35 Burst results for "Grant"

Why MLK Was Wrong on Reparations

The Larry Elder Show

01:19 min | 2 d ago

Why MLK Was Wrong on Reparations

"Give me okay in 1968, spoke about he didn't use the term reparations, but that's exactly what he was talking about. Here's what he said in 1968 the year he was assassinated. And I'm quoting at the very same time that America refused to give the Negro in a land through an act of Congress, our government was giving away millions of acres of land in the west and in the Midwest, which meant it was willing to undergird its white peasants from Europe with an economic floor. But not only did they give them land, they built land grant colleges with government money to teach them how to farm. Not only that, they provided county agents to further their expertise in farming. Not only that, they provided low interest rates in order that they could mechanize their farms. And he also spoke about black people needing to get their check from the government. So MLK certainly was right in talking about equal rights. But frankly did wrong in suggesting government should do something to provoke equal results. To the extent that there were people who were discriminated against or their legal heirs, there have been lawsuits that have been filed, there have been settlements that have been reached. But beyond that, a government can only be just in its own time.

Midwest Congress America Europe
UK Prime Minister Boris Johnson’s Luck May Have Just Run Out

The Hugh Hewitt Show: Highly Concentrated

00:35 sec | 6 d ago

UK Prime Minister Boris Johnson’s Luck May Have Just Run Out

"Of rule breaking runs into a crisis, according to The Economist, the telegraph says Rishi sunak, who is their Chancellor of the exchequer, the smart young guy, the 41 year old, didn't show up in common just in his support the boss. The Tories will be buried if they ignore the real lessons behind Boris's fall. Alistair heath of the telegraph writes. Tory benches packed out for bloodsport as Boris Johnson reaches new heights of cringe, according to Madeline grant in the telegraph. Boris Johnson is toast, if Susan grey comes back and says anything other than he's completely innocent and that's not going to happen. Then conflicting

Rishi Sunak Alistair Heath The Telegraph Boris Johnson Madeline Grant Boris Susan Grey
Democrats Change Voting Laws in a Bid to Win Elections

The Dinesh D'Souza Podcast

01:54 min | Last week

Democrats Change Voting Laws in a Bid to Win Elections

"There are some very interesting things going on in the Democratic Party. You would think that if the Democrats are beginning to think that their policies are not that popular, they would work on selling those policies, they would work on pulling back the policies that the American people flatly reject. But no, they have no intention of doing any of that. Their solution is really simple. Let's change who gets to vote. So that's let's try to figure out how we can manipulate the voting process so that we can win we the Democrats can win, despite our unpopular policies. This way we can forge ahead with the policies. We can still pull off election victories. Now a clear sign of this is New York where you would think the Democrats kind of have a lock, the Democrats are gonna win anyway. But even in New York, they're very insecure about their prospects. And so what have they done? They've actually passed a law allowing non citizens and chord dreamers to vote. Now, this is a rule. This is a permission that was passed by the New York City council. It's apparently been approved by the new mayor, Eric Adams. And it will go into effect well. It will go into effect if court challenges don't succeed. But let's look at what they're trying to do. Now they know New York knows they can not allow illegals to vote in presidential elections. In fact, they can't even allow illegals to vote in state elections. So what they're saying is we want to allow illegals to vote in municipal elections. And so this would be elections for local offices, local referendums, that kind of thing. So it's called municipal avoiding rights. And New York City becomes the first major U.S. city to do this to grant widespread municipal voting rights to non

Democratic Party New York Eric Adams New York City Council New York City U.S.
American Airlines Apologizes for Pilot Repping 'Let's Go Brandon' Luggage Tag

Mark Levin

01:19 min | Last week

American Airlines Apologizes for Pilot Repping 'Let's Go Brandon' Luggage Tag

"Now we talked about that I talked about this airline stuff and I just wanted to hit this because I thought it was funny The American Airlines CEO and the corporation are now apologizing about a pilot that had a let's go Brandon sticker on his luggage tag So he's rocking the let's go Brandon swag and gets chastised for it And it went viral after a Twitter user Was responding to it and they were blasting him for doing it Here's what they said Cowardly rhetoric on their crew luggage when they're in uniform We are the only passengers who noticed and we're disgusted The user added Now okay granted I mean you know they didn't say anything when it was BLM time last year it was kind of encouraged It was like you know if you want to do that now people are saying oh stop the presses You hear the cars break screeching How are you going to compare Let's go branded to BLM Well I think I just did Number one but I get it intellectually There are some differences It's not an apples to apples comparison and I get that But it's BLM was more right It was a social movement as a social political movement Let's go Brandon is a piece of pop culture but I guess it's a political statement just the

Brandon Swag American Airlines Brandon BLM Twitter
Bucs beat Panthers 41-17, earn No. 2 playoff seeding in NFC

AP News Radio

00:45 sec | Last week

Bucs beat Panthers 41-17, earn No. 2 playoff seeding in NFC

"The the Tampa Tampa Bay Bay Buccaneers Buccaneers defeated defeated the the Carolina Carolina Panthers Panthers forty forty one one to to seventeen seventeen to to captured captured the the second second seed seed in in the the NFC NFC playoffs playoffs and and a a home home game game against against the the Philadelphia Philadelphia Eagles Eagles next next weekend weekend leaving leaving only only seventeen seventeen to to ten ten beginning beginning in in the the fourth fourth quarter quarter the the books books exploded exploded for for twenty twenty four four points points including including two two Tom Tom Brady Brady to to Mike Mike Evans Evans touchdown touchdown strikes strikes Evans Evans made made six six catches catches for for eighty eighty nine nine yards yards and and passed passed the the one one thousand thousand yard yard receiving receiving mark mark for for the the eighth eighth consecutive consecutive year year an an NFL NFL record record but but I'm I'm just just happy happy to to be be just just being being in in a a failing failing to to break break records records in in breaking breaking all all records records it's it's a a it's it's a a true true blessing blessing and and I I don't don't take take it it for for granted granted Scott Scott coming coming each each year year or or we're we're what's what's L. L. often often try try to to be be the the best best I I can can be be Carolina Carolina Sam Sam Darnold Darnold threw threw for for two two hundred hundred nineteen nineteen yards yards and and two two scores scores but but it it wasn't wasn't enough enough to to get get a a win win I'm I'm Tom Tom Akins Akins

Tampa Tampa Bay Bay Buccaneers Carolina Carolina Panthers NFC Philadelphia Philadelphia Eagl Tom Tom Brady Brady Mike Mike Evans Evans Evans Evans Buccaneers Mark Mark Panthers Eagles NFL Scott Scott L. L. Sam Sam Darnold Darnold Carolina Tom Tom Akins Akins
Watershed moment in NYC: New law allows noncitizens to vote

AP News Radio

00:42 sec | Last week

Watershed moment in NYC: New law allows noncitizens to vote

"More more than than eight eight hundred hundred thousand thousand noncitizens noncitizens end end dreamers dreamers in in New New York York City City will will have have access access to to the the ballot ballot box box after after mayor mayor Eric Eric Adams Adams allowed allowed legislation legislation to to automatically automatically become become law law on on Sunday Sunday the the legislation legislation was was approved approved by by the the city city council council last last month month that that would would take take effect effect as as early early as as next next year year opponents opponents have have said said they they plan plan to to challenge challenge it it unless unless the the courts courts intervene intervene New New York York becomes becomes the the first first major major U. U. S. S. city city to to grant grant widespread widespread municipal municipal voting voting rights rights to to non non citizens citizens allowing allowing them them to to vote vote in in local local elections elections but but not not federal federal or or statewide statewide more more than than a a dozen dozen communities communities across across the the U. U. S. S. already already allowed allowed noncitizens noncitizens to to cast cast ballots ballots in in local local elections elections Julie Julie Walker Walker New New York York

New New York York City City Mayor Eric Eric Adams Adams City City Council Council New New York York U. Julie Julie Walker Walker
 Prince William seeks nominees for $1 million Earthshot prize

AP News Radio

00:46 sec | Last week

Prince William seeks nominees for $1 million Earthshot prize

"Britain's Britain's prince prince William William is is seeking seeking nominees nominees for for his his one one million million dollars dollars of of shocked shocked prize prize prince prince William's William's appealed appealed to to innovators innovators around around the the world world to to submit submit nominations nominations for for the the competition competition aimed aimed at at finding finding new new ways ways to to tackle tackle climate climate change change William William and and his his charity charity the the royal royal foundation foundation launched launched the the price price in in twenty twenty twenty twenty inspired inspired by by John John F. F. Kennedy's Kennedy's nineteen nineteen sixty sixty two two moonshot moonshot speech speech that that challenged challenged Americans Americans to to go go to to the the moon moon by by the the end end of of the the decade decade the the prize prize to to be be awarded awarded to to five five winners winners every every year year until until twenty twenty thirty thirty is is billed billed as as the the most most prestigious prestigious of of its its kind kind each each winner winner will will receive receive a a grant grant of of one one point point four four million million dollars dollars to to develop develop and and scale scale up up the the ideas ideas Charles Charles to to this this month month London London

