part of the coronavirus relief plan. Joe biden will temporarily raise the child tax credit quite significantly and democrats already whispering the really like to make this change permanent. And do you think we'll see that pattern more. Broadly a will to make permanent to the kinds of changes. The governments were essentially shocked into by the pandemic. The will is that. I think it's too early to tell but the demand is clearly. Then that's an important start. Say lots of people. Such as mrs hope who we heard earlier have experienced vulnerability that can come with the show but also have seen how the state can help these moments of shock. And i think it would be very hard in a next crisis for states to roll out similar policy bazookas to help the people so i think on the demand side and again this is something we already sold before the pandemic domon strengthening for better more generous safety nets are that will only grow on the back of the pandemic experience whether the will is that is launching a political question and it's also a fiscal question but i am carefully hopeful because this past year has provided a live experiment of all sorts of policies that otherwise would have taken years to get the political backing for and so after all this experimentation. What are the lessons from the pandemic that you think should last. I think the most important goal here is just to ensure or cushion workers against certain shocks and just to make that a bit more practical and most of communists have argued that covered his shown the generosity of benefits should be pegged to the state of the economy so that when indeed were going through a mass period of shock and it's much harder to actually find a job benefits should be more generous. And when the economy's healthy again then you can make them a bit. Less generous against more flexibility in the welfare system to short revamped post covid social safety net would on the one hand provide enough flexibility to incentivize work but also have a state that wasn't afraid to step in when disaster hits and crucially estate that would also invest in human capital in childcare in health in educating the next generation as well as rescaling older workers today and that second element is important because just bringing out a huge umbrella on the stormiest days won't be

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House approves $1.9 trillion COVID relief package, sending bill to Biden

AM Tampa Bay

00:49 sec | Last month

House approves $1.9 trillion COVID relief package, sending bill to Biden

"Economic stimulus plan since the Great Depression, and now millions of Americans can expect $1400 checks. Democrats alone gave President Biden his first major legislative victory on this about the A's are 2 20. The nays are 2 11, passing the $1.9 Trillion American rescue plan we have passed. Historic, consequential and transformative legislation. House Speaker Nancy Pelosi says middle and lower income families will benefit from $1400 stimulus checks, extended unemployment insurance in child tax credits as well as money for vaccine distribution in $300 billion for state and local governments. It just throws out money without accountability. House Republican leader Kevin McCarthy she used to bill is a bailout for Blue states on Capitol Hill.

President Biden House Speaker Nancy Pelosi Nays Depression Kevin Mccarthy Capitol Hill
Biden's $1.9 trillion COVID-19 bill wins final approval in House

THE NEWS with Anthony Davis

01:58 min | Last month

Biden's $1.9 trillion COVID-19 bill wins final approval in House

"I'm anthony davis congress. Ribbon along party. Lines approved the landmark point nine trillion dollar covert nineteen relief bill on wednesday as president. Joe biden and democrats claimed a major triumph. Phone legislation marshalling. The government spending might against twin pandemic economic crises. The depended a nation. The house gave final congressional approval to the sweeping package by aena party. Line two hundred twenty two hundred and eleven vote precisely seven weeks off to biden into the white house and four days after the senate passed the bill. Republicans in both chambers oppose the legislation unanimously characterizing his bloated crammed with liberal policies and signs the crises are easing most noticeable. Too many americans provision providing up to fourteen hundred dollars in direct payments this year to most adults and extending three hundred dollar weekly. Emergency unemployment benefits into september. The legislation goes far beyond that. The measure addresses democrats campaign promises and biden's top initial priority of a one two punch that i hit the country a year ago since then many americans have been relegated to hermit like lifestyles in their homes to avoid a disease. That killed over five hundred. Twenty five thousand people about the population of wichita kansas and plunged the economy into its deepest depths since the great depression for biden and democrats. The bill is essentially a canvas on which they've painted the core beliefs. That government programs can be a benefit not a bane to millions of people. And that spending huge sums on such efforts can be a cure

Aena Party Anthony Davis Biden Joe Biden Democrats Congress White House Senate House Wichita Kansas Depression
House set to pass massive virus relief package

AP News Radio

00:48 sec | Last month

House set to pass massive virus relief package

"President Biden is on the verge of his biggest legislative win yet as the house nears passage of a massive virus relief package it's one point nine trillion dollars aimed at helping Americans get vaccinated back to school and work and get back on their feet financially the boldest action taken on behalf of the American people since the Great Depression California Democrat Pete Aguilar says it's what the nation needs right now but the plan has had zero G. O. P. support with number two house Republican Steve Scalise saying the focus should be on helping those who need it not just sending everybody a check all across America the president estimates eighty five percent of Americans will get direct payments of up to fourteen hundred dollars Sager mag ani Washington

President Biden Pete Aguilar G. O. P. Steve Scalise House California America Sager Mag Ani Washington
Boomer and the Millennial February Special - burst 01

Boomer and The Millennial

07:39 min | Last month

Boomer and the Millennial February Special - burst 01

"So we we. We need to get started before our neighbors waco away said we will be providing the soundtrack. Oh yeah for for our show they go. It's been interesting. I wonder if they're going somewhere. Probably they're young church their young and in love. You're probably going somewhere. Church may have enough. Maybe a little late for them. What better what better place to go. It is sunday. Look i'm just saying you live with with to opie we got cynicism all right exactly. I don't have a boomer. Father whatever generation you are was the one. After boomer i don't know gen-x the thing is genetic after boomer at the generation that came after them Well you know some say oh. You mean the generation after the boomers genetics boomer. Yeah nobody prehistoric. Nobody cares about that though. Talk about it being the the greatest generation ever really what happened during that generation World war two. You know they came back and what about the great depression that was probably part only front country back so we're going to corona right now dan. we're trump. Yeah so you know. I mean we go through i last we. We might be we greatest know we get out of this you know. I don't know the greatest generation given all the stuff that we've gone through at least it's still going through. that's true. welcome back as banter or done with the banter back guys. Another episode of boomer and lineal episode boomer and the millennial date do i'm ready to boomer marmande millennial and Thank you for joining us once again episode. Who knows ten me. I think it's ten or eleven can never keep up but we are coming up when anniversary. This is facts Next one because we march de during the morning dean bidding of the pandemic. Well it's a special day. Yeah it is. Valentine's day happy valentine's day thanks. Valentine's day youtube. Sorry to record valentine's day on what's going on. I just had so many plans with. Yeah yeah it's also black history month but you know you spending valentine's day with your parents so that's a good thing. Yeah i mean it's totally cool people. You love yeah. Valentine's day is not just about significant. Others you know what i mean this is. This is the first time that. I've been single on valentine's day in quite some time. Though i will say that and i just you know that's a hick so yeah you didn't know what you mean your granddaddy used to see how used to break up with his girlfriend right before christmas. Did he make up like after new years. Have the new right then. They have like this huge argument. Like the end of january beginning of february and then on the fifteenth sixteenth like. Oh hey i'm sorry. I misunderstood you on valentine's day. I think we should work this out. He's getting even have to do anything. I know it's kind of genius. Yeah that is so i. He was such a cazenove. He did have one problem though. He didn't know that he thought you call. You know when you were serious about somebody dating you know a friend. Yeah he would call him his fiancee. How do you make that how you make. That was state. There's a big worse as a big day. That's a big difference and you can imagine you know the young lady was like. Oh my goodness is got big fiance. Yeah he was like. Oh yeah i guess because he got that kind of response you know. He was like cool to christmas. Yeah right you can't be my fiance. When i thought we getting married. I guess we're gonna hit him that that's what it meant. Yeah he was like. Yeah we gotta we gotta dial that back a little bit care but anyway it's it's it's it's i don't know also saints sentence. Please please say sentence. So you modernize your mom. And i had this thing about. We would just you know if you really. If you celebrated a holiday holiday. But valentine's day on fifteenth you'd be good to go man could get flowers candy and a card for about fifteen thirteen bucks. Yeah sometimes not bad. Yeah so. I guess i'll be telling your mom have you tomorrow. Right right yeah. It's it's valentine's day somewhere in the world right exactly so you learning a lot from the boomer here. Yeah i see i mean. Apparently apparently i. Yeah so i'm single. And i have no valentine but that's okay You know life goes on. Yeah you got to do two things one. You got some very good advice okay. No good advice but in the second thing is you have a new tattoo. Yeah why did you disagree. Grace kings just love. You love vaguely talking about my life. Before i can even get to it like suppose. I didn't want to tell people oops now. It's not even that. I think yes. I did get a new tattoo. I'm a few days ago. Here's my thing though. My thing is. I don't really like i don't really like just flaunting it like i won't. I won't like post about them on social media and stuff. I have a lot of friends who do that. They'll get a new tattoo. Tattoo them and like. Oh look my tattoo that i don't post about. I'm guarantee you a lot of people. Don't even know how many i have or have seen all of them. I'm just saying. I mean it must bother you too much giving you ever almost asleep. Yeah almost we're almost done but yeah this won't hurt. I'm not gonna lie was pretty bad. Well it looks nice. Thanks no derm is yeah you got to take it off. Saran wrap wound healing it. I guess it's doing everything done safely. Yeah everything yeah i mean. They're super kobe. Friendly like in kinney was wearing a mask face shield. Okay yeah like well. this is not your first one. Yeah yeah this is actually my fourth one. But i got nam sorry. This is actually my during kobe. Kobe because i got four kind of all one two three four all at the same time and then this one but yeah so. This was kind of like my valentine's day gift to myself. I guess you could say. I've been working madman. This week drained me. Yeah i mean you've been really doing a lot you getting up early. Yeah coming in late thursday. I got up at four thirty. Got home at four thirty in the morning. Yeah that was tough.

