20 Burst results for "Grant Baldwin"

"grant baldwin" Discussed on Smart Passive Income

Smart Passive Income

11:14 min | 4 months ago

"grant baldwin" Discussed on Smart Passive Income

"The next part of the talk but any tips for loops that are open but not click beatty. If you will or or bait and switch he yeah I mean sometimes the the it depends on the nature of what you're talking about you know so. I'm going to give you the the seven top marketing hacks for twenty twenty. But you're going to have to sit through thirty minutes of stuff I before I get to us like that feels a little Not necessarily like slimy but it just like I mean. Get to it sooner rather than later you know. So if you're going to open loop you WanNa make sure that you are very clear on when you're going to close that so that's not something. The audience is just like hanging on hanging on hanging on hanging on. One thing that you can do is you can watch comedians comedians. Do this really really well where they do. What's what's called a callback where they will reference a joke that they told earlier A punchline that they told earlier And there's some comedians that that do an insanely good job this and Just as a quick side note like medians are really really good to learn from from a speaking standpoint. Because they're doing something similar they're standing on stage for forty five minutes or sixty minutes. They're they're trying to captivate an audience and they're trying to keep their attention and keep them from looking at their phone and take the audience on a journey on a story So comedians can can do a really good job with us but I think again. Put yourself in the position of the audience. You know as as you're giving the talk if you're listening to this or you feel like I mean. Come on dude get to the point. Where where are you going with this or if you like? No no like this is genuine. This is part of it. It's moving the story forward and I'm hanging on for this. There's also goes back to something. I mentioned at the very beginning. Where each time you give the same talk you figure out what works and what doesn't work right. So you're you're you're hearing from the audience or you're seeing from the audience that I opened this loop and I got to. I closed too quickly or open this loop and I could tell like maybe I heard some feedback afterwards that House was really wondering if you forgot about that one part. Or if you're going to get back to the other part you said you're gonNA give us the seven steps. Whatever happened to that guy? Yeah Yeah so like you. You can hear some of that feedback. That again helps you to make the talk better each time which is ultimately what what makes you a better speaker is when you get up and speak. It's not like here's here's the first time I've given this talk but it's actually. I've told the story you know tens or hundreds of times and I've got really dialed in and really refined and Polish. So that I know exactly where I'm going to know exactly when and where to open the loops. So the best makes sense for the audience that they take them on the journey that I've designed for them. Nice things are catching that and a definitely will tell that story or else. I'll leave people hanging and we don't want to do that so I want to move onto slides. We talked about the content of the talk a little bit but slides a lot of people struggle with slides a lot of people of film with bullet points. A lot of people do a lot of things with them. I'd love to hear your thoughts to share mine after okay. I got strong feelings on You do so. Here's here's my two cents. Slides should be an enhancement and not a replacement for your talk. Slide should be an enhancement and not a replacement for your talk. So let me explain what I mean by them I remember my wife was attending a conference recently and she was sitting in a session. She Tech summations like Hey. The session is supposed to start several minutes ago. The presenter was having some trouble with her slides and she told the audience. The slides aren't working. I can't give my talk until we get the slides working to which I would reply. Then you should not be up there. What we mean by that and wait for speakers to think about this as a litmus is. Let's imagine five minutes before you're about ready to speak the slides go down. The projector breaks. The computer doesn't work. Something's not working with the technology. Which again is a real thing? There's a lot of things that can go wrong with acknowledgee. Yeah like if that happens which it can and will does happen if that happens. You're talk still has to stand on. Its own you can't say like well I'd love to but led to give my talk. I just can't because they don't have slides then you're not. You shouldn't be up there so again. All that to say your slide should be an enhancement Nada replacement. This is where I think. A lot of speakers have a tough time. Is they spend more time like worrying about the slides or worrying about how it's going to look or trying to think through what their next lines are and they do it. And all of a sudden the talk becomes the secondary thing and so the sides. It should be an enhancement. If it's a replacement if you're just reading off the slides or if you're just using those as your cue cards then just show us a video like you don't need to be up there but so i. I have strong feelings about slides from that standpoint but I will say that slides are incredibly incredibly effective. If done well and if done right so if for example let's imagine again. We have no idea where this engagement stories. But I'll jump on that train if you were describing the story to us and telling us about that it's one thing for us all of us to be listening to it right now. It's something totally different. If you said hey let me show you a picture of right after engaged. Here's that moment. That makes it so much more real than than what you can describe it as as so pictures especially it can be incredibly incredibly effective and incredibly powerful but again they cannot be a replacement for talk One other quick note on slides is humor is really really a really effective tool for speakers. Buy A lot of people. Don't worry about a lot of people worry about humor. And I don't feel like I'm funny or I don't know how to deliver good punch line or joke or a story or anything like that images and videos can work really really well for humor. So maybe you're showing mean or you're showing a funny picture or you're playing a short video Those things can work really well where you don't necessarily have to come up with humor you just showed a slide and people associate the humor of the slide with you as the speaker. So that's another again. Just kind of side note there so again. Big thoughts big picture on it. Sides can work really really well. But they need to be an enhancement. Not a replacement for your talk okay. We're in agreement there one hundred percent. I thought I thought you were going to go no slides because you're that about how important like the talk is well. I personally don't use slides but I don't think they're necessarily a bad thing because I know I know a lot of speakers who don't use slides and all that speakers who use slides and it's not necessarily one is better or worse than the other because like I said you can do things with slides and show things that you absolutely cannot describe with words so slide can be really really really effective. I think oftentimes one third US wrong and two they can there's so technical glitches and issues and things that can go wrong. I I remember speaking of something recently. And a buddy of mine and I were standing backstage. And he's getting ready to go out there and we're kind of talking about his talk and the only thing he was talking about was his slides was okay. I'm thinking about this slide and this line and this line and I'm worried about this slide like me. And you're you're so in your head about the slides. What about the talk? What about the talk? You're getting ready to give so again. Sides can be really effective. But just make sure you're doing it in addition to not in replacement of the talk if anybody's seen me speak on stage before typically you'll see me use slides but typically you'll just see an image with no words to enhance the story to bring people into the environment that I'm talking about. For example. I was telling a story about our wedding beautiful wedding reception. I might even crack a joke and go and let me show you a picture from the reception. And then it's a picture of the fire festival of complete disaster right because then there's a little humor there right and then. I know I'm just kidding. The here's the actual picture and it's like gorgeous and that's like another quick way to use slides that I love it within just like people expect one thing and you show them something else. That's what a comedian does. And you could do that with slides really easily and I and I feel my slides do a lot better job than than I do. Being Funny And I use that to my advantage but now I now I'm lost. Where was I going with that? I don't know that's okay. That's fine I'll give you a quick example so remember a couple of years ago. I was speaking at a conference in a mutual friend of of you and I won't tell you who was he. He gave a keynote. He did a phenomenal job. It was amazing and One of the funniest parts of the talk was. He showed a a video. It was like a one minute. Video in the middle of it was hysterical. is very very good and right after his session. I was doing a workshop about speaking and so I asked the audience. We're talking about of writer. Different things related to speaking and I said how many guys enjoyed the previous speaker that we just saw it was like. Oh yeah they were. Amazing is how many of you thought that that speaker was really really funny. And everyone's like. Oh Yeah. They're very funny and they are very very very funny speaker but I asked the audience there and that workshop. I said what was the funniest part of their talk and they all said the video so again think about like they all assume like that speaker was hilarious and again speaker but the thing that they thought was. The funniest was playing a video. All the speaker did was press a button of video. He didn't even create but the audience connects. The Dawson says that speakers funny because of the video that they showed half joe again videos. Memes gifts Pictures like those can work really really well for humor. Stay within your style. I would just say be you and use that stuff to sort of enhance what it is. You're doing like you said I remember where I was going. The other way that you slide is typically a when I make a point or I have a really driving home the point I'll typically have a slide that represents that point and then I actually have the word or the combination of words. Noble points ever And that's sort of my style and I have a very popular youtube video. It's actually my most popular youtube video. One point two million views at this point grant how to create an awesome slide deck which is pretty crazy that I usually create youtube videos about but somehow got picked up in the algorithm so that will also linked to the successful speaker. Which is you? Jeff Gordon's new book. Jeff spent a guest on here several times very stoked about this new book. It's called the successful speaker before I into one final question I want to ask you. I'd love to just have you talk a little bit about the book with four and where they can get it. Yes so they're like you said. The book is the successful. Speaker five steps for booking gigs getting paid building your platform and so I was a been a professional speaker for over a decade of done. Hundreds of speaking engagements and Really learned a lot about the INS and outs of the speaking world. And how do you get gigs? And how'd you book gigs? And who hire speakers? And how much do you charge? And what do they pay speakers to talk about? And just the INS and outs of that world and so we took everything that we've learned. Put that into the book to walk people through A step by step process of how they can find book gigs as well and some people listening right now have aspirations to be a fulltime speaker. They WanNa do you know fifty seventy five one hundred gigs a year and some people say. I don't WanNa do that much other things going but I would love to. Do you know two or three or four or five gigs. But I don't know like. How do you find gigs and again? How much do you charge and like? How does this work so wherever you are on your speaking journey however much speaking you? WanNa be doing. The book will give you that playbook that that guy that step-by-step manual of the steps that you need to take an order to find him book gigs. So yeah. The book is The successful speaker out in stores everywhere Amazon. And all those good places all the places all the things well congrats to you and Congrats Jeff. Jeff listen to the show and you've been on a while before to cool that you guys are collaborating together on that. So we'll put links in the show notes and all that good stuff the last question I wanna ask. You is about rookie mistakes. What what are some of the most common rookie mistakes? I'll go over myself. Maybe we can go.

Jeff Gordon youtube twenty twenty US House Nada Amazon writer Really Dawson joe
"grant baldwin" Discussed on Beyond the To Do List

Beyond the To Do List

02:31 min | 4 months ago

"grant baldwin" Discussed on Beyond the To Do List

"Handbook like this is the way to learn how to do the not only the craft. But the business of speaking. I think that succinctly delivers on what the promise of the book is is that I mean this is how you're going to create a speaking career. I it's just that simple and and I'm so glad that you inject partnered on this and This is going to be a dog eared. You know gone through book in my immediate future for sure go. I appreciate that man. Yeah it's We want it to be something that could be a guide and handbook that people can use for years in the future so there's going to be sections and chapters that may not be relevant now but Another couple of months. Like all right mentioned booking gigs and a. Dang now that's a potential opportunity and they asked me how much charge and so now nigga flipped to that part of the book and figure that out or I gotTA talk coming up in a couple of weeks. I'm starting to work on. Should I use lies? Obama flipped to that section of the book. And and go through that. So it's definitely something that you can go through cover to cover but it's also something you can kind of use his a handbook to refer back to as As you grow your own speaking business grant Is there any special place you'd like to direct people to? I know it's wherever fine books are sold but like specifically to. Maybe they're not quite on board yet they want to learn more about the book Beyond this conversation. Where would you like me to send them? Yeah everyone can go to the speaker lab dot com slash book the speak aloud dot com slash book. That's where you can download a a couple of free chapters and We got a couple of free bonuses there as well if you go through there But yeah the. The book is the the successful speaker five steps for booking gigs getting paid building building your platform and books out everywhere. Books are sold awesome. Grant thank you so much for being back and hopefully. I'll see you soon in person. Dan always good to catch up with you. Well that's another podcast crossed off your podcast listening to do list. I hope you enjoyed listening in on this conversation I had with grant Baldwin. Whether or not your speaker or not. I know I got a lot out of going through the book as well as talking with grant. If you're interested at all in speaking this is the book for you. I'll link it up in the show notes which you can find at beyond the to do list dot com slash three one six. That's also the place where if you're inclined and got something out of this episode. Would you do me a favor of sharing it with somebody? You know needs to hear it whether you're over there on the show notes or you want to just hit the share button here in your podcast player. App OF CHOICE. And if you enjoyed this episode feel free to support it by giving it a rating or a review wherever you do that for other shows that you like. Thanks again for sharing. Thanks again for listening. And I'll see you next episode..