Prince Prince William William Prince Prince William Britain William William Royal Royal Foundation Foundat John John F. F. Kennedy William Kennedy Charles Charles London
Navy blocked from acting against 35 COVID vaccine refusers

AP News Radio

00:47 sec | 2 weeks ago

Navy blocked from acting against 35 COVID vaccine refusers

"A a federal federal judge judge in in Texas Texas is is blocking blocking the the navy navy from from acting acting against against thirty thirty five five sailors sailors who who refused refused orders orders to to get get vaccinated vaccinated against against cold cold at at nineteen nineteen the the Pentagon Pentagon has has received received thousands thousands of of requests requests for for religious religious waivers waivers from from being being vaccinated vaccinated but but it it has has not not granted granted any any these these thirty thirty five five sailors sailors refused refused to to comply comply on on religious religious grounds grounds and and the the judge judge granted granted a a preliminary preliminary injunction injunction save save the the navy's navy's process process for for considering considering religious religious exemption exemption request request is is flawed flawed and and amounts amounts to to feeder feeder be be injunctions injunctions a a new new challenge challenge to to Pentagon Pentagon chief chief Lloyd Lloyd Austin's Austin's moved moved mandate mandate vaccination vaccination for for all all military military members members there's there's no no indication indication the the judge's judge's move move will will affect affect other other troops troops well well over over ninety ninety percent percent of of the the military military is is now now fully fully vaccinated vaccinated Sager Sager mag mag on on me me at at the the White White House House

Navy Navy Pentagon Pentagon Texas Navy Lloyd Lloyd Austin Pentagon Austin Sager Sager White White House House
Congressman Matt Gaetz: 'I Wouldn't Measure the Speaker's Office for Drapes Quite Yet'

The Charlie Kirk Show

01:11 min | 2 weeks ago

Congressman Matt Gaetz: 'I Wouldn't Measure the Speaker's Office for Drapes Quite Yet'

"It looks like the Republicans going to take back the house. I see almost no possibility. That isn't the case. Is that right? Well, I wouldn't measure the speaker's office for drapes quite yet. The macro generic ballot gives us a lot of tailwind. But you actually have to go win specific campaigns in specific candidates. You got to go beat golden in Maine. You got to beat a slotkin in Michigan. And you got to be Laurie and spanberger in Virginia. And these folks have run competitive campaigns and they have won them. And so I don't take it for granted. We have to have compelling candidates. And that's why what turning point has done with this America conference, this pro America conference we've been enjoying is so important because it actually gives our candidates the right tone, the right message, the right infrastructure to be able to go and win and I think that if we just say, well, the generic ballot looks good for us. We could look past some of these specific tactical things. I think what you're talking about is we also have to play to win, not as if we've already won and just play defense and taboo corporate tax cuts, right? Zombie Reagan isn't coming to save us. And so, you know, just sort of harkening back to the zombie Reagan issue matrix won't be helpful.

Slotkin Spanberger Laurie Maine America Michigan Virginia Zombie Reagan Reagan
Titans clinch 2nd straight AFC South, beating Miami 34-3

AP News Radio

00:47 sec | 2 weeks ago

Titans clinch 2nd straight AFC South, beating Miami 34-3

"The the Tennessee Tennessee Titans Titans ended ended Miami's Miami's seven seven game game win win streak streak dominating dominating the the dolphins dolphins thirty thirty four four to to three three Titans Titans quarterback quarterback Ryan Ryan Tannehill Tannehill did did all all he he needed needed to to do do going going thirteen thirteen of of eighteen eighteen for for a a hundred hundred twenty twenty yards yards and and two two touchdowns touchdowns but but the the spotlight spotlight went went to to running running back back d'onta d'onta foreman foreman signed signed to to the the practice practice squad squad in in November November to to rushing rushing for for a a hundred hundred and and thirty thirty two two yards yards and and a a touchdown touchdown in in a a division division clinching clinching game game in in January January foreman foreman says says he's he's taking taking nothing nothing for for granted granted the the event event planner planner football football does does all all the the little little things things that that I I was was missing missing well well being being at at home home I I mean mean I I I I just just take take every every moment moment to to cherish cherish it it you you know know I I mean mean I'm I'm here here to to try try to to help help this this team team anyway anyway I I can can so so I I don't don't ever ever take take it it lightly lightly never never no no no no day day that that I'm I'm here here I I never never take take it it lightly lightly Miami Miami quarterback quarterback tua tua Tagovailoa Tagovailoa when when just just eighteen eighteen of of thirty thirty eight eight for for two two hundred hundred five five yards yards and and an an interception interception with with the the win win the the Titans Titans captured captured the the AFC AFC south south title title for for the the second second straight straight year year hi hi Jeremy Jeremy can can go go over over

Titans Titans Tennessee Tennessee Titans Tit Ryan Ryan Tannehill Tannehill Miami Dolphins Onta D'onta Foreman Football Tua Tua Tagovailoa Tagovailoa AFC Jeremy Jeremy
Pennsylvania Court Allows Inspection of Dominion Voting Machines in One County

The Larry Elder Show

01:34 min | 3 weeks ago

Pennsylvania Court Allows Inspection of Dominion Voting Machines in One County

"This is from world net daily, there's something called the amistad project. And they've been focused on focused on election integrity. Before the 2020 ballots were counted, and they just announced that the Commonwealth court of Pennsylvania is allowing project almost our project and Fulton county descend, the county's dominion voting machines to the state Senate for inspection. The director of the amistad project is named Phil Klein, he said and I'm quoting him. The court recognized that it was improper to demand that the county which owns a machines, and is responsibility of running the election, along with the legislature can't determine whether the machines work properly. As a judge noted, there's no justification for preventing the county from looking at their own machines. And inspection had been scheduled for earlier this month, but the state AG and the Secretary of State sued to prevent any more to prevent such move to affirm the accuracy of the 2020 election results. Now it's set for January 10. And that will be after a judge determines that the review must be allowed to proceed. With a short delay to allow experts on both sides to come up with a formal protocol for the inspection. The am a star project attorney said this executive branch officials were trying to stop the inspection altogether, but the judge did not grant their emergency motion to stop the inspection. They did not go to court seeking a delay. They sought to stop it and they lost.

Commonwealth Court Of Pennsylv Amistad Project Phil Klein Fulton County State Ag Senate Legislature
Biden's Child Tax Credit Could Create a Massive Expansion of the Welfare State

The Larry Elder Show

02:17 min | Last month

Biden's Child Tax Credit Could Create a Massive Expansion of the Welfare State

"What the heritage foundation writes about what Biden wants to do with the child, tax credit. In reality, he's proposing a massive expansion of the welfare state. Except he's calling it a child allowance. In the policy relies upon the child credit tech credit. Now think about a tax credit. That means you pay taxes, right? Well, he's expanding it for people that don't pay taxes. They don't have jobs. Rather than providing tax relief, the plan would give cash grants to families who do not work or work comparatively comparatively little. The Clinton era welfare reform understood that paying able bodied people not to work with good for neither society, nor recipients. Such payments tend to push individuals out of the labor force and toward the margin of society, impeding upward mobility for both adults and children. In reality the plan would offer zero long-term tax relief to working families with children. Even in the short term, some 75% of the aid would go to cash grants to families who owe no income tax. Contrary to the Biden administration rhetoric the primary focus would not be taxed relief, but the elimination of all work requirements and work incentives from the current child credit program. Under the current system, a family must earn at least $2500 during the year to be eligible for the cash grants. The Biden shallow allowance policy seeks to rip out these work requirements and incentive credit explicitly overturning the principles of welfare reform. Under the Biden plan, the federal government would for the first time in a quarter century provide unconditional cash grants to families who choose not to work during the year.

Biden Heritage Foundation Biden Administration Clinton Federal Government
Why Is Congressman Mark Garcia Against Diversion Program for Juveniles?

America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

01:48 min | Last month

Why Is Congressman Mark Garcia Against Diversion Program for Juveniles?