Valentine Marmande Opie Depression DAN Grace Kings Youtube Saran Kinney Kobe
Unpacking The Surge In Violence Against Asian Americans

Fresh Air

04:20 min | 2 months ago

Unpacking The Surge In Violence Against Asian Americans

"Seeing a surge and anti Asian attacks against the elderly. A 91 year old man was violently shoved to the ground in Oakland's Chinatown in 84 year Old Man was killed in San Francisco last month. And this uptick in anti Asian violence is not just local wrestled. Young is a professor of Asian American studies at San Francisco State University and co founder of Stop A P I Hate, which is tracking these incidents. And professor have the number and kinds of these incidents against Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders change since the pandemic began. Yeah, in the beginning at the start of the pandemic, when people had higher fears when shelter in place started. And when President Trump began to insist on using the term China virus, we saw clear surge of racism. We saw how hate speech like using the term China virus led to hate violence. And I think that has invited a climate where people can target Asian Americans and attack them. It's really horrifying the crimes against our elderly population. You know, my mom's 94. I grew up with my grandmother. So for the Asian American community, see our elders. An attack like this is particularly Horrific and touches close to home. There have been previous waves of hate crimes against Asian Americans over in our country's history, obviously and during periods of economic distress going back Two the murder of instant shin in Michigan in 1982. Does this seem different to you? We've seen surges and racism against Asian American during times of epidemic. During times of war like Japanese American incarceration, Yes or 9, 11 and in times of economic downturn. It's different now, because we're have all three conditions. We have the pandemic. We have the worst recession since the Great Depression. And we have the U. S. China Cold War. What kinds of incidents are you seeing? Um, Obviously we've seen these brutal physical attacks against the elderly Recently. What other kinds of incidents are you seeing? Yes. Oh, about 8% of our incidents are physical thoughts were getting pushed and showed having rocks and bottles thrown at us another of large percentage. We're getting coughed and spat upon 8% of our cases. So my own wife was Running insulin disc, locked her away on a trail and coughed in her face That's happened so often again. We began to track it and because because people think we're a health hazard, so they want to get back at us by coughing at us, it's sort of unique to the pandemic. Most cases, though, our verbal harassment 70% are we're getting yelled at again. We have racial slurs slung at us, but the other, not this micro aggressions. They're pretty traumatizing. They're really troubling these cases of hate. And how satisfied are you with the response by law enforcement in the community, especially here locally with these recent incidents. Think law enforcement and local jurisdictions have been responsive. They recognized the problem. I think it's because Asian American community has advocated and stood up so strongly. President Biden issuing a memo announcing the anti Asian here. I think that's a victory for the Asian American community breath. These concerns his attention. You know, Friday's Lunar New Year do you have, you know heightened safety concerns around This, uh, this upcoming holiday? Yeah, we do. Asian American only are often going out shopping may have more money and then could be more vulnerable. So we're calling in at least in the San Francisco Bay area is for local residents to go out and patronize Chinatown because of the pandemic, Things had been shut down. And so the elderly when they do go out or more isolated if we could have more residents going out shopping, strolling not acting as vigilantes or patrols, but just being present. Also calling for more funding for community ambassadors, not necessarily more policing. But more hiring of local residents who know the neighborhood come from the community that speech of the merchants and the residents. No, even serving the UN house. People in our neighborhood. Okay.

President Trump China San Francisco State University Oakland San Francisco President Biden Young Michigan Depression San Francisco Bay UN
How Lowriders Were A Protest Against White Supremacy

Past Gas

07:48 min | 2 months ago

How Lowriders Were A Protest Against White Supremacy

"The low rider movement was also political as a journalist of the nineteen seventies wrote quote. Low writing culture expresses the refusal of young chicano american to be anglicized. Never been a clear case of the automobile being used as an ethnic statement when mexican-americans drove low riders. They're both claiming their identity. And refusing to become invisible hassled by cops pigeonholed by the media and profiled by the general public. There is often a cost but the reward as it is so often in car culture was freedom. The history of low riding is as old as the history of los angeles car culture itself. If you've been to la or even if you haven't you're probably aware that it's a spread out city of wide boulevards and busy highways. You pretty much need a car to get around. And that's been the case for over a century of the city's history as early as the nineteen twenties. The city had an auto ownership rate of one car for every two point. Two five people compare that to the national average at the time which was one car for every seven people and it's because the tire companies paid to have the public transit yet. They show it in the documentary roger rabbit. It's very enticing to say that there is you know why conspiracy there probably was. There is definitely benefit for certain parties to shut it down but also people also liked having their own cars. So is a mix of things almost as soon as cars got into the hands of angelenos. Enterprising owners dissatisfied with stock sameness of cars like the ford model. A or the chrysler fifty eight quickly got into modifying them and stripping. Wait to create hot rods. Which back in the day were known as hop ups or cow jobs. I'm so glad that word has died out. What is a gal. I've idea let's bring that back. Yeah we got bring back. Dow job algi. That's so funny. My girlfriend said no more gal job. So i get the ones i have running cow job. My girlfriend says i gotta get a real job. Get rid of all my gal jobs. Cow jobs okay. So i found an an inch of blog post on jalopy journal dot com talking about the term gal job and just like hopped up or souped up right how that came from like racehorse giving racehorses like pills pills or drugs to improve their performance gal was also a nickname for like drugs as well So you're gone up your horse. The gow job got it and yeah while the initial focus was on speed some maters quickly became interested in how far they could push the envelope and other ways the great depression of the nineteen thirties was an added incentive for kearns iast to fix up and modify older cars rather than buying the latest and greatest the predominant car culture was creating hot rods. But there's a counterculture developing especially among the mexican american community that was a direct reaction to the dominant mostly white rod. Seen at first it wasn't known as low writing. It was just lowering your car. Also popular was chopping or lowering the roof of the car. Decorating vehicle's exterior with designs and replacing stock interior components with plush luxury substitutes. Still the term low rider hadn't yet been coined in the thirties. The clear predecessor of low rider history in the chicano community was a co style. A slang word that roughly translates to punk or troublemaker. But you goes were known for wearing zoot suits slipping their hair back and duck tales a distinctive pattern of slang and in association with swing in jazz. Music is so cool. I watched like archival footage of and they're just like i wish i could pull that style off. My grandpa had zoot suit back in the day. I wish that you are the same like personality. You had the same job hobbies but you just were every day. I'm like accidentally slamming the coattails of my zoot suit in my impreza. Guys look pretty cool. Still pacheco's weren't necessarily associated with a specific style of automobile wasn't until the fifties that mexican american culture started to really embrace the low rider aesthetic in the nineteen fifties. Many white hot-rodders chose to raise their car turning away from the sleek look that had been popular before the war in the words of chicano artists gabriel gibson. White drivers quote went into hot rods and fast cars. They would raise their cars. These big all motors these big trucks but the raza for the race says now i want to do the opposite on a nice and slow slow and low. The one thousand nine hundred fifty saw the true emergence of low rider culture especially in los angeles in the postwar period. Los angeles was a hub for american auto manufacturing. Second only to detroit with ford chrysler and general motors. All operating assembly plants in the area matching if that was still true. That'd be cool. Yeah bill alice. Ten cities ton is stan. Low rider culture. You have to understand. The history of los angeles and it's mexican population originally founded as a spanish mission to spread catholicism in the seventeen hundreds by the eighteen hundreds it had evolved into a forming and ranching up while the land owners were initially of spanish and mexican descent by the eighteen fifties white americans began to dominate. Los angeles is economy and governments prize surprise. Although mexican americans. And even chinese immigrants outnumbered white americans white angelenos still held most of the political power in the city while the white neighborhoods of los angeles boomed tocado in hispanic populations were increasingly regulated to urban ghettos or barrios especially in the east los angeles area away from the pacific ocean and the downtown core at first these neighborhoods were little more than shantytowns but after world war two the population of l. a. began to explode. The city had one of the largest populations of mexican people living anywhere in the world including mexico. Thousands of mexican americans who had served in the war returned or moved to los angeles and with the cash stipend provided by the gi bill. Many of these vets had the income to afford a car of course despite the improved economic times mexican american communities were still far from the luxury of beverly hills or the film set glamour of hollywood. I'd say hollywood is trying to say that convincingly knowing that hollywood is not very glamorous. Yeah i'm sure back in the day it was but the thing i find funny in interesting seeing like torres families like german tourists in like they're blonde hair and jean shorts like walking around hollywood so confused. Yeah well this is a this place full of like forty dollars suit stores and like weird pizza places. If you're coming to la don't go to hollywood. It's pretty bad. Plus all the studios are like in culver. All the studio sony's in color but most of them are in north hollywood. With their means of expression limited. Low riders became an important symbol of personal expression. Freedom and cultural independence

Jalopy Journal Los Angeles Roger Rabbit Chrysler Gabriel Gibson Ford Bill Alice LA Pacheco Depression Model Raza General Motors Hollywood Stan Detroit East Los Angeles Pacific Ocean Mexico
Wendy Williams Shares Alleged Details on 'One-Night Stand' With Method Man

Power 106 Programming

01:51 min | 2 months ago

Wendy Williams Shares Alleged Details on 'One-Night Stand' With Method Man

"We never left. Wendy Williams recently did an interview and out of nowhere unsolicited told the world that she hooked up with method Man. Yes, me to get Joe D. Danny. Two way were in the club. I said to him, you know you want to come over and he said, Yeah, people didn't even realize at the time it was Wendy and one of the biggest stars just left and went back to her penthouse where she baked him in her Jacuzzi. Tub and smoke more. We, you know that was back in the coke days. I don't remember what he did. I'm not gonna implicate him on that. Did you guys go all the way? Yes, OK. Wendy withheld Robb Stark. The fact that you bathe him is a little weird, but also why? Why now tell that story. Could it be that you're trying to promote your movie That's about to release Oh, no, Wendy, you cloud chasing Listen, Wendy went the hell are you going to learn when he I hate to do this to my elders. But when you're 56 years old Your whole grandma. Anybody want to hear about their grandma gain their freak on during the Great Depression. Talk about the 19 twenties went the only thing that were roaring. Get it, Warren Twenties, No. And also how you gonna do Method man like that. Don't blow off the spot because you want your movie to pop alleged drug use one night stands possible cheating left was minding his business. And now you have to hear about the time he got to smack and ended up wooing your tank. All right, Also a minute to the world. That it was a one night stand is that many? That it must not be not good, because it meant the men got a taste. I never went back for the cream. Oh, that's last. It must have been trashed. Sorry, Wendy, But please enjoy another well seasoned, never kiss and tell l because your order is up at least number one for hip hop, baby

Wendy Joe D. Danny Robb Stark Wendy Williams Coke Warren Depression
Why Consumer Confidence Is So High