Grant Obama Baldwin Dan
"grant baldwin" Discussed on Beyond the To Do List

Beyond the To Do List

10:36 min | 4 months ago

"grant baldwin" Discussed on Beyond the To Do List

"Hello and welcome back to beyond the to do list. I'm your host Eric Fisher. And this is the show where I talked to the people behind the productivity this week. I'm thrilled to have back on the show. My Friend Grant Baldwin is back to talk about his new book. The successful speaker five steps for booking gigs getting paid and building your platform. This book was Co authored by Jeff. Goings. Who's been on the show a number of times as well. I was thrilled to talk to grant again. Not only just in general but about this book specifically and what we tried to do was cover a little bit of material in the book but then I know grant. He's on every podcast right now. Talking about what's in the book and why the book is but I wanted to go a step further and talk about productivity tips. That would help somebody who is starting out or already is in the speaker business. Somebody who's been giving talks so I- crowd source some questions from a few friends who who are already speakers and they gave me some great ones so those answers are in this conversation with grant Baldwin. Enjoy well this week is my privilege to welcome back to the show grant Baldwin Grant. Welcome back good to be here. I'm trying to think is this second time. I A while you know and and I'm GONNA I don't you. Can I have mixed feelings about bringing this up? But I'm going to because it kind of is the Jeff Jeff. Coins is the elephant in the room. Jeff so he's been on he's been on he's been on the most of everybody so everybody including Michael. Hi who even just recorded a new episode with so I think maybe the tide now. I don't know but the debate was. Do I count this as an appearance? For Jeff or not. Oh No you don't come just not here. I don't I think you've made the right call there. I think jeff is going to be tied. And he's going to have to come back so but the reason the reason I bring it up because you've got this brand new book out. There called the successful speaker and on the cover there it says grant Baldwin with Jeff Gyns and that's the proper way to pronounce that by the way so he told me From the beginning that when we first met his last name rhymes with coins so going and I don't think you have to whisper it. I'm fine to bring it up. Get it so there's no it's not. It's not an elephant and to me. I am a hundred percent happy to discuss it so I want to go a couple of different places here and I'm just going to state it all upfront. So that anybody listening knows what we're going to cover a lot of people be like okay. Well I've heard on other shows. So why do I need to listen to this one? Well first and foremost you and I are GonNa talk briefly or not about hey. What was it like collaborating with Jeff on this book? That's number one number two is. Let's get into the book a little bit that number three. Which is the really cool part is. I've got productivity questions for people that want to be speakers that you may have the answers to and if you don't like we'll stop you but I'm betting all all you you won't be stumped because all you can do is share your experience but it's going to be so beneficial for people who are just getting started or who are into speaking at whatever level they're at with it that I think those productivity questions of how to be productive on the road a I won't spoil all the questions but that's kind of the threefold Approach I want to go to. So I'm I'm game. Let's go awesome so I up. So what was it like working with Jeff? It was great honestly. I've told them this privately. I've told them this public back. I'm at the time this recording the book's been out about a week I saw jeff a couple of days ago and We'll get together and and we're like dude we did it. We made a thing I told him then I have against public. Before like I would I would go through the process again with Jeff had a really good experience and so for some some background and some context So Jeff for those that that that may not know Jeff is a phenomenal writer has written and published. Many books really knows the publishing world really. Well it's a few years ago yet. A friend who knew in the publishing space who had asked him if he if he knew of anyone who could had an audience who'd be interested. And maybe doing a book and so he he had mentioned me. Eight texted me and said Hey. Do you have any interest in all right in a book? I was like not really honestly like I like Jeff loves writing books and I self published a book several years ago And it's just a whole lot of work. And he's a crapload of work and Jeff loves writing books. I'm just Kinda like like I get the value of it. I totally value. But there's also no shortage of other things that are good things that you may not have the ban with four and that's Kinda where I was with with book and so we we Kinda talk back and forth about it and he. I remember exactly. How can you even all right grant already have all of this content all of the The intellectual property the The course material the podcast interviews. The case studies the examples. Just the experience of boots on the ground for years and years as a professional speaker. what have we worked together and I just become the scribe and take all of your content and put it into book format I was like okay. Well that that sounds appealing so we kind of we talked with a publisher about it and ultimately that's kind of where we landed and so I remember running it by There's a couple of guys with and can ask them and said. Hey Jeff talking about this project. He's never really done something like this. This is kind of thing for me too. So what do you guys think? And they all kind of said like so. Let me get this straight. A publisher wants to give you a bunch of money for Jeff going to write your book. I was like okay. Well that sounds good. Let's do that And so you fast forward to today And we're really really really happy with the finished product and talk. I had had someone who'd message me. And they said Hey. I got the book read at one day. It was amazing. I was joking with my wife like I think. That's because Jeff Rhoda. I think if I wrote it I don't think they'd be excited about it And so I think like I think what's interesting about this and why I enjoy. I've enjoyed talking about it publicly as a lot of sense for a lot of authors There is a ghostwriter behind the scenes. But it's like this hush hush quiet thing like you're gonNA ballooning too that you know No I wrote every word and I'm happy to say like no no like Jeff wrote like I know it's all my content all my ideas We worked together but like Jeff is the one that was you know pen and paper so to speak. That was making happen. in terms of the actual the flow of the book. And so I think it worked out really well in that I again. I had the content but just because I had content doesn't necessarily mean that I'm an amazing book writer and so it worked really well to partner with someone who was and so So you know. I've kind of been half joking. Have Serious Jeff is basically a you know. A non ghostwriter ghostwriter for the project named Ghost Rider As even as we're working on it from the beginning the the publisher said Hey. Do you care if we put jeff name on. The cover is like now. I don't care it's fine to me Like I'M NOT GONNA lose any sleep over it so So yeah it's it's recognized like It's my content but I definitely viewed as a collaborative process and Jeff was was phenomenal to work with. He's like a tangible ghost. He's not you. Don't walk through present in the room and and not in just I feel his presence in the room like no. He's literally there. I mean coincidentally is a little Pale so both of us out miss that staying And this is the thing is As soon as he was teasing this at his last tribe conference. And I don't mean just the last one. I mean the final one months ago that this was a thing he was working on with you and as soon as I heard him say that I was like I want that book and and then it was literally a few months later that you were like. Hey what's up and sent me an email about this and I was like of course you can come on the show and And the reason is because there's so much to in terms of creating good work and doing you know this content creation slash whatever form that takes whether it's podcasting whether it's writing social media blogging You know I I don't know but speaking is is is a is a vein of that as a form of that and it is a career it is and and I think in the same way That actually Jeff's last book Real artists don't starve. This is kind of that companion piece to that. Thought that through line of you can do a. You can have a career doing your art. This just happens to be grants art right. Yeah and and I think Jeff did a great job with recognizing that There are a lot of artists and creatives in In his audience our audience one of things that we kind of recognizes that for a lot of people are certainly a lot of people who want to be fulltime speakers. And there's a lot of people who come to us with that ambition but there's also a lot of people right now here like I don't want to be a fulltime speaker But I wouldn't mind doing. I don't know five gigs. A year. Ten gigs ear. But I'm just having trouble figuring out You know how to find those gigs or how much they charge. What do you speak about or who hire speakers and just kind of like the the nuts and bolts ins and outs of the speaking world and just for a lot of people speaking is just part of what they do? You know so you know take Jeff Jeff is doing a lot more speaking now and and he said Hey. I want to speak but also want to raise my own books. I WANNA do some some of these ghost writing projects. I want to offer courses. I want to. Do you know coaching or consulting or any number of other things and speaking of one spoke in the overall wheel and there's people all along that spectrum of you know where you're at where jeff sat where. I'm at or they haven't started at all. They've never spoken and they want to. And they feel like they have something to say something they want to share. You know they're in those early stages of questioning whether or not whether thing that they how they think they have to say is something somebody else would want to hear so it kind of getting into the content of the book. Let's just talk here a little bit about you. Know what do you say to somebody who is trying to just get started? Or isn't maybe is maybe even on the threshold of questioning whether they could. Yeah so the book walk through this five step process that makes the acronym speak. Spca K- kind of high level overview. And then we can kind of begin wherever you want but The SS select a problem to solve. This is the most important most critical piece and this is really the kind of build a house you know if you get the foundation right then. The rest of the House tends to go up pretty smoothly but If you just GONNA rush passes. Which is what we often. I'd want to do then we're left with foundation that's Kinda shaky and rocky and and hard to build a sustainable business upon so you have to get really clear on two things one is who do you speak to. And what is the problem that you saw for that audience now? The mistake that a lot of speakers make and this isn't exclusively speakers. This tends to be the case with entrepreneurs in general is that we want to throw the net as far and wide as possible. And so we say you know who do you speak to speak to? I speak to humans. I speak to people messages for everyone is like that doesn't really work and in the same way. If you would ask someone you know what you speak about. Or what's the problem that you saw this? Well what do you want me to speak about? I CAN SPEAK ABOUT ANYTHING. I.

Jeff Jeff Grant Baldwin Jeff Rhoda publisher Jeff Gyns Baldwin Grant Eric Fisher writer Michael partner
"grant baldwin" Discussed on On the Schmooze with Robbie Samuels

On the Schmooze with Robbie Samuels

01:54 min | 5 months ago

"grant baldwin" Discussed on On the Schmooze with Robbie Samuels

"For years to come. Share it resonate with you in the show notes at on the SCHMOOZE DOT COM. Look for episode one hundred eighty five. That's also real fine all the links and resources from today's show as well as nearly two hundred archived episodes on this pinchers inspired page reach out and let me know. What your favorite interviews do you have events on your horizon. Don't waste time and energy going to events without a strategy to actually meet people. Read my books croissants versus bagels Sir. Tj effective and inclusive networking conferences. So you feel prepared to make the most of this opportunity. You'll find the book and Bonus Material Eh Croissants. Vs BAGELS DOT COM. You've already read it great. My Book is very close. Ah Crossing two hundred Amazon reviews. Would you add yours. Thank you if you enjoy this episode of the grant. Please share with your friends. And don't forget to subscribe so don't miss next week's show remember subscribing is always free. Are you a fan? That's awesome? I'd love to review and Apple podcasts. It's easy to find our page at I tunes dot on the shoes dot com. Thank you to dance. Look forward to connect to you again next week. Entering another town professional. Who's achieve success? In their field or industry I'll ask probing questions to get them to share untold stories about their leadership journey. Now they build and sustain their professional network. Huntsville then have an amazing week. Thanks for listening to on the SCHMOOZE podcasts. At www dot on the smooth dot com. That's on the Schmooze S. C. H. M. O. Z..

"grant baldwin" Discussed on On the Schmooze with Robbie Samuels

On the Schmooze with Robbie Samuels

15:30 min | 5 months ago

"grant baldwin" Discussed on On the Schmooze with Robbie Samuels

"They took as opposed to the person who's been doing it for twenty years. They don't remember like the first two. Yeah as which is another thing like you said if you said okay. I want to be a motivational speaker. That without even emailing Tony Robbins. Let's see what Tony Robbins is doing today? Well the things that Tony Robbins or whoever is doing today is very different than what they did. Originally that got them from zero to one and so I think about like in my own Business Day. What I'm doing today was not on my radar to be doing and would not be advisable recommended to other people who are not at a similar stage. Like don't worry about this. You need to focus on this right. You need to be focused on these other steps of the process and so It's exactly right to not necessarily look at where someone is today or the or the things that they're doing today look at what they were doing. Like I like going back and paying attention to someone. Meyer respect doing when they were at my level when they were at this same spa or they ran into a similar challenge or they were considering this type of strategy. How did the how does it apply to them today because they may be two different answers and I also think the idea of really being thoughtful about how you reach out Was another release strong takeaway for me and I heard you mention a moment ago. That you're in this pure mastermind. You know this is a thing. I think. A lot of people overlook the power of of having these peers who I I'm assuming are all striving. They're all like their own businesses or building. They can all relate to what you're doing. How how far into your business where you before. You were able to pull that together. Was that something you started with? Or was that in the U. Having grew into no I was definitely something early on So this was a yellow early five years ago where the business was was doing. Okay We were doing You know we were doing multiple six figures and revenue. But I knew we had the potential to the certainly do more and so So part of what I was doing was looking for as me and kind of another guy. We're talking to are kind of talking about this idea of of we do have a couple other guys. That would be on a shortlist that we might be interested in Is a part of what we were looking for was People who had similar Who are at a similar stage of life like all. These are these guys. I really admire and respect as as entrepreneurs and their business but Also awesome husbands are some fathers and just like great dudes that I wanna I WANNA be around. I want my family's to be around like and since then like It was a group of guys that Kinda came together but our wives have all become good friends or wives have done trips and they have no real common connection other than their husbands happened to spend a Lotta time together. So that was Was Really impacted looking for people. Who were you know? Just kinda similar phasing stage of life. Another thing that was really. Valuable was Trying to look at people who you feel like I almost imagined almost like a like I I don't really do any I don't do. I invest in mutual unbound to any individual stock. Investing by kind of imagine like. Are you looking for like stocks that you feel like all right that stocks going somewhere right? I don't know how to actually do that in the actual stock market. But I feel like I feel like I'm a fairly good judge of people where there's people you can tell like our that person's sharp that person's going somewhere and that's the type of person that I want to be connected with and aligned with And vice versa like Hopefully I am that to you. Know to these other guys as I think that that was something that was beneficial to all of us early on to feel like all right. We're all Rawal climbing them out together and this is a good opportunity for us to we can probably do more collectively better than we could. On our own So less and we're all like have similar business models but different industries. That were not you know not really competitors or anything so it's a good chance to compare notes on that side of it but it has been I would say my connections with those guys have been Definitely towards the top two or three things that have given me any level of success it is an incredibly incredibly valuable and like Very very deep lifelong friendships. That I have with these guys because because of that you know and Like I mentioned I live here Nashville One of the guy to the guys live here in Nashville woman lives in Saint Louis. Wom- lives in Middle Nowhere Kentucky and We still try to get together once or twice a year to spend time in person but we also Talk literally on a daily basis and texting and and we use. Vox Lot and slack and But just Casa communication of like sharing Sharing what people are how things are going This morning We do almost every day every other day or so but one of the guys will say what's everybody doing. Say What your goals for the week? How's the week going for anybody? Need anything that type of thing because again part of being an entrepreneur part of being self employed as I I worked from home. I love working from home. But I'm I'm by myself all day My wife is here. My daughters are here but like in terms of a work environment. We have a team. But their virtual jewel. I don't interact with anybody on on the team or other entrepreneurs outside of this this Home Office that I have and so other people who I know like. They're all doing their thing to do. So let's let's compare notes on. What was ray work on anything? What are your goals for? The week has the week going as a month. And you know that sort of thing So those those relationships with those people make a have made a massive difference. I love that anyone listening. And you don't have to wait so you're making multiple six figures. You can just find people who are like on your level Such a I mean. I think Masterminding General Whether it's facilitated or pure mastermind is just so invaluable. 'cause IT'S A it's a concentrated way of building relationship so as you've been developing your business over the last Gosh almost now decade and a half. Then you have met people so many people have met you How do you not okay? So you have your inner circle but how do you nurture and sustain connections with like your second and third tier out the people you might see like once a year at a conference or someone yet you worked with really altan five years ago but now you haven't really seen them in a while like what was your habits or philosophies around that yes that's a great question I wish I was more strategic added. I know I have a few friends who are and like every six months clockwork. I'll get a text message from them or something. Just kinda like touching base and checking in I was like I need to do more of that So I I would say like A few simple things that come to mind one is is attending. I don't attend to Tomba a few conferences here. And there where I know like peers are going to be going. See these people and maybe people can only touch base or see you know. Once a year I have found that meeting people in person Completely changes the dynamic of a relationship right because there may be people who I've text away. I've emailed with or exchanged facebook messages or talk on zoom or whatever. It may be and like yeah. We're you know friends or something but if we meet at a conference or if they're I live in Nashville. So if people come through under something or If I'm in their city speaking to someone and we are able to connect and just changes everything being able to connect with people in person. So I've always been really intentional about About trying to connect with people in person So I found that that makes a makes a big difference. I also just try to like be aware of Of what people are up to what people are working on. Where people are you know things projects people have us. There may be times where I may not again as consistent or disciplined as as I would like but just taxing people. Hey I just saw that you just you know did this thing. And so Congrats on that. Or that's really cool or you know that sort of thing Trying to be aware and paying attention to those things and I would also say that What we're doing right now. I have found for me. I'm guessing for you to the The podcast I host a called. The speech lab has been really valuable for networking. Because there's a lot of people that I've interviewed. I'm sure you have to that people who are great people who normally if I was like. Can you give me forty five minutes or an hour of your time to pick your brain and talk and get to know you? They wouldn't they wouldn't do it because they're mean or bad people or anything they're just busy. They have going on But they would take time out of a to do a podcast interview. So there's a lot of people have been able to connect with that way is a good chance to you know to talk shop or just to connect You know we we've been recording here for X. amount of minutes or whatever but we also chatted for a few months before will chat for a few minutes afterwards and it's good chance to build some that that connection report people that maybe you wouldn't have otherwise talk with so Those are a few things that come to mind. Yeah it's too bad you didn't really have an answer for me so when you're traveling do you think about the you know in Chicago when you're heading to Chicago. So how do you track that? How do you know who do you know that lives in Chicago? Good question I will say this as a as a caveat because I when I was I was speaking fulltime. Doing ABOUT SEVENTY GIGS. A year and so There's a really good chance I would be passing through some major market at some point and so it's kind of just a aware I'd say again a lot of it just kind of keep in my own head. Which again praised the the best way to do that? But I'm kind of aware of of people that may be in the area sometimes if I if I'm in an area Say That because another caveat. I I am a bit introverted and I liked being with people but I also don't always like being with people and I'm completely fine to sit in a hotel room by myself and then I'll have to be around people all the time so I'm good with that so I would say like If I go to a city I'm not just like hey I just WanNa meet a bunch of strangers and hang out. I am not like that at all. my my wife is very similar. We say we're not antisocial selectively social in that We may go to your party but we wanna know who's going to be there. We need the guest list. I and if it's basically all people that we know we WANNA hang out with okay. We're in this. I we know one other person and a bunch of a widow now. There's a good chance we're to stay home in our pajamas and watch Netflix. So So I try to just be aware of people who are are in areas where I WANNA be. I think the other thing is I it does help. We moved to Nashville about five years ago. And there's people that regularly are passing through here for different conferences. Events nationals can be a touristy city at times and so people want to come here and visit So usually I.