"So if juveniles commit felonies like burglary, assault, vehicle theft robbery grant theft, sexual battery arson, you name it, they can bypass being charged and go straight into some other program. This is causing a big problem in Los Angeles where we are already seeing a surge. Really, crime rate skyrocketing around here. Yes, absolutely. And really, this is a continuation of this guy who is effectively working for the bad guys, giving hope to the criminals rather than protecting the law abiding citizens in our county, gascon, you've heard before, he's like the penguin from Gotham City. He's out there to do harm to our city. And he's absolutely making the biggest difference in our county that we've ever seen from a DA in the most negative way. So this new policy and when they say diversion, they're using that in the term in the sense of diverting not as in a good time. But literally diverting juveniles through our out of a system and then into a rehab program without any accountability. And what this would effectively do is allow a juvenile for instance to hold you at night point steel your stuff threatened to kill you and while they're robbing you using a weapon, they would get arrested, put into this diversion program, rehabilitated without ever seeing the inside of a courtroom without having charges levied against them. Literally a violation of the constitution, both amendments, 5 and 6, where we actually hold people accountable and again, this is just a continuation of a bad actor in the form of gascon who is literally not charging criminals for crimes. These aren't petty theft. These aren't low level misdemeanors. These are felonies and any other state any other county and these folks are going to be let free.

Gascon Gotham City Los Angeles
Over 75% of Americans Believe the Media's Primary Goal Is to Push Its Own Agenda

Mark Levin

01:19 min | Last month

Over 75% of Americans Believe the Media's Primary Goal Is to Push Its Own Agenda

"Listen to this statistic And I saw this in my email from convention of state really really interesting More than 75% of Americans say the media's primary goal is advancing their own political agenda Crazy stuff right 76.3 to be exact percentage 76.3% of Americans now believe the establishment media's primary goal is to push its own political agenda according to a poll from Trafalgar group and the convention of states Now 62% 62.7% of Democrats believe that the primary focus of the mainstream media's coverage of current events is to advance their own opinions or political agenda while 70 excuse me 37.3 believe that finding and reporting facts is their main objective So you have this one group that says no no they're in it to win it These guys are the real deal They're legit And then the overwhelming amount of people think they're fake their phone either fraud like the late great bomb grant used to say So where does that put us That puts us with a fake phony fraud in The White House Joe Elba was so Biden and immediate that supporting him and now they don't know what to do Now they're trying to shake things up at CNN to see if they can repair it And you've got journalists and professors that are trying to come to the rescue clean up and il 6 Clean up another

Trafalgar Group Convention Of States Now Joe Elba Biden White House CNN
Durant carries Nets past 76ers for another short-handed win

AP News Radio

00:28 sec | Last month

Durant carries Nets past 76ers for another short-handed win

"Kevin Kevin Durant Durant highlighted highlighted is is thirty thirty four four point point night night by by making making a a game game tying tying four four point point play play with with at at one one forty forty six six remaining remaining in in the the nets nets one one fourteen fourteen one one oh oh five five down down into into the the seventy seventy Sixers Sixers grant grant also also had had eleven eleven rebounds rebounds and and eight eight assists assists Thursday Thursday for for Brooklyn Brooklyn which which was was missing missing seven seven players players due due to to a a coronavirus coronavirus health health and and safety safety protocols protocols Blake Blake Griffin Griffin and and Nick Nick Claxton Claxton both both added added a a season season high high seventeen seventeen points points in in the the nets nets fourth fourth straight straight win win the the Sixers Sixers dropped dropped their their third third straight straight despite despite Jo Jo Ellan Ellan be be just just thirty thirty two two points points nine nine rebounds rebounds and and six six assists assists I'm I'm Dave Dave Ferrie Ferrie

Kevin Kevin Durant Durant Sixers Sixers Grant Grant Brooklyn Brooklyn Nets Blake Blake Griffin Griffin Nick Nick Claxton Claxton Sixers Jo Jo Ellan Ellan Dave Dave Ferrie Ferrie
Bret Baier Takes Another Look at Ulysses S. Grant's Presidency in New Book

Mark Levin

01:25 min | Last month

Bret Baier Takes Another Look at Ulysses S. Grant's Presidency in New Book

"You have a fantastic book to rescue the republic Ulysses S. Grant the fragile union and the crisis of 1876 The book has done fantastically well It would make a great stocking stuff for a great Christmas gift people and get it at Amazon.com Any retail stores a matter of fact And Ulysses S. Grant has been long misunderstood living in the shadows of Abraham Lincoln When you agree with that I really think that's what the book did And his list on the historian's vote and however you take that historians voting on presidents He's gone up about 13 spots just in recent years But I do think that this book is another look at this presidency And you know this from your amazing book that congratulations on all the success I mean holy cow Record breaking But you read those reviews and just people who read the book on Amazon or wherever Barnes and noble And you put on in there and you just click on some of the people that take time to type And what I got out of that is that people's eyes were opened to really an American hero not just in the union general position but in the presidency trying to hold the country together as the country was really tipping towards a second Civil War

Ulysses S. Grant Amazon Abraham Lincoln Barnes
Arizona Attorney General Mark Brnovich's Active Lawsuits Against Biden Admin

Mark Levin

01:10 min | Last month

Arizona Attorney General Mark Brnovich's Active Lawsuits Against Biden Admin

"Important Well as you know we've talked about we have multiple lawsuits going on because the Biden administration their policies are not only unpopulated or unconstitutional And so we've sued over the vaccine mandates for federal workers and federal contractors We have an ongoing lawsuit but a judge in Georgia just granted a nationwide injunction so federal contractors are not going to be forced to comply As a result of our lawsuit against the osha rules which are clearly unconstitutional you know those rules now have been stayed and the Biden administration says they will not enforce them but trust but verify we will see what the Biden administration does They move the goal post all the time as you know And we also follow lawsuit We got an issue on injunction regarding healthcare workers and the mandate that people that healthcare workers that get Medicaid money or any federal dollars have to get the vaccine Clearly unconstitutional that's been put on hold as well So that's all the vaccine mandate legal unconstitutional lawsuits were involved in And we also obviously have lawsuits related to the border and what the Biden administration is doing to essentially not only abolish ice but abolish our southern

Biden Administration Osha Georgia
OJ Simpson a 'completely free man'; parole ends in Nevada

AP News Radio

00:43 sec | Last month

OJ Simpson a 'completely free man'; parole ends in Nevada

"His his lawyer lawyer says says OJ OJ Simpson Simpson is is a a completely completely free free man man Simpson Simpson was was acquitted acquitted in in nineteen nineteen ninety ninety five five of of killing killing his his ex ex wife wife and and her her friend friend he he went went to to prison prison for for a a case case in in Las Las Vegas Vegas I I didn't didn't steal steal anything anything from from anybody anybody and and I I didn't didn't know know I I was was doing doing anything anything illegal illegal more more than than a a decade decade after after the the acquittal acquittal Simpson Simpson was was found found guilty guilty of of armed armed robbery robbery for for a a confrontation confrontation with with sports sports memorabilia memorabilia dealers dealers he he served served nine nine years years in in prison prison in in Nevada Nevada and and was was released released on on parole parole in in twenty twenty seventeen seventeen I I will will be be no no problem problem you you know know and and I I I I think think I I kept kept my my word word this this is is a a set set of of done done my my time time state state police police in in Nevada Nevada say say Simpson Simpson was was granted granted good good behavior behavior credits credits and and discharged discharged from from parole parole effective effective at at the the beginning beginning of of the the month month I I met met Donahue Donahue

Simpson Simpson Oj Oj Simpson Simpson Las Las Vegas Nevada Vegas Donahue Donahue
"grant" Discussed on WorkLife with Adam Grant

WorkLife with Adam Grant

05:43 min | 2 months ago

"grant" Discussed on WorkLife with Adam Grant

"A lot of square foot of housing because you are not going to find the same house in New York. Your carry progression in your job and even the sense that you are the reason doing this particular job as opposed to something else. That reminds me of some research that Terry Mitchell and his colleagues did on what they called job embeddedness, which is the idea that if we want to predict people's turnover over time, we need to pay attention to their fit with the organization is their alignment between their values and their interests and their skills and what they do and where they belong. We need to look at their links to people and we need to look at what they would have to sacrifice to walk away. And one of the things they found in the research was that you had to look at fit links and sacrifice in a community, not just in a job to determine whether people would really walk away. And it sounds like you've arrived at a very similar set of conclusions in from a very different perspective. Because we are looking at the same data. And presumably as an open mind as we can. So back on the point of dignity, the desire to be respected. Also, the meaning that you spoke about the motivation to make a difference. When I was doing my doctoral dissertation, I had done some experiments with university of fundraising callers. And I found that just randomly assigning them to meet one scholarship recipient who had benefited from their work was enough to substantially increase the number of calls they made. The minutes they spent on the phone ultimately, the money that they raised. And one of the first questions that I got, I think it must have been in my first job talk was, well, but how does showing people the meaning of their work and seeing who they help? How does that compare against a financial incentive? And I thought it was such a complicated question to answer because I don't know what dose of meaning is equivalent to a $100 reward..