The Indicator from Planet Money

05:27 min | 2 months ago

Why Consumer Confidence Is So High

"Cerita dolly is a retail analyst at forrester surgery. I am so glad that you're with us. And i wanted to ask you about feelings. And the economy specifically the consumer confidence index was up this week and like. What does that help predict. What do we expect to see happen win. Consumer confidence goes up or down when people are confidence They tend to spend more and that tends to to generally fuel the economy. If you are less confidence that could mean things like cutting back on what you're spending on or either not buying anything discretionary or buying cheaper versions of what's discretionary and you know it's funny because consumer confidence right now is not that terrible. It's down. I mean certainly but it's nowhere near as bad as it was like in two thousand eight two thousand nine so it's it's relatively good for where we are relatively strong. They're certainly a sector of the economy consumers who have fallen on hard times of which there are millions and I think those are consumers that that are weighing down that confidence number but a significant portion of consumers especially affluent consumers have actually done very well through the pandemic for the most part they have remained employed at their their pre pandemic salaries and they don't have as many places to spend their money because they don't have the restaurants to eat out at have the leisure travel that they would have done normally on top of that many of them have their wealth tied up in stock portfolios and the stock market has been on fire. It is sort of a weird time. It's like our economies almost split into maybe even more so than was already happening and there are some people who are just in a desperate situation and then people who are doing maybe relatively better than they were a year ago. Because like you said. They're earning the same salary in their expenses have gone down. Yeah there's definitely bifurcation. It was the case even before the pandemic but i think it's been even more pronounced now so consumer confidence is a lot lower than it was this time last year. But it sounds like you are surprised that it's not maybe like lower than it is right now. Oh yeah when we were going into the pandemic we the thinking. The general consensus kind of in march was that this is going to probably be as bad as the great depression if not worse than the great depression that was the prevailing wisdom before because we were shutting down the entire economy and thinking was everything is going to halt. But that actually didn't turn out to be the case and how is that translating it retail are people buying a lot of stuff right now or some stuff for you know that is a fascinating fascinating question and in all of the things that we have been looking at the the most interesting part is retail spending in aggregate which very few people realize is at record high levels yet if you look at the whole. Us we're buying more than we were earlier. Or we're buying more than i think in the last twenty years you know in the last month and oh wow you don't think of that right. There are some sectors that have been suffering tremendously in the chew sectors. That have been suffering. The most are the apparel sector Which is heavily tied to malls. And that's why you hear a lot about the mall suffering and the other is the restaurant sector but on the other hand we are seeing record high levels of spend with mass merchants. We are laying targeted and stuff target walmart. You're seeing record high levels of span with the grocery stores and you're actually seeing growth in some companies like burns and noble. You know kind of come back from being on life support. People just need more things to do at home or ways to entertain their kids so correct me if i'm wrong but even taking into account restaurants which have just been like totally decimated and places that count on foot traffic and all of that on the whole we're buying more there's been like a net gain even with that big drag coming. Yeah yeah it has. It has been amazing to me. I mean that's almost unbelievable to me. Because yeah i walk around new york city and it's like a ghost town for signs everywhere it's shocking and My numbers are coming from the census. Every month they released data around how much people have spent and we saw that decline that precipitous decline in the months of march and april. But those that was the worst of it you know you saw the economy starting to to reopen and some of the spend rebounding or in some of the spenders being replaced. So you know. Instead of people going to the malls they would spend money at target and walmart or you know. Instead of people spending money at restaurants they were buying food for for cooking at home or they were buying different products online on amazon. Right like furniture

Cerita Dolly Forrester Depression Walmart New York City Amazon
Job losses from virus 4 times as bad as '09 financial crisis

UN News

01:30 min | 3 months ago

Job losses from virus 4 times as bad as '09 financial crisis

"New data on the economic impact of covid. Nineteen has confirmed what many have been thinking. Workers haven't been hit like this in generations. According to the international labor organization ilo people trying to earn a living suffered massively in two thousand and twenty after the corona virus started spreading globally. Early last year. Ilo director-general guy. Ryder told journalists on monday that the impact has been four times worse than the last major financial crisis over a decade ago. This has been the most severe crisis for the world of work since the great depression of the nineteen thirty its impact is fault greater than that of the global financial crisis of two thousand nine when comparing with the law school Twenty nine teen. We now see that eight point. Eight percent of global working hours will lost in the course of the year. And that is the equivalent of two hundred and fifty five million full-time jobs. These lost working hours came from reduce time at work or what is called unprecedented levels of unemployment that affected one hundred and fourteen million people. The said that pandemic restrictions may have accounted for the bulk of these people leaving the labor market either because they were unable to work or because they stop looking the un body said that these massive losses resulted in an eight point. Three percent drop in global income from work equivalent to three point seven trillion dollars or four point four percent of the world's economy not taking into account cash subsidies for workers.

ILO Ryder Depression UN
Job losses from virus 4 times as bad as '09 financial crisis

AP News Radio

00:36 sec | 3 months ago

Job losses from virus 4 times as bad as '09 financial crisis

"The corona virus is destroying a historic number of jobs when you when expert says the corona virus pandemic has been the most severe crisis with the work world since the Great Depression of the nineteen thirties it crushed work hours around the world destroying what amounts to two hundred fifty five million full time jobs who took the biggest hits women and young workers the U. N. expects jobs to bounce back in the second half of this year but it says that depends on the coronavirus fading and vaccines working I'm ready to fall lay

U.
President Biden Has Promises To Keep

Latino USA

03:59 min | 3 months ago

President Biden Has Promises To Keep

"Back in november latina and latino voters helped deliver the presidency to joe biden in key swing states like georgia and especially arizona. Let the next. Voters helped turn former red states. Blue and during the campaign biden made a long list of commitments to our communities on day. One i'm sending to the united states. Congress a immigration bill. We're gonna find those kids. We're going to unite them with their parents. The opening school safely will be a national priority for the biden harris administration. Reverse trump's rollbacks of one hunter public health and environmental rules biden has said he'll invest in education and healthcare for letting us he said he'll stop border wall construction and that he'll work with congress to create a path to citizenship for undocumented people but in also said he'll crackdown pollution in communities of color and reduce incarceration so in the lead up to the inauguration that usa reached out to young denness and latinos around the country to your what promises they're hoping biden will keep and what they want biden to do that he hasn't committed to yet plus we're going to speak with these young people about how the changes they wanna see would actually impact their own lives. We're going to start this very non. Comprehensive survey by speaking with virginia. Blasio's virginia's a ninth generation daytona who up near a city on the texas mexico border were in the south texas. Brush country so a lot of trees and prickly pear cactus virginia is also an environmental science and policy consultant that usa producer. Scarsi spoke with virginia. And she's going to pick up the story from here. Virginia lives in a rural area on a fourth generation. Cattle ranch that been her family of for close to one hundred and twenty years. We inherited it from my great uncle. Who was a grand champion calf roper. During the great depression he traveled the radio circuit with his brother. You know they were fortunate enough to be born into families that had a lot of land and so they were able to run cattle and support their families. That way and my dad was enamored with that history of cowboy culture. He virginia and her brother on the land. She remembers running around as a little kid watching her. Dad moved these huge cows from field to field and she thinks growing up this way set the foundation for a love of nature that eventually led her to go to grad school to study climate change. And that's where she was. When in two thousand eleven he had still all the cattle on the ranch because the drought guy particularly bad and There was a national study. That came out shortly after that drought showing bet Climate change me the heat waves longer and temperatures more intense that year and so we know that climate change has already been impacting us. There had always been droughts in south texas though. Virginia says they got worse and worse over time. It meant the grass wouldn't grow. Which meant virginia's dad had to start buying a lot of food to keep his cattle alive so much so that he wasn't making money off his ranch anymore. You know it's kind of funny. Because i was always kinda hassling. My dad was like dad counts. Produce methane and methane is really bad for the climate but when it came to the point where he had to sell them because he realized a drought was so bad. It put things into a different perspective for me. Because i realized that he really didn't have a choice. I realized that we had kind of gotten into this plane. With climate change where it wasn't theoretical. It wasn't something far off in the future that could happen. It was it was happening now

Biden Virginia Biden Harris Administration USA Blasio Scarsi Congress Joe Biden South Texas Georgia Arizona Daytona Roper Mexico Texas Depression
Succeeding in PR during a pandemic with Victoria Kennedy

Agency Ahead by Traject

05:16 min | 3 months ago

Succeeding in PR during a pandemic with Victoria Kennedy

"Today we are talking. Pr i am so excited. I am joined by victoria. Kennedy who is. Ceo of victoria's pr and she works with a range of different entrepreneurs getting published a mentioned in top publications. Thank you so much for joining me. Today victoria thank you so much for having me gary. It's a pleasure to be here. It is so good to have you back. You are my first episode in twenty twenty one. Hopefully twenty twenty s behind us now twenty twenty was the weirdest year ever and it's impacted the pr world so right out of the gate. I wanna just talk to you. About what the last nine months twelve months have looked like since kovic started. How have you adapted your pr firm. And how has pr kind of as an industry had to adapt to cove it and this virtual world. That is a fantastic question in one about to say goes against industry. Standard occurs won't be on the show otherwise so the last nine months have been the best nine months of my entire career. Be best. I am so grateful for twenty twenty now really i mean because no no not but yes i am. Let me explain by that because it wasn't just good for me. I want to explain to you. Why now twenty. Twenty one is the best time if you're a digital marketer if you have a digital business to get into it because what we're seeing right now is a paradigm shift. That is what happened when covid been a lot of businesses went under and a lot of big businesses were too big to fail quote unquote realize. They can't do business the same way they were doing it before. What does that do. What does all disasters do. Destruction brings creation guys. This is our time for creation. Ice started my pr business. During this pandemic time it was doing real estate marketing. Okay had my agency agency owner marketer riot. I hit it during this time. My background is. Npr's it wasn't like. I learned something new however it was a it was a different business altogether and i took advantage because what a traditional pr companies doing right now. They're struggling the old ways to get into publications. Where you go to networking events and you smooth and you drink and you take people out to coffee in lunch and expensive. You know restaurants blah blah blah. You can't do that anymore in that is not coming back okay. Which is fantastic for people like us who work from home. You can work from anywhere in. The world is a matter which country in we can still network. Fine editors find journalists make real realize connections and then use those two to establish our pr business dwelling pr. I've used digital marketing to my advantage and hoping we can talk about that today but guys. It's never been better. This has been a great year in two thousand twenty one even better that i'm love your perspective. And and that's the hardest thing with a lot of businesses. Like you know it is an adapter die sorta situation and it sounds like you are agile and ready and kind of trying and figuring things out. What has the playbook look like in how. How has it tied into digital marketing for you in the firm. Yeah well it's funny that you should say that. But i'm i'm giving a tedtalk in two weeks in my talk is all about reinvention. Cool about how you must. Reinvention is like the new superpower being able to adapt is what is going to save. You especially now technology's moving at such an exponential rate jobs are becoming obsolete those who can adopt the quickest or the ones who are going to reap all the words not the ones who are. I'm so sad. Everything is turned out horribly. But there's always opportunity anytime. There is like in the great depression that produced the most millionaires. Ever i don't know that i don't know most people know that but you think about all this hardship. There's also so much opportunity guys in. This is our time to get that opportunity as far as digital marketing goes for pivoting. You know these big organizations are having a hard time catching up. So what did i do. I went in and snuck and got the market share. You know. i'm reaching out to people on twitter. i'm reaching out to editors on the platforms that they like. I'm messaging them on following up with things at big corporations don't do because they're too good for it. I'm not too good to comment a funny meme on. Somebody's tweet because i find it funny right. I'm not too good for that. And that's the thing. Those are the people who win. I was able to start mike. pr company. We went from zero to six figures in three months. And there's a couple of reasons why but one is. Because i wasn't afraid to work hard and to it's because i had already established my personal brand as an authority in the marketplace. We'll talk about the power personal brand how this plays into it but number three because there's a door open in the pr world reese's usual is not happening anymore. I took advantage of that by using my digital marketing. Spills skills in marketing and i transferred that to pr. So if you're in an agency like a dog maybe a dog trainer. Did you ever think about you can do that online. You can train other dog trainers online. Course right there's so many different creative ways we can think now guys think digitally because that is the future.