Nashville Tony Robbins Chicago Netflix Meyer facebook self employed Kentucky Tomba Saint Louis
"grant baldwin" Discussed on On the Schmooze with Robbie Samuels

On the Schmooze with Robbie Samuels

12:09 min | 5 months ago

"grant baldwin" Discussed on On the Schmooze with Robbie Samuels

"So then equip US security sales job and then I I quit the seminar company and then I quit the school similar thing and then there's just all my own stuff But again that just takes time to build up knowing that like It's not going to magically happen overnight. So the was the last. I guess true career thing that I had And then there's kind of a hodge podge worth of stuff in the interim to build up a to what the speaking business was what I love about. This is that you recognize that you needed both time and a little more experience. You know so sounds like some of your jobs. Were good money like working at a fine dining restaurant but not necessarily giving you time on a stage. Although I thought of of Uh I love waiting team it was nice. I thought it was very formative. Like yea certainly an element to it to me. It was certainly like I really enjoyed it. My brother and I worked together at a restaurant. And we we. We still talk about like those really fun. I wouldn't mind picking up a shift here. They're just because it was fun but it sounds like some of the other jobs you had. We're also getting on stages and help crafts right leg because the reality is like even though I enjoyed the job at the restaurant It was it was a means to an end. It bought me time. It gave me two things. He gave me L. Me earn some money but it also gave me a lot of flexibility which was important as the speaker because I knew that There were times where it will I remember talking with a friend who is interested in being a speaker and they worked on some banking job as of Monday through Friday. Nine to five type GIG says it's just hard to be a speaker that way because it requires you to travel it. We're going to require you to you know a Wednesday morning events that you know five hours away but then also maybe a You know the Monday afternoon event and you're going to burn through your vacation day so quick so kind of a hodge podge of stuff for me. gave me a lot of the freedom and flexibility to the maybe a month or. I had a whole bunch of speaking gigs and I could. I just didn't sell as much that month on the security thing or I didn't do as many other schools emily's and I didn't work as many shifts in the restaurant and then the opposite was case where I may have a month. That was really really slow. And I didn't have any speaking GIG since I was having to pick up some other stuff as just gave me a lot of the freedom to like again kind of piece things together And make something collectively work. Which I think is the case with more and more Careers today just in general for people that you know historically used to be you got a job and you work Monday through Friday nine to five and that was just those all you did you know and now may be. I'm an iron a little bit of money here. A little bit of money here a little bit of money here and collectively it makes it work So I see more and more people doing that. And for some people speaking is is just one you know spoke in that hub of what they may be doing so to make a living. Yeah the GIG. Economy is definitely go. Tourneys for people. So I'm curious though grant as you made this shift mentally even before you moved into it as a full-time thing like what was the I mean. I think of challenge both like in mindset but also talent challenged around like you know like for you obviously carving out time was the challenge in so you came up with this remedy but was there a mindset challenge round deciding that you were going to be. You know doing this. Be An entrepreneur. Take on all this risk on your own. And what was that like? Of course because there's with speaking and I think with not just speaking but a lot of Any entrepreneurial endeavor is there's massive ebbs and flows. An entrepreneurship is not for the faint of heart. There days you're just like pan where we're killing it. This is great. This is fun. This is so easy right and as just like well we didn't were out We did our best and it's not working anymore and you're just you're doing the best you. Can I say that all the time to entrepreneurs I said we're we are making it up as we go? We are doing the best we can with what we have. In that moment. As reminds me a couple of years ago I live in the Nashville area and I was attending this entrepreneurial breakfast with some friends and there's a guy that I knew he had been working he had kind of a side hustle and he'd been working on it on the side for a little while And the previous week. He had quit his job. He is going all in on the side. Hustle built up to a making the leap going all in and I do too. I wake. You're all in on this. How do you feel I remember him? Saying like I'M I. I feel scared anxious worried. I feel excited. I feel thrilled. I feel terrified. I feel all of the above right and I remember telling him. I said I've been. I've been self employed this at the time of this recording employed for thirteen fourteen years now and I was like that doesn't go away like all of those feelings. You just described a don't go. I haven't earned paycheck from a company and well over a decade now. I still worry like I don't know man. Maybe I should go get a job at Walmart. Like some those. That just seems simpler and cleaner So realize that that's that's part of it of the nerves the anxiety the worry the fear. The insecurity is the Dow. Like when people say that they're dealing without my normal you've gotta be able to the stomach and role with the mental and emotional highs and lows because that's part of what you're signing up for it like you're not guaranteed success at all and and speaking and entrepreneurship and business and anything like we've had some level of success at this point but it could collapse tomorrow like who knows what the next twenty four hours of life look like or how things could dramatically change or shift or pivot and all of a sudden just like crap is not you know what use word while work. I think regularly about the phrase. Like what got you here won't get you there. And so yes we got to this point but it doesn't guarantee anything at all like we could stay at this point forever we could at the whole thing could collapse and fall apart. Who knows right? It's always say that in any way to like scare people are Bladder. Anything other than just like the reality is is like you have to. You have to be able to stomach that and be able to understand the the ebbs and flows of business highs lows and that's that's part of what you're signing up for so you know one of the best descriptions. I had for this was Scott Stratton when marketing Talking about this million Speakers Bay twenty five thousand dollars of talk and he says every fall. He looks ahead of the following year. There's like an empty calendar and every like October he thinks. Oh my God I get a job and it's like I had a good round but it's done you know it's it's kind of. It was helpful in a way to hear that. Even someone dot caliber and that level of success you know with everything. He's accomplished still. How's that moment because you gotta be constantly working at it and see? Don't really have control like you know you do your best and I think you're right. That's a that's something. That's a certain Grit that speaker or an entrepreneur in general has to have and you don't know if you have until you get tested right right like you can't think about it and think. Yeah I think I'd be good at that you know. I think I'd yeah I got some. Yeah but also I think this also speaks to like why. It's so important to network with other people who are doing. You know similar things who are in your world There's a few Guys that I'm going to mastermind with in fact it was kind of funny. We were looking at Each morning I look at my You those facebook memories the pop up reading a look back in the past and the very first time this group of guys and I met was five years ago today at the time of this recording As a bad group of guys and we talk on a daily basis has been incredibly valuable. Because you're able to share. The wind geothermal share the highs lows would ask question dribble to express your doubts and so there are times where it's like we just something went really well. We just had our best revenue month ever like and you want to be able to celebrate that and give someone of a virtual high five and then there's days where you're like you know are a key person just said that they're quitting or We just did this. Big Project or launches. An didn't go how we expected or Hey I just run into this situation in any of you dealt with this or how do you handle this as having people around you that can say hey what? You're running into like insecurities. That the the douse the fears. That's normal you're good. You're fine helps. Just be reassuring like okay all right so I'm not alone in this. I know that other people have dealt with this are dealing with this as well as I think it takes the pressure off of feeling like I'm isolated. I am on the sign that I am. The only one that feels like. There's I looked at site. I thumbed through Instagram facebook. Or whatever and everybody's got their act together and everybody's businesses blowing up and reality is is behind the curtain. We're all doing our best with what we have at that moment. Were all trying to figure it out as we go. We're all making it up as we go And some days. We got together in a lot of days. We don't and that's part of it but surrounding yourself with other people who have feel similar and have gone through similar things as is incredibly incredibly valuable and helpful and so glad that you brought relationships and community into this conversation. Because I definitely wanted to ask you about that and early on you said that When you're trying to figure out how to get started you ask speakers About their work. How did you know speakers at that point? I didn't I didn't I was on email and stocking people and Yeah houshold of finding people. I'll I'll say this one of the most valuable things that I think Early on and even today is look for people who are doing something similar that you want to do and that you can model right doing something similar but doing it in a way that you want to do it right so so for example and and also say look for people who are like a step or two ahead of you not like light years ahead of you right so if I said all right. I WANNA be a motivational speaker. So let's reach out to some motivation. let's reach out to Tony Robinson. Suetonius up to these days. You know like that's not gonNA work like we're we're talking two totally things But YOU WANNA be focused on people who are against a step or two ahead of you that you look at their business and you have a realistic a sense of like you know. And if I if I do the work I could see doing that. I could see like being at that level And I feel I feel confident in realistic and self aware enough to know that that's possible so reaching out to A few people was really really valuable for me early on. Just ask them questions and and try to to To pick their brain type type of thing I would give Kinda give some some some thoughts on if you're going to do that because a lot of people on the other end and I get a lot of the you know. Pick your brain type Type emails of questions A few things that Work for you and some things that don't work for you okay. So things that don't work for you is asking these big vague questions right so if you just email someone someone emails me and says how do I become a speaker Kind of big thing where it's like. There's there's a lot to that right. versus going to someone and say and asking a very specific clear question. So if I came to you if I knew okay rob networking expert and so if I thought Hey Robby there is one person I'm on thinking about reaching out to And I was going to reach out to them via email. And here's what I was GONNA say Do you think that this would be a good approach? I that's an easy thing for Robbie to respond to and be like. Yeah that totally I would do that or actually you might tweak this word or the sentence or something as easy to respond to versus. Dang like a rally. Do I network with people Yeah there's a lot to that you know So if you.

US Nashville self employed facebook GIG Scott Stratton emily Tony Robinson Walmart Speakers Bay Robbie
"grant baldwin" Discussed on On the Schmooze with Robbie Samuels