Terry Mitchell university of fundraising New York
"grant" Discussed on WorkLife with Adam Grant

WorkLife with Adam Grant

05:45 min | 2 months ago

"grant" Discussed on WorkLife with Adam Grant

"Of sort of going out of their well established field, my call for my girl and a theory for object and decided that they were going to teach development, which they were making up as they went along. And they were making up with us. And it was about, I don't know 5 or 6 of us students in the room and it's also exhilarating to see a field being created in front of your eyes and with your own inputs. And yeah, it was a bit people sorry was insane in the sense that they were like, you're a good student. You know, you could just get a great job if only you did a normal field. And I said, well, that's not. I didn't come here to get a great job. I can be able to study development economics. And it was not even question for me because I knew why I was there and I was going to do it regardless. So if we fast forward, I don't know, a couple decades. You wrote a book about radically rethinking poverty. And I think it's a wonderful summary of so much of the research you've done. But it's also a perfect fit for the show, because this show is about rethinking assumptions that we take for granted. So I'd love just for starters if you could talk a little bit about what common assumptions about poverty are overturned by your work. So I think depending on the flavor of the month, there are any number of wrong assumptions about poverty. And what's interesting is that they are very strongly held at a moment in time, and then they are kind of next year it's another one. So the one when I grew up and that I grew up poisoned. In fact, I grew up believing when I was naively thinking I was going to save the.

"grant" Discussed on WorkLife with Adam Grant

WorkLife with Adam Grant

05:58 min | 2 months ago

"grant" Discussed on WorkLife with Adam Grant

"Wow, okay, there's so many things I already want to follow up on there. The first one is you said it's dangerous to follow the career advice of your or pursue the career interests of your 8 year old self. So I had a similar experience with my, I guess, my early exposure to economics. When I was a sophomore in college, I was declared a joint major between psychology and economics. And I knew I wanted to understand human behavior and I thought the two worlds would be great to try to marry. And then I showed up in my first economics class and the professor wrote on the board that quality of life was a function of consumption and savings. That is the dumbest equation I've ever seen. My happiness has very little to do with how much I consume and how much I save. Do economists understand at all. What people care about and what drives the quality of our lives. And I'm wondering if I gave up on economics too soon, do you think I should have I should have rethought my distaste for those equations? Yeah, I think you should have, but I understand why you didn't. And I think many, many years, students have exactly the same experience, I had the same experience and I had given up. It's only because I needed to make a little bit of money in Russia and because I thought it would be a way of being closer to what was happening that I got back in the proximity of economists. Many people stopped because that's what they're exposed to or maybe if they go to a second lesson and there's stuff learning that countries worse is related to their GDP or some such. And then I'm like, we don't rightly conclude that it's not for them. And I think that's an error of it's not even an error of the economics profession. It's an hour of the way because I'm taught because if you look at what economies do, it's so varied and it's so diverse and there are still people who write down those equations, but there are many people who do other things like the behavioral economics you would perhaps have done if you had continued in the field. But you have to have completed and survived two years of disparate to get to it. And most people don't. And that's why now, this year, for example, at MIT, I teach two classes that targeted to freshmen. I want to get them right out of high school before they done any economics..

Russia MIT
"grant" Discussed on WorkLife with Adam Grant

WorkLife with Adam Grant

01:58 min | 2 months ago

"grant" Discussed on WorkLife with Adam Grant

"Going to be one of the most <Speech_Female> critical things that you <Speech_Female> do going forward. <Speech_Music_Female> Thank you. You're <Laughter> awesome. Thank you. <Laughter> Thank you. <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> Thank you. <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> Next time <Speech_Music_Male> I'm taken for granted. <Speech_Music_Male> Nobel laureate <Speech_Male> Esther duflo <Speech_Male> joins me <Speech_Music_Male> to talk about how to fight <Speech_Music_Male> poverty with <Speech_Music_Male> data, and <Speech_Music_Male> how to motivate people. <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> You wrote at <Speech_Music_Male> one point that <Speech_Male> economists <SpeakerChange> are <Speech_Male> like plumbers. <Speech_Female> When parameters <Speech_Music_Female> are really helpful, <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Music_Female> my father kept <Speech_Music_Female> saying that the best <Speech_Music_Female> for me to marry <Speech_Music_Female> would be a doctor <Speech_Music_Female> or a plumber because you <Speech_Music_Female> always need these people <Speech_Music_Female> near you. <Speech_Music_Female> <SpeakerChange> Finally, <Speech_Music_Female> I found neither.

"grant" Discussed on WorkLife with Adam Grant

WorkLife with Adam Grant

08:09 min | 2 months ago

"grant" Discussed on WorkLife with Adam Grant

"If you were writing a PepsiCo today, where would you start on that? You know, it's interesting. One thing I won't do is create hoteling systems and offices. Because if we're going to go to work, you need your personal space there. Because you're leaving home, which is, you know, kids running around the center of all the work required to be done. If you go to the office, you want peace. But now if you're sitting in a hoteling system, where it's not your place, you're plugging your computer wherever you want and start working. It doesn't feel quite personal to me. So hoteling which was in effect in the last few years may have to be revised into some workspaces. I think it would be impossible to hire to retain the best and brightest without some flexibility. I think it would be impossible to retain higher and retain young family builders and women without some flexibility. And so we're going to be writing the rules of the future of work quite a bit in the next two years. But I just hope Adam, all of these committees on the future of work, some of which I'm a part of. Don't just talk about robots and cryptocurrency and technology, but also talk about role of women, role of families. How do we go back and rewire the social infrastructure of the country? How do we do that? I hope all of that is part of the future of work. I hope so, too, which begs the question, what are you up to now? The moon shot just to set up a car economy. But beyond that, I said to the board of Amazon, which is, you know, a lot of fun, I'm learning a lot. I said on the board of Phillips memorial Sloan Kettering, the international cricket council. I teach up at the military academy at West Point. So my plate is full. I'm having a time of my life. The only thing I'm missing is my quarterly earnings pressure. That was a joke. Almost looked like you were savoring that for a second. The Hartford is an insurance company, but they're also human beings. They believe that people are capable of achieving amazing things with the right encouragement and support. As the first carrier to create a team dedicated to small business, more than 30 years ago, they really understand small business owners. They're here to help you succeed with insurance solutions that can be designed for small businesses like yours. To learn more about the Hartford's small business insurance and why over 1 million small businesses trust the Hartford, head to the Hartford dot com slash small business. So watching Amazon given that you sit on the board. I almost did a touchdown dance when Jeff Bezos finally after two decades committed to being earth's best employer, not just earth's most customer centric company. Why did it take him so long? And what can we do to accelerate more leaders down that path? I don't think look I've been on the Amazon board for two years. And long before Jeff articulated being the earth's best employer. I think it's very easy to put out a set of words. If you don't have the programs to go behind it, it's a problem. I think what Amazon is constantly looking at is if we say we're going to be the earth's best employer, what does it mean? And can we deliver on that? So the companies consumed by that on customer centricity, they figured it out. On the employer piece, everybody's focused on that. What does it mean? And is it an absolute number? Is it a relative measure? How are we going to make sure that I mean, Amazon was always one of the highest paid minimum wage? $15, Amazon committed first. Educating its employees giving them the opportunity to go get a college degree, major commitment. They're raising the wages again. And so Amazon is trying to figure out what's the basket of pay and benefits that their workers need to remain happy at Amazon. And so I think they have all the work done and the implementing it. So you're saying the talk followed a little bit of the work. I think the talk, the public talk, followed a little bit of the walk, which is I think the way it should be. Yeah. I think so too. So we're going to go to some audience questions. I've asked a few, but they're more coming before we do that. Can we do a lightning round? Sure. All right, it's up to you whether you want to give a word or a sentence or something in between. First question is, who is the living leader that you admire most? Lynn Manuel Miranda. Okay, I have to follow up on. The fact that he can wrap the way he does. Oh, play. I keep trying it, I can't do it. You've tried. I've tried, doesn't work. All right, we'll ask for a demo tape later. Okay, secondly, a company whose culture you really look up to. That you're not on the board of. But I'm not on the board of. Patagonia. Hard to disagree with that one. Okay, third question. If you were now going to have the challenge of running any company, which company do you think you'd be most excited to take the helm of? Oh, God. I'd take a healthcare company. Because the healthcare industry needs such radical reinvention so many ways. I don't know if I can pull it off, but I would give it a good shot. Well, we could certainly use your wisdom and talent there. If you were going to take any class in business school, what would it be? Data analytics. And finally, your best tip for dual career couples, you had a pretty complicated situation with your husband's work and yours, taking you to two different states and cities. And sometimes even multiple countries. What did you learn from that? First marry the right guy, very, very important. And early on in your life, make sure before you get married, just make sure both of you understand it's an equal partnership, not you're going to do all the work and your husband is going to be along for the ride. And also make sure the husband's family. In the Indian context, make sure the husband's family is supporting you. Because if they put pressure on the sun, you've lost it. So in my case, my in laws are bigger supporters than even I expected. They even today, my biggest supporter. So I had the lottery of life on this. It has been in the end. Perry for good in laws. Check them out too is what I'm saying. Check them out. There is nothing that you don't do, diligence on. I have to. All right, let's take some additional audience questions here. How did you become comfortable in your skin in a large company? You know, you never comfortable. There's always that unease. And even now, after having lived there for 42, 43 years, having been CEO been in all the halls of power, there's still that unease. And maybe that's what propels me to keep doing better all the time, but I'm comfortable, then I used to be, but you never get fully comfortable. And the big piece of advice I'd give people is, maintain your authenticity, maintain your roots, maintain what makes you, but don't come to a different culture than expect everybody to accept you for a 100% of what you are. You've got a blend into. You've got to blend into. The one story I tell you is that when I first came in here, in those days, the first question they would ask in a recruiting interview is about the ball game that happened the previous night. Sports was the language of business. So how was that touched down? What did you think of this playoff game? Everything was about sports. I can say can we talk cricket? No. They don't even know what cricket is. They think it's the most boring game. You know, I remember one C you're telling me cricket, oh yeah, you talk about cricket, I'll go shopping and come back. It does the most boring game, which is okay. You know, if you're not used to it, it can be. But I never watched baseball, please. Remember, cricket is 5 days. Without an outcome, all right? So let's just be clear here. It puts baseball to look.