Victoria Kovic Kennedy Gary NPR Depression Twitter Mike Reese
The Last Civil War Widow Dies

The Armstrong & Getty Show

01:45 min | 3 months ago

The Last Civil War Widow Dies

"The last Civil war widow has passed away. Just died. She was 170 years old. How does the math work on that? She must have been really young or No. She married a guy when she was 20, who was 90 and he was in the civil war. You know, Funnily enough. You missed both of them. By three years. She was a 17 year old schoolgirl and married a 93 year old civil war. Yes, she did. Yuck! And then she lived to 101 this because he had the musk of Shiloh on him. I mean, what was the was the appeal there? Maybe he wore leather pants, an enormous musket. I don't know. I don't know it was. It's love who you can't define love. Exactly. She's 17 just become a woman. He's 90 three's Got a little maturity. A little wisdom been around a little fought a Civil war. Exactly. He's got great stories. Holy cow. That's just that is so oh, no, that that's either some freakish religious thing. Um or our arrangement she was sold to him. Yet Jackson's father, That's the woman volunteered his teenage daughter to stop by Mr Bolan's home each day to provide care and help with chores to pay your back pay Packer kindness, Bolan offered to Mary Jackson, which would allow her to receive his soldier's pension. After his Dow? Yeah. Compelling offer in the context of the Great Depression. Yeah, well, that's from that book about the high cost of good intentions. That's one of the examples they give is checks going out to Revolutionary War veterans or civil war veterans, and it turns into spouses and then and then kids, and it just keeps growing and

Mr Bolan Mary Jackson Bolan Packer Jackson Depression
5 charts show what the global economy looks like heading into 2021

The Tel Aviv Review

03:07 min | 4 months ago

5 charts show what the global economy looks like heading into 2021

"Our yesterday's professor fluke. She's vice president of research. And the william davidson senior fellow for economic policy at israel democracy institute. She's the former governor of the bank of israel and professor at department of economics at the hebrew university of jerusalem earlier this month Professor flog served as the co chair of the idea is l. e. horovitz conference where the most pressing issues relating to israel's economy and society where discussed professor conflict. Hello and welcome back to the tel aviv review. Good morning. so. When corona virus hit it seemed like we were heading for an economic downturn that would rival the great depression but according to the bank of israel and always estimates israeli economy in terms of gdp per capita on employment growth and other measurements seems to be bouncing back and within a few years to return more or less to the levels prior to the crisis and it seems also that this crisis if everything goes according to plan will even less devastating than the two thousand nine hundred thousand nine downturn. So where the initial estimates and overreaction altogether anything wrong. I think we're still in the middle of a very serious crisis. It's true that recently we've seen some oppo revisions both today. A growth estimates of the global economy and also for the the projections for the israeli economy. But still we're talking about a very deep recession globally. Were talking about according to the most recent projections of the cd. We're talking about a contraction of over four percent this year and hopefully a rebound of about four percent next year. This is just in comparison to the global financial crisis the global economy contracted by only zero point one percent so we're still talking about a very deep recession and that's true also for the israeli economy If we are on the path as described by damore to mystic scenario that was a published by the bank of israel it means to the economy will contract this year by about five percent. And we'll rebound by about six percent next year. If we are on the less optimistic scenario where the corrina is not contained the pandemic is not contain then we will have a somewhat more severe contraction this year but much slower recovery by next year so i would say Were still talking about two very serious crisis. A very severe recession however it's true the israeli economy is doing somewhat better relative to other economists. I

William Davidson Israel Democracy Institute Bank Of Israel Hebrew University Of Jerusalem Department Of Economics Israel Depression Damore
Santa returns to Rockport for Christmas

Nightside with Dan Rea

00:57 sec | 4 months ago

Santa returns to Rockport for Christmas

"A 122 year old Christmas tradition was alive and well in Rockport. This Christmas with a slightly different look. WBC's Kendall Buell was there to bring us the story. Very Christmas Christmas Tree Committee of Rockport has brought Santa Claus to town through two World Wars, the Great Depression and the last global pandemic in 1918. So, of course old Saint Nick was gonna be in town center this morning, posing for pictures with kids. I'll be at 8 ft. In the background committee chair, Buddy Wood says those happy kids didn't mind having to keep their distance. I know Santa was their farm and they're keeping their distance with the understanding that this is the way it has to be So, walking away really happy? Yeah, and walking away real happy. And did I mention this was all is the Christmas storm was really kicking up. It's the Christmas Tree Committee of Rock board has shown over 122 years. Some traditions can take whatever you throw at them

Kendall Buell Christmas Christmas Tree Commi Rockport Buddy Wood WBC Saint Nick Santa Claus Depression Santa Christmas Tree Committee Of Ro
"great depression" Discussed on Throughline

Throughline

02:31 min | 9 months ago

"great depression" Discussed on Throughline

"<Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Speech_Music_Female> That's it for <Speech_Female> this week's show. <SpeakerChange> I'm <Speech_Male> Rhonda Data? <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Male> At Blue <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> and you've been listening to <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> through line. This <Speech_Music_Female> episode <SpeakerChange> was produced <Speech_Male> by me and me <Speech_Music_Male> and our <Speech_Music_Male> amazing cast. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> I'm Jamie <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> York or was <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> the voice of Henry <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> right my grandfather. <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> I'm Lawrence. Wu <Speech_Music_Female> and <SpeakerChange> I played <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> Fong I'm <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> not only Barton. <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> I read the writings <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> of Meribel <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> Sir. My name <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> is Kia, Mac, and cheese <Speech_Female> and I <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> was the voice <SpeakerChange> of Dorothy <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> Height. <Speech_Female> The soundtrack <Speech_Female> for this episode was <Speech_Female> composed and performed <Speech_Female> by one of our favorite <Speech_Music_Female> artists. <Speech_Music_Female> Ronnie, <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> that's spelled. <Speech_Music_Female> H. A. N.. <Speech_Music_Female> A. <Speech_Music_Female> R. A. An <Speech_Female> eye. She <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> has a new album that <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> just came out called <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> home on <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> one records. <Speech_Music_Female> You should check <Speech_Music_Female> it out to hear more <Speech_Music_Male> of her amazing <Speech_Music_Male> work and <Speech_Music_Male> shot out to the <Speech_Music_Male> rest of the through line <Speech_Music_Male> team, which includes <Speech_Music_Female> Lane <Speech_Music_Female> Calvin Levinson <Speech_Music_Male> Julie <SpeakerChange> Kane. <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> Back, checking for this <Speech_Music_Male> episode was done <Speech_Music_Male> by Kevin <SpeakerChange> Vocal. <Speech_Music_Female> Thank <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> you to Jason. Fuller <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> and Steve Tyson <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> for their voiceover <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> work. Thanks <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> also to Camilla. <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> Smiley and Anya <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> Brenneman <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> and special things <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> to Victor Knee <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> author of longtime. <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> Calif- <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> and to the Henry <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> Hampton Collection <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> Washington. University <Speech_Female> libraries, <Speech_Female> and for the <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> Mayor de la source story <Speech_Music_Female> excerpted <Speech_Female> from salutation to <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> Spring by Mirabella <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> sort from <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> prairie schooner <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> volume twelve <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> number three by <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> permission of the University <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> of Nebraska, <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> Press Copyright <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> Nineteen <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> thirty eight by <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> the University <SpeakerChange> of <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Nebraska Press. <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> If you have an idea <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> or like something <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> on the show, <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> please write us <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> at

"great depression" Discussed on Throughline

Throughline

04:45 min | 9 months ago

"great depression" Discussed on Throughline

"Forget that..

"great depression" Discussed on Throughline

Throughline

05:38 min | 9 months ago

"great depression" Discussed on Throughline

"Either. It is for the new data rate. Is obeyed into the same. And gave spring. Spirit. And continuity. Who? And, how Nice! Alight Chinatown the largest oriental city in the oxygen. Talk! A little pock stands the new steel statue of soon yet sam father of New China. Frequent plan tastic ceremony celebrate holidays of all China in the traditional manner..