On the Schmooze with Robbie Samuels

12:49 min | 5 months ago

"grant baldwin" Discussed on On the Schmooze with Robbie Samuels

"Today's guests philosophy is to work with what you got and build as you go along that philosophies helped thousands of people graduate from his booked and paid to speak training course ready to start and build their own speaking business's transforming their passion project into a paycheck a nationally known speaker. He is given nearly one thousand live presentations and has spoken to over. Half a million people in forty seven different states through leadership conferences conventions and many other types of events he is the host of the speaker lap which is a podcast with nearly three hundred episodes. That focuses on speaker training and interviews with speakers who will help listeners. Their business his first book reality check is taught in four hundred high schools around the country. He's also the author of the successful speaker five steps for booking gigs getting paid and building your platform. Please join me welcoming grant Baldwin Fisher. Avi Appreciate you. Let me hang out with your fun crap. Thanks for joining us for your office in Nashville. A pleasure to have you on here so as you know this is a show about building strong now works in the context here is leadership so tell me how do you define leadership and when did you realize you had the skills to lead. Leadership has always been one of the things that's been pretty fascinating in fact I remember In High School Maybe my sophomore junior year and I was in. I think it's like a psychology class and we're supposed to do a paper on even remember what the papers supposed to be about. But I asked if I could do. The paper on leadership is just one of those things that was kind of fascinating intriguing to me As all it's one of those things that I think is always kind of been that case as a as a speaker as an entrepreneur. Some news is trying to make a little dent in the world that That that leading externally in terms of the people that we that we work with. Who served the will help it? Also internally in terms of the Our team our employees company But even for myself for our family Leadership shows up and a lot of different ways. It's a first definition. I've I've always heard leadership as influence the ability to get other people to To follow you and and and trust you in a direction that you're leading them so Yeah I love the topic of leadership and looking forward to this conversation. Well I I love that. You went back to high school. Sometimes I have to help people. Kind of CERIGA dig a little further back there like my first job or when I first director and I'm like what about so what I mean. This is so curious to me the grant because I don't think many people in like ten or eleven grade or like leadership is totally topic. I mean I did project Oliver Wendell Holmes but I don't think I did it because he was a leader to no no. He was a leader. You know so. What was there something with the people in your world that were great leaders like did people tell you you? Alicia potential. And you're like what does that even mean like. How do you even get to that conversation? I think it was one of those things I recognize early on that I had an ability to to lead and influence other people Hopefully a positive way and but I also know in In High School I was really involved. My local church and my youth pastor had a big impact on my life and I know he really believed in me and gave me opportunities to lead and to speak From time to time and I feel like it was just one of those things that I I resume with that. I clicked with those fascinating intriguing to me and I think it's I think it's important for anyone to kind of look back like you said on those things that what are the things that you were naturally drawn toward as you know as a child or a teenager and the things that you resonated with things that you Appealed to you that you WanNa do more that you were fascinated with Paying attention to those things and how they show up and other areas in your life in the future and so. That's really what my youth pastor was was for me was very influential in that way And then also gave me opportunities to to lead in various capacities obviously saw the potential in. You were when you got involved with your already. A kid who ser- organized other kids the playground. Where you you know were you I don't know some kids sell things in school or get kids to all like were gonNA projects like the kind of kid. Yeah I remember I remember like from an entrepreneurial standpoint that I I was the one that was mowing lawns throughout the neighborhood Which didn't necessarily involve Other kids or anything but one of the things. I was I was fascinated by entrepreneurship and wanting to earn a dollars a kid and even now as a as a parent of my wife and I have three daughters and so Helping them understand that One of things we tell them all the time is that work equals money and If you want something you gotta you gotTa earn it and you got to work for and you got at that just magically happen and so I can think of I think at times like I remember one time in. Maybe I think fourth grade That it was during March madness which the NCAA men's basketball tournament and man's of friends played basketball the time and we loved We love watching these games in the tournament and a lot of like that. The Big Games in the first few days of the tournament war a during the day and so I asked We convinced Our teacher if we could bring in a TV And have lunch in the classroom. Which was you know as an elementary kid was unheard of? You had to go to the lunchroom. You had to. You know All in order type thing and convinced her to to let us sit in the classroom and watch basketball during lunch. as yeah. I just With friends that I knew I had influence. I knew I knew that that I had opportunities to lead them and and I could be influential and I played competitive basketball ants. I knew I was a leader on that team so like I mean just looking back. I think several opportunities moments that I had you know in school and out of school to help Hopefully lead others. I love this example about basketball though and the and getting the TV into the classroom. Because you're right like the fact you even thought to ask is so outside of what's expected of an elementary school student saying like this little tiny black and white TV. That I think my parents must have or something. And that makes me sound way older than actually but Yeah I just remember. We had this. I mean this tiny little maybe twenty inch TV or something and lugged at into the classroom one day so he could watch basketball at lunch recall. Yeah you're like a hero to your right. I mean that's in some ways you had a problem you had to propose you propose a solution. You knew the people you're to convince you made the campaign and when you were successful you executed the plan like like. That's a good leader right there. Yes there was not that much thought that went into it. I want a ten year old. Who wants to watch basketball with my friends at lunch? So that was basically the extent of it worked out. Yeah that's great. I love it So where did you go after it? Did you go to college? You go back to work. After high school went to a went to local Bible College. Actually and again. My youth pastor had to begin to my life and an was a great speaker And so then eventually worked at a local church as a as you youth. Aspirin was doing a lot of speaking myself I really enjoyed it. I felt like I was I was good at it. Really resonated and in speaking is a form of of leadership and influence and being able to help people Through various situations or circumstances personally and professionally And so is one of the things I wanted to pursue and knew I was decent APP but just didn't know what to do next so one of the things I'd I'd say a lot is that I felt like I had the potential but I needed the plan had potential but I need the plan meaning that I felt like I was a good speaker. I'll goes you know okay as speaker but I just needed to figure how he actually gigs and book gigs. And how much do you charge and who hire speakers unlike? How's how's this world work and so Started talking too much other speakers was trying to figure out how do you how do you do this? And how do you become a speaker? I think we figured view things out and have been able to make up is so interesting because I can imagine. There was a point in your life where you were speaking but didn't know that that was a profession. Yeah I would say so Well I would say there's an in college. I worked for a guy who was a fulltime speaker and and get the help a little bit on the On the back in with like logistics and contracts and travel and that sort of thing and so it. Kinda got a little sense of like okay. This is a thing I think it was a real common thing though And is maybe one of the things that That you had to have some special skill set or some special ability or He had a he had was like the top national director of of some organization in the past and so I figured like okay. Well I'm not that so I don't have the credibility or the The resume that would qualify to speaker quickly. Learned like those. You don't need those things ought to be a speaker And so yeah it was certainly one of the things I was interested in but I just wasn't sure just wonder how to how to do it. You know like I was working with him. And he's done fifty sixty gigs year. And I'm like that doesn't happen overnight. So and is is like. He's getting these emails on a regular basis of people interested in and then hiring him and and that sort of thing. I'm just like what like? Where did that? Start as it happened. You know and so. That was definitely a challenge. Ileana just trying to figure that out is that every every speaker every entrepreneur everybody's starched from zero. So I did my very first GIG and you go from zero to one and then you go from one to two and two ten intend to fifty and so on and so forth but everybody starts from zero. Nobody is born as as professional and an expert in any subject topic or skill set Like everyone starts from the same spot with so helpful for you even know that having had a chance to work for this professional speaker and see the back end to see that it was professionalized that you know and that he was doing he was doing well. He was like getting out in the stages so often. Because I mean I went through college and an highschool organizing events and didn't know that that was a thing to remember. Oh I mean I would. I mean okay. I'll give you an example when we went for my Senior trip town from New York to DC. I found out that one of the buses holds fifty eight adults so I organize fifty eight of my friends to be on one bus School like like I opportunities organize people and create experiences everywhere everywhere like no matter what it was bigger small and you know. Eventually I was running conferences and Iras running panels and I was organizing teams of people. I didn't I didn't go into it thinking all clearly. I have a job here. Hicks something for people with certain point that out to you But like you said people start not with the knowledge of how to do Did you go from youth pastor right speaking or did you ever have that? I guess I'm GonNa Call it like ninety five day job. Experience will yes. Yes or no The fashion thing I would say was the last true career thing that I had Because whenever decided like okay I want to be a speaker Becoming a speaker starting any type of business typically not one of the things that are had on Friday. You make that decision like okay. Monday Amal fulltime speaker making a living from this. It just doesn't work like that it. Just it takes a minute to get it up and running and so why made the decision like okay. I want to do this and this is the direction. I'm going I knew it was going to take a little bit to build some of that momentum so for a little while I was working a couple of different odd jobs so I worked for a security company doing residential sales security sales and security systems. Which is one hundred percent commission job? Somebody gave me a lot of freedom of flexibility with schedule I worked for two different restaurants as a server And really enjoy that. I worked as a at an at an applebee's in college And really enjoy that. So it was serving as fund so worked at a couple of fine dining restaurants later in this transitional period made decent money from from the had. The also gave me a lot of freedom. Flexibility Worked for a seminar company doing some seminars for them here and there worked for a school simply company doing stuff stuff for them. So it's kind of like this hodgepodge of stuff over a two year period of all right. I'm going to build this this one thing. But it's not gonNA overnight saying so. I'm kind of doing this hodge podge enough as the speaking Picked up and my own speaking picked up than I was I quit the restaurant job..

basketball In High School Nashville Baldwin Fisher NCAA Oliver Wendell Holmes applebee director Aspirin Bible College bus School national director Ileana New York Hicks DC
"grant baldwin" Discussed on On the Schmooze with Robbie Samuels

On the Schmooze with Robbie Samuels

01:47 min | 5 months ago

"grant baldwin" Discussed on On the Schmooze with Robbie Samuels

"Your heart start to beat faster and wonder if it would be heard if there was a momentary lull in the conversation. Your palms are sweaty. And now you're worried about shaking hands. You think to yourself well. I've survived ten minutes. Will anyone notice if I leave? You are not alone if you feel this way. We have all felt like outsiders or perhaps even invisible particularly the first time attended a big event and truly didn't know a soul and no one talked to you for days face with those tight. Clusters of people happily chatting. You felt left out perhaps alone. A crowd those shoulder to shoulder huddles are nearly impossible to break into. And what leads you clinging to the edges the room feeling like an outsider?.

"grant baldwin" Discussed on The Accidental Creative

The Accidental Creative

09:59 min | 5 months ago

"grant baldwin" Discussed on The Accidental Creative

"And that you know the essence of it the idea of it and that you've thought through details of of stories and transitions and the points that you WanNa make. But you don't feel the need to I need to recite this verbatim. I think that again. That is where it becomes way. More robotic Remove some of that that spontaneity that you're talking about so some of the most real authentic genuine moments for an audience in terms of connecting with an audience happen When things that just happened Off The cuff for things. That happen. that you weren't expecting or that you were an anticipating and it's just like this raw real moment that is really really powerful not only for the audience for the speaker as well so allow that room for the spun eighty but the but the what what allows you to have. This is that you're competent in your material. And you're comfortable in your material but it's not a robotic Manuscript that you're just reciting yes so I I have never. I'd never scripted talk until this past summer. I was asked to speak something called the global leadership summit and it was going to be broadcast. Four hundred and five thousand people around the world and they're like ten thousand people in the room for the for the for the speech and I had a half hour like literally a half hour to do this like that's that's it. That's what you get and I was really nervous about presenting US nervous about getting the material delivered properly so scripted. The entire part of it was they wanted it scripted because it's being translated into a bunch of languages but but part of it too. I would have done it anyway because I wanted to make sure that there are certain key points that I hit and I was thinking about like playing a piece of music like their notes that you wanna hit or certain high points you WANNA hip. But there's also room for feel and sway an improvisation and things like that in between those key notes and so I wanted to make sure that I hit the right like certain phrases I wanted to boom. I wanted to deliver those absolutely but the funny thing is the reason to tell. The story is the most tweeted quote of the entire talk was something that was spontaneous. That wasn't my script. It was a brilliant is forged colder of creative conflict. That wasn't even in my script but because I was so comfortable with everything else my mind was just wandering and looking for stuff to say because I did. I was trying to remember what was next. And so that's like if you're giving a client presentation if you're whatever like sit down think through here the points I wanNa make. But then also think through. What are the possible objections that they're going to raise? And how would I address that if they raise this objection or that objection and actually script that out in what you WANNA say? It looks make you so much more comfortable and spontaneous in the moment because you're comfortable with all of the material. Yeah very much so and I think it just gives you a lot more confidence going into it. What what you and I would never recommend is for someone to say. I'm just GonNa you know a few minutes before I go speak. I'm going to scribble a couple thoughts on a napkin. And hopefully it all works out like the the best speakers on the planet. The best presenters that you've ever seen They don't just get up there and wing it like they spend hours and hours and hours and hours behind the scenes working in preparing and and and going over things to the point when they get up there. It looks like they're speaking off the top of their head. It looks like they're just shoot. You know they're just winging it and shooting from the hip but the reality is like again they spent so much time to make it look effortless As a really you you have to invest that time So that you feel really comfortable and confident on stage. Yeah Yeah Okay so I wanNA talk about the the final letter I want to talk about is establishing your expertise. I think this is a real hurdle for some people because I think to to some people that feels like toot own horn ray or become a quote unquote thought leader which is a phrase. It's very polarizing culturally polarizing. Any for a lot of reasons one of them. Is You know there are a lot of people running around claiming that there are thought leaders in its. I feel like that's not something you can ascribe to yourself. It's like it's like saying I am a general in the army. You're not because following enough so you know what does it mean to establish your expertise. Yeah this really comes onto to your marketing materials and so creating your your website your demo video and letting the world know like this is the service that you offer so In the same way that again this is an exclusive to speakers but any type of of you know creative service professional that Just because you're clear like okay. I know who what the problem is that I I can solve. I I create these amazing logos for Realtors like that's great but if nobody knows you exist like you you're going to be out of business real quick so now we have to start to build some momentum by letting people know like this is what I do and this is how I can help and this is how how I can actually solve a problem. And so in this day and age like if you don't have a website you don't exist like people don't won't take you seriously amfar speakers. A demo video is really important to To to give some type of Idea of what? It would be like for you to stand up on stage. Maybe you're phenomenal speaker. But you're not exactly what they organization or group is looking for Or maybe you're a horrible speaker and an event needs to see that ahead of time. To to mitigate the risk of whether or not they're going to hire you so When we talk about establishing yourself as the expert it's not just like you said not just Just putting on a hat and say I'm suddenly overnight expert at starting to put together some resources and materials that people can look at and determine if you're a good fit for what it is that they're looking for. Yeah and and how would you recommend so for somebody who maybe is? Let's say that they are a leader in an organization. Maybe THEY WANNA start speaking at some industry events you know. Maybe that's a way that they want to a build. A personal brand in their industry be make themselves more marketable maybe to to go to another organization or get a promotion or something you know because once you get to a certain level of leadership in an organization speaking at industry functions can be one of those things that gets gets attention from the organization. It starts getting you look for promotions and things. How would you recommend that? They go about that. But maybe they don't want to be a professional speaker full-time but they WANNA start getting some opportunities like that. How would you recommend they go about establishing their expertise to enable them to do that? Yeah and you touch on a couple of things there that I think is really important because like you said not. Everybody wants to be a professional speaker. Not Everybody wants to be a fulltime speaker. Another not everybody wants to be a bunch of GIGS. But around is like even if you spoke at a couple of Of Trade Shows or association events or some things in your world There's a lot of benefit and value to that like you mentioned from a credibility standpoint from a networking standpoint whenever you know We go to whatever our association event is and we're looking at people's name tags or connecting with people and someone's got a little speaker lane your tumor speaker a ribbon on their name tag Like there's a certain amount of prestige and recognition that goes along with that So that it can be it can be certainly valuable in ways beyond just you know whether or not you got a check to speak at a certain event. So where would you go from there in terms of okay? Now I WANNA start. Actually I would love to speak at a couple of things you know two or three or four things. A year would be awesome in my in my space in my niche. So From there you want you WanNa do is is start by Even just looking up some the association events that you are currently attending those are good chance that if you're you know if you're Let's say graphic designer. They you may be attending something On a on an annual basis or semi annual basis that Either something that that your company requires you to be out or you just know like these are are a lot of a similar people that are already there for opportunities for networking or for whatever. It may be So they're probably going to be looking for speakers for that type of event and they're going to be looking for either keynote speakers or workshops speakers So what you want to be able to do. Is You want to be able to again going back to the previous couple of steps there. A being really clear on what it is that you speak about. What's the unique topic that you have And then from there you can actually begin to reach out to whoever the event planner may be and again. If it's in your space already you may or do you know who that person is. But a lot of times people won't think of YOU If they don't know that this is a service that you actually provide so I'll give you a quick example a few years ago I was like sort of have I was kind of intrigued and doing some coaching and I you know but I don't really get many inquiries for coaching and But I am something I'd like to do more of and so we added a page on our website and promoted a little bit and all the we had all these coaching inquiries and had a bunch of people who were saying. I didn't even know this is something that you offered. And the the simple point is like people don't know that you offered if you don't tell them that you offer it so there's there's plenty of people who may be interested in and having you speak at their event or their Association of aunt or their trade show or the workshop or whatever who say you'd be you'd be great. I didn't even know that you spoke. I didn't even know this is something that you're interested and so you have to begin to let people know that that you are interested in it and that that you would be a good fit And especially if you if this is an event that you've attended in the past and you probably have a good idea of what the other topics are that. They are typically bring in speakers to talk about again. Whether that's you know breakout our workshop or You know a seminar keynote or whatever it may be you already know. Some of those options and opportunities may be but then it's beginning to reach out to them and connect the dots of of how you can best help. Yeah I encourage anyone who is in that position where you think. Hey I have. Industry expertise have unique perspective to bring to my industry you to explore this and you may think well. Who Am I to do that? While most of the people on stage these events are thinking the exact same thing so but but they but they overcome that hurdle and there are tremendous benefits to becoming a voice in your industry granted that go beyond just you know maybe getting paid to speak some more because some of these industry events. You won't get paid right. It's not about that. It's about increasing your brand getting your point of view out. They're beginning to show your value to the organization and frankly also about honing your perspective as an internal leader of the organization. You if you're out there speaking you have to get really clear about what you want to say. And that'll hone your leadership as well. Yeah and one other quick thought here for those that are interested Speaking can also be really great lead generation for other parts of Your Business so if you offer some type of consulting.