Amazon Hartford board of Phillips memorial Slo PepsiCo international cricket council Lynn Manuel Miranda Jeff Bezos West Point Adam Jeff Patagonia Perry cricket baseball
"grant" Discussed on WorkLife with Adam Grant

WorkLife with Adam Grant

08:07 min | 2 months ago

"grant" Discussed on WorkLife with Adam Grant

"Us about some of the biases you faced and how you dealt with them. Well, you know, again, the time that I came into the corporate world, there were no women in consulting maybe two women in BCG Chicago, which is where I was. And the only other senior woman was in Boston and I'd never met her. So there were no senior women in BCG Chicago. And going over to client organizations, I don't believe I ever saw a woman in a client organization. So you enter rooms and there will be 50 people in the boardroom or a conference room and you'll be the only woman. And half of it was my problem at him, because I walked into these meetings always and said to myself, I'm sure they're all thinking, what is she doing in this room? You know, she's so different comes from an emerging market, woman and on top of that, what is she going to contribute to us? So right off the bat, I dug a hole for myself. And I said, I've got to dig out of this hole. Because I've got to prove to them that I have a right to be at this table. And so I would over prepare, I would have every number of my fingertips. I mean, I was like a walking computer, which didn't exist then. I was there at the laptop. I was in. I was in those days none of those existed, remember. So I would prepare and I'd earn a seat at the table. And as you mentioned, like clothes are pretty interesting. And so they look at me saying who is this person that you brought into the room? To advise CEOs of big companies and consulting. And so I had to get them to overcome all of those negative screens and view me as just a brain sitting behind a table. And after the first couple of meetings, they would always turn to me first. And so I think I benefited from the fact that people are willing to look past the superficial stuff and get to the crux of the matter, which again I'd say only in America. And I was a beneficiary of all of that. So the fact that I was the only woman in most cases, I probably experienced less bias than many people experienced today. Because people actually wanted me to succeed to say it's a novelty. Let's see how we can have a succeed. Wow. So this idea that you were going to prove yourself, and you had something to prove. I think you're preaching to the choir here. Our own samarina Muhammad, I think sitting right there. Has done some brilliant research on underdogs and how when people underestimate you or when people doubt you, if they're not credible, that fires you up. Yeah. And it leads you to say, you know what? I'm gonna show you. Where it's much harder is when the people above you are credible, where they've accomplished a lot where they're very senior. And they're questioning you. And who are you going to trust? Your own confidence that you can do it, or this very senior person who thinks you can't. How did you deal with being an underdog or being underestimated in those situations? End of the day, I can only rely on my competence, my knowledge. So like I said, I was over prepared. Let me tell you how I prepared. If this was the assignment I was given, I always levitated and define my assignment with that much bigger, because I wanted to understand every linkage between what I was given to how it was going to impact the enterprise as a whole. So I always zoomed into my assignment and zoomed out to see how the impact is going to measure the cross. So whenever anybody talked about something, I said just a minute. It's not going to help the company because if I took what I was doing, what personally and personally was doing, the combination that I'm suggesting is way better than the combination, you are looking at. But maybe I'm missing something. You know, in my youth, I'd say, I'm writing you're wrong. I do black and white and in your face. I was taught how to communicate in a more gentle way. So I'd say things like, you know, maybe I'm not understanding what you're doing, although in my head, I'm going you're wrong. Telling me, can you help me understand what I'm missing? And then at the meeting they say you're wrong, I'm the boss forget it. But a day or two later they'd come back and say, I think you were right. And they called me the dog with the bone because if I decided that I was right, I'd come back and reconceptualize it 5 different ways. I wouldn't give up, because at the end of the day, if I had done all the work and I thought my solution was right for the company. And I felt others had not done the kind of work. It behooved me to keep coming back to the issue to lead the showed me compelling analysis to disprove me, or accept what I said. So my CEOs would always call me. She's a dog with the bone, don't argue, because she's not going to give up if she believes she's right. I think you need that kind of conviction something you do. What if you're wrong, though? If they have better facts to prove that I'm wrong, I'm willing to completely accept it. Because remember, the goal is not personal showcasing. The goal is what's right for the company. But you've got to match me with facts and figures. Don't just say, my gut tells me this. Gut works, but cut works when it's backed up with some facts and figures. Ideally formed after the facts and figures. Ideally formed after the fact, but I tell you many senior leaders are president of the past. So their gut comes from what they've been doing all the time in the past. And if the world is changing, the situation is changing, you've got to change. And then they don't know how to change. So they always rely on my gut tells me this is what you got to do. Then you start to have doubt saying, oh, you're a prisoner of your path. Let me see how I can help you. So then you take over PepsiCo. And you have this bold, massive vision, to reinvent the business, essentially, and say, we don't want to just give people sugar water. We don't want to contribute to an epidemic of obesity or poor health. We actually want to make people healthier. Was that a challenge to get people on board with that vision or had the world changed enough that people were starting to come around? Can I just agree with that characterization at all? So please correct. I mean, let me reframe your question to say that the portfolio was made for a time when that's what people ate and drank. I came and saying consumer tastes are changing. I want to take what I call a fun for you portfolio and make it better for you and good for you also. So that the consumer had infinite choice. They could eat and drink whatever they wanted. And all that I wanted to make sure was the better for you and the good for your choices were not more expensive, tasted bad or not available. So they all had to be ubiquitously available, affordably priced and high quality. That's all I wanted to make sure. You know, I had to do that because that's where the consumer was going. And again, when I became CEO, we did a piece of work on mega trends. What are the big mega trends that will impact PepsiCo over the next decade or two? And then future back, if you work on it and say, what do I need to do today to cater to these trends? Because it takes a while to get the R and D and all of the disciplines in place. The product launches the innovation. So that megatrends work was my true north. And once I got the boat to bind to the mega trends, it was very easy for me to devise the strategies and the plans to address the mega trends. So it was relatively easy. And now just selling it to the rest of the people in the company. And the question is, what words to use? This is where I think using the words that speak to people's heart is more important than speaking to their minds. And so performance of purpose was born. And how do you continue to deliver performance? Because PepsiCo is a performance machine. But due to the way to ensure human sustainability, environmental sustainability and talent sustainable. And that was purpose, nourish, replenish, cherish. So when you put all of them together, you spoke to the employees and we got.