"great depression" Discussed on Throughline

Throughline

05:26 min | 9 months ago

"great depression" Discussed on Throughline

"great depression" Discussed on Throughline

Throughline

02:16 min | 9 months ago

"great depression" Discussed on Throughline

"great depression" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

07:56 min | 10 months ago

"great depression" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

"But one on. That is to see my country again on the road to prosperity would show more same unless. Through the lessons of this experience. To. See the principles and ideals of the American people perfect. David Kennedy talked to us a little bit about. Herbert Herbert, hoover. and. How his experience and thinking, contributed to the decisions, made or not made in nineteen thirty. Loss to might popular memory. Because of Hoover's reputation as presiding over the initial phase of depression, fail presidency. No, no real argument about that. But as lost to are popular memory, at least the when he assumed office, in nineteen twenty nine, he was widely regarded as arguably the most competent person in the world. He had an enormous reputation. John Maynard Keynes who had watched him advise woodrow? Wilson, the Paris Peace Conference in one, thousand nine hundred nineteen ninety. Kane said hoover was the only person who emerged from the ordeal of the Paris negotiations with an enhanced reputation. nineteen, the presidential election of nineteen twenty approached. who rose actively recruited by leaders in both parties Republicans wells democratic. to, stand for the presidency. He had served a window Wilson's cabinets regressive president is I vote for president that he cast the United States was for Theodore. Roosevelt's Bull Moose Party of nineteen twelve, so he was a leg, not that progressive tradition, and he was widely regarded as a extraordinarily competent and effective i. If even somebody with those kinds of credentials reputation. Could get walloped and overcome by something like the Great Depression. It's a reminder of just how complicated. Modern societies are and how even the best amongst us, the most intelligence and committed amongst us can get overwhelmed by problems on a scale that no one had at this. So, whom are I think it I'll repeat who who presents. He was a failed. Presidency is no real argument about that whatsoever, but it wasn't because he was malate man. he was a child of his own time as we all are and. He just was inadequate to the situation that he face. So given that David Kennedy I think it's absolutely fascinating that we have some very prominent economists and I'm thinking particularly right now. Ben Banenky who cut his academic teeth on studying the during the Great Depression Right, he actually says that the depression is a bad metaphor to use in comparison to today, and he's Tito. The Brookings Institution last month. I believe quote. If all goes well in a year or two, we should be substantially in a substantially better position. That's coming from former fed chair. Ben Bernanke but given what you just said about Herbert Hoover I'm still coming back over and over again in my mind to the the force and importance of uncertainty, both then and now right and I would say right now. The uncertainty is that we have are. We don't know how much the corona virus is going to change people's long-term behavior especially in A. A consumption based economy like ours right? We don't know if if banks are still gonNA feel cautious about lending to businesses big and small if they expect another outbreak or another major flare up. That's going to shut down the economy. There's so much that we don't know. Can we all have the kind of confidence that? Burnett Anki seems to be tiptoeing into? Excellent question I think what Bernanke is referring to that speech, he referenced. Is the fact that the Great Depression lasted depend measured at least a decade. by some metrics last. Dozen Years Nineteen, twenty, nine, hundred, forty, one in this country. Whereas worst case, scenario is terrible worse case to be sure. Of this current pandemic crisis could last a for years until we get a vaccine. That would be awful, no question about it. But for years is surely a lot less than ten or twelve years. So, the duration of the depression I think is one of its most prominent characteristics. One of the things stamped. It's such large letters. History books is the fact that lasted throughout the entire decade. Likely face that that's number. One number two and I wanna go back something. Jack Beatty said earlier tonight, hesitate always the disagree with Jack, but I want to argue with you a little bit Jack. Of A big. Maybe you were making a civil point about the comparability of uncertainty, today and nineteen. Thirty. I think that the nature of uncertainty today is actually somewhat different than lesser than it was. In nineteen, thirty, nine hundred thirty people have difficult, even defining the problem. They just there was no adequate language to really sum up in a coherent way what the problem was therefore what should be the the vectors of approach to deal with today we were. The Bulls is called grown of. And we, we know what the pathway to get out of. This mess is to find a way to knock down that particular. Infectious disease then we could begin to be properly functioning society against so. In debt in general Further. Say That we we understand me. Thanks up. And others how pandemics work! We know what their morphology is. What their developmental pattern, so we have a pretty good tool kit. And we we know aren't the target is. In one, thousand, nine, hundred thirty. The toolkit was pretty empty, and nobody had a really good definition of exactly what the problem was. Jack go ahead. Well, that seems cogent to me. I would just then go. Yes, we have the toolkit David, but do we have the people to use the tools? You know the political system of the nineteen thirty. Through up. Herbert Hoover the most competent man in the world and Franklin Roosevelt Successful Governor of New York Long Career in the Navy Department and world. War One fifty years old vital. Our system has come up with Donald Trump, and Joe Biden of whom British Observer, recently said his public appearances range from the inarticulate to the incoherent. And and politics. You said elsewhere David. That politics then was was toxic, but now is septic. That is the degree of polarization now between the parties is even more than it was. Then when we think of you know FDR fighting with the Republicans Republicans a lot of them voted for social security unimaginable, well, perhaps not who knows, but anyway I would just go to the quality of the people, and the and the and the Politi as well and saying yes, we know the problem I agree with you there. Future isn't that opaque, but the people that are going to be able to deal with the problem. Has the political system turned out the best people to do that? L. Remind you checks that what I'm sure you know. Is that no less than authority at the time that Walter Lippmann who was probably the single, most widely read and respected pundit of the age a called Franklin Roosevelt, during the nineteen thirty two campaign, an amiable boy Scout, who, without a particular qualifications for the office, when very much like to be president United States so even..

David Kennedy Herbert Hoover depression Franklin Roosevelt Jack Beatty Ben Bernanke president Hoover United States Herbert Herbert Wilson John Maynard Keynes Paris Brookings Institution fed Walter Lippmann Burnett Anki Donald Trump Ben Banenky
"great depression" Discussed on Freakonomics

Freakonomics

05:15 min | 11 months ago

"great depression" Discussed on Freakonomics

"Have been paying idled employees sixty to ninety percent of their wages through their employer. Some Americans think this might work well here. Abigail Wozniak does not. I think that I'm probably ready to be done making the US. Europe comparisons, not sure that it's helpful to moving policy forward in the US so. In an emergency you have to work with what you have and. The reason Europe and other countries are able to do things differently whether it's in the labor market institutions side, or it's in the test and Trae side reason they can do. Things differently is that they have a different set of institutions in place right now today that they're working with and. Might those institutions provide better long run outcomes. Maybe, but we don't have those institutions and we're not going to build them in the next week. Will Way I look at it? This crisis has being A. Confirmation of the critical role of institutions. And? How much US institutions have suffered over the last few years? That's Darren eskimo glue an economist at MIT and Co author of why nations fail the origins of power, prosperity and poverty. We have completely failed in dealing with this crisis, and this is nothing but a colossal failure over ours tuitions. Awesome okwu points to South Korea Taiwan Germany as places that have used their institutions well on both the public health and economic fronts. The German unemployment rate for instance is still below six percent. In his book why Nations Fail Asamoah Glue? Rights of pandemic. The black death the fourteenth century plague estimated to of wiped out more than half the population of Europe it was as Smug, writes a critical juncture. In European history in some countries it disrupted the existing economic and political balance in society, and he puts it broke the cycle of extractive institutions, while enabling more inclusive ones to emerge at least in some places, covid nineteen awesome, ugly makes clear is nothing like the black death as far as human suffering, but it is a critical juncture because it has really disrupted the interesting system. With the Global Order National. Economies infrastructure public services. And it has. Created an environment in which different countries are going to go in different directions. He sees four directions. The US could go in the first one is essentially doubling down on luck we have. There will not be a renewal in our efforts to strengthen the health care system is not going to strengthen autonomous agencies such as CDC. EPA and so one and this scenario will not solve any of our interesting problems so option one is status quo ISM, and not very encouraging. The sand scenario is no less dangerous. We could learn wrong lessons from the current crisis. We can say look the countries that have been successful like China are. Was that authoritarian, so we have to become more authoritarian. It's the democracy that shackles on our effectives. But what enabled those successes exactly the depth of capacity expertise in Chinese Has a history of going back two thousand five hundred us so to speak so if we went strategy in the United States for instance be doing that China China light in other words We'd get the worst of both worlds, authoritarianism minus the efficiency. This is Earth pod. Which I think is no better. which is that we could get another wrong less? We learn that the state has continued to fail is ineffective and instead of the state. We have to turn to corporations. An America run by Google and facebook and Amazon and Microsoft. It may seem. That's already the case. Especially, since all these firms have actually done well during the pandemic, and that's not a good future, either because you know the companies that are going making the economy are ultimately responsible for partly greedy inequality, Parvo, the lessened democratic nature of system, so three of the four scenarios Osama, glue and visions are bad ones. But he does see one better option. It's essentially repeat of how the US responded to the Great Depression. Lessons that politicians in experts learn during that period was that. In a more dynamic, modern and globalising economy, not having a strong social safety net, not having the right type of regulation monetary policy fiscal policies. All of those were very dangerous, and they opened the door to be crises, inequality, poverty, and ultimately to. Fascism in the case of Germany and Italy forests..

US Europe A. Confirmation Abigail Wozniak Osama MIT South Korea Taiwan Germany Trae ISM China China China Global Order National EPA Germany
"great depression" Discussed on The Last Word with Lawrence O'Donnell

The Last Word with Lawrence O'Donnell

02:59 min | 1 year ago

"great depression" Discussed on The Last Word with Lawrence O'Donnell

"Now it's time for a special hour here on. Msnbc LIFE in the time of Corona virus hosted by Dr Zeke Emmanuel and our own Ali could alley Rachel. I it's these things that I seek out these little great messages. These babies born these people celebrating people doing what they can for graduations and and and marking this change in this time of Corona virus. We do need these things. We have to stay on the news and we have to hold power to account but we do have to celebrate the fact that life will go on and one day. We'll get back to normal so thank you for sharing that with us. We have to check this stuff. We have to check. This has to be part of the way we understand this time. Thank you appreciate it. My totally nice red while the staggering tragedy of the Kroto virus has in fact made us numb to some of the numbers. One point two million cases so far nearly seventy eight thousand Americans dead in this short time. Seventy eight thousand lives lost. Think about many families. Friends communities have been affected. The number itself doesn't tell that story. The loss of seventy eight thousand people whose lives were claimed by a virus that I bet most of them have probably never heard about three months ago. It is almost unimaginable. Today we can add another unimaginable number two. This pandemic fourteen point seven. That's the percentage of America's unemployment in April. The worst since the Great Depression probably worse today. By the way because those numbers reflect a calculation that was taken a few weeks ago. This is a health crisis. This is security crisis. It's the security of millions of people their ability to feed their families to pay their rent to provide for their children as Rachel said joining us again for the hour. Dr Zeke Emanuel Vice President of global initiatives at the University of Pennsylvania and a veteran of the Obama Administration. Zeke and I are going to tonight speak with Pulitzer Prize winning journalist Laurie Garrett who very early on this very show warned how bad this pandemic could become. Many of us didn't WanNa believe what she said but she was right. Americans are fighting through this later. We're going to be joined by the renowned psychologist Angela. Duckworth who's got a lot to say about keeping your head in times like these but first the news and there is a lot of tonight just in the last two days to White House. Staffers have tested positive for corona virus. Donald Trump's personal valet who serves trump has meals. We learned today the vice president's press secretary who is married to the close trump aide Stephen Miller. Donald Trump today claim. The positive test was proof. That testing doesn't necessarily work if she tested very good for a long period of time and then all of a sudden today she positive so she tested positive. Manner they blew. This is why the whole concept of tests.