US Association of aunt
"grant baldwin" Discussed on The Accidental Creative

The Accidental Creative

11:01 min | 5 months ago

"grant baldwin" Discussed on The Accidental Creative

"Grant Baldwin grant is longtime friend associate Someone I've known in followed For for a very long time and he has a new book. It's called the successful speaker and we're GONNA be talking with him about that today. Grant welcome to the excellent great podcast. Todd it's an honor to be here I've a Huge huge respect for you and appreciate you. Let me hang out with you. Yeah so so I would love to hear a little bit about your background and a little bit about your story. You know because you didn't you didn't come out of the womb as a speaker as a professional speaker. It was it something. So what what? What was your journey like getting to this point? Yes if we go way back in time in high school I was really involved in my local church and my youth. Pastor had a really big impact on my life and he was a A phenomenal speaker and So really kind of caught my attention of like I want to do that. That seems like a cool gig and so That's kind of the path I was on for a little while I was I worked at a After College I worked at a local church as a youth pastor Actually while I was in college I worked for a guy who was a professional speaker and he was doing sixty seventy gigs. A year and I kind of helped on the back end With with travel and logistics contracts and helping books and stuff and so it kind of got to see like okay. This is actually a thing. You know And so as a youth pastor I had a lot of opportunity to speak felt like I was decent. Wanted to do more of it. No idea what to do from there So that certain meeting some other speakers who were who are doing it and and I just started again more and more realize like okay. This is like a legit opportunity that exists. You know it's not just the you know this. This random person the local town who speaks at a few things here and they are like you could actually make a really good living and and make a big impact By being a speaker so I sorted pursue that and over the next year to Really went all in on it and went from doing zero gigs. Every everyone starts at zero And to the point where I was doing. Sixty seventy gigs. A year and really really enjoyed. It was a lot of fun And then eventually got to a point where I had. A lot of people are asking me like. Hey I've I've seen how you've built your business. I want to be a speaker and for some people you know. They wanted to do the sixty seventy one hundred plus gigs a year. And then there's plenty of people who are like. I don't want to do that many like I have a a fulltime career. I have a job or a business or family or whatever that That would prevent from wanting to do that many but I would love to do two three four five gigs a year. I don't know how to find those gigs or the charge. What to speak about or who. Who Book speakers are that whole world? And so that's that's Where we really started. That transitioned more than the training side of of working speakers and teaching them how to find Speaking gigs and The the core of what we do today in the speaker labs in your business correct. Yeah Yup Yup everything we do is over the speaker lab DOT COM. So I know people listening right now. Your lot of people. Listening are leaders of organizations may be there Designer on a on a creative team. Or maybe they're not running a business in their thinking. Wait a minute I don't. I have no desire to be a speaker. Had that what you so. I know you're tempted. Maybe some of your attempted right now to say okay. This isn't relevant but it is relevant. Let me tell you why because all of us have to present ideas in order to win business in order to persuade people in order to in some capacity advance our cause. We all have to learn how to do that. And grant is a master at that helping people get to the core of what they want to communicate and then presented effectively. Whether or not. You're you know whether or not you're trying to get paid for a specific speaking gig. So what I would like to do is I would love to talk about this speak. Acronym is an acronym with him. When he they call that one that's SPA. It's like Okay Maksim. Okay good so let's talk about what that what that means. So the first step is select a problem to solve. This is the place we recommend that speakers begin is by selecting a problem to solve so again whether you're a professional speaker or maybe you're in an organization that you have to present on something. How do you recommend people begin to circle the airport on what the problem is that they're trying to solve? Yeah it's a great question so this is really the foundational piece and if you get this part right then everything else in the process becomes a lot simpler and smoother but for most people And again this is an exclusive digest speakers. The supplies a lot of different ways. Give you some examples in a second but the idea being that you have to be clear on two things one. Who is it that you speak to? What the specific person that you're speaking to and to. What is the specific problem that you saw for that person and the more specific more clear the more narrow the more focus? You are the easier. It is to find gigs which counterintuitive because oftentimes. We assume that the bigger than that is that we can spread the more services. We can offer the more things we can speak about the more things we can do. More hats we can wear the more opportunities we have and the reality is is the opposite is actually the case. So one of the ways we talk about this. Is You want to make sure that you are again. Not just as a speaker but any type of lake creative profession creative service professional. You WanNa make sure that you're positioning yourself as the steakhouse and not the buffet as the steakhouse and not the buffet and what I mean by that is tablets. Imagine you were going to lunch We have an option. We if we're looking for a good steak we could go to a a fait. Where state as one of one hundred different things that they offer and they're all mediocre or. We could go to a steakhouse. That's all they do you know. They don't do LASAGNA. And they don't do pizza and they don't do Salads Burger. They don't do anything they do. Stay they do one thing and they do it. Really really really well and again. It's counterintuitive. Because you think well if I'M A BUFFET. I have more options. I have more options and I'm going to draw a bigger crowd but all of the services that you're providing all of your offerings. They're ultimately going to be pretty mediocre versus the steakhouse. Who said we do one thing and we are the best at that? So that's really what you want to make sure that you're doing again. Not only as a speaker but any type of creative professional vir- saying like I do this one thing and I do this really really well versus trying to be all things to all people. So that's where Speakers have a difficult time and again I think entrepreneurs and just create a professional in general have a hard time of wanting to help as many people as possible so some speakers say things like you know who do I speak to. I speak to humans. I speak to people or you know. What are you speak about? What do you want me to speak about? I can speak about anything and the reality is that just doesn't work. Yeah well and and I think that by the way that doesn't mean that you have to just say I speak about one thing or if your business owner I only solve one problem right you. What one thing I've discovered is that I can speak about the wide array of things but I have a very specific problem in each of those areas that I solve rate so if somebody comes to me and says hey we have a leadership issue. I can take great. I can help you understand how to motivate the people on your team from a leadership capacity. That is something that I'm really good at teaching leaders. How do that's a problem that I solve right very specifically or creativity? Oh well you know. We're really struggling. I can help your team generate more ideas more efficiently more effectively. You know like those are specific problems versus just talking about creativity. You're talking about leadership talking about these. Those are not problems to be solved topics to be addressed right very much so again. Remember like you. You're touching on there that you are in the problem solving business and so you have to be providing some type of solution to that so sometimes you know. I'll I'll hear speaker say I wanna I wanNA tell my story at this crazy overcoming obstacles story that I wanNA share or I wanna just only be a motivational speaker and does motivate people or is want people to be happier and like all those are like well intention but you have to again. You have to position yourself in a way that you are solving a very specific problem for a specific audience. Yeah absolutely I love that insight so the second part of the speak acronym is prepared. Deliver your talk. How say that? Somebody's going in to give a client presentation right. They're going to go in. They'RE GONNA try to pitch business or something like that or maybe they are giving a talk for a group. Maybe they're giving at an industry conference or something. They've been asked to speak. What are the first steps that you need to take him preparing your talk? Yeah you really want to begin with the end in mind and figure out. What's the point of the talk? And where's the talk going to go so it's kind of like if you thought about it like a road trip. You know you wouldn't just get in the car and start driving and hope that you magically end up somewhere that you intended to you're gonNA figure out what's the destination and they were going to reverse engineer and figure out what's the what's the best possible way to get there so as an audience you. WanNa make sure you pick everybody up at the same spot and you drop everybody off at the same spot So you really have to figure out why. What's the main idea? What's the point that you're trying to a communicate? Are you trying to get them to act differently or think differently or feel differently? Or what the action that you want the audience to take so wait to kind of think about. This is an audience as always asking themselves to questions. And we've done this. You know you and I have been an audience as everyone. Listening has been an audience before anwr always asking two questions. So what and now what? So what now it? So what? How does this apply them? And that's a great story. I'm glad that that happened to you. I'm glad that you're businesses successful. I'm glad that you overcame that crazy. Obstacle so how. What does that have to do with me and now let as a nice story? That was interesting those inspiration on those funny. That was a whatever the the adjective is now. What am I supposed to do as a result of this as you're working on your talk Always be thinking through those two questions. So what and now what? Why is this matter to the audience? And what do I want the audience to do as a result of this do you? So I've heard varying degrees of passion on both sides of this issue and I would love to hear your perspective on the idea of scripting a talk before you give it. Because I've I've heard some people say no absolutely not it ruins your spontaneity and other people say no absolutely. You must do in order to really know your material. Well so where. Where do you fall on that spectrum? Yeah I recommend scripting it but I don't recommend reciting it as such and what I mean by that if I were to ask you to. Tell me about Your Mary tell me about whenever you proposed to your wife like you could probably tell me that story off the top of your head but if you said. GimME FIVE MINUTES. Let me just sit down. I'm early GonNa think through the details of that. What did we say to each other? Where were we? What was the setting? What was the weather? What was who did we call immediately? Who Did we talk to? What was everyone's reaction? You could probably come up with it and tell a better story because you really took some time to think it through so I like to approach it that way. The the thing I would remind people of is whenever you manuscript it out that again you're not trying to read that verbatim like it's it's possible that that You know we've all seen speakers who are so robotic and it just feels like they're in their own head and they're just trying. I forgot my line. I forgot my word. And you're not you're you're a human being talking to a collection of other human beings so you want to speak like that you don't need to just be reciting something and so sometimes people worry like speakers. Were I would if I forget. You know what if I get if I if I say Something wrong or if I forget the the main idea that I was supposed to you or I forget the story or anything like that remember. It's like you know if we were singing the national anthem right now and you butcher. The words like everyone knows it but whenever you are speaking from stage nobody has a script. Nobody knows where you're going if you do the points out of order if you forget a story or if you forget if a flood a punchline nobody knows the difference so I think that I take some of the pressure off yourself so I recommend that you. Have you have a a manuscript that you? You're confident in Juneau..

Grant Baldwin Todd Juneau business owner anwr engineer
"grant baldwin" Discussed on The Accidental Creative

The Accidental Creative

02:49 min | 5 months ago

"grant baldwin" Discussed on The Accidental Creative

"Today's episode is brought to you by skill share. So it's time to explore new skills. Deepen your existing passions get lost in creativity was skill shares online class. Maybe twenty twenty for you is a year where you need to develop some new skills. Maybe this is a year where you need to explore areas of curiosity that you've just been too busy to do before well skill shared takes away all of the excuses. What you find might just surprise and inspire you skills. Here's an online learning community where millions come together to take the next step in their creative journey with of inspiring classes for creative and curious people on topics like illustration design photography video freelancing. A much much more to skill share is an online learning community offers membership with meaning with so much to explore real projects to create and the support of fellow creative skill. Share empowers you to accomplish real growth so the classes on skill share are designed for real life for people who are busy right so you can move your creative journey forward without putting your life on the hold you can learn and grow with short classes that fit your busy routine and still shares also incredibly affordable especially when you compare it to the Pricey in person classes that are offered you know or pricey in in person workshops. An annual subscription to skill share is less than ten dollars a month. Which is an incredible bargain. When you consider all of the skills that you can apply to your to your life to your career. That's going to help you get wherever you want to be more quickly and effectively so I know we have a lot of entrepreneurs that listened to the show and I know sometimes. It's an entrepreneur as fellow entrepreneur. I don't know where to turn when I need to learn something to understand something regardless of what the topic is you know. It's hard to find people who can teach you the skills that you need to know while skills. Your has classes on any number of topics related to entrepreneurship. That will help you move your business forward. You know for example. There's a course called art of the start by Guy Kawasaki. You probably know Guy Kawasaki turning ideas into a high growth business entrepreneurship hustle from business plan to real success. Basically the aid Z. Of how to turn your idea.

Thinking About Writing A Book?

Build A Big Podcast - Marketing Podcast For Podcasters

05:49 min | 5 months ago

Thinking About Writing A Book?