samarina Muhammad Chicago Boston PepsiCo America obesity
"grant" Discussed on WorkLife with Adam Grant

WorkLife with Adam Grant

07:54 min | 2 months ago

"grant" Discussed on WorkLife with Adam Grant

"Questionable anyway. So you've got to know when to rethink the paradigm that you're operating in. Well, I'm a fan of rethinking in many ways. But this seems like this seems like blasphemy. How could you say we're okay with being number two in a market? What CEO does that? Well, why are you looking at just one brand? That's the first problem with the way you look at the beverage business. But 25 years ago, the market is to be 80% sodas and 20% all of the beverages. Today, it's about 40% sodas and 60% other beverages. If you get locked into comparing bran cook versus brand Pepsi, it's like, you know, yesterday's business when the market is going away from you and going into the future businesses. So you've got to look at the overall beverage business to the overall beverage business. And just for your information, Pepsi has looked a nice tea, number one, Gatorade, number one, Starbucks Frappuccino, number one, aquafina, doing pretty well. So you've got a really go with the times. You know, the best example is people say that the red beverage is timeless, the blue beverage is timely. I'd rather be timely than timeless. Interesting. So we have some MBA students in the audience. I am often critical of that choice of pass particularly if they did an undergrad business agree. Wondering, who needs 6 years of business education? Then I agree with you. Okay. 100%. Either you do an undergraduate in business and do your post graduating something completely different or you're doing undergraduate and something which has hint of science and then do your MBA. I honestly believe that you're right. 6 years is too much. Okay, but but you two see value in an MBA if you didn't study business as an undergrad. I don't know the MBA of today. Hesitating. Let me tell you why, because I think the NBA education needs to be read on recast. The MBA degree that I got versus the MBA degree that exists today. I think it needs to come a long way. So let me rewind hit play and come forward. When I went to the Yale school of management and did a masters in public and private management. It was way ahead of its time. Because what Yale was teaching way back in 1978 was that companies are rooted in society. They have a duty of care to every society and community their part of. So we have to think of all stakeholders and think of the impact of every company on every constituency deals with before it sets a strategy of financial objectives. Some years later, Yale went to an MBA because that was considered the only way to get in the rankings, which I have a real problem with. But then although what does fantastic in the rankings I've got to tell you? We don't care officially. Thank you. But then if you fast forward now, this whole ESG stakeholder theory purpose has brought us full circle back to Yale's original goal of linking companies into societies. So I think you should never have walked away from masters in public and private management. And when I went to school, one third of the cases were nonprofit. One third was government political only one third was corporate cases. So it was a great experience for starting about the Metropolitan Museum and when it was going through bankruptcy how to recover. Those were fantastic cases which sort of made you understand. The other thing to Adam that bothers me is in business schools. We teach people not to be siloed in companies. How you should break down silos. But I think business schools in universities are extremely siloed. So I think we have to rethink in business schools. How we rewrite the education. So it's more practicing what we are supposed to be teaching. I think that's a valid critique. And I would love to see us take steps in that direction. I think we've taken some. We have a lot more work to do. Okay, so in my dozen years at Wharton, the proposal I've been most excited about that's gotten zero attraction is to eliminate the two year MBA, and only offer a one and a three year. The one would be for a career accelerator. So we're going to go right back to their same industry. The three would be for career switchers to have time to do two internships and actually learn what they want to do moving forward. Support or reject. I would give them the book called rethink and have them read it. I think that's what's badly needed. You know what? You never have any status in your own backyard, right? Actually, the association of MBA deans or the debate that discussion. The last time I spoke to them, I think it was a New Orleans. I told them they had to rethink the entire MBA. Time has come and some of them turned the other way others said, it's a great idea. Maybe now the one year could be a remote though. It could be? Yeah. And the way technology is progressing could become a reality, which means no more buildings. All right. Well, then whose names will go on? That's gonna work. That's right. And I don't know how we fund this whole enterprise then, but that is a problem you could solve for us. One of the things that I think you were remarkable at both during your consulting career and as you moved into management roles, was recruiting people to mentor you. People who often were very busy who didn't need more mentees. How did you do it? How did you get people to say, yes, I want to invest in Indra? I don't think I've ever asked somebody to be my mentor. People sort of pick me. And I think what I've learned over the years is mentors pick you, you don't pick them. And the reason they pick you is because they see something in you that attracts them to you. And they think that if they were to mentor you support you and accelerate your progress, they will also look good downstream. Every one of the people that has served as memento supporter promoter whatever, even I will say, I had a part in her development. You know, I helped her move through these years of her life. And so I think you have to be careful about going to some stranger and saying, will it be my mentor, which a lot of people ask me to do? I can't do it. The second is that if you are a mentee, support to whatever you are, you owe a duty of care to your mentor. So if your mentor is giving you advice, don't just listen to the one year and let it go out the other year. Process it. And if you're not going to take the advice, go back to the mentor and say, look, you gave me this advice on this issue. Let me tell you why it didn't take it. Let me tell you, perhaps be that I went down. And let me tell you why I did that. So you have to give respect to the mentor. If you want to maintain the relationship. It's very important. This is such invaluable advice on both fronts. I can not tell you how many students I've had come into my office for career advice. And then they do the exact opposite of what I recommended. And I hear about it 6 months later. I don't care whether you followed my advice. I want to learn from what your analysis was. That's exactly. I also want to be able to say, now I told you so. Instead of waiting until you take the job and then call me a year later and say, I never should have gone to that company oops. You know, people forget that this mentor mentee relationship is actually two way responsible relationship. Cherish it. Well, and on the first point, I think one of the things that's so powerful here is we hear frequently from our students, I feel like it's an imbalanced relationship. I have nothing to give back to my mentor. What you're saying here is excelling. Succeeding is what you give back because then you're a mentor, get some credit for your success and also gets to see you go off and check. If you do a good job, that should be, you know, psychic pleasure for your mental, because it doesn't matter if you're working for that person. If you're doing a great job somewhere else, they look at you fondly and say, you know, I had to say in her doing so well in that job because I trained her to think this way or approach things this way. So they take great pleasure in your progress wherever you are, wherever they are. Yeah. So you had a lot of support of people surrounding you. You also had some people who did not necessarily see your potential. Talk to.

Pepsi Yale Metropolitan Museum Yale school of management association of MBA Starbucks MBA NBA Wharton Adam New Orleans
"grant" Discussed on WorkLife with Adam Grant

WorkLife with Adam Grant

02:54 min | 3 months ago

"grant" Discussed on WorkLife with Adam Grant

"Such a hard time coming around to rethinking this idea of the ideal worker? The biggest gap I think is all discussions of the future of work, talk about robotics, technology, disruption from that. It does not talk about family, doesn't talk about women, young family builders, who are all central to this idea of the future of work. If you don't have enough women in the workforce, you're not going to have jobs filled. Because a lot of the care jobs are going to be remain unfilled, especially when we have 10,000 people reaching the age of 65 every day in our country. So we better worry about women coming into paid work. Women are getting college degrees at ten points higher than men. They've got a whole point of GPA more than the men in stem disciplines. 70% of high school valedictorians are women. Today in a knowledge economy, the country is going to succeed by having the best and the brightest come to work. So we have to give women the choice to come into paid work. We've got a grease as kids for them. Instead, what do we do? We put barriers up to them and say, you know, if you have a kid that's your problem. That's why they're delaying having kids. So I come back and I say the day we include families and women and young family builders in our discussions on future of work. I think everybody's sensibilities will improve. I think so too. I think one of the I guess one of the roadblocks that I'm seeing organizations run into is take an experiment that Nick bloom did at the C trip call center in China where people who are randomly assigned to work from home or 13 and a half percent more productive, but they were half as likely to get promoted because they didn't have face time with senior leaders. And I know that a lot of leaders are starting to worry about this disparity where if people do have flexibility if you're hybrid or you're fully remote, they're still going to be people probably men, probably people without families at home, who end up with more of that FaceTime and they're going to be advantaged unfairly. How do we solve that? I think we are in the most tricky part of that discussion right now. How is hybrid work going to work? Should you give people the choice to decide how to deploy the hybrid days? Or do you mandate for groups of people to come in certain days and others not to come in other days? The only way is going to happen is if office footprints themselves change. So that you basically say, we are going to say coming only for two days, three days and not going to come in. It's going to help the climate is going to reduce our office footprint, whatever. The commercial real estate guys in our life what I'm saying. But the reason I'm saying this is because that's the only way you're going to avoid the men going into the office and the women's staying home. And working flexibly and having trouble balancing all of the priorities. So this idea of rethinking is something that I've been spending a lot of time on lately. And not surprisingly, frustrated that a lot of leaders are afraid of being accused of flip flopping..