Donald Trump Stephen Miller Dr Zeke Emmanuel Dr Zeke Emanuel Vice President Msnbc Zeke Pulitzer Prize Rachel Laurie Garrett White House Ali America Duckworth Angela University of Pennsylvania Obama Administration press secretary
"great depression" Discussed on Marketplace with Kai Ryssdal

Marketplace with Kai Ryssdal

10:48 min | 1 year ago

"great depression" Discussed on Marketplace with Kai Ryssdal

"We present today. A couple of ways to think about this economic crisis as a lesson from crises passed as a sonic reimagining of those plain old stock charts and as a new way to think about one business from American public media. This is marketplace in Los Angeles. I'm Carl Rozelle. It is Tuesday today. The end of what has felt like an endless market has always to have you along everybody. Well we have here in. This crisis is in some ways. A straight up supply and demand problem. And here's what I'm talking about. We are not using as much stuff as we were even a couple of weeks ago. There's just not a whole lot of demand but in some parts of the global economy supply is still going strong in. That imbalance is leading to some out of the ordinary problems. If you've been following oil at all you know this and if not we'll hear you go the. Us benchmark is down around twenty dollars a barrel staggeringly low. Air travel is down. There's way less driving not a whole lot of demand but all the oil that's out there and the oil that is still being pumped has got to go somewhere right. And as marketplace's Justin Ho reports storage of commodities is the real hot commodity. Right now the. Us has the infrastructure to store unused oil. Whether it's an old salt caverns along the Gulf coast or oil tankers that flowed offshore. But Jim Burke hard at IHS MARKET SAYS WITH DEMAND PLUMMETING. That storage is reaching full capacity. The infrastructure is not built to handle a twenty twenty five percent overnight collapse in oil demand. Thing is there are reasons. Why a producer would keep pumping oil now. Burkhart says shutting down at drilling rig and damaged reservoir. Tom Sang at the University of Tulsa says. Smaller producers might have to keep pumping oil despite the low prices. They're getting for it. Even though on the books it's going to be a loss. They gotta have some cash flow to maintain operations and that's just in the US. Matt Smith is director of commodity. Research Clipper data which tracks flows of crude oil around the world. He says the oil production war going on overseas will dump even more crude onto the market. We're going to be seeing a lot of barrels coming to mock in the next few weeks not only from Saudi Arabia but likely from Russia. Alabama's Smith says the price of storage is shooting up. Oil Tanker rates have reportedly doubled from last week. Jimbo card I market. Says if storage capacity runs out. Us oil production might have to start shutting down at current production levels the oil supply surplus will exceed the ability to store. So something's gotTa Give. He estimates that by next year. Us production could drop by nearly a third. I'm Justin how for marketplace uncertainty is probably the by word of this crisis so far for people and businesses and entire industries real including healthcare specifically given that this is actually a healthcare induced economic crisis. Right so what? Consumers are going to end up paying for healthcare down. The road is an issue covered California. This state health insurance marketplace out here has a report out. Estimating covy testing and treatment is gonNA cost anywhere from thirty four to two hundred fifty one billion dollars which it says could show up as a bump and insurance premiums of four all the way up to forty percent now yes. Those are huge spreads. I grant you that. But those are spreads that are huge. Because as marketplace's Kimberly Adams reports figuring out who is paying for all of this is incredibly complicated. It would be nice to believe that. No one is thinking about healthcare bills right now but the bills will come. Some will get picked up by Medicaid and Medicare private insurers individuals but some of the costs of treating patients with krona virus are just not being paid for it all and that means some clinics and hospitals are eating costs for now says achieve Moreau Tra who teaches healthcare policy at Harvard and while there may be a surge of hospital visits for Kovic. Nineteen patients are understandably scared to get healthcare so a lot of other forms of healthcare have been reduced these discussions about current a virus costs and will pay them are already happening. Benjamin is good leads. The Health Research Institute. At POW. See if we're thinking about the employer insurance market. This is the time period when health plan. Actuaries are starting to think about what next year's cost will be cost that factor into healthcare premiums paid by employers and individuals and health. Plans don't have a lot of data to go on right now. What will the government ended up covering? How many people will eventually need care? Are there a lot of procedures? There are being put off and so then we'll be even additional procedures in the coming year? All we really have right now is a whole lot of uncertainty in Washington. I'm Kimberly Adams for Marketplace Wall Street on this Tuesday. At the end of a month that is GONNA be in the history books more down than up but honestly kind of mellow relatively speaking. We'll have the details. When we do the numbers to recap the situation here briefly macro economic indicator wise more than three million people filed first time claims for unemployment the third week of March. We'll get this week's first time claims day after Morrow and then on Friday the first monthly unemployment report since things started going south. And I'M GONNA hazard a guess here that one of the big economic questions on people's minds is how bad are things. GonNa get so history buff that I am. I thought it'd be a good idea to get a hold of a bunch of historians to talk about economic crises passed and in particular the Great Depression and what it might be able to tell us about what we ought to be looking for today to see where we might be going tomorrow. Kathleen Day teaches at Johns Hopkins. She's also the author of a book on the history of financial crises in this country. It's called broken bargain. She joins US. Well Yeah. She joins us from home. Maybe I should go to the Sun Room where no one will come barreling in all right. I've got out of the kitchen. Hold on we'll wait. I'm too we get it. Panelists number two is Eric Hilt. He's an economic historian at Wellesley College. Also working from home. I spent this morning inside a couch fort constructed by my six year old daughter Reading to her finally Corolla Friedman. She's a professor of finance at northwestern who right now is sharing makeshift. Home Office with her husband and Sarah trying to navigate. That's all right first. Question to the panel. What started the Great Depression Anyway? Okay so it's important to distinguish between the stock market crash in October of nineteen twenty nine that everybody knows about and the Great Depression itself. Okay noted but how did it happen? The first problem leading up to the Great Depression was that the Fed failed a bank. Regulators failed to put on the brakes too risky lending for speculative stock market so there was a stock market bubble and people were investing in like crazy. How many blache Bram Real Nava the stock market crash late? Nineteen thousand nine spanning sixteen and a half million shares of stock sold in a single day. The collapse of the stock market gave an increase in uncertainty so individuals stopped consuming runner of depression and crisis so the economy started to contract in probably summer of nineteen twenty nine but it became a great depression rather than a severe recession. Probably starting in nineteen thirty when a wave of bank failures started to occur. Okay wait you catch. That did became a great depression rather than a severe recession when a wave of bank failures started to her banks by the hundreds by the thousands of forced to close on the banks to lend the financial system quakes taught us so the tipping point that lead to what we think is a great depression with banking crises rather than stock market crash. The Great Depression started when those banks failed. Businesses couldn't get loans anymore so they couldn't do business. The reason that the Great Depression was the Great Depression was that the financial system essentially melted down and for the most part. The Fed did very little to try to stop that. It didn't act as a lender of last resort to many banks which also contributed greatly to the depth and breadth of the depression. So what we've learned from that is that you need to be able to inject liquidity in a moment of crisis you need to be able to bail out banks so that banks can keep on lending and restore confidence familiar bailing out banks to keep the economy going to the great recession of two thousand eight two thousand twelve. Ben Bernanke you who is a student of the Great? Depression bailed out the banks. Okay but wait. The Great Depression was the Great Depression. The great recession was the great recession. And this ain't those yet. This episode is very different from the Great Depression crazies in the past having a little bit different than this one. But there's no doubt that there's some economic rough water ahead so today we are. Seeing policymakers acting very quickly Jay pal and the Fed have cut interest rates to basically zero. They've started buying bonds trillions of dollars in bonds to put more money into the financial system. They lower the rates. They charged banks to borrow money and a whole lot more. So then panel. What should we be watching to help us understand what kind of crisis this might turn out to be? Unemployment of course and employment claims the unemployment rate credit delinquencies credit markets credit for small businesses significant and prolong deflation declining prices and bankruptcies out here is that this is an economic crisis. The likes of which nobody alive has ever seen. So even the experts don't know exactly what is going to happen. Thanks again to our experts our panelists Kathleen Day. Johns Hopkins Eric Hilt at Wellesley and Corolla Friedman at northwestern.

Us Fed Justin Ho Depression Kimberly Adams Kathleen Day Los Angeles Corolla Friedman Eric Hilt Carl Rozelle
"great depression" Discussed on Nobody Listens to Paula Poundstone