"Are released a book last year. It's called big podcast. Grow your podcast audience build listener loyalty and get everybody talking about your show. This book is available. Everywhere it is on kindle is in paperback and very soon I will have an audiobook version of it for you. I read every single word. I read every single word probably five times because I don't know how to read that. Well just kidding but as a podcast. Your people are listening to me. I kinda got a little bit of perfectionism going right. I wanted it to be something. I was proud of a wanted it to be something that would last. So I've gone through this piece by piece. Edited it together myself and that is almost done definitely within next month. I'll let you know about it. I don't WanNa get too much on this episode because I want to focus on a portion of an interview that I did with a guy named grant Baldwin. You may know him from the Speaker Lab. Podcast if you're interested in building a speaking business. He has a new book. It's called the successful speaker. Five steps for booking gigs getting paid and building your platform. He did it with a guy named Jeff coins. You may know Jeff from his own books. He's got a great book. Called real artists. Don't starve and if you're into books. War of art by Stephen Press Field. If you're in a mindset books. I think you'll really like it. Jeff worked with grant on this book. The successful speaker to package grants information into a book. Format grand has all this public speaking knowledge. He does podcast. He's done a lot of interviews. He may be in the same situation. That you're in your Talker europe-wide castor you speak to but maybe you don't right so part of this conversation with grant. I asked him about that. I have about working with Jeff joins using jeff as a ghostwriter to package his information and here is that portion of the interview speaking of expansion. You do the new book the Successful Speaker. A lot of people start the book. Go to speaking to promote it. You start with speaking now. You've got a book which you're also promoting via speaking among other things. Let's talk about this. I want to know how you got the deal. Did they approach you and by that? I mean Baker. The publisher was because you were known or did you have to go to them. Talk about how you got this deal. Publishers are typically looking for people that have an audience and can ultimately sell books and so that was something that that we definitely had with our audience so I was a full week for several years and then a few years ago. We'd started the speech lab where we're doing more training and coaching for other speakers. As we built up a significant audience and email lists and social media following of people who are interested in speaking. Not everyone wants to be a fulltime speaker when there's plenty of people who are interested in speaking to various degrees. That was something that was certainly appealing to them in terms of us being able to promote and sell books and get the word out on on a book the backstory would be I worked with our mutual. Jeff going on this and Jeff had reached out a one point like hey. Do you have any interest in doing a book at any point? Like not really like I had done a a self published book. A few years ago had done well but I like I just don't enjoy writing like I prefer podcast audio and speaking and I just don't writing is not my favorite thing. Let Me Stop You when you say. Dunwell of heard you talk about the numbers. You had pretty good numbers on that. Self-published book yeah and it was so as a when I was doing speaking of doing a lot with Initiative on a lot with students doing a lot with with high school student and collisions So we sold the books for them and sold over thirty thousand physical copies of the book. I don't know where that ranks in terms of of Of Average book sales. Let me have you think of like this. This is what a guy told me from the music industry one time he said If you think thousand CDs isn't a lot look at what a thousand CDs is and you. Imagine thirty thousand bucks. That's a lot of books man. Yeah that's the book did fine and so I think from a bucket list item of just like check the box. I wrote a book. I wrote every single word of that book like all right. I'm done I'm good. I don't need I don't need to read it but I see the value of a book. You didn't feel that on on because it says with Jeff going and I was curious about that to basically the way it came to be as Jeff asked me like. Hey Do you have any interest in doing a book? I was like really. He had a friend with Baker the publisher and said hey the they might be interested. Are you interested in doing something? Like I duNNo. Maybe we had a couple of conversations with Baker and so finally came back and said all right. Here's the deal. You have a ton of content already around speaking so done. Hundreds of podcasts episode with multiple courses of done. A lot of interviews have a lot of cases that they have a lot of experience on all things speaking a lot of success stories. He said what if what if I was kind of the writer for I took all that content and I just kind of synthesized it. It's all your content. It's all your materials all your voice. I'm just describe. Would you be interested in something like that? Like Yeah Heck Yeah I'd love that'd be awesome. You know white publisher said we want to give you a bunch of money for Jeff going to write your book. Yeah where do I sign up for that? So that's essentially what it turned out to be is Jeff is kind of a non ghostwriter ghost rider and so it's all my content but he was the one that took that content and to turn it into Book Form Jeff as extremely knowledgeable when it comes to the publishing space and writing books and crafting books and so he was absolutely amazing to work with had a great experience and so different are written in different ways in terms of like a lot of well known. Authors have ghostwriter meant to be a ghost. That's unknown also Jeff. Yeah Jeff was very much like I said from the beginning like I have no problem talking about like jeff part of this project and the project would have happened without Jeff. So that's a little of the behind the Music

Jeff Coins Publisher Baker Kindle Speaker Lab Grant Baldwin Stephen Press Field Writer
"grant baldwin" Discussed on RED - The Marketing Podcast For Experts

RED - The Marketing Podcast For Experts

09:27 min | 5 months ago

"grant baldwin" Discussed on RED - The Marketing Podcast For Experts

"This is because you are touching different senses how we receive messages where people can see you going to receive your message that way but they're not going to receive it in the same way that they can hear you when they can just hear you. They are receiving it in a different way when they can see and hear you and this is one of the reasons that live speaking is so important and is such an effective way when it comes to building your brand building the brand of the products and services that you are involved with building the brands of the companies that you were working for. Here's basically what I'm saying when it comes to organize and your ideas effectively getting those ideas out to the world you benefit by having all these things the podcast blog newsletter the mailing lists the book and by speaking live. Because you reach people in different ways you reach people at different times. Let's take television. For example you gotTA television show. Nobody watches television in the morning. Radio dominates in the morning. Why is that because people are getting ready for work? People commuting their in their cars. They're not where they can watch television in the evening. Television is more popular than Radio Afternoons Television More Popular Than Radio Morning. Radio Rules podcasting. Listen to whenever you want so it doesn't matter if it's a holiday. It doesn't matter if it's primetime the point being is the more ways you can reach out to people you're hitting these senses but you're also hitting them at different times of the day some of the Times they're going to be more receptive your message than others. Somebody's spreading a message. You may be familiar with the podcast called the speaker lab. The host grant Baldwin has a new book out. It's called the successful speaker. Five STEPS FOR BOOKING GIGS. Getting paid and building. Your Platform Grants job at the speaker lab. It is to help people like you spread your message via speaking and a lot of stuff that he talks about. It's the same stuff that I talk about here. It's getting clear on your message. Getting clear on who? Your audience is solving a problem. I had a conversation with him about these things. Even if you're not a speaker I think you're going to be helped by it because all of this will apply to you in the way you deliver your message so without further comment. Here's my conversation with grant Baldwin of the Speaker Lab. Podcast less muscle you. You're running by my house. Literally I remember that I was getting ready to bring that up. I was I was doing a half marathon. You get to that point in the race where you're just kind of a delirious and you're like. I think that's David over there. And you're you're hauling Hollerin' and it was pretty funny thinking about seven miles so you had a long way to go after me and that's it I did. You are the boost of energy and confidence. I needed to get through the second half. It's funny with Music City Marathon. It's weird I'll be hanging out there with my dog and you wouldn't think that people would see you on the side of the street but I guess you guys are looking for something to distract you from the seven miles when you're running along if you have big crowds there that's encouraging. That definitely helps like you hear people versus like a lot of your training around you. Just kind of In silence by yourself so yeah any type of little pepper encouragement or you see a familiar face it can. It can be good and the other thing too is like a lot of those races people. Hold up some pretty funny signs So that can be good just as a mental distraction. Probably a lot like the speaking business in that it's a marathon not a sprint. Yeah takes a while to build up your new book. You talk about that. Let's talk about the speaking opportunity. What makes speaking better than other options for spreading a message? Speaking is one of those unique opportunity to really see. You can really see it. Connect with an audience. And what I mean by that. Is You know there may be thousands of people listening to this right now and we at any given point in time and we will never see any of their reactions as they listen to it and the same way that anybody who reads a book the author never gets to like watch them. Read the book but whenever you were speaking you get to see that. Live that real time feedback of the audience nodding or clapping or laughing or crying. Or having these like Aha epiphany type of moments and you get that real time feedback that you don't get through other mediums or other platforms so I don't know that again. I'm certainly biased. Speaking is a phenomenal way to make an impact and to make a living. But there's there's a lotta great ways to do that. Speaking just provide some unique opportunities that I think some of the other platforms mediums. Don't when I was in the music industry one of the things that we would see and this would really happen for the first album when you've got a ban that is out playing gigs. And they've got instant feedback. They know if the songs work they know if the songs don't you see this with comics definitely think that's one of the great things about speaking is that they're going to let you know really quickly if something lands or doesn't land. Yeah I would say. That would probably upset. Well what does the downside? The downside is you know you and I are both in our homes recording this right now and there's going to be people who are listening all over the world to this whereas if I go speak in an event we're going to have to leave our house we're GonNa have to go there. And we can only impact the number of people that are in that room so there's a limitation people that could actually travel or drive or whatever to that room to that event to see. You speak to do your thing. That's kind of the extent of what that message can do. So they're certainly that just limitation. You can also make the case that seeing someone speaking person you may actually be able to have more impact more personal connection for sure then you could versus a podcast blog or some other form of media you're just limited by the By by time and space and the people that are actually in that room that you could speak to. I want you to compare the podcast that you have with speaking talk about the connection that you have with people. Do you feel that you've been able to maybe have a better relationships with the people that you've seen in person or is it possible to do that via podcast? So I've done two hundred sixty two hundred seventy podcast episodes for show this big labs so we. We helped teach people all about the INS and outs the speaking world and a lot of interviews with that and so I have heard this from other podcasters and I found this to be the case with me as well and I'm sure you have as well David that when people listen to your podcast that it is a different relationship and instance different connection versus if they read a blog post so you can have all the same content a lot of the same material on a blog post. But there's something about hearing your voice and hearing cadence and things that you say and maybe like common lines that you use phrases that you use that. Just connect to the audience. So the vast right before. We're recording this. Just did another podcast interview and the guy had listened to quite a few episodes of the podcast mates have references to things just other things where he just felt like. You really knew me because of the podcast. I don't think you can do that or you. Don't think you accomplish that through something like a blog post. So yeah there's definitely like that unique form of media where someone is hearing your voice able to have that what feels like that personal intimate connection with you even though they maybe have never met you. I think about like podcast. I listen to that. I listen to regular basis that the host. I've heard that person's voice so many times that I really feel like I feel like I have some type of connection even though I've never interact with them or may never have talked to them. They have zero clue who I am. I feel like I know them. Just because I've heard their voice and familiar with them or their life or things that they've said you know what their businesses like because of just hearing them on a regular basis so yeah. Podcasting is definitely provides a unique opportunity in that way. Is that weird to you when you do in a speaking. Gig 'cause you are in front of people and maybe you're not in other ways that you market your message but because of your podcast and certainly because of this book that people are walking up to you and they know you but you don't know them Yeah I mean. It's a fairly introverted person. And so I have zero problem going into some type of area where I don't know anyone and just hiding not necessarily feeling the need to. I need to be the life of the Party or the center of attention or anything like that when that case it makes a great because they can come up to you. It came weird though. Like when they're like hey grant I heard you talk about your wife and your kids. It happened today at Costco. Had someone come up to me like hey are you grant of listening to your show or like it's cool when it happens? I love meeting people had a TSA agent at the Unite. Both live in Nashville is at the airport. Like Hey grandmothers and do podcasts webinars. And there's a time we were in In line and Disneyland in California there's a lady a couple of people in front of us and she turned around and she comes back like goes back against the line and it was like are you grant and so it happens. Sometimes I'm like you know those type situations and it's like I genuinely enjoy meeting people who listened to the podcast or who've gone through a program or who have interacted with some of material that we've created as help them in some way that's really cool because the other side of it is like we were talking about was speaking with speaking. You can see the reaction you can see those people and you can shake their hands or give them a hug or give them a high five or fist bump or whatever after you speak and interact with them in some way and they can tell you either what they're going through or how you're working to help them or how the talk out them or whatever with podcasting are a book or whatever it may be you. You don't always get that and so when you actually meet someone outside of your bubble and they're able to share with you. Hey here's how you're working to help me. That's incredibly rewarding. That's really really cool so I don't have any desire to be some celebrity that I can't go to Walmart without being recognized that that does nothing for me. But you know when you have to happen occasionally..

Times Speaker Lab grant Baldwin David Nashville TA Costco California TSA Walmart Disneyland
Thinking About Writing A Book?

Build A Big Podcast - The Marketing Podcast For Podcasters

07:04 min | 5 months ago

Thinking About Writing A Book?

"David Hooper. Build a big podcast hence senior for a while. Still around got some great stuff. Coming up for you apologies. We're kind of on your man. Something came up very exciting project. Big podcasting project actually. Unfortunately I can tell you what it is I hate to be. He's like that. Maybe someday I'll be able to that. It was a good opportunity a lot of fun and a lot of lessons from this project and Well Yeah let's move forward with your podcast. Let's talk about spreading your message. One of the things I've also been working on. You might have heard me talk about it. A little bit are released a book last year. It's called big podcast. Grow your podcast audience build listener loyalty and get everybody talking about your show. This book is available. Everywhere it is on kindle is in paperback and very soon I will have an audiobook version of it for you. I read every single word. I read every single word probably five times because I don't know how to read that. Well just kidding but as a podcast. Your people are listening to me. I kinda got a little bit of perfectionism going right. I wanted it to be something. I was proud of a wanted it to be something that would last. So I've gone through this piece by piece. Edited it together myself and that is almost done definitely within next month. I'll let you know about it. I don't WanNa get too much on this episode because I want to focus on a portion of an interview that I did with a guy named grant Baldwin. You may know him from the Speaker Lab. Podcast if you're interested in building a speaking business. He has a new book. It's called the successful speaker. Five steps for booking gigs getting paid and building your platform. He did it with a guy named Jeff coins. You may know Jeff from his own books. He's got a great book. Called real artists. Don't starve and if you're into books. War of Art Stephen Press Field. If you're in a mindset books. I think you'll really like it. Jeff worked with grant on this book. The successful speaker to package grants information into a book. Format grand has all this public speaking knowledge. He does podcast. He's done a lot of interviews. He may be in the same situation. That you're in your Talker europe-wide castor you speak to but maybe you don't right so part of this conversation with grant. I asked him about that. I have about working with Jeff joins using jeff as a ghostwriter to package his information and here is that portion of the interview speaking of expansion. You do the new book the Successful Speaker. A lot of people start the book. Go to speaking to promote it. You start with speaking now. You've got a book which you're also promoting via speaking among other things. Let's talk about this. I want to know how you got the deal. Did they approach you and by that? I mean Baker. The publisher was because you were known or did you have to go to them. Talk about how you got this deal. Publishers are typically looking for people that have an audience and can ultimately sell books and so that was something that that we definitely had with our audience so I was a full week for several years and then a few years ago. We'd started the speech lab where we're doing more training and coaching for other speakers. As we built up a significant audience and email lists and social media following of people who are interested in speaking. Not everyone wants to be a fulltime speaker. Let there's plenty of people who are interested in speaking to various degrees. That was something that was certainly appealing to them in terms of us being able to promote and sell books and get the word out on on a book the backstory would be I worked with our mutual. Jeff going on this and Jeff had reached out a one point like hey. Do you have any interest in doing a book at any point Like not really like I had done a a self published book. A few years ago had done well but I like I just don't enjoy writing like I prefer podcast audio and speaking and I just don't writing is not my favorite thing. Let Me Stop You when you say. Dunwell of heard you talk about the numbers. You had pretty good numbers on that. Self-published book yeah and it was so as a when I was doing speaking of doing a lot with Initiative on a lot with students doing a lot with with high school student and collisions So we sold the books for them and sold over thirty thousand physical copies of the book. I don't know where that ranks in terms of of Of Average book sales. Let me have you think of like this. This is what a guy told me from the music industry one time he said If you think thousand CDs is on a lot look at what a thousand CDs is and you. Imagine thirty thousand bucks. That's a lot of books man. Yeah that's the book did fine and so I think from a bucket list item of just like check the box. I wrote a book. I wrote every single word of that book like all right. I'm done I'm good. I don't need I don't need to see valuable book. You didn't feel that on on because it says with Jeff going and I was curious about that to basically the way it came to be as Jeff asked me like. Hey Do you have any interest in doing a book? I was like really. He had a friend with Baker the publisher and said hey the they might be interested. Are you interested in doing something? Like I duNNo. Maybe we had a couple of conversations with Baker and so finally came back and said all right. Here's the deal. You have a ton of content already around speaking so done. Hundreds of podcasts episode with multiple courses of done. A lot of interviews have a lot of cases that they have a lot of experience on all things speaking a lot of success stories. He said what if what if I was kind of the writer for I took all that content and I just kind of synthesized it. It's all your content. It's all your materials all your voice. I'm just describe. Would you be interested in something like that? Like Yeah Heck Yeah I'd love that'd be awesome. You know white publisher said we want to give you a bunch of money for Jeff going to write your book. Yeah where do I sign up for that? So that's essentially what it turned out to be is Jeff is kind of a non ghostwriter ghost rider and so it's all my content but he was the one that took that content and to turn it into Book Form Jeff as extremely knowledgeable when it comes to the publishing space and writing books and crafting books and so he was absolutely amazing to work with had a great experience and so different are written in different ways in terms of like a lot of well known. Authors have ghostwriter meant to be a ghost. That's unknown also Jeff. Yeah Jeff was very much like I said from the beginning like I have no problem talking about like jeff part of this project and the project would have happened without jeff so it's a little of the behind the Music Graham Baldwin. The successful speaker is the book. Five steps for booking gigs getting paid and building your platform. We were talking about working with Jeff going. Who's the ghost rider on this project? That kind of partnership. Maybe something for you to consider. If you've got all this great information you think you know I don't want to write a book. It's a lot of work and it is a lot of work. You're talking about it earlier. Even reading the book for me a lot of work a lot of work is it worth it. Yes came walking with a ghost rider. Help to get something out in your voice quicker than you can do it on your own absolutely a