Nick bloom C trip call center China
"grant" Discussed on WorkLife with Adam Grant

WorkLife with Adam Grant

03:52 min | 3 months ago

"grant" Discussed on WorkLife with Adam Grant

"I want to tell you about a new podcast from Ted. It's called am I normal with Mona chalabi? Mona's a star data journalist, and in every episode, she investigates a new question like how many close friendships do you need? And can you actually trust your dentist? But since studies and spreadsheets don't tell the whole story, she's talking to experts, strangers, even her mom, to fill in the gaps. Ultimately, it's a show that asks does normal even exist? Follow am I normal with Mona chalabi wherever you're listening? Thanks to the Hartford for sponsoring this episode. Hey work lifers. It's Adam crane. Welcome back to taking for granted. My podcast with the Ted audio collective. I'm an organizational psychologist, and this series is about rethinking assumptions. We often take for granted about how we work, lead and live. Today's guest is one of time's most influential people. Sprinter Alison Felix. In Tokyo at age 35, she won her tenth and 11th Olympic medals, becoming the most decorated track and field athlete in American history. And the most decorated woman ever in the sport. She's now meddled in 5 straight Olympic Games. It was an especially triumphant moment since he came in the aftermath of challenging Nike's lack of pregnancy protections for athletes. When Allison was expecting in 2018, they tried to cut her pay by 70%. When she asked them to guarantee her salary, if her performance suffered due to childbirth, they refused. After she spoke out publicly and walked away, they finally changed their policy. Since then, Allison has founded her own footwear and lifestyle brand. With her brother west. I'm an adviser to say sh and I was thrilled to see Allison when gold and bronze in her own shoes. I can't think of a better role model when it comes to achieving excellence sustaining success and bouncing forward after disappointment..

Mona chalabi Adam crane Alison Felix Mona Ted Hartford Olympic medals Allison Tokyo Olympic Games Nike
"grant" Discussed on WorkLife with Adam Grant

WorkLife with Adam Grant

01:53 min | 7 months ago

"grant" Discussed on WorkLife with Adam Grant

"I wanted to write about it john. This is ben such a delight and talking to you is every bit as exciting and enjoyable and eye opening as i hoped it would be. Well thank you so much autumn. It's really great to be with you and have a chance to talk with you. I'm a big fan of your work. So this really cool. Taken for granted as part of the ted audio collective show is hosted by me. Adam grant and is produced by ted with transmitter media. Our team includes colin. Helms gretta cohn. Dan donald joanne luna grace rubinstein. Shell quint ben. Ben chang an nfl. This episode was produced by constanza. Show is mixed by rick. Quan original music by hans sale sue and alison lately breath old. I feel like about every third sentence. You're right. I think either which i wrote that. Or oh my god. He's been living in my head. I feel this way. That is my favorite thing about books. Actually is those moments when it feels like the writer knows something about you that you've never told anyone and you get to co. Mingle these deep really abstract hard to fathom experiences and feelings with a writer. That's what i love about reading. So if if my book could be that for you. I'm super grateful. One more thing you know. I love data. And we'd love your help and gathering some data about work life. Let us know what you think at survey nerds dot com slash. Worklife will appreciate your feedback on strikes to build on and weaknesses to overcome that survey nerds dot com slash worklife. Thank you ex..

john alison rick colin Dan donald joanne luna grace r hans sale Helms gretta cohn Shell One more thing Ben chang Adam grant third sentence ted audio collective Mingle ted constanza sue
"grant" Discussed on WorkLife with Adam Grant

WorkLife with Adam Grant

05:19 min | 7 months ago

"grant" Discussed on WorkLife with Adam Grant

"A kind of safety or security a sense of deep sense of home that i may don't feel now because circumstances have changed. I'm in a different place in my life. And that's what i was thinking about. I was thinking about how there's always there's always a past that you can't get back to that part. At least part of you wants to return to right. Like i would love to have a conversation with people. I love who've who've died. Or i would love to be able to. I would love to be able to go back and spend one day in the apartment that sarah and i shared in in new york when we were in our twenties. Now i am happier in almost every way now than i was then but i still do sometimes feel a longing for for an old an old self so that that speaks to what i found so interesting about it after i stopped rejecting the idea it it seemed like you were defining a new type of nostalgia or at least one that i never thought about before because normally when i thought about nostalgia. It was longing for an experience or a moment that was passed. Its person i've lost or It's a place. I was in a group that i was part of. That's moved on and you wanted to go back. it sounded like identity nostalgia. You wanted to recover a version of you. And as i thought about it more i realize yeah there are parts of my pass selves that i miss The just the the sheer wonder of being curious about what career i might pursue a little bit even though that was mostly an anxiety provoking but but i think there is a weird phenomenon where once we've gone through something it feels different so everything feels survivable after you survive it and i think that's a lot of why i allow myself sometimes to think about those those past versions of myself fondly. Well my favorite review that you did in the whole book was cut..

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"grant" Discussed on WorkLife with Adam Grant

WorkLife with Adam Grant

04:44 min | 7 months ago

"grant" Discussed on WorkLife with Adam Grant

"In my life. When i was experiencing a lot of burnout but also didn't understand one that i was experiencing burnout and to why i was experiencing it and understanding that it. It isn't just about how much work you're doing was really important for me understanding that if i have a sense of daily progress in a sense of small winds work becomes much easier and more fun and then when i have a sense of orientation and purpose work doesn't feel so overwhelming to me and so that that was probably the biggest thing that i that i use all the time when i start to feel that way i can tell myself okay. Well what are some small wins or. Are you venturing away from a feeling of purpose in your work and maybe that's why you're feeling burnt out. I think of course there are lots of other causes vern out lots of other treatments for it that we're discussing that episode but that's that's what resonated really deeply with me and it. It was kind of like a magic pill overstated or anything. Well as a native midwesterner indianapolis flavor of this review. It's very kind and warm. But i also imagine there are some ideas. You've disagreed with a challenge. A little bit. Is there anything that that jumped out at. You where you said. Now you got this wrong. Or i have a different take on this one of the things i really like about. The podcast is that you make room for uncertainty and celebrate the wisdom of to change your mind. But i think i haven't even radic more radical approach to uncertainty than you do to be uncertain about everything all the time no matter what i only there are moments where you have a measure of certainty that i feel like. I'm not sure. I'm not totally sure that matcher i one hundred percent sure. That's true as i would be but you have your much higher tolerance for ambiguity than i do..

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"grant" Discussed on WorkLife with Adam Grant

WorkLife with Adam Grant

04:03 min | 7 months ago

"grant" Discussed on WorkLife with Adam Grant

"It looks more like oh well you know. Here's our slate and should we choose from these. So there are basic ways of getting there. And i'd focus obviously in this conversation in corporate america but when it comes to people in my ted talk i said invite people in your life. Who don't look like you don't think like you who don't act like you and who don't come from where you come from and i tell people you could make a conscious decision to do that. You could actually go. And in your workforce invite people that you don't normally see or know to lunch and not in some creepy weird way but in a way of just trying to foster knowledge and information. And then i asked the person who has invited to stay open minded and give people the benefit of the doubt would if we lived in a world where there was all benefit and no doubt that we could actually create a scenario where we understand. People are going to ask questions that are difficult. And they're going to put their foot in their mouth but they're well intentioned or they're trying to learn or no more in their imprecise and awkward in the exchange as opposed to you being annoyed by it gave a talk at to a group of students at princeton wants. And they're like we're tired of people asking us. Do we get sunburn. And how do we wash our hair when braids and all that stuff. And i was like listen easier than picking cotton field if that is the worst of your job right now. I think our ancestors had a harder harder road here so if part of your responsibility to educate people about what it is like to be us because we know so much more about them than they know about us. I think you're up to it. I love that one of my big regrets in my career to date. Is that when. I have seen moments like that. Sometimes i haven't spoken up. What advice can you offer enclosing to make sure that..