Nobody Listens to Paula Poundstone

09:28 min | 1 year ago

"great depression" Discussed on Nobody Listens to Paula Poundstone

"Got it worked. I wouldn't click and there. She went all right. Paul you back. Yeah all right you missed. She's excited about being the car. Yeah she is in previous shows. We bragged about our growing listenership and places like Poland and of course the United Arab Emirates. You're familiar with that. Yes and Moldova. We my gosh well. We thought we were big in Moldova. Right why do we think we showed up on their top charts? Yeah and then it turned out. They only only have three downloads to podcasts. Around the whole country. Yeah we look good compared to nobody. Yeah so but now. It's there for a while. We were just starting now. I'm episode eighty eight or whatever it is. We actually tasted the staple food of Moldova for loops. No Mama League all right but we compared it to fruit. Loops we did. That are still not clear. Handful of Moldovan. Just listen to the show have more from from meeting Malaga to eating fruit loops. That's almost certainly not true. Remember that that movie that started out as a play performed. That was a Abba Song. Mama Mia Mama League yeah. Well I'm glad we relive that inquiry interest on the hand if you've heard melodious giggling in the background during this entire segment it's It's because we've got right here. Tony Anita Hall our producer and our internationalist We're GONNA what we're GONNA do is. We're going to get proactive about this rather than talking about a country where we have downloads. We're GONNA pitch ourselves that that's a good idea right so we're going to turn our site to a place where there is a huge audience just waiting for us tonita whole welcome thank you thank you give us your pitch so Nama Say India. Nama saying the NAMA stay forms of traditional greetings mention the ancient Hindu scriptures? It translates to I bow to you and when greeting one another with it as as just something. That Brentwood Yoga people. Well they're getting it from somewhere. Oh I didn't know where they were getting from India absolutely because when you say as a way of greeting someone it means may our minds meet. Oh mayor reminds me reminds meat so nama stay and not usually something you think about when you're stretching on a mat. No no no no no so now I think it means mayor minds meet in a dark corner in. And then we fuck like bunnies see. That's probably that would novice Damian. But that's really yeah. I've actually been researching and you mean no were no. It's actually hop hop hop breeding Polo. Is My very different. I'm Tony Blanco okay. We not mistake. Did they produced out of nowhere? Somewhat appear to be finger finger cymbals because I'm second to India that what you decided to do now mistake India mayor minds mouth three on. Nobody listens to Paula. Poundstone all right. That's a culturally sensitive greeting probably more so than the hop hop things on the right track Now the great thing is this is the perfect week for us to India. Because before you eat there you must thoroughly wash your hands with soap and water. We do that here too by the way. Maybe we let for for a long time. It's like you're it's because they eat with their hands. They do no foreign exactly no forks and actually it's a widespread practice in south and east India But it's a bit rare in north and west India. What's the hand? Wash their hands in north and west India. They don't eat with their hands controlled by big fork up there. Yeah right exactly. Yeah big silvery. So what if there was a table you know northwest Eat South? Indians all at the same table so two of them would just grab the food off the plate and shoving their mouth that they're well wash hands up to the people with like just grubby dirt all over there. Yes he would grab their forks and put that in there. Am I correct in? Almost any scenario where people from various places in India are eating together. They yes could play that. I'd imagine that they kind of you know all agree on some sort of standard like we do here in the United States of America. Oh yeah yeah so they would just come together and hey we're washing their hands all right. So we're GONNA use this phone but everything else have attic. It's quite possible. Our new friends so fasting is an integral part of Hindu culture. Okay And because it's a way to represent one sincerity and resolve. Oh sincerity and resolve about what I do whatever you want. I mean famously. Gone on a hunger exactly that we could go on a hunger strike till we get to number one in India. We're looking to do that. I will you won't I will. You will be reaching for a potato chip within twenty seconds before and you're going on a hunger strike until India gets heavily invested in US Indian people first of all. Welcome UNTIL WE ARE NUMBER. One with a bullet on your charts. I'm not going to eat. Today is day one. That's not gonNA happen. You're going to be eating faster than you can say Nama stay hop. What are you reading right now? What's in your mouth right now. No did you potato depending lapel. Aiding guess are you going to swallow it? Spit it out. Spit IT OUT. Swallowed it okay. Potato chip with a fork because I was trying to appeal to northern only really winning them over Footing the because it's also the largest vegetarian friendly country in the world for German Friendly Yup because twenty to forty percent of all Indians are vegetarians. That's a lot. It's a lot of people. Wow Yeah so so. There's salad bars there than here. Yeah Yep and they're washing their hands before they Washington and they're not eating meat. That doesn't mean they don't need this. Need Garden vegetables are scared of them. You I do some Indian cooking. It's true mentioned that I can make a nice curry with a with a homemade rate within I'm just sucking up to Indian. You're not even helping. I'm not gonNA eat it okay. I'm not gonNA eat that food. You know why I am not eating until we are number one with a boy. What's that there's a twix? Rapper writers earlier. Eight at early. Run on there. I'm not eating. Okay I'm going to tell us about the subcontinent Freddie. Mercury is of Indian descent. I didn't know that yeah. Did you not see that movie? No you didn't see that Mo- it's pretty good movie. His parents had moved to England with air. There clearly Indian. Well they had no idea. Wow boy his music doesn't say India to play some Indian music with you. Well I brought both Freddie Mercury and the national anthem of and so are we going to compare them. Sure we'll start with queen new good okay so we're listening to don't stop me now by Queen. I fix album jazz. Am I read about that Yeah Okay I'll turn it down a little bit though. Is this the best way to honor our new Indian friends because I if I'm not mistaken? Freddie was born in London wasn't he this music has almost nothing to do with traditional Indian culture. Picks up though he don't hear type when they rushed cake and promote and she put race can't get. I'm not even sure that rice cakes are a thing in India yet was Oh that was part of. Ghandi's wedding ceremony really traditional pudding of rice cakes credit mouth. Yeah I wasn't there but I saw it in the morning to actual abuse. You read that somewhere. Not Okay then yes. I put risk in her mouth. This is the national deresh okay. This is a national anthem. Jonah Ghana Mon.

India Moldova United Arab Emirates Mama League Freddie Mercury Tony Blanco Paul Poland Paula Ghana Tony Anita Hall United States Washington Ghandi producer England Mo America London
"great depression" Discussed on American Innovations

American Innovations

05:26 min | 1 year ago

"great depression" Discussed on American Innovations

"It's nineteen thirty. The world is stuck in the early stages the great depression many Americans lift their spirits at the new moving picture shows in theaters and nickelodeon 's Buster Keaton Charlie Chaplin comedies. These films are often introduced with Mickey mouse cartoons or newsreels one newsreel in particular dazzles the audience with the promise of soon bringing these new moving picture shows into their very own homes presents. A backstage preview television the newest miracle of modern Electrical Engineering Mr penalty shown shown at the right is working on the image dissect to photoelectric camera. Tube of his own invention that distinguishes his system of television from others. It is said to be responsible for the most clearly defined television pictures placed in the second of this receiving system is a funnel shaped cattle due the round flat surface of its bulb becomes the picture screen in Studio Monitor. It does it as well. As in home receiving sense the image detector Tube and the Cathode Ray tube are the heart and brain system. Television Vilo Farnsworth's image to sector tube and camera system had finally brought the long anticipated picture radio into being station equipment. The electrons become radio impulses to broadcast and picked up by receiving sense where the routine is with us. The radio impulsive becoming points of light that appear on the screen as picture thirty pictures. I completed every second. These earliest television programming was live performance music and sound accompanied. The OBAMAS was action both visible and audible elements going on the air in perfect synchronization battling with the speed of light to amaze of tubes and equipment. The show leaves the station send the towers viewed by the television public and audience as yet small and comparatively ignorant of the research and experiment. That makes it possible rush to see and hear people many miles away watching this newsreel in the movie theater. The audience is intrigued but sceptical. The most fanciful dream of mankind is day startling reality destined to become the world's most popular science in one thousand nine thirty in San Francisco. Two years have passed since Filo funds worth with help from his wife. Pam Gardner and her brother cliff triumphantly showed off off a working prototype of electronic television. Violence picture was on the front page of the San Francisco Chronicle under a headline that called him a genius is name was being being mentioned in newsreels magazines journals and the Associated Press but he hadn't yet found a manufacturer to partner with so financially files fortunes agents hadn't changed Penn gave birth to their first son. Filo T farnsworth third the previous year and a second son. Kenny would follow in nineteen thirty one but now a curious envelope in the days male brings a new possibility. You got a letter here. Filo says it's from New York I can't believe. RCA is offering one hundred thousand dollars for the image sector would. That's wonderful that exactly pam they want to own it outright i. It's not ideal but one hundred thousand dollars is a lot of money. Not compared to what television will eventually be worth. It's a mistake to cash in too soon like this. We have to keep the faith. I understand. Filo it's your invention that's Pammy. It's not it it never was. It's it's all of the great minds that have come before to make this possible. And it's you it's cliff. All of us were a team but they wanna buy our work and call it. There's it's just not fair. They can license it if they like. I've spent my entire life working towards this Pam. It's like it's like trying to sell one of our children. The Lord will provide Filo a a few weeks later. The farnsworth's receive another big opportunity with visit to the lab from United Artists. The Film Production Company was Silent Age Film Stars like Charlie the chaplain. Douglas Fairbanks D W Griffith and Mary. PICKFORD PICKFORD is especially enthusiastic. We just had to see this amazing new television system. We've heard so much about it. But when the time comes the image to sector won't cooperate Filo is rattled. I I'm sorry folks. This is humiliating million chaplain smiles. Don't sweat it. I've seen worse like Douglas's latest picture a few hours later. After the stars leave cliff finds the problem on a wire wasn't plugged in it. Was that simple Dan. How did I not see that Pam tries to reassure him? Mary Pickford was here. We were all a bit distracted. It did keep the faith Filo when a third opportunity knocks a few weeks later Filo is determined to answer the call this time. FILC who radio in Philadelphia. They they they want to license the Patents Fund our research. But it'll still be ours with some help Vilo at Phil Co so in Philadelphia moving from the bay area to the city of brotherly love. What do you think it sounds great? And so the Farnsworth family packed packed their bags with their belongings precious equipment and board a train to head across the country to Philadelphia Pennsylvania. His family counting on him. Kylo could only pray he was making the right decision..

Filo Vilo Farnsworth cliff Filo T Pam Gardner Mary Pickford Philadelphia Charlie Chaplin PICKFORD PICKFORD Buster Keaton San Francisco Chronicle San Francisco nickelodeon OBAMAS New York Pennsylvania
"great depression" Discussed on The Highwire with Del Bigtree