Jeff Coins Publisher David Hooper Baker Speaker Lab Grant Baldwin Kindle Art Stephen Press Field Graham Baldwin Writer
"grant baldwin" Discussed on The $100 MBA Show

The $100 MBA Show

05:44 min | 6 months ago

"grant baldwin" Discussed on The $100 MBA Show

"Speakers speakers the best potential clients those who already higher speaker so Conferences Associations Trade shows events churches schools schools. All of them are already looking for speakers. You don't have to think about whatever conference you attended in the past six months or a year whatever conference that was whatever speakers they they didn't nobody had to convince that organization hire speakers. They were already planning on hiring speakers. You can just show them why you are a good fit so reaching out. Lastly just googling and emailing potential events can work well works well to also connect with other speakers who are speaking at events that you might want to speak out or refers events between one another Another thing that you can do is to look for opportunities that you can speak out locally speaking leads to more speaking. So the more you speak the more you speak speaking is very much a momentum business so you can also start to build word of mouth and referrals from other events that you've spoken in the past and then finally last one is k.. No win to scale AOL. Those that are interested in speaking also probably interested in writing a book or a course or doing podcasts or doing any number of other things as what I want you to recognize is something. That's GONNA come first. I something's GonNa come last. There's no right or wrong amount of speaking to do some people want to be a full-time speaker speaker. One hundred plus times a year other people say hey. I've got a full time. Coaching Consulting Service Service based business. But I would love to speak five times a year. Both are fine but you got to think through and figure out which one makes the most sense for you all right guys. This scrambled in from the speaker lab. If you want to continue learning about all things speaking definitely check out our new book the successful Speaker Five steps booking gigs getting paid and building your platform you can learn more at the speak aloud dot com slash book. Also if you enjoy this podcast then you might enjoy our podcasts. Coach Omar has been a guest on. You can find that over at the speaker lab. PODCAST ask again. That is the speaker lab. podcast all right. Thanks for hanging out with my friends. Thanks for joining me today. Back to Omar today's episode so it is supported by Microsoft teams. Hey hundred dollar and be listeners. No matter what type of business you're in whether you're a new entrepreneur or a season executive we all know meetings meetings struggling to pay attention searching for files that seem impossible to find. And if you're not in the room you're not in the know. Welcome to the new way to work together. Microsoft soft teams from group projects to weekly all hands. Microsoft teams will change the way you teamwork. You can contribute to meetings from anywhere chat with coworkers. So you're never ever out of the loop and find all your files even edit them in real time in one convenient place getting better. Business doesn't have to be hard when you have one place to create free and make decisions as a team. There's no limit to what you can achieve for my team a growing remote team. It's really important to have a place where everybody can discuss and make decisions together other so we can move forward together as a team. This is why Microsoft teams is so powerful. Whether you're hashing out a bug or even just sharing new ideas to improve the the business. Microsoft teams allows everybody on your team too freely. Communicate great ideas when you're ready to unleash. The power of your team open teams learn more at Microsoft Dot com slash teams that's Microsoft dot com slash teams. What an amazing guest teacher lessened by grant Baldwin? If you love cities lesson there is a lot more where that came from. Mark Your calendars February. Eighteenth this is when grants new book. The successful speaker comes out. Better get go to Amazon right now and pre-order the book now if you want a real life example of everything grant taught today implemented on a website head on over to Omar's in home dot com that's Omar's e. and h o m dot com. I've implemented everything that grant has mentioned in today's lesson on my own website on my own speaker page. I got my video I Speak specifically about certain things in business I put into play everything in the S P K formula. The grant taught us today today. Thanks again grant Baldwin for the great lesson that wraps up. Today's lesson make sure you hit subscribe right now. And whatever you use to listen to podcasts. Subscribing driving is absolutely free and allows you to have access to all of our archive episodes over fourteen hundred business lessons. You can subscribe using any podcast. The APP we're on the Mall Apple. PODCASTS stitcher radio spotify overcast Himalayas. You name it. We're on it before I go. I want to leave you with this public. Look speaking has opened so many doors for me. I can't even enumerate them. Yes is helped my business and brandon allowed to make sales but also has opened so so many opportunities for me. I've met incredible people at these conferences other speakers that I have always admired I shared stages with them and uh uh spoke them on panel discussions and got to get to know and become friends with. I've gone to learn so much about what makes a great live event so I could do the same with my own business. I've had opportunities to be introduced. Incredible thought leaders and people in the media all because I decided I gotta get better as as a speaker. I gotta put something together so that I can be able to offer my expertise on stage and I followed everything that grant has taught today. Luckily I've been a friend of his for years and been following his work so he's been a tremendous amount of help so apply what you learn today and reap the benefits really soon. Thank you so much for listening. And I'll check you in tomorrow's episode Alcee then take.

Microsoft Coach Omar Baldwin AOL googling Himalayas executive brandon Amazon
"grant baldwin" Discussed on The $100 MBA Show

The $100 MBA Show

10:44 min | 6 months ago

"grant baldwin" Discussed on The $100 MBA Show

"Earn a living Grand Baldwin is here to show us. How can't wait to get into this? Let's get into it. Let's get down to business support for today. Show comes from fizzle. Let's be honest. Entrepreneurship can be lonely. When you're working hard grinding away to make your business a reality it can get mentally and emotionally draining? grassing yourself things like am I doing. The right things. Thinks is my product or business idea a good one. Does my website communicate the value offer. I wish somebody can look over it. Get the support you need. When you're starting and growing your business with fissile fizzle can help you earn a living doing something you love? They do this with training tools coaching community. And they're famous roadmap. It's great how do I know. Well I've been fiddler for over six years now join me. And thousands of other entrepreneurs giddy free fourteen day trial and support the show by GonNa fizzle dot co Slash Omar again to get started with a fourteen day. FREE TRIAL GO TO F I. Z Z L. E. DOT CEO Slash Oem ar again. Graham Baldwin is the founder of the Speaker Lamp Dot Com. I've known grand for about about seven years now and not only. Is He an incredible public speaker in public speaking coach. But he's a fantastic teacher. This is why I'm so excited. Have Him as as against teacher on today's show he's GonNa give you so punch values going to give you what you need to make sure you're successful as a speaker now. If if you want to get the most out of today's lesson take some notes. He's going to be dropping a lot of value a quick story about grand before I handed over to him. I know grant personally as a friend. And I've seen him on stage keynote events in front of thousands and even though he's a dynamic speaker on stage. He's hilarious. No he's he's really funny. Actually an incredibly valuable to the event on a personal level grant is sort of an introvert. He's not extroverted by nature. So it goes to show so you can be a great public speaker even if you're not extroverted gray embraces his introverted self and he doesn't change and this is what I love about him is. He's a skillful speaker. He's entertaining but he doesn't feel compelled to be this bombastic character in real life so without further ado. I'm GONNA pass it onto the Grand Baldwin to teach you the five steps to find and book speaking gigs taken away grant. Hey what's up everybody. This is Graham Baldwin founder of the speaker lab host of Collab- PODCAST and author of the new book. The successful speaker five steps for booking gigs getting paid and building your platform. So today I will be teaching you through the speaker success. Assess roadmap all right. So let's get down to business so the speaker success roadmap is going to make the acronym speak S. P. A. K.. This is a five step process S. for finding and booking gigs so the first one s is select a problem to solve select a problem to solve. This is where you need to answer a couple of key questions number one is who it is that you want to speak to who it is that you WANNA speak to. You cannot try to speak to everyone. This is a mistake that a lot of speakers and entrepreneurs make is that we think we can just speak to anybody. That just doesn't work so if I were to ask you who do you speak to. You don't want to say who do you want me to speak to or I speak to humans or speak to people like that doesn't work. You have to be very specific specific and clear about who it is that you want to speak to now even if you said well grant I speak to women okay. That's awesome but that's still like half of the world's population so you really want to be narrow and clear about who it is that you speak to the second part of the equation is. What is the problem that you solve for that audience? What's the problem that you saw for that audience? One of the things you have to remember is that as a speaker you are in the problem solving business just because you care about a problem just because you think it should matter to other people doesn't necessarily make it so so just because you're interested in it doesn't mean organizations are group's actually hire speakers to talk about that so there has to be this overlap between what you're interested in what you're passionate about and what organizations innovations actually book speakers to come in and speak about. What's the problem that they can solve for that audience so again remember you are in the problem solving business now? One of the things we tell our speakers or students all the time is that you want to be positioned as a steakhouse and not a buffet steakhouse and Nada. Here's what I mean by that. So imagine if you you and I we're going to go grab lunch later. Grab dinner by the heat and we're looking for a really good steak. We have a choice we could go to a buffet where steak is one of one hundred different things that they offer or we could go to a steakhouse where steak is all that they do and they are the best at it right. They don't do LASAGNA. They don't do pizza. They don't do Tacos they don't do anything else there but steak and they are really really good at stake. That's the type of place that we want to go to. That's the type of place that you want to be as speaker. Here's another way to think about this. Let's imagine that God forbid that you had to have brain surgery okay. Let's hope that you don't blessed that you did. You got a choice you can go to your local family doctor. Where they you're a doctor? They went to medical school. They probably took a class on surgery. They probably know a little bit more about the brain than you and I do. There are smart person or an educated person. But I don't know that they've done brain surgery or or you could go to the person that is a brain surgeon. That's all they do day in and day out. All I do is brain surgery if you break your arm. I'm not your person if you have a cough. I'm not your doctor. If you have asthma attack not the person to go to but if you have brain issue I am the best now. It's counterintuitive because we feel like in order to get the most possible gigs. We need to spread the net as far and wide as possible. More people I could speak to audiences I can talk to the more problems. I can solve the more topics I can speak about the more potential opera -tunities that I have but the opposite is actually the case the more narrow the more specific more clear the more focused. You are the easier it it is to find and book gigs. So remember here. You want to be the steakhouse and not to the buffet. You want to be the steakhouse the buffet. You WanNA solve a specific problem for a specific audience audience and not try to do all things for all people if I ask you who do you speak to you and you say well I speak to humans as Okay what do you speak about. Well what do you want me to talk about. I can talk about anything thing like that doesn't work remember. The first step here is select a problem to solve all right. The second part of the process is you need to prepare your talk doc. Prepare your talk. You know what the problem is now. Let's talk about the solution. What's the Louis Solution that you're going to bring to the table as speaker for this for this problem now? This could be in. The form of a keynote could be a workshop. It could be a seminar. Could be a breakout but you need to begin to think through what the talk is going to be about. And how you're going to solve this. It's now one of the the best tips I can give you whenever you're working on. Your presentation is US stories. Lots and lots and lots of stories if I said right now. Okay I want to tell you a quick story a you immediately as a human are drawn in. You have no idea where the story is GonNa go. Is this going to be funny. Is this going to be sad is going to be entertaining. Is this going to be interesting. It's going to be boring. No clue but we are drawn to story. We WanNa know where a story is going to go so one of your best weapons one of the simplest things that you can do is to tell a lot of stories. I'll I'll tell you a story I'd leave you hanging. I've noticed that whenever I pick up my daughter take her every Wednesday night to our local church youth group and so whenever I pick her up after church and we're driving home and as a good data. I'm trying to ask her like. Hey what did you guys talk about tonight with the youth pastor. Talk about what you learn and oftentimes even though she just laughed. She just heard him speak it shows. I think you talked about you. Know Friendship or docked about forgiveness or something like that you'll talk about these like one word kind of which part of it may be just a teenage girl. Nothing but the other thing that I've noticed issue saying Oh he told the story Oh he told the story about Da Da da and she can recite the whole story but she can't remember all the the other little the things that may have been discussed so people also remember stories. We remember what they talk about. Because again humans relate to stories so we have selected problem solve. We have prepare hair your talk. The E is establish yourself as the expert. Establish yourself as the expert now to do this need to key marketing tools number. One is you need a website. Now you know if you're listening to this podcast if you don't have a website you don't exist people won't take you seriously. You have to have a website a website also as a personal brand. I recommend that you use your name as the domain so I have grant Baldwin Dot Com. People are interested in hiring grant they come to grant ball dot com in fact having your name as domain is so important that actually purchased the domain for my wife and all three of my daughters and now I'm squatting on those until they need them someday and then I'm GonNa Sela Ah back to them at an exorbitant rate. Some pretty excited about that so you have to have a website. The second thing you need to have. Is You need a demo video. You need a demo video now. What exactly is a demo video so think of this like a movie trailer a movie is you know? Let's say ninety minutes long two hours long. They take that they boil it down to two or three minutes and within those two or three minutes you have an idea the plot the theme the characters all of that and the point of the demo video and the point of the movie trailer is to make you want to see more. Make you want to see more so you need to have that demo video because if you want someone to take you seriously if you want someone to put their name on the line and put their reputation on the line and hire you that they need to see something. They don't need to see the entire talk but they need to see something that gives them comfort and confidence when booking you that they've done their due diligence that they know that you are a good fit for their event. She need a website so you need a demo video fourth step. A acquire paid speaking gig acquire paid speaking gig. Now you may be listening. Grant Omar. I thought wait a minute This is the whole point like I want a book speaking gigs right but again I want. Let's go all the way back here. You need to do these sequentially. Do you understand now why you need to do these orders if you say. Hey I just just want to book gigs awesome. Who Do you speak to just talked to anybody and everybody okay? What do you speak about? I can speak about anything. That's not gonNA work. That's not going to work as a speaker. That's not going to work as an entrepreneur manure so once you're clear on who you speak to and then once you're clear on what you speak about was the problem that you saw. Have you have your talk ready. You've prepared your message Once you have your marketing materials awesome place your website your demo video then as the part where you start marketing now again. This is the part where you're just getting started. You're starting to take some action here because what the the mistake is that. A lot of speakers make is our website. I got my video and now I just sit back and wait for the phone to ring. That doesn't work. Don't make that mistake. You want to continue to moved the ball forward. Now let's point something out here and one of the best ways to book. Gigs is to connect with organizations and groups that are already hiring.

Grant Omar Graham Baldwin founder Grand Baldwin Baldwin Dot Com L. E. DOT US cough asthma gray S. P. A. K CEO
Grant Baldwin on How to Find & Book Speaking Gigs

The $100 MBA Show

09:25 min | 6 months ago

Grant Baldwin on How to Find & Book Speaking Gigs

"Graham Baldwin is the founder of the Speaker Lamp Dot Com. I've known grand for about about seven years now and not only. Is He an incredible public speaker in public speaking coach. But he's a fantastic teacher. This is why I'm so excited. Have Him as as against teacher on today's show he's GonNa give you so punch values going to give you what you need to make sure you're successful as a speaker now. If if you want to get the most out of today's lesson take some notes. He's going to be dropping a lot of value a quick story about grand before I handed over to him. I know grant personally as a friend. And I've seen him on stage keynote events in front of thousands and even though he's a dynamic speaker on stage. He's hilarious. No he's he's really funny. Actually an incredibly valuable to the event on a personal level grant is sort of an introvert. He's not extroverted by nature. So it goes to show so you can be a great public speaker even if you're not extroverted gray embraces his introverted self and he doesn't change and this is what I love about him is. He's a skillful speaker. He's entertaining but he doesn't feel compelled to be this bombastic character in real life so without further ado. I'm GONNA pass it onto the Grand Baldwin to teach you the five steps to find and book speaking gigs taken away grant. Hey what's up everybody. This is Graham Baldwin founder of the speaker lab host of Collab- PODCAST and author of the new book. The successful speaker five steps for booking gigs getting paid and building your platform. So today I will be teaching you through the speaker success. Assess roadmap all right. So let's get down to business so the speaker success roadmap is going to make the acronym speak S. P. A. K.. This is a five step process S. for finding and booking gigs so the first one s is select a problem to solve select a problem to solve. This is where you need to answer a couple of key questions number one is who it is that you want to speak to who it is that you WANNA speak to. You cannot try to speak to everyone. This is a mistake that a lot of speakers and entrepreneurs make is that we think we can just speak to anybody. That just doesn't work so if I were to ask you who do you speak to. You don't want to say who do you want me to speak to or I speak to humans or speak to people like that doesn't work. You have to be very specific specific and clear about who it is that you want to speak to now even if you said well grant I speak to women okay. That's awesome but that's still like half of the world's population so you really want to be narrow and clear about who it is that you speak to the second part of the equation is. What is the problem that you solve for that audience? What's the problem that you saw for that audience? One of the things you have to remember is that as a speaker you are in the problem solving business just because you care about a problem just because you think it should matter to other people doesn't necessarily make it so so just because you're interested in it doesn't mean organizations are group's actually hire speakers to talk about that so there has to be this overlap between what you're interested in what you're passionate about and what organizations innovations actually book speakers to come in and speak about. What's the problem that they can solve for that audience so again remember you are in the problem solving business now? One of the things we tell our speakers or students all the time is that you want to be positioned as a steakhouse and not a buffet steakhouse and Nada. Here's what I mean by that. So imagine if you you and I we're going to go grab lunch later. Grab dinner by the heat and we're looking for a really good steak. We have a choice we could go to a buffet where steak is one of one hundred different things that they offer or we could go to a steakhouse where steak is all that they do and they are the best at it right. They don't do LASAGNA. They don't do pizza. They don't do Tacos they don't do anything else there but steak and they are really really good at stake. That's the type of place that we want to go to. That's the type of place that you want to be as speaker. Here's another way to think about this. Let's imagine that God forbid that you had to have brain surgery okay. Let's hope that you don't blessed that you did. You got a choice you can go to your local family doctor. Where they you're a doctor? They went to medical school. They probably took a class on surgery. They probably know a little bit more about the brain than you and I do. There are smart person or an educated person. But I don't know that they've done brain surgery or or you could go to the person that is a brain surgeon. That's all they do day in and day out. All I do is brain surgery if you break your arm. I'm not your person if you have a cough. I'm not your doctor. If you have asthma attack not the person to go to but if you have brain issue I am the best now. It's counterintuitive because we feel like in order to get the most possible gigs. We need to spread the net as far and wide as possible. More people I could speak to audiences I can talk to the more problems. I can solve the more topics I can speak about the more potential opera -tunities that I have but the opposite is actually the case the more narrow the more specific more clear the more focused. You are the easier it it is to find and book gigs. So remember here. You want to be the steakhouse and not to the buffet. You want to be the steakhouse the buffet. You WanNA solve a specific problem for a specific audience audience and not try to do all things for all people if I ask you who do you speak to you and you say well I speak to humans as Okay what do you speak about. Well what do you want me to talk about. I can talk about anything thing like that doesn't work remember. The first step here is select a problem to solve all right. The second part of the process is you need to prepare your talk doc. Prepare your talk. You know what the problem is now. Let's talk about the solution. What's the Louis Solution that you're going to bring to the table as speaker for this for this problem now? This could be in. The form of a keynote could be a workshop. It could be a seminar. Could be a breakout but you need to begin to think through what the talk is going to be about. And how you're going to solve this. It's now one of the the best tips I can give you whenever you're working on. Your presentation is US stories. Lots and lots and lots of stories if I said right now. Okay I want to tell you a quick story a you immediately as a human are drawn in. You have no idea where the story is GonNa go. Is this going to be funny. Is this going to be sad is going to be entertaining. Is this going to be interesting. It's going to be boring. No clue but we are drawn to story. We WanNa know where a story is going to go so one of your best weapons one of the simplest things that you can do is to tell a lot of stories. I'll I'll tell you a story I'd leave you hanging. I've noticed that whenever I pick up my daughter take her every Wednesday night to our local church youth group and so whenever I pick her up after church and we're driving home and as a good data. I'm trying to ask her like. Hey what did you guys talk about tonight with the youth pastor. Talk about what you learn and oftentimes even though she just laughed. She just heard him speak it shows. I think you talked about you. Know Friendship or docked about forgiveness or something like that you'll talk about these like one word kind of which part of it may be just a teenage girl. Nothing but the other thing that I've noticed issue saying Oh he told the story Oh he told the story about Da Da da and she can recite the whole story but she can't remember all the the other little the things that may have been discussed so people also remember stories. We remember what they talk about. Because again humans relate to stories so we have selected problem solve. We have prepare hair your talk. The E is establish yourself as the expert. Establish yourself as the expert now to do this need to key marketing tools number. One is you need a website. Now you know if you're listening to this podcast if you don't have a website you don't exist people won't take you seriously. You have to have a website a website also as a personal brand. I recommend that you use your name as the domain so I have grant Baldwin Dot Com. People are interested in hiring grant they come to grant ball dot com in fact having your name as domain is so important that actually purchased the domain for my wife and all three of my daughters and now I'm squatting on those until they need them someday and then I'm GonNa Sela Ah back to them at an exorbitant rate. Some pretty excited about that so you have to have a website. The second thing you need to have. Is You need a demo video. You need a demo video now. What exactly is a demo video so think of this like a movie trailer a movie is you know? Let's say ninety minutes long two hours long. They take that they boil it down to two or three minutes and within those two or three minutes you have an idea the plot the theme the characters all of that and the point of the demo video and the point of the movie trailer is to make you want to see more. Make you want to see more so you need to have that demo video because if you want someone to take you seriously if you want someone to put their name on the line and put their reputation on the line and hire you that they need to see something. They don't need to see the entire talk but they need to see something that gives them comfort and confidence when booking you that they've done their due diligence that they know that you are a good fit for their event. She need a website so you need a demo video fourth step. A acquire paid speaking gig acquire paid speaking gig. Now you may be listening. Grant Omar. I thought wait a minute This is the whole point like I want a book speaking gigs right but again I want. Let's go all the way back here. You need to do these sequentially. Do you understand now why you need to do these orders if you say. Hey I just just want to book gigs awesome. Who Do you speak to just talked to anybody and everybody okay? What do you speak about? I can speak about anything. That's not gonNA work. That's not going to work as a speaker. That's not going to work as an entrepreneur manure so once you're clear on who you speak to and then once you're clear on what you speak about was the problem that you saw. Have you have your talk ready. You've prepared your message Once you have your marketing materials awesome place your website your demo video then as the part where you start marketing now again. This is the part where you're just getting started. You're starting to take some action here because what the the mistake is that. A lot of speakers make is our website. I got my video and now I just sit back and wait for the phone to ring. That doesn't work. Don't make that mistake. You want to continue to moved the ball

Graham Baldwin Founder Grand Baldwin Baldwin Dot Com Gray Cough Grant Omar United States Asthma S. P. A. K
"grant baldwin" Discussed on Six Pixels of Separation - Marketing and Communications Insights - By Mitch Joel at Mirum

Six Pixels of Separation - Marketing and Communications Insights - By Mitch Joel at Mirum

01:33 min | 2 years ago

"grant baldwin" Discussed on Six Pixels of Separation - Marketing and Communications Insights - By Mitch Joel at Mirum

"Isn't that diversity because again i'd rather definitely lose two i'm a big believer in cooper titian i'd rather lose to the person who's just better i don't really care what they look like who they sleepless or whether front edges don't but it is a huge issue in our industry and i'm wondering what your take as on it and how you deal with it and again when i'm when i'm even coaching people i'm often like there's an elephant in the room we have to discuss here which is you know you are of agenda or visible minority this going to benefit from this amazing world right now because people are looking for that diversity yeah i know i think there's a for better or worse than an unfortunate i think there's a lot of truth to that that i know for for me when people have asked me like hey what you gave can you recommend a good female speaker like there's one or two that i recommend but there's just burst i can you recommend a good males be guy i know i know several and so i think i think there is a lot of truth to that and for me i i'm married i've got three little girls so i live in a house of women and so it's really really important to me as a father to make sure that my girls feel empowered that they can they can do anything that had a guy can do anything that amount man could do as a whether we are watching m e sports on tv or watching sports and earn and we are those girls by yeah you're girls can totally play that sport girls complaints were just like as can play was born girls can be speaker just like asking can speakers so helping them to realize that so i you know i don't know what the answer is to that issue but i i totally agree that.

"grant baldwin" Discussed on Six Pixels of Separation - Marketing and Communications Insights - By Mitch Joel at Mirum

Six Pixels of Separation - Marketing and Communications Insights - By Mitch Joel at Mirum

01:33 min | 2 years ago

"grant baldwin" Discussed on Six Pixels of Separation - Marketing and Communications Insights - By Mitch Joel at Mirum

"At eats eight breathing slate like any free moment you have you're working on this being business that you're doing that to me that hustle is like at the detriment of the things that matter most to you but i think it's being able to say you know what there are going to be times where i'm gonna stay up a little bit later i'm gonna get up a little bit earlier i'm gonna take up saturday morning to work on this that you have to find those pockets of time to build this new thing i know for me personally whenever wherever i got started speaking like you can't you know had his mate like you can't just say all right friday i'm going to quit my job and monday i'm gonna become a fulltime speaker at like it just doesn't happen like that like i find it takes most speakers usually anywhere from two to three years depending on a variety number of factors to go from interested in speaking to being able to do it full time so that's a lotta time where you most people don't have a bunch of savings that they can live off of so they're going to have to be working somehow and beginning to and and drawing a paychex somewhere i i'd like to eat and live and doors so i could just say i'm gonna just chase during the been speaker and hope it all magically works out like i had to keep doing other things so if what i meant for us for a little while i was working fulltime a coward at like a hodge podge of jobs as working at a a security company doing like sales work for them at the time as as in my early mid20s those working at a fine dining restaurant doing some as a server and was working kind of a hides podge number of things just to make make ends meet and but at the same time trying to build the speaking business so at so especially in that transition period it feels like you're doing a.

three years
"grant baldwin" Discussed on Six Pixels of Separation - Marketing and Communications Insights - By Mitch Joel at Mirum

Six Pixels of Separation - Marketing and Communications Insights - By Mitch Joel at Mirum

01:31 min | 2 years ago

"grant baldwin" Discussed on Six Pixels of Separation - Marketing and Communications Insights - By Mitch Joel at Mirum

"That mitch does it or the way that i do whether the way to anybody else does it too you can do speaking the way that makes sense for you so would ice what i say that you know some brand new speakers everley done this before is has the potential to be a twenty thousand dollar speaker tomorrow no absolutely not now given the right topic and the right the right audience the right industry the right presentation skills then yeah they could get there but it is an absolutely it's a lot of work and most people don't don't reach that point but there's also a lot of people who don't want to reach that point and they're just content saying i'm totally find doing a few local gigs here and there for five hundred or a thousand bucks and that's really all they're looking for so early it really kind of depends on what you're metric of successes and in terms of speaking so for clinical down that road grant what do you think makes a great speaker that yeah that's a great question because i think what makes a great speakers a bit subjective you know they the speaker that you would find amazing i might be like add there are i and vice versa you know and and now that anything's you know better worse it's kinda like you know what's the you know was the best flavor of ice cream rozier you know what's a favorite foods are kind of canada pens now having said that i think there are definitely some things that that separate speakers from other speakers i think um a huge thing that any speakers capable of doing is the level of of practice rehearsal and preparation and the gaza avenue is a misconception about great speakers is there just naturally amazing in yeah there's there's certainly speakers at argest naturally charismatic and their great.

mitch gaza twenty thousand dollar