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"grant" Discussed on WorkLife with Adam Grant

WorkLife with Adam Grant

05:41 min | 7 months ago

"grant" Discussed on WorkLife with Adam Grant

"Welcome back to taken for granted and more of my conversation with mellody hobson. Let's talk about then when somebody recognizes the weakness like that and says. I need to be more considerate but then doesn't make the change. You've said that some people don't change until they're in pain. what set about. I learned that from nancy. Parrots men at At allen and company she was on the board of princeton with me and she said her mother was a psychologist and her mother said that to our people. Don't change unless they're in pain and it just stuck with me. I thought about the times that i had been in pain that i had changed. And it's unfortunate that that's what does it to you. You see that in smokers who smoking after getting cancer run ins with the law. Whatever it might be plenty of examples of that were changed comes from feelings of great fear or pain. The pandemic is a perfect example of that. We had to pit in a major major way and you saw companies really not just survived but thrived. We asked a lot of people in this pandemic in terms of change and modifying behavior and it was something that i know didn't come easy for certain people but the adoption was necessary. So this was People change when they're in pain. Yeah i think one of the reasons. People don't adapt is they're holding onto the past. And i know george has some advice for you and others on that about what jet is doing. Don't do get is don't hold on. That is a very important concept that george had to teach me in a very sad moment where it lost the individual that worked at the firm and i was just so sad and it was a young woman who had gone on to start her own business and she was a superstar so great. I poured my heart into our and i thought she'd be running area out one day when she left. I literally i was like choking back tears. And george looked at me and he said i don't hold on. That's why they have no attachments. And your master and it was like within a minute. I process that and then i thought of staying and that silent if you love someone new set them free and i was like i have to set her free and it was really one of the most profound concepts for me that you can't hold onto people you.

mellody hobson george one At allen nancy one of the most profound conce one day a minute
"grant" Discussed on WorkLife with Adam Grant

WorkLife with Adam Grant

05:06 min | 7 months ago

"grant" Discussed on WorkLife with Adam Grant

"You're one of my role models when it comes to feedback and you have had incredible experiences of receiving difficult feedback and then learning to benefit from it. And i wonder if you could share how. You've learned to take tough feedback. Well we have this really great coach at aerial and one of the things that he told me was. That feedback was not a right. You're not entitled to it so whenever you get it. It's a gift and you treat it that way. And that was something. I really took part. And he also told me that you should be willing to receive feedback from anyone and it shouldn't be dependent upon if you like the person or don't like them respect them. Don't respect them. they may have a point. That really makes a lot of sense in something for you to think about. Thirdly if someone calls you a horse's ass the first time you might say okay the second time you might say. I'm going to think about it. The third time they call you. Horses asked by a saddle get feedback. That is repetitive. See what it is that people are seeing in you that you need to work on so with all that in mind one of my mentors is bill bradley. The former us senator and hall of fame basketball player one day. He sat with me and he said you know melody. If you're not careful you could be a ball hog. You could really step over a lot of people and it has the potential. Do not be good. And i remember sitting there and telling myself don't cry. I was certainly second guessing myself and thinking. Why is he saying this to me. It didn't feel very good. But i also thought to myself at the time if i cry. He won't ever give feedback again because who wants to sit and have to put someone back together after they've given them feedback and then want to do it again. So i just remember sitting and really quieting myself emotionally. So that i could receive what he said and then i left thinking about ways to solve for some of the things that he had mentioned melody. It's an amazing story and it raises some questions for me. The first one is it doesn't seem like calling someone. a ball hog is a gift. Did not bother you. Sure it bothered me. But this idea that i could hijack a conversation and he said it with your enthusiasm and your charisma you could dominate and dominating you can silence other people so one of the ways that i actually went about it was. I tried to engage with people by asking them questions about themselves. I from the person who picks me up in the lobby for meeting to wherever i am. It takes the attention off of me and people like to talk about themselves. I also ended up learning a ton of things about people. It's a tool that. I use to not be a ball hog. There's so much that can be learned from this. I think also though i would go to bill bradley and say there might be a more effective way to deliver that message. Maybe if you're a little bit.

bill bradley second time first time third time first one one Thirdly things one day
"grant" Discussed on WorkLife with Adam Grant

WorkLife with Adam Grant

03:07 min | 7 months ago

"grant" Discussed on WorkLife with Adam Grant

"I've only worked at one company. The average american has eleven jobs in their lifetime. But it makes complete and total sense if you grew up as me that you would cling to permanency and security. I'm the youngest of six kids. My mother was a single mom. She worked really really hard but we often were in tough situations of getting addicted or getting our lights turned off or phone. Disconnected or car repossessed. Sometimes they didn't know where we're going to live. It was just a terrible way to live as a result of that. I just had this great sense of financial insecurity. I ended up having an obsession with school. Which was the center of calm and security for me in a world. That was not common not secure and i could control outcomes at school so i became this crazy student then. I went to princeton and in all of those settings. I was just an observer. I saw the life that i want it. I romanticized the friends that i had on the lives that they had in the two parent households and all of these things and it did. Give me this aspiration for financial security at some point. I felt like i had won the birth lottery. In every way anybody who knows anything about your childhood would suggest that that is not the first narrative come to mind. The reason i say one the birth lottery is not. Because i didn't work extraordinarily hard and still do and not because i didn't pay my dues and consult with really smart people to help me and tough moments but let's just start with dna. I got a brain from those two people that put me in good stead in school. That's that's a fluke. You don't know what you're going to get when you know. Meet billy smart kids. I'm like thank your parents for that. Dna the first thing that put you in a good place so then the had the dna. A lot of people don't necessarily use it to their advantage. I was fortunate that i made the right decisions at the right time. That chose aerial. I'm not saying that everything wouldn't've worked out. But i'm just saying that i took these non traditional paths big wall street firms and i went to this little firm and chicago because i could sit next to work with this guy that i thought was really smart and that understood me and that would foster mitalent and allow me to grow so that. That's why i say. I won the lottery then i was born in america. That's a real thing. If you could be born anywhere in the world to be born in america even with all of the things that are wrong in america which is a lot. It's still has a a leg up on a lot of other places in terms of creating the the opportunity for success. I'm adam grant and this is taken for granted by podcast with its head audio collected. I'm an organizational psychologist. My job is to think again about how we work lead..

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"grant" Discussed on WorkLife with Adam Grant

WorkLife with Adam Grant

05:20 min | 8 months ago

"grant" Discussed on WorkLife with Adam Grant

"So i was gonna say i was going to say. In some cases it's easier to think about working on my own emotional intelligence and the application of the skills that i know. I used elsewhere than it is to say okay. We've got to teach a kid who doesn't necessarily have a fully developed. Prefrontal cortex yet to interact differently. But i wanna. I wanna react to this labor idea. It's so interesting. I i find skills when i hear a skill i immediately think. Ooh that's something. I can study and practice and master and i'm excited about it when i hear labor. My association is that's a task that somebody else's forcing me to do. That's why i don't have a bus. I just find the idea of thinking about this skills. As opposed to the labor a little bit more autonomy supportive which is ironically what. You're critiquing about the way that corporations manage emotional intelligence. The other thing that i think about here is when i hear emotional intelligence i see it as a little bit liberating. We live in a society that judges people heavily on their intelligence and mostly does that in terms of their mathematical and verbal skills right so we have too many kids who grow up in america and other parts of the world to hold. They're not smart. And i think by calling it an intelligence. It legitimates the fact that okay. You might not be a math whiz. You might not be the person who will write the next shakespeare play or the next maya angelou poem but you have a very important set of cognitive capacities that really matter in the world. Do you want to rob people if that way so i think there are two questions there the first days i mean. I think you're right that there is a reason you don't want to think about it as labor because then you don't have to see it as the employee employer relationship anymore because when i'm talking about labor i'm not talking really about an activity that someone is doing but i'm talking about kind of position that somebody occupies and a political and economic position that someone has to occupy and the kind of work that they have to do because of it and so yes of course talking about it as intelligence focuses or centers and idea of autonomy. But i'm saying that that is in part a false idea of autonomy but then to your second question it's also not a false idea of autonomy right. I think one of the reasons emotional intelligence or personality are as popular as they are is precisely because of what you say that they do give people a sense of self right. They give people a language or vocabulary by which they can understand themselves as having a certain set of capacities and now they have an idiom and terms to use in order to describe that and it can be incredibly grounding. And the same way. That i told you that i want to think about the interrelation between people and the structures that they occupy. I think this here. To as an example where we can think on the one hand about ideology and on the other hand about something quite utopian in that idea that there may be people who are simply more emotionally adept than others that this might be an overall good to the world and that we might be able to learn something from people who have this capacity about religion nationality more generally. And and so i again. Just don't wanna let go of this ability to think about to think about this concept or to come at this concept from from both sides. I love that that mic drop. If we were live in a room with an audience right now. People would be cheering just crush..

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