The Highwire with Del Bigtree

08:20 min | 1 year ago

"great depression" Discussed on The Highwire with Del Bigtree

"Parents are are the last line of defense for kids. And don't deferring contract out your decision making in your brain to some authority because we have fairly good evidence that the regulatory agencies they're supposed to be protecting us are captured. The problem here is regulatory capshaw. Yeah so the regulatory agencies are supposed to be protecting us or actually protecting the pharmaceutical industry big chemical companies power plants. That sort of so so I think I think two things need to happen one is we have to do something. Something about regulatory capture both at the federal and state level we have to just ban financial conflicts of interest at the CDC and eight and FDA those everybody the whole argument whether it's Obama or trump. Or anyone they say nobody else understands pesticides like this. Scientists that worked on Santo. That's why putting them at the FDA or the EPA nobody understands oil drilling and fracking better than someone that does it. That's why we're putting them at the job at the EPA. How do we get around that argument? Yeah well look. There's this large literature on what's called the funding perfect and the funding effect looks at how financial conflicts of interest change research outcomes. And so what. The what. The literature shows is that amy financial contribution from pharmaceutical company from a chemical company. Changes Research outcomes literally changes changes the data so if a pharmaceutical company provides free pizza to the steady on a clinical trial that changes the outcome that the data so polly complaint too. They say when Bobby Kennedy was going to be put the head of the Vaccine Safety Commission by Donald Trump like he has a bias. He shouldn't be running this department. You know the scientific studies and I used to say the doctors arguments hold on a second. Are you telling me that you think that a bias would affect the outcomes of the studies like absolutely. I said that's my problem with your studies when I live in a world where everybody's saying flaxseeds the Great Adventure of the twentieth century. Three every doctor says there's no such thing as back injury. You can't do a study. You're not doing a challenge study. You're not challenging the product the way it should be it should be a bobby Kennedy. It should be a doctor Dave Weldon who here reference In the Burton hearings. It should be somebody that is willing into challenge it and say I don't buy it. I don't believe it safe. I don't believe this chemical safe. That's how science is done and we're just you know it's the opposite visit. It's we're not going to do when he studies. We're going to look the other way I mean it's so incredible This was complaining to the New York Times writer about like. How does it not bother? Are you that vaccines are getting. No safe these against placebos there. We now know that. There's no surveillance systems that anyone really trusts. And then if you do have a surveillance system is arguing on on twitter right now with a couple of doctors great you believe in the St which has you know. Millions of people on it. The Institute of Medicine said do evacuate vs on backstabbing. Best they refused used us that database for the one thing that you could actually get some answers on so it's doing it on purpose. I guess that's my probably my final question to you because you deepen. You're looking at this from a different way. I get asked this all the time to some dark force. Are they just doing this on purpose. Complete ignorance what is going on because because you said one trillion dollars you know by twenty twenty five years from now my kids. My daughter's six years old. What happens when she's He's twenty? What happens you know fifteen years from now at this rate what are we have? Yeah yeah that's one of the things that I've been trying to figure out in this whole debate both the regulators the scientists and politicians who who continue to choose not to study the evidence and are just repeating tired soundbites that they get they hear from the pharmaceutical industry or from a lobbyist or that they maybe have read in the New New York Times. Is it willful. Do they know that they're being untruthful. And I think capture happens in a lot of ways so there's financial capture right consulting gear stock option and a job promised after after you leave the regulatory agency but there's other kinds kinds of capture right what they call cultural capture. So if I think these people live in an information bubble right so they only talk to people people who think like them they only read new sources that think like them in my research and this is chapter five of my thesis. I look at the way that capture sure happens throughout the knowledge production process and science itself and basically from the moment a student sets foot on a medical school campus all the way through his or her career until retirement. They're living in information bubble farmers shapes what's in the text books. They give consulting gigs to their professors. The chair of the department has a console Djing Gig with the pharmaceutical company. The university is invested in Johnson and Johnson or bay or or or or one of those big companies and then they go into medical Michael Practice right and the clinical practice guidelines are written by a committee that's-that's filled with pharmaceutical industry types. Right and standards of care are written by the pharmaceutical industry. And so and then they pick up the New York Times and they're they're not talking about a crisis or an epidemic or anything like that and and so they live in this information bubble. And it's really comfortable in that information bubble right there. Well paid their well respected. There looked up to in society and so I think one reason we get such pushback is because we present evidence that sorta pierces that information. And it's painful dad. Used to always say why. Let a factor in the way of a good story right. They're living in a good story. Don't give me data. Don't give me facts. Watch these bills and Trenton. Where they're going to try and do data collection on dying dying babies? Why would that even be a heavy lift? I mean you should think every single politician that does not pass by every politician. Then you know that these people are all being paid off but you know we could go on on and on but your research is brilliant I commend you on taking a look at this terrifying. I mean perhaps perhaps more terrifying because those of us that aren't suffering in home and going through this we can live in our own bubble. But it's coming for us. Isn't it this year on effect every pocketbook that's GonNa Affect the future of a nation and the world and the more we can talk about this and the more we can bring sunshine onto this conversation the more that we can have hard conversations about the science about the risks about. What's happening with kids about what's happening with families families about cost? We have to have a lot more of these conversations. And I'm so grateful to you and your whole team here at the high. Wear because you're bringing this information to people and it's going to break through through has to because there's only one way forward for the United States of America we have to get these toxic chemicals Outta Children's bodies so that we can have some semblance went of the United States as it currently is it's untenable to continue down the current path that we're on where all these toxic chemicals are allowed into children's Prince bodies. We can do better. We know how to and you're helping to show people the way forward and I'm grateful for that and and I'm grateful for all the MOMS who turn turn out to educate their elected officials about these matters and there's sort of this epidemiology from below. That's happened happening. It's a remarkable moment in the history of this democracy and and I trust continue. Thank you so much for work. If you like that clip that'd be sure to check out Our live broadcasts highwire every Thursday morning at eleven. Am Pacific Time. You can watch it on facebook youtube. I tunes end twitter we'll see..

Bobby Kennedy EPA New York Times FDA United States Obama CDC Santo twitter Dave Weldon back injury Donald Trump facebook Institute of Medicine twenty twenty
"great depression" Discussed on American History Tellers

American History Tellers

01:47 min | 2 years ago

"great depression" Discussed on American History Tellers

"We'll put you in the shoes of everyday citizens as history was being made. And we'll show you how the events of the times affected them their families and affects you now. Over the course of about a decade, the great depression of ended American society, the claps of the stock market in October nineteen twenty nine was the first widely seen sign of the great, depression, only the onset of World War. Two would clearly markets in this gut wrenching period. Devastated lines, transform the global economy and recast the direction of our country. Hindsight shows the conditions leading to the great depression appeared well before the stock market collapsed declining factory production and plunging cotton prices were early indicators of trouble followed by a torrent of lost fortunes, Bank closures and stock crashes that left the country staggering unemployment would grow to previously. Unimaginable levels bellies would with hunger promises would be broken. Millions of people would be driven to migrate accelerating environmental disaster that would stretch across state lines. It was a decade. Unlike any other reform minded politicians would. Reshape American institutions, even as labor, unrest, racial strife, and the dark shadow of native isn't pushed back from all sides in that decade American suffered through shocking loss to a recovery that would only be completed by the onset of global conflict. But just a few years before the country was enjoying a period of unbridled enthusiasm, the nineteen twenties had roared mightily technological advances following the end of World War One had revolutionized factory lines and consumer goods by some assessments manufacturing grew by seventy percent from nineteen twenty two to twenty eight. Meanwhile, more Americans than ever could afford to buy new cars radios.

seventy percent
"great depression" Discussed on WRLR 98.3 FM

WRLR 98.3 FM

02:39 min | 3 years ago

"great depression" Discussed on WRLR 98.3 FM

"More to help the great depression and that dumb fdr lengthened did and then i heard someone like oh i've never heard this before what is proof in like he was from milton friedman and like i instantly you likely has always for milton friedman i easily discounted and then i like it was like i will maybe i shouldn't go milton is a pretty smart guy i dunno he's got a least what is it to nobel so hide him instantly but no i know what you're saying back to w i i i really am in i do make a an intentional and conscious effort to not just expose myself to those things that bolster my own opinions it's very difficult to do do it also to i think is more and more difficult now because there's not a tremendous number of gentle news outlets moderate news outlets where you can just sort of get a bit of a a little bit of both and i listened to npr but i also to uh do watch fox news on occasion i can't take that much more than i can take msnbc he's tend to stay away from that induce cnn i'll i do alatas sky news and i do a lot of internet reading with like atlantic forbes uh you know business insider and these are this try to get that spectrum the one area that i won't really spent a lot of time getting a quote unquote and i'm saying this ironically alternative uh news and information is in the in the medical and science brought because what i find is that the non traditional outlets for medicine in particular tend to be very beanal very rapacious they're they're they're they're they're publishing for greed rather than for education and by that i'm i'm i'm looking to you um mr mer gola and who's in our backyard and in a lot of these natural news and david avocado wolf these guys who clearly no giant even argue selling off like like the website com e l that are only i'll i'll i'll use sbc dot com is a source of their website and it's one of those websites they like otto plays adds an annual they do a lot of click bait articles whereas if you go to some like a boring one like this like bisic stat orders offline in in i don't i don't think that they have to be i would i.

great depression milton friedman msnbc david nobel npr otto milton
"great depression" Discussed on Motley Fool Answers

Motley Fool Answers

01:31 min | 3 years ago

"great depression" Discussed on Motley Fool Answers

"The great depression played out over three years and that i think did the opposite of what the 1920s did is that people just got a custom to pessimism and they got the their hope vanished after you just been beaten up consistently for three years people does lose all their optimism in all their faith and that feeds on itself because you know if if businesses and employees investors don't have any optimism don't have any confidence than it's really hard to get up so the stock market bottomed in mid 1932 on employment the economy bottomed in 1930 three four years after the crash saturday how do we recover how do we get out of this this is where like things could get political and putin you know a lot of people still disagree with this ninety years later but franklin roosevelt is is elected a 1932 brings answering 1832 and brings in you know starts starts the new deal so there's that element of it of economic stimulus from the new deal does changing tactics and what not there's also a thing with all recessions that prices get low enough stock prices housing prices convene a labour prices things get low enough than its it's attractive to get back in business and every investment every business opportunity is attractive at some price and prices got ridiculously low in 1930s everywhere the price of labour of the price of food but 1932 stock prices were down eighty nine percent from their 1929 peak.

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"great depression" Discussed on BizTalk Radio

BizTalk Radio

02:14 min | 4 years ago

"great depression" Discussed on BizTalk Radio

"Grew up during the great depression and they remember quite vividly the you know the red lines and all that stuff and people jumping off of buildings and and clashes and so forth and if you grew up in that kind of an environment you are skewed differently now many of us baby boomers there's also grew up in a financial era were we made outsized returns better performance i mean if you're an investor starting in the mid nineteen 80s he sees stocks away differently than those investors that invested in nineteen twenty five or nineteen sixty six and it has an indelible mark that it's made in your psyche and so what we need to do do is really put our full biases on display we need to be able to come clean with an adviser that has the guts to look you in the eye and say your full of baloney basically in what your beliefs are and that's hard to do i can tell you as a former adviser it's hard to do i did once i was fairly successful as an advisor and didn't quote need the business uh i was quite able to do that i will tell you if you're an adviser listening to me you'll lose some but you'll have integrity and you'll get more than gene then then you lose because people will respect you more if you just say you know what i mean i wouldn't say it this way but that whole idea of not being an investor and the stock market this form of baloney is the best asset class of a long time periods and that whole idea that you don't need to have some safe money to cover essential expenses in retirement or you don't need to have guaranteed income as part of your strategy or you don't need to have asset location or tax management and all that stuff because you can do this stuff on your own without me is baloney too that's what we're talking about managing emotions with logic take quick break.

great depression baby boomers advisor stock market
"great depression" Discussed on Harvard Kennedy School PolicyCast

Harvard Kennedy School PolicyCast

01:47 min | 4 years ago

"great depression" Discussed on Harvard Kennedy School PolicyCast

"A unpleasantly in the interwar period uh with the rise of fascism on the one hand and communism on the other hand and then of course a deep collapse of the world economy uh in in the great depression um and and my fear uh looking at what was happening uh in economic trends in poltical trends was that um uh as as the world economy became a more integrated uh somewhat paradoxically at at that democracies would become a domestically disintegrated so there was this this tension uh between what was happening um globally between the beneficiaries and various elites all around the world really um sort of iin interacting gun and exchanging views ideas good services finance and so forth but it were increasingly becoming disengaged from their own societies and a were a big um gaps and cleavages opening up not just in terms of incomes and and wealth and opportunities but also in terms of uh uh our our our our cognitive maps are mental accounts of how the world work on i think we've seen the swear clearly now uh in a number of um country's most prominent the of course in the recent election in the united states where we really told me about two different countries um an and many of us of who live in in cambridge um have difficulty understanding how a half the country wool voted uh for somebody who um uh many of us believe uh has has a completely false sense uh in the wrong sense of of of reality.

united states great depression cambridge one